Teitl Casgliad: Llan

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 24 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE REPRESENTATIVE BODY OF THE CHURCH IN WALES

THE REPRESENTATIVE BODY OF THE CHURCH IN WALES. IMPORTANT PROPOSALS. THE Finance Committee of the Repre- sentative Body met in London last week under the chairmanship of Sir Owen Philipps. The four Welsh Bishops were present together with lay and clerical representatives from each of the four dioceses. A report of a sub- committee on provisional stipends to incumbents appointed since Sep- tember, 1914, on the question of dilapidations and on the question of the future upkeep of cathedrals, was care- fully considered. The four Diocesan .Boards of Finance were asked to draw up schedules of provisional stipends for in- cumbents appointed since the passing of the Act of 1914 for the consideration of the Representative Body at its meetings at Rhyl on January 6. The sub- committee was requested to consider further some points in respect of the dilapidations, but, subject to this further consideration by the sub-committee at Rhyl on January 5, their recommenda- tions were adopted for presentation to the Representative Body on January 6. The question of the upkeep of cathedrals, was referred back to the sub-committee for further consideration. These three important subjects, which will come be- fore the Representative Body and the Governing Body at their meetings at Rhyl on January 6, 7, 8, and 9, make it probable that the attendance at the meetings at Rhyl will be large, notwith- standing the difficulties of the time of the year. The Finance Committee considered arefulIy the question of an early appeal for the necessary funds to replace the loss of C48,000 a year by disendowment and to provide another LIOO,000 a year to enable the Church to meet the grow- ing spiritual needs of Wales at the present- critical time. A strong Ap- peal Committee was appointed to organise the appeal, under the chairmanship of Mr. H. N. Glad- stone. It will be the duty of every Churchman and Churchwoman in Wales to respond to this appeal to the very utmost of their ability without delay, and Churchmen in England will be asked for their sympathy and help.

VALE OF CLWYD NOTES

VALE OF CLWYD NOTES. --+-- HONOUR FOR A ST. ASAPH CANON. Cern. LAST WEEK the University of Wales con- ferred the degree of D.Litt. (causa nonoris) upon the Rev. Canon, Fisher, B.D., Rector of Cefn. This is a well- merited honour, for Canon Fisher is noted throughout the Principality for his research and labour in the fields of Welsh and English literature. He is Jhint editor of the hives of the Saints, and is one of the leading members of the North Wales Archaeological Society. Mr." Fisher was made Canon of St. Asaph two or three years ago. Llanddulas. The Rev. Canon 'Roberts, Rector of Llanddulas, has been appointed Rural Dean of Rhos. The Canon is well-known in the Deanery; having been Rector of Llanddulas for over twenty years. He is editor of the Diocesan Calendar and a member of the St. Asaph Board of Guardians. Bodelwydden. The returned soldiers and sailors of this parish, numbering about fifty, were entertained by the Rev, J. H. Hope, vicar, and Mrs. Hoptt to supper in the schoolroom last Friday week. An excel- lent supper was provided and a most de- lightful evening was spent. The -vicar congratulated the men who had returned home safely, and referred in a touching manner to those who had made the supreme sacrifice. The company was then entertained by Mrs. Hope, Mr. Cookson, and Mr. Harrison with songs, &c. St. Asaph Sale of Work. A most successful sale of work was held last Thursday in the Church House. There was a crowded gathering, and a very substantial amount was realised for parochial purposes. The promoters of the sale are to be congratulated upon the excellent results of their efforts, Rhuddlan. The various church organisations in this parish are being carried on most successfully. The Young Men's Guild meets every Tuesday evening under the leadership of Mr. Edwards, Cwybr. Misses Wallis and Massey are respon- sible for the Children's Guild and Band' of Hope on the same evening. This work is much appreciated. Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. J. V. Hughes have charge of the G.F.S., 'while Miss. Walker is hon. sec. of the Women's Church Working Party. The latter is busy working for a sale of work which is to be held shortly.

ERRATA

ERRATA. SUNDAY SCHOOL SYLLABUS. OUR correspondent regrets that Con- firmation should have been inserted in Syllabus 1919-1920, and not Holy Matrimony." The Marriage Service is down for 1920-1921.

THE MISSION OF THE WELSH CHURCH

THE MISSION OF THE WELSH CHURCH. BY THE REV. R. E. ROBERTS, M.A., HON, C.F., KNIGHTON VICARAGE, LEICESTER. « The winning 01 Souls for Christ. WE come next to the second great mis- sion of the Church, i.e., the winning of souls for Christ. It is a common failing among religious people that they do not realise what an enormous proportion of the population- is untouched by the Churches. You are probably aware that 70 per cent, oif the men from Wales who served in the Army declared themselves to be C. of E. but we Chaplains found that a very large number of them had in fact little or no association with institutional Christianity. If instead of priding ourselves upon OUT" good oon- gregations we considered how many there are who attend no placoo-f worship, we j should have a more accurate conception of the situation as it really is. This reflection brings home to us the para- mount importanee of evangelisation, i.e., to carry the message of the Gospel to those who do not frankly embrace it, with such power that men will, come to accept Jesus Christ as their Saviour and to serve Him as their King in the fellowship of His Church." When all is said and done that remains a primary duty of the Church. How can this gigantic task be best approached ? A great deal can be done through the quiet efforts of the resident clergy. Argue as you will as to the rights and wrongs of the case, it is a fact that the pastoral work of the parish priest is a potent factor in attracting men and women to the Church, and through the Church to true discipleship. I cannot avoid the conviction that much of iit might be better directed than it is in many in- stances. Too often the visiting is con- fined to those who least need it. The clergy might well risk bestowing less at- tention upon those who attend church, in order to bestow more upon those who do not. Let them call in the evenings upon the men who have returned from work and who now, alas! hold aloof from all form's of organised Christianity. Let it be known, whether they will hear or whether they will forbear," that the Church, at any rate, cares for them and really desires to help them to the. know- ledge of God and in the keeping cif His Commandments. Much, too, can be done; especially among young people, through such organisations as clubs and social centres, provided these are re- garded not as ends in themselves, but as stepping stünto higher means of grace. I would, however, lay special emphasis upon the importance of organising and conducting evangelistic missions. Al- though much good has resulted from spasmodic and isolated parochial mis- sions, there can be little doubt that better results would follow if more at- tention were given to organisation. a.nd cohesion. There is, as I hope to show, a great deal to be said for bringing to bear upon this particular work careful pre- paration, a definite purpose, and the active support of the Bishop. The whole subject needs and deserves patient study on the part of those called to lead in the Welsh Church at this critical time, and close attention should be given tio the important element of psychology. I shall not be thought impentinent' I hope, if under this heading I venture to advance beyond generalisations and indicate the main outlines of the course it would be well to follow. So important is this subject of evangelistic missions, and so special is its character, that the argu- ments of entrusting it to an expert in every diocese far outweigh the objections. The purpose would be best served, per- haps, by the appointment of a Canon Missioner whose duties at the cathedral or elsewhere would not be exacting as regards time, and who might, therefore, devote the greater part of his attention to devising the best means for organising missions. In consultation with the Bishop he should proceed to nominate about ten of the best qualified parish priests in each Archdeaconry to form a group of mission preachers. With these he would keep in constant touch, and care would be taken to help in equipping them intellectually and spiritually for their great work. I would suggest that once a year in eadh Archdeaconry a mis- sion be undertaken throughout one Deanery. In the Diocese of St. Davids the whole ground would thus be covered ,in about seven years, and in St. Asapli in about six years. The advantage of the decanal-oner the jparochial missionlli that it facilitates what we call atmo- sphere" and helps to.arou,se interest and enthusiasm. We hear much of mass movements in the foreign mission field might we not aim at mass movements here at home as well ? Every effort should be made to reach these hitherto un- touched by the Church's ministrations open-air processions and preaching would be a prominent feature, and care would be taken by the local clergy to note the name and address of each in- dividual who had responded to the message. It would, be following apos- tolic usage, as recorded in Acts viii., if the Bishop would hold confirmations in as many centres as possible not many months after the mission. Those of us who know fiie temperament and religious instinct of the Oymry cannot but believe that there is scarcely in the world a more promising field for spiritual enterprise and evangelistic preaching. If in this great moment of her history tha Ghuroh proves that what she supremely cares for is not the social status or the political prestige of which Disestablishment may have deprived her, but the fulfilment of the great commission to preach the Gos- pel to every creature; if in the day of impoverishment she concerns herself not with the gold that has passed from her possession, but for the souls that remain for her to woo and win, we need not trouble about results. By the benedic- tion of Heaven the response will be com- mensurate to the earnestness and energy manifested in the Church, and she will became a- greater spiritual force than she has been for many centuries. There is one other means of winning souls for Christ which must not be omitted, i.e., public worship. There is scriptural authority for including the services of the Church in this category. St. Paul exhorted the Corinthiams so to conduct their assemblies that even the unlearned and unbelieving would be con- vinced of the Divine presence among them. I fear this is a purpose which has often been lost sight of. Imagine what a difference it would make if we habitually sought to give this persuasive character to our Sunday services! Instead of being chilly and dull as they often are—con- gealing prayer and praise into the frost- work of formalism—they would in every detail be lighted as with fire from the altar of Heaven. I want to plead with my fellow clergy for the introduction of architectural beauty and orderly colour and inspiring music into the service, and not least for a clearer indication that in the prayers the priest is really and reverently speaking with God.. All this would be helpful anywhere; it would have exceptional value in Wales. For although, there is much on the surface that suggests the contrary, it is true that the Cymry are not naturally severe and puritanical in their tastes. The people who glory in the pageantry of the gorsedd and the song of the eisteddfod would not be hindered but helped in their worship by artistic and well- directed enrichments. I would plead, too, for more elasticity in the form of services, particularly at Evensong. We Welshmen dislike rigidity, and require as much scope as is seemly for spon- taneity. The Church in the past has lost in influence more than I care to con- template through lack of adaptability in public worship. I trust the oppor- tunity which now presents itself for making certain modifications in this re- spect will be turned to advantage by those in authority. Let everything pos- sible within the limits o,{ decency and order be done now to make the worship of the Church such that it will unveil the glory of God and move the hearts of the worshippers. To these adventures I believe God is now calling the old Church of Wales, which yet is never old. The oppor- tunities are unprecedented". The nation that yielded the highest percentage of volunteers in the war, and that has be- hind it a great religious tradition, and within it a deep religious instinct—this nation will not turn a deaf ear to the Gospel of life if it be faithfully preached throughout its hills and valleys. There is no religious communion more fitting than. the Church of St. David, Giraldus Cambrensis, Bishop Morgan, Griffith Jones and Dean Edwards to carry to this people the message of Redemption now and for ever. If the Church gird her loins for the task, as indeed she is doing, there are those here to whom it may be vouchsafed to see the fulfilment of the prophecy uttered by Daniel Rowlands in darker days than these, H True religion has begun in the Church, and into the Church will return ere long." Let me address, in conclusion, a special appeal to you young people. You are students at the Welsh University, and soon you will go forth and spread your sails upon the broad ocean of life. I can imagine, and indeed there is no nobler vocation for a young man than to take part in tihe splendid and inspiring work that opens now before the Clmrch. Your young mellshall see visions." So be it. This is not a matter of mere emotions. There are substantial indica- tions that, by the blessing of God, the renaisEanise that developed so largely out- side the Church between 1730 and 1830 will be repeated and even surpassed with- in the Church in the course of this cen- tury. I put it to you who, now on the threshold of life, must be making the great choice Canyon imagine a nobler or indeed a happier vocation than to spend, and be spent, imthe service of this Church? I invite you in ail earnestness to rally round her, not just for her own sake, but for the sake of all that she may be in bearing witness to God and in winning souls for Christ.

DEANERY TRANSFERRED TO ENGLISH DIOCESE

DEANERY TRANSFERRED TO ENGLISH DIOCESE. WELSH CHURCH ACT EFFECT IN OSWESTRY, S UNDER the Welsh Church Act the Os- westry Rural Deanery, for centuries in the Bishopric of St. Asaph, is now traHsJeried: j to the Lichfield Diocese.

THE WELSH CHURCH AND CHARLES DICKENS

THE WELSH CHURCH AND CHARLES DICKENS. APROPOS of the robbery of the Welsh Church Bill to come into fotte on March 31 next, the following letter, by Charles Dickens, shortly after the wreck of the Royal Charter on the Anglesey coast in; 1858, will be profoundly instruc- tive and interesting as affording evidence of the solicitude of her clergy for strangers, and if for strangers, how much more for their own people! What was true then is still true to-day in almost every country parish throughout the Principality. It is the poor who always suffer most in the long run from hasty measures ill conceived. In his descrip- tion of his visit to Llanallgo, writing to the then Rector, the Rev. Mr. Roose Hughss, Charles Dickens says: "It was the kind and wholesome face I have made mention of as being then beside me, and I had purposed to myself to see, when I left home for Wales I had heard of that clergyman as having buried many scores of the shipwrecked people, of his having opened his house and heart to their agonised friends, of his having used a most sweet and patient diligence for weeks and weeks in the performance of the forlornest office that man can render to his kind, of his having most tenderly and thoroughly devoted himself to the dead, and to those who were sorrowing for the dead I had said to myself, In the Chrisftmas season of the year I should like to see that man again!' And lie had swung the gate of his little garden in coming out to meet me not half an hour ago. So cheerful of spirit and guiltless of affectation, as true, prac- tical Christianity ever is. I read more of the New Testament in the fresh, frank face going up the village beside me in five minutes than I have read in anathematising discourses (albeit but to press with enormous flourishing of trumpets) in all my life. The ladies of the clergyman's family, his wife, and two sisters-in-law, came in among the bodies often. It grew to be the business of their lives to do so. The cheerful earnestlieAs4 of their good Christian minister was as consolatory as the circumstances over which it shone were sad. I have never seen anything more delightfully genuine than the calm dismissal by himself and his household of all they had undergone, as a simple duty that was quietly done and ended. In speaking of it they spoke of it with great compassion for the bereaved, but laid no stress upon their own hard share in those weary weeks, except as it had attached many people to them as friends, and elicited many touching expressions of gratitude. Down to yesterday's post outward my clergyman alone had written 1,075 letters to relatives and friends of the lost people. In the absemce of self-assertion it was only through my now and then delicately putting a question as the occasion arose that I became informed of these things. In this noble modesty, in this serene avoidance of the least attempt to improve an occasion which might be supposed to have sunk of its own weight into my heart, I seemed to have happily come, in a few steps, from the church- yard with its open grave, which was the type of death, to the Christian dwelling side by side with it, which was the type of resurrection. I never shall think of the former without the latter. The two will always rest side 'by side in my memory. If I had lost anyone dear to me in this unfortunate ship, if I had made a voyage from Australia to look at the grave in the churchyard, I should go away thankful to Cod. that that house was so close to it, and that its shadow by day and its domestic lights by night fell upon the earth in which its Master had so tenderly laid my dear one's head." May Dr. Thoma,s-tb at splen-did Christian champion—derive further in- spiration from the above to repeal the Sacrilege Bill! GREY.

LLANDAFF DIOCESE

LLANDAFF DIOCESE. CE.MS.—Diocesan Union. A MEETING of the Council of the above Union was held on Saturday, Decem- ber 6, at 5 p.m., in the Wrenford Memo- rial Schools, Newport, Mon. Among other, important matters transacted were The Church Army Work/' introduced by the Rev. E. Hughes, Diocesan Organiser for thp O.A. Social Centres Scheme; proposed quiet days or re- treats for deepening spiritual life and quickening of the spirit of active service among the men in a diocese with over a million souls; whilst the Rev. D. J. Watkins-Jones, M.A., the newly ap- pointed C.E.M.S. Diocesan Messenger, was present to make the necessary I. arrangements for visiting the branches and federations in the diocese. The gathering proved most helpful.

ALL SAINTS YNYSYBOETH

ALL SAINTS', YNYSYBOETH. ON Sunday, November 30 (All Saints' Day) the new organ was dedicated by the Hev. D. Ellis Jones, L.D., Vicar of Aber- cynon. The ceremony of unlocking the organ was performed by Mrs. R. J. Martin, the Vicarage, when a large congregation assembled, and an appropriate and in- spiriting discourse. was eloquently de- livered by the Vicar of Abercynon. The choir, choirmaster and organist are to be congratulated on the admirable way the service was rendered. Good work is being done in this difficult district, led by the Vicar .theRev.R. J Martin.

Advertising

HODDER & STOUCHTOWS NEW BOOKS. READY IMMEDIATELY, An entirely New and most Important Work by DR. 133 SMITH Author of THE DAYS OF His FLESH." The Life and Letters of St. Paul. BY THE REV. PROFESSOR DAVID SMITH, M A. D.O. Over 700 pages. Complete in One Hand- some Volume. 21s. net. Prospectus on application. Rev. Professor A. T. ROBERTSON. A GRAMMAR OF THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT: In the Light of His- torical Research. By the Rev. Professor A. T. ROBERTSON, M.A., D.D., LL.D. Litt.D. Third and Definite Edition. 42s. net. Elaborate prospectus on application. Rev. Professor JAMES MOFFATT. A BOOK OF BIBLICAL DEVOTIONS. By the Rev. Professor JAMES MOF- FATT, D.D., Author of The New Testament A New Translation." Ready immediately. 6s. net. Dr. JOHN KELMAN. WAR AND PREACHING. By the Rev. JOHN KELMAN, D.D., Author of Thoughts on Things Eternal," Salted with Fire," etc. 6s. net. JANE T. STODDAET. THE CHRISTIAN YEAR IN HUMAN STORY. By JANE T. STODDART, Author of The Old Testament in Life and Literature," The New Testament in Life and Literature," etc. 7s. 6d. net. i JANE T. STODDART. THE CASE AGAINST SPIRITUALISM. By JANE T. STODDART. 5s. net. Rev. Professor W. M. CLOW. THE IDYLLS OF BETHANY. By the Rev. Professor W. M. CLOW, D.D., Author of The Cross in Christian Experience," etc. Ready immediately. 5s. net. Rev. Professor H. A. A. KENNEDY. PHILO'S CONTRIBUTION TO RELI. GION. By the Rev. Professor H. A. A. KENNEDY, Author of St, Paul and the Mystery of Religion." 6s. net. Sheriff R. L. ORR. ALEXANDER HPMDERSON-Chureh- man and Statesman. By Sheriff R. L. ORR, K.C., M.A., LL.D, Illustrated. 15s. net. Professor FOR.REST. A MEMOIR OF THE REV. PROFESSOR D. W. FORREST, D.D. By the Rev. JOSEPH LECKIE, D.D. 12s. net. Rev. J. H. MORRISON. STREAMS IN THE DESERT. By the Rev. J. H. MORRISON, M.A., Author of On the Trail of the Pioneers." 4s. net. Dr. R. H. FISHER. THE OUTSIDE OF THE INSIDE: Reminiscences* By the Rev. R. H: FISHER, D.D. 2nd Edition. 6s. net? Dr. H. WO.TEOMPOON and the Rev. J. M. IUFIERNIMMIM A MANUAL OF CHTOCH DOCTRINE. By the Rev. H. J. WOTHERSPOON,- D.D., and the Rev. J. M. KIRK- PATRICK, B.D. Ready immediately. 6s. net. Dr. J. D. JONES. THE LORD OF LIFE AND DEATH. By the Rev. J. D. JONES, D.D., Author of The Gospel of Sovereignty, The Hope of the Gospel," "If a Man Die," etc. 6s. net. Dr. DAVID WA1SmT THE SOCIAL EXPRESSION OF CHRIS* TIANITY. By the Rev. DAVID WAT- SON, D.D., Author of The Social Advance," etc. 5s. net. Rev. THE PERMANHBJCE OF CHRISTIAN- ITY The Hastie Ledures. By the Rev. THOMAS WILSON. 6s. net. OTHER BOOKS NOW READY. A SHORT GRAMMAR OFTHE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT. By the Rev. Professor A. T. ROBERTSON, M.A., D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 6s.net. THE MINISTRY OF 1 HE WORD, By the Rev. G. OAUFBELL MORGAN, D.D. 63. net. THEIiEllt OF ALL THINGS Beginnings of the Belf- Revelation of Jesus. By E. S. WATSON (" Deas Cromarty "). Edited by ROBERT A. WATSON, D.D. 5s. net. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP IN THOUGHT AND PRAYER. By BASIL KKEWS and HARRY BISSEKER. 2s. 8d. net. LIES. By the Rev. G. A. STUDDIM IMNESY, N.C., C.P. 6s. net. WHERE SCIENCE AND RELIGION MEET. By WILLIAM seen PALMER. 6s. net. THE ANGELS AND THE SHEPHERDS. By the Rev, J. R. MILLER, D.D. 2s. net. THE OPINIONS OF R. H. BROWN. Edited by his Amanuensis, P. A3V9BSN DEVIS 6s. net. THE NAZARETH PROGRAMME FOR THE LIFE WORTH LIVING. Discussed in Letters to his Son and Daugh. t)r, by MARCUS WARREMER. 8s. 6d. net. HT H0»BEft & ST0UGHT0N Fublisheis, Warwick-sq., London, E.C. 4.