Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

rhifyn: First Edition

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 6
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE WAR

THE WAR. Friday. MORE RUSSIAN VICTORIES. North of the Somme our troops continued to press the enemy with hand-to-hand en- counters during Wednesday night. Heavy fire on the German lines continuet4 the enemy replying with many gas and tear she lie. With tne capture of Pazieres we are now established in the German second lines on a front of over 9,000 yards, ajid since the opening of the Somme battle on July 1 we have taken about 24 square miles of the enemy's ground. General Snkharoff's troops are making headway towards Brody and the line to Lemberg. The last -communique from Pe.trogroo speaks of fighting at the fords of the River Boldurovka, a tributary of the Styr eight miles to the north of Brody. So far in this battle, the third victory for General Sakharoff within a fortnight, ll38 officers and 6,250 men have fallen into Ruaeian hands. Saturday. ANOTHER FOUL MURDER. General SakharofTe three victories on the Volhynian border during the last fortnight have culminated in the capture of Brody, an important town through which run the Iriailway and! main xioad from Dubno to Lemberg. This break in the Austrian linet may compel the Central Austrian Army, commanded by Count Bothmer to fall back from the line of the Strypa, which they have so stubbornly defended throughout General Brueiloff's offeneive. A further brief message from Petrogratf says that the whole line west of Lutsk has been broken and that the enemy has been routed, losifg 9.000 prisoners, including two generals, with 48 guns. The whole of Delville Wood, held by the 5th Brandenburg Division, on the extreme right otf the new British) line north of the Somme, has been recaptured. At Longueval, where the German posi- tions form a wedge between High Wood and Delville Wood, the last of their strong- holds fell yeeterday. Serbian troops are in action again, and have had' a victorious fight with Bulgarians on the Greek frontier near Monaster. Captain Charles Fryatt, of the Great BasteTn Railway steamer Brussels, cap- tored in the North Sea and taken into Zee- brugge, has been Court-martialled and shot bv the German authorities. The excuse for this official murder is that he made an attempt to ram a German submarine last March. Monday. RUSSIA'S HOST OF PRISONERS. In their capture of Brody the Russians took prisoners 400 officers and 20,000 men. General Sakharoff's strategy, which has achieved its immediate object in the fall of Brody. At other points on them front besides Brody the Russians have achieved more notable successes. Kaledin's troops, just at the point of their junction with those of Lesh, have forced the passage of the Stokhod. This blow, aimed straight at Koyel, at a. point about 21 miles away from it. threa- tens the whole defensive plan of the Ger- mane. Their positions here were very strong, but the Russians have overrun them. Farther South Kaledin has also advanced his line towards Vladimir-Volynek. Thie result of these two moves is shown in the German communiques, which announce the retirement of their troops from the salient formed by the line of the Stokhod south- east of Kdtvel. This victory of Kaledin's army is des- cribed in a message from Mr. Stanley Washburn. He believes the achievements of this army to be "the most important performed by a single army since the be- ginning of the war." The enemy's front, he says too. is broken on a line 13 miles long, and about 10.000 prisoners have been taken, with 47 guns. South of the Dniester Lecitskv is again on the move. "By a dashing coup" he has "thrown the enemy back in the direction of Sitaniislau.' The prisoners he has made and the war material he has captured are being counted. The week-end dispatches from British Headquarters report no decided change in the position. Three airships raided the East Coa«t be- ftwefn midnight and 1.30 a.m. on Saturday morning. They dropped 32 bombs in Lin- colnshire and Norfolk, but caused no casualties, and did no material damage. At one place anti-aircraft guns drove them from their objective. The execution of CaptailT1 Fryatt ha.s been welcomed with enthusiasm in Germany. Neutral comment is severe. Tuesday. THE NEW ALLIED MOVE. The Rusians are well over the Stokhod on the whole base of the triangle that tho railways from Rovno and Sarnv form with its apex at Kovel. The roads towards Kovel are black with the columns of the retreat- ing enemy. A stubborn action delays the Russian pur- suit, but Mr. Stanley Washburn gives reason, in his dispatch published to-day, for thinking that this is an affair of rear- guards covering a general retiment of the Germans. The victory of Brody has been followed by a considerable Austrian retirement. The Admfiraltjl published yesterday a brief account of an attark on a Zeppelin 30 miles off the East Coast by a British airman early yeeterday morning. He fired more than two trays of amunition into the Zep- pelin. Then he wais stunned by a broken portion of his machine-gun. When he came to the Zeppelin had disappeared. Mr. Asquith said in the H-oilse of Com- mons yesterday that this Government had heard with the utmost indignation of the murder of Captain Fryatt by the Germans— an "atrocious cnme against the law of nations and the usages of war." He re- peted1 most emphatically the resolve of the Government that this and other crimes shall not go unpunished. Mr. H. E. Duke is to be the new Irish Secretary. The Lord Lieutenancy is to be left unfilled for the present. Wednesday. BRITISH GAINS HELD. Our men have held their small but im- portant gajns north of Babentin-le-Petifc, reported on Monday afternoon. The Ger- mans attempted to drive them out, but were successfully repulsed. Just north of the Dniester, the Russians have crossed the Koropiec River-a slight advance against Bothmer's army. Towards Kovel the battle continues, without definite result at the moment. The Zeppelins which raided the Eastern and South-Eastern Counties on Monday night caused' no casualties, though they dropped about 60 bombs. At. least six air- ships were obseiVed. They flew at a great height, and this, with the misty nights, made their numbers difficult to determine. Probably there was another, but this seems to have dropped no bombs. One of the raiders was attacked by aircraft, and war, engaged by anti-aircraft guns. It was seen to drop to a low altitudo and disappeared in the mist. Mr. Austen Chamberlan announced in the Hous-e of Commons yesterday the measures which have been taken by the Government of India in connexion with the deaths of .troops on trains from Karachi. Three high officers have been removed from their posi- tions.

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS Capt. P. B. Davies, son of Mr. and Mns. C. E. Davies, Lloyds Bank. Carmarthen, has gone out to active service to the firing line again. He was home after being woun- ded in Gallipoli, and answering a call from .the War Office for Volunteer officers, he, with thirteen other officers, became attached to another regiment, and is now in Frante. Not much "slacking" about that. Physical Instructor Dudley Jenkins, H.A.C., visited Carmarthen last week. In- structor Jenkins is a well-known St. Peter's Boy, being the second son of the late Mr. John Jenkins, merchant, King-street, Car- marthen. He has been spending a few days at Ferry-side, and looks in the best of health. The following Carmarthen boys were home on leave during the past week:—Sap- per W. Lloyd, R.E., son of Mr. J. F. Lloyd, Picton-terraoe; Bugler' Wi. Lewis, 4th Welsh Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, 26, Union-street; Cadet Arthur Wat&on. 1st Officers' Cadet Batt., son of Mrs. Watson, Lammas-street. Pte. Owen Harriets, Carmarthen, writes home to say that the battle of Loos was mi'd compared to the last of the Big Push." And he adds that, strange to say, his platoon and another was led into action by a Carmarthen man, viz.. Lieut. Charles Reeves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Reeves, King- street. Only thiis week Lieut. Reeves writes home describing the severe battle, and say- ing that his guardian angel must have been working overtime for him that he should have come out of such a hot corner with- out injury. Sergt.-Major John Thomas Jamcq,, Comp- ton House, Lampeter, who enlisted as a private at the end of last year, was pro- moted step by step, until last week he was made eompanv^sergeant-major. Trooper Walter Thomas, Pembroke Yeo- manry, was home on leave during the week-end. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas. 43, Francis-tcrraee, Carmar- then, and expects to -go to the front shortly. The death isi announced of Capt. D. Jones. Welsh Regiment. He lived at Wern- isaf, LTanio, Cardiganshire. 'The Churchpeople of 5t. David's Parish, Carmarthen, send parcels to the following- prisoners of war weekly:—Pte. J. Callage han, Welsh Regiment; PtPtl. C. Goodwin, A. Greenland, and CoRman, of the South Wales Borderers. The parcels are prepared and packed by Miss Hearder, Picton-place; the Misses Richards. Picton-terrace; Mrs. Watson, Lammas-street, and Miss Pooley, Picton-place. 1jb? following appeared in Friday's "Gazette" Welsh Regiment: Temp. Ma jor J. R. Williams M restored to the establishment (July 29). Capt. (Temp. Major) J. R. Williams relinquishes the temp, rank of major on alterttion in post- ing (July 29). Pte. Llewellyn Griffiths, R.W.F.. second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Griffiths. Drys- Iwyn, Pa>cmain-street, Carmarthen, arrived at Carmarthen on Tuesday on a visit to his parents. He was recently discharged from a hospital in London. Cy.-Sergt.1Iajor E. D. Rvam, who was killed in action in France while serving in the Shropshire LigjWt Infantry, was well- known at Aberystwyth, where his father is a respected tradesman, and also a,t New- castle-Emlyn, where he was a cashier at the London and Provincial Bank. Lieut. J. B. Bowen. son of Mr. G. B. Bowen. Llwyngwair, Pern.. has been gazetted temporary captain in the Royal Flyingi Corns. Cant. Bowen was formerly in the Pembroke Yeomanry. Lieut. David Morgan, R.W.F. (machine gun section), has been wounded in France during the great aiVance. He is the son of ,the Rev. T. M. Morgan, vicar of New- eh'urch. and was formerly a playing mem- ber of the Carmarthen Harlequins R.F.C. It is reported that Lieut. Wightman, of the East Surrey Regt.. has been wounded in France. He is well-known in Carmar- then. having married the daughter of Mr. and W. Morris. Tabernacle-terrace. He was a former student of the South Wales Training- College, having captained both the Rugby and Soccer teams. Mr. George Jones, 10, Parade-road, Car- marthen, has received official information that his son. Lance-corporal John E. Jones, 3rd Welsh Regiment, has diied of fever whilst on military service in India. Lance- corporal Jones was well known and highly .popular in Carmarthen, and prior to enlist ing was an attendant at the Joint Counties' Mental Hospital. Carmarthen. He was 24 years of age, and I'.erved his apprenticeship as oompositor at the Weekly Reporter office. The sad news is intensified by The faot that only about three week-; ago his mother passed away. Great sympathy is felt with Mr. George Jones. News has been received at Carmarthen that Lieut. E. H. Heath, of the Welsh Regiment, has been wounded in several places by gun shot and shrapnel whilst leading1 his men during the big push in the West. Lieut. Heath is well-known in Carmarthen, being a former student of the South Wales Training College. He is now in hospial at Manchester. It is officially announced in the casualty list of July 20th that Pte. J. Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Benlian Farm, Cellan, has been killed. Pte. Davies was engaged at the Commerce House, Lam- peter, prior to th war., Lieut. G. Eo Thbmas, R.F.A., son of Mr. Thomas Thomas, J.P., Ha.rddran, Carmar- then, bar, been promoted temporary cap- tain and adjutant. Prior to enlisting Capt. Thomas was pastor of Berachah C.M. Church, Fishguard. Com; >an y Se rgea n t- M a j or E. D. Evans, Kind's Shropshire Light Infantry, has been killed in action in France. He was a cashier at the London City and Midland! Bank, Newcastle-Emlyn. and joined the Army in the early days of the war. He was a son of Mr. Ed. Evans, Baker street. Aberystwyth. Rev. Titus Thomas. B.A., son of Mr. Thomas. Troedrbiwfer, Pencader, has joined the Army and left recently to take up a. post as chaplain at Crowborough, Sussex. He was curate at Llanybyther, where he was very popular. Good luck There is, happily, no foundation for the statement tlhat Captain and Adjutant C. T. Morris Davies, of the Royal Warwickshire;* (son of Mr. Morris Davies, Ffosrhydvgaled, Cardiganshire), has heen killed in action. The official intimation is to the effect that the gallant soldier is missing. News has been received that Second- Lieutenant T. C. Nicholas, son of Mr. J. W. Nicholas, clerk to the. Carmarthenshire County Council, is missing. He belonged to the Machine-gun Corps and took part in the attack on Delville Wood. Prior to joining the army he was articled to the law with Messrs. Brodie and Walton, solicitors, Llanelly. His brother, Lieut. J. W. Nicholas, is also on active service. Trooper W. Jeremy (Pembroke Yeo- manry), son of Mr. and Mire. Stephen Jere- my, Park Lodge, Carmarthen, was home on short leave from Oswestry. Tpr. Jeremy leaves for the front this week. Pte. Edgar Edwarda, 2nd Welsh Regi- ment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Owen Edwards, Water-street, Carmarthen, writing home to his parents, states that Lieut. C. E. Reeves (son of Mr. and Mrs. Reeves, King-street) led them into the attiuck at Mametz, and that Pte. Fred Hughes, of Friar's Park, W14s wounded. Fears were entertained for the safety of Sergt. J. R. Jones (Queen's Westminster Regiment), Velindlre, who has been out in France for over a year, but his anxious parents were delighted to hoar from him on Monday morning and that he is quite weliL Amongst the reported missing, is Rifleman W, A. Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Bodafon, Drefach. He is only 10 years of age, and has been out sintje Faist September. He was reported missing after the big engagement of July 1st. Pte. Edgar Morgan, of the Australian Imperial Forces, second son of Mr. and Mrs. James Morgan (currier), King-street, Car- marthen, recently paid a visit to his home. Pte. Morgan, who went to Australia about four years ago, came over to the Dar- danelles with the Australian Forces, where he was .severely wounded. He returned to Australia to recuperate, and then rejoined another regiment, with which he is now in England. He expects to leave shortly for France. His many friends at Carmarthen wish him all luck in the future. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have two other sone with the Colours, viz., Q.M.& Oriel Morgan, Mon- mouth Regiment, and Pte. Olney Morgan, H.A.C. Information was received by Mr. M. Ed- ward, New Inn (Pencader) Council School, on Saturday, that his son Pte. Tom Ed- wardls. Alma Council Schools, has been wounded, leaving been hit iill the left arm and thigh with a shrapnel on the 25th ult. His period of braining was spent at Kinmel Park. Rhyl, and from there he went to Chatham, where he joined the Royal En- gineers Special Brigade in the Chernitstry Department. He went out to France about throe months ago, and since that time he had seen considerable fighting. On Fri- day. the 27th. he was brought bark to a Birmingham Hospital. We hope that he will eoon recover.

A YOUNG ST CLEARS HERO

A YOUNG ST. CLEARS HERO (By ithe Rev. J. Dyfnallt Owen, Y.M.C.A., Bethune, B.E.F., France). The other night a sprightly young man called at the hut: he was modest in his bear- ing, simple in his talk, and sensitive to every movement around him. He seemed as if he had stepped .from an unseen world he had a far-off look in his eyes. I soon recog- nised him as one who had been for four or five years a member of Lammas-street Chafpel. He stood before me with a pierc- ing gaze, yet, wivh a tenderness that comes to the exes when one thinks of old times or meets an old friend. What a change the war 'had wrought in his attitude towards life! The shy, reserved, young lad bore all the characteristics of a hero. He came to Bethune for a few days' rest. But at what .sacrifice were those few days of rest earned'' Those days came and were gone like an idyll of the spring-time. As we talked of the great tragedy that is being enacted all around us, whilst the guns were hurtling their deadly missiles through the air, there came now and again a suggestion in word and action and look of the distin- guished part he had taken in it. We felt for days that we were on the eve of a revo- lution, and at last it dawned upon us this 'quiet, modest lad, scarcely twenty years of age, had been recommended for military honour. When these words will appear in print, the name of Ira Jones, the young hero of St. Clears, will be well-known to his coun- trymen as the distinguished possessor of the Military Medal. I think that lie is the first West Wajian, if not the first Welshman, to 'It" win this coveted honour. I may say that the Military Medal is given for distinguished bravery on the field of battle. Ira possesses a quality of bravery which is of supreme value. There i;; f type of religious faith, a sanity, together with a past!on of abandon in his bravery which can be accounted) for only by the deep religious spirit which animates him. He reminds me of the chivalrous knight of romantic times, when the Church of God had its service the finest type of youth. He is sans .peur et sans rpproche. He holds that his courage is not his own. it is the power God has given him to serve his fellow-men. On three occasions he has been recom- mended for honour. Oil one occasion he brought in two men seriously wounded when under terrible shell fire. Another time he ventured forth under a hail of shells, and brought the battery books to safety; and in addition, on many occasions he has mended his wireless apparatus when it was smashed under shell-fire. I cannot help admiring the spirit of courage and self- sacrifice which possesses his soul. May he be long spared to serve his country in this time of dire need, and may the Church of God in our own dear land send forth young men of like quality of soul. Herein is the highest production of religion—chivalry, modesty, and self-sacrifice.

MAKE IT PUBLIC

MAKE IT PUBLIC PUBLICITY C OUNTS. CARMARTHEN PEOPLE LOOK FOR r4 What about the statements pnb'is'ned from time to time for years I a"r; Are tho men and women who made them standing by all they said. Carmarth *n uv.ii*> klloY. Read the word of I'lis ( ¡.rfl.ar.!I!11 woman. It is this kind of proof the public watch and wait for. On February 2nd, 1909, Mrs. E. Jones, of 14, The Avenue, near St. John's Church, Carmarthen, said :—" For about twelve months I was troubled with cruel pa.ins across my back. Sometimes I scarcely knew what to do. the pains were so severe. When I stooped the pains cut across my back and almost dragged me down. I was quite help- less when they were at their worst, and could not get on with my housework. Often I had to rest in the middle of the day, I felt so miserably tired. Dreadful headaches also affected me. and I sometimes came over Very dizzy. I found at last that it was my kidneys that were out of order. Hearing of Doan's backache kidney pills I decided to try them. and they did me a great deal of good. I .always take Doan's pills when I feel the slightest return of the pains, and they put me right. I can heartily recommend Doan's pills to anybody who suffers with kidney trouble. I Woukl not be without them for the world1. (Signed) E. JOXK!?.' On February 14th, 1916 SEVEN YEARS LATER—Mrs. Jones said:- Seven years ago Doan's pills cured me of serious trouble, and I am glad to say I am keeping very well in- deed now. I always speak well of them for they are worthy of it." Kidney weakness causes sharp twinges when stooping or lifting, fits of depression, dizzy spells, headaches^ urinarv disorders, swellinps of the ankles and limbs, and' those mvsterilous aches anal pains so easily mis- taken for female trouble. Backache, drop- sical swelling, drowsiness, sediment, or anv irresnlarity of the bladder are enough ean<*<> to Suspect kMney disease. Then besrin usinir Doan's backache kidney T>ill?. which are solely for the kidneys ami bladder, Jind have brought new life and sfrp-iirth to thousands. Of all dealers, or 2/9 a box-, from Fost^r- VcClellan Co.. 8 Wells St.. Oxford St.. London, W. Don't ask for kacknche or k^ney^ pills.—ask DISTINCTLY for backache kidney pills, the same as Mrs. Jones had.

THE BATTLE OF THE GARAGE

THE BATTLE OF THE GARAGE" MELEE IN NOTT'S SQUARE AND ITS SEQUEL. CARMARTHEN MAGISTRATES IMPOSE A STIFF FINE. Considerable interest was evinced in a case heard at the Carmarthen Borough Police Court on Tuesday, when David Harries, 36, Sandy Gate, Llanelly. was sum- moned by John Thomas, The Central Garage, Carmarthen, for assault. Harries was also charged with having assaulted Charles Miles, 51, King-street, a chauffeur, whilst a third summons for assault was issued against Harries by Chae. School- mister, a. motor mechanic in the employ of John Thomaj. Owen Francis Dtarvies, Morlan, Sandy Gate, Llanelly, and G. Lewis, 16, Panbrey Road, Llanelly, were also (charged with having assaulted John Tltomag, The Central Garage. Mr. T. Howell Davies, solicitor, appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. T. R. Lsdford, solicitor, Uanelly, for the defendants, JIlho pleaded not guilty. The case arose out of a motor-trip by a party of seven from Llancily to Carmarthen on Saturday, June 24th. Detailing the lIr- cumstances of the case for the prosecution, Mr. Howell Davies said the car was left by the chauffeur at the Central Garage belong- ing to Mr. John Thomas, and in the after- noon the defendants Harries and Davies went to the garage to fetch the car. They were told that they could not take the a.r out without the chauffeur coming for it, and there followed a series of attacks of a brutaj aind dirstardly nature OIl the' com- plainants. T Vr" Anthony Basker said he saw 0^1 ,'orV;us. on Saturday afternoon, June 11 a klack eye on the left and he could not see out of the. eye. There was a fracture of both nasal bones, Had lie bled a lot from the nose. His face was more or less covered with blood. He dreesed his wounds and told him to go home to bed. Replying to Mr. Ludfard, witness said he saw Mr. Thomas in the garage on the Monday following. Mr. Ludford—He was as fit as ever?— I don't think he was as fit as ever. It was onlv a black eH1. I haive had a good many (laughter). When you box you are apt to get a black eve. and it is not con- sidered serious. Do you suggest that he was ■serclously injured?—I should say that he had a severe blow. COMPLAINANT'S STORY. John Thomas, one of the complainants, said that on Saturday, June 24th, he re- turned from lunch about 2.30 when he saw David Harries and Owen Francis Davies, who were- sitting in the car, arguing with the boy. There were also present Chat lee Miles, chauffeur to Major Cass; Chjarlos Schoolmister, Philip Jones, and Willie Davies. Witness asked them what was the matter, and Charles Miles told him. "These men want the car out and the chauffeur is not here." Witness told the men they could not get the car out without the chauffeur. David Harries said, Who is going to stop me." and witness said he would stop him. Harries then jumped out on to the step of the car and hit witness t, violent blow in the face until he fell against a motor-cycle halftunned. Charles "Miles and the others rushed to Harries > id pushed him out. ilr. Davies—Did you use any violence?— No, I could not. I was stunned. Continuing, witness said that a little later, whilst he was :n the garage moving a cair, ho saw David Harries come on to Miles, who was standing at the door with his hands in his pocket, and hit him violent- ly in the eye. There was a, little scuffle, and Harries ran awav. In about +en minutes afterwards Charity Schoolmister was kneeling down in the act of pulling off the wheel of a motor car when about srtven or eiglit men ran into the garage and hit Schoolmister about and kicked him. Witness went to his assistance, and about three or four caught hold of him and hit him about the fare. He knew three of the men—they were the three defendants. A crowd then came in, and' with the assistance of a few townspeople, the defendants were pulled from him and 'chucked out." A PAIR OF BLACK EYES. Cross-examined by Mr. Ludford, witness said that Danny Waltere called upon him at the Farmers' Arms, and asked him io settle the case. Witness told him to go to hie solicitor. Mrt Ludford—It was a matter of money was it not?—No, He could not sav who hit him on the nose, but Harries and Davies hit him in the face. He could not say how many times. He had two black eyes. Mr. Ltidford-Tlie doctor said y6u ha3 only one black eye ?-I had two black wuea The doctor only spoke to one biaok ve and an injury to your nose, and you you were struck all over the f-ce I. ft Ttti provoke the men at all?—No. Then can you explain why two or thl" Bober and respectable men should attack you?—No. I suggest that you 11" It evcitoci and squared up to Harries, and then you had a regular" set-to." and that whilst ym \"re ,It it, Schoolmister came to help you —No Are you a Carmarthen boy?- Yes. Mr. Ludford—Then you don't take knocks without hitting ba/ck (laughter). BLOW FOR A BLOW." Charles Miles, chauffeur, said he kept a car at Mr. Thomas's garage. He remem- bered a oar being brought in to the garage on this Saturday. He went back to the garage at 2.30 when he .saw Harries and Davies sitting in the car and wanted to take it out. He told Mr. Thomas that the car did not belong to them, and Mr. Thomas told them to get out of the car, and they said, "You won't put me out." They then jumped at Mr. Thomas and knocked him in the face. Witness and the others pushed the two men out af the garage. A few minutes afterwards witness was standing at the daoi4 of the garage with his hands in his pockets when Harries, who he did not see approaching, struck him a blow in the eye. Harries then went away, and a little later six or seven men came back to the garagie, including the three defendants. i-k-hoolmister, who was on his knees attend- c in to a car, was attacked by a soldier, and Lewis and David Harries. 1. It was everyone for hiwiself then." added wit- itesR, and we had to dodge them." J By Mr. Ludford—He had a cut on the eye 'from Harries, and he gave a blow bae!, (laughter). I fetched him back one," added witness. Mr. Ludford—So you were about quits? —No; I did my best, but I don't think he had as bad as f didl Mr. Ludford—What I cannot understand i. what are you grumbling about? You had the time of yaur life (laughter). Yon gave back knock for knock, and I am glad to hear it. BELGIAN AND THE "BLUE-SPOTS." Charles Schoolmister. a Belgian engaged at the Central Garage, said he was in charge of the garage whilst Mr. Thomas was out. A car was brought in on this Saturday, and a little later Harries and Davies came in and sat in the car. and asked- Phillip JWIPA to start the engine for them. Charles Miles told Jones not to start the engine as the chauffeur was not there. Mr. Thomas came in and told the man not to take the car ouSB. Harries then asked who was going to stop them, and Thomas replied, "ru stop you." Harries then rose and came to the -tep of the car and struck Mr. Thomas a violent blow tin the face. Wit- snes then rendered assistance in throwing the two men out. He denied kicking an y one. Later. Harries came back and struck ■Miles in the facet About ten minute* a.ft.t'r'WarIs, he heard the rushing of foot- steps and whilst he was kneeling down at- tending to a car. three men attacked him. j Harriet held him by the neck and the others struck him. Replying to Mr. Ludford, witness said lie was not a fighter. Mr. Ludford—Bui you might be a kicker. You know that in Belgium as in France they don't fighfc like we do with the fists With how many wounda did you leave the battie of the garage? (laughter). Witness-I was pretty stiff the next morn- ing. I had blue spots on me (laughter). Wino told you that you had blue spots on you?—My wife (laughter). Mr. LudfordL-She might have thought you had mieasles (laughter). Wm. Davies, chauffeur in the employ of John Thomas, gave corroborative evidence. C-coss-examined by Mr. Ludford, witness said it was Da4vieo who gave Mr. Thomas a black eye. Mr. Ludford—Thomas says that Harries gave him the black eye. Did Miles hit Harries back?—No. Miled swears thiat he did hit him back? I did not see it. It could not be much of a hit anyhow. Witness ,iaid the "scrap" developed into a regular scrimmage," and he was hit, and for nothing too," he added amidst laughter. Corroborative evidence was also gfven by Phillip Jones, apprentice mechanic at the Central Gaa-age. P.C. George Morgan, who arrived on the cne, said Thomas was bleeding freely from the nose, and had a very bad bruise on the left eye. Recalled by Mr. Ludford, John Thomas denied that he had figured in an assault cise before, either as plaintiff or defendant. Will vou swear that you have never been charged with assault?—I don't remember. I was not convicted anvhow THE DEFENCE. David Harries (24), one of the defendants, said this was the first charge of any kind brought agjajtist him. He was now in mourning after a brother who was killed about fourteen days ago in the battle of the Sommei On Saturday, Juaic 24th, he and others thought they would like to see the beauties of Carmarthen" and they came here by cax. After lunch he and Davies u V tga^age to fetch their overcoats which they had left in the car. did not want to .start the car at all for thev could not drive. He sat in the car, and Thomas asked him what he waa doing there and said that unless he came out he would chuck him out. Thomas called him every- thing, and witness told him not to use bad language. Thomas stood by the car in a ifighting attitude, and witness came one of the tear, or otherwise Thomas would etrike him. When witness was coming out of the car ho struck Thomas, and there was a jscuffle. Witness bled profusely from the nose, and could hardly walk. When hift friends saw him in this state, they asked who lilad done it and went back to the garage. Then there was a regular fight, about, six or seven each side. It was not true that two men held Thomas's arm whilst witness pummelled him. By Mr. Davies-They went to fetch their •overcoats from the car because it bad been raining in the morning. He admitted striking tho first blow because otherwise Thomas would have struck him as he was in a fighting attitude. Thomas did not fall on a motor-cycle, but stood up to fight him. Witness denied striking Chas. Miles, he did not see him at all. Schoolmister was not stooping down when he was struck. Schoolmister kicked witness whilst he was on the floor. Owen Francis Dalies (35), another defen- dant., said it was the first time for him to figure in a police court. Thev were =even coming down in the car from Llanellv. He had lunch at tiip Angel. Mr. Ludford—You were safe there, and it is a pity you did not stop there (laughter). MISTAKEN IDENTITY? Continuing. witness said onlv Harries went into the car to fetch the coats. Thomas asked Harries if he was the owner of the car. Harries replied, "No." and Thomas retorted. "Tlien come out. af it. or J will f.P P you out." Witness told Thomas not to be =0 foolish, and Thomas answered. "He can have all lit- wants if he come,; in there." If Thomas hnd shifted away instead of standing by the car in a fighting attitude he would have gone unmolested. "The blows were coing so fa.=t that I could not see them," slid witness, "and the Belgian also kicked Harries." Witness did not. strike anyone, and he thought, he had been mis- taken for someone else. G. Lewis (29), t\l'(, third defendant, said 110 had ii(tv,)r been in a court, before. He was not with Harries and Davies. and was not in the row at all. He simplv saw a. crowd in the square and he walked into the garage out of pure curiosity. Nobody etruck him and ho did not strike anyone. Daniel Walters. West End Hotel. LJan- elly. ex-Wrelsh International footbafler, said he happened to be at Carmarthen last week when ho had a chat with Mr. John Thomas at the Farmers' Arms. He asked Thomas if Lewis touched him and he replied, "He did not touch me at all." SPIRIT OF CARMARTHEN BOYS. Mr. Ludford, addressing the bench for the defence, said he did not know what Mr. Howell Davies was desirous that the magistrates should do with the defendants. When Mr. Davies spoke of brutal assaults, he (Mr. Ludford) was perfectly certain that he would sniff at the mere suggestion of •) fine, and that nothing short of beheadm*' 01; an order to hang, draw and quarter his clients would satisfy Mr. Davies's blood- thirty craving that morning. Mr. Davies wanted the bench to believe that the de- fendants went about Carmarthen on this day like roaring lions seeking whomsoever they might devour. Mr. Davies wanted them to believe that the witnesses for the prosecution had their hearts down in their boots like cowards, and that they laid down like Iambs and allowed the defendants to wipe the floor with them. If that were so, then they were not born in Carmarthen. He never knew of an oocasion when a Car- marthen boy was not. ready to stand up and show his pluck and courage just as well as a Llanelly boy. Mr. Ludford suggested that the case had been exaggerated and blackened against the defendants. He sub- mitted that Harries did not meet a flock of lamtys in JohJn Thomases garagie, hut a flock of men who punished him badlv. Harries did nothing to be ashamed of inas- much as it was a fa.ir fight. Harries had very much the worst of it. With regard to •Davias :and Gordon Lc^vi^ fife submitted th^'1"6 been a mistake in identifying After a long retirement, the bench fined Harris a total of J66 ( £ 2 on each of the ithreo summonses), and witnesses' co«ts- JJnvies and Lewis were fined 10s. each and witneses costs.

WELSH SOLDIERS AND THE CHURCH

WELSH SOLDIERS AND THE CHURCH At a diocesan society meeting* at St Asaph on the 26th ult., the Bishop of St. Asaph raid that the Church in Wales shared equally the perils of the moment under an unequal burden of anxiety, for the dav that brought peace to Great Britain was the dav appointed on which the Welsh Church was to be deprived) of her s. anty endowments. .Meanwhile a costly Commission was being mamtn-ned to get all ready for the blow to fad. \,ore than 70 per cent, of those who vounteered from Wales for military service were Churchmen, while the Welsh Church in a hopeless minority among stav-at- lnmes and conscientious objectors. After 'e wnr things would go on as usual. Those to return would make their voicPS '<■(! He would not say what the- would •feel about colebrating the day of peace bv despoiling the oldest branch of the Church r m the country, but one thing was certain—they and we were casting longing ves to those graves where their dear 'ones rested. It was passing strange that those I" c T .1 SI\ared to rpturn to ^'ales find the advent of peace for which •hey fought ushered by the alienation from •im ..rc'1 ^°r ancient churchyards. 1 .ie impietv of this deed dealt a wound that en time could not heal.

FARMERS DRINKS

FARMERS' DRINKS LICENSING PROSECUTION AT CARMARTHEN. ltt tho Carmarthen Borough Police Court on Alonday Mr. illiatn Thomas, licensee of the Three Salmon Inn, Water-street, Nyas e'e charged under the Liquor Control Older with .supplying- intoxicants during prohibited hours, and Ihomas Lewis, Clyngwyn New- church, Thos. Thomas, Posty-issaf, Aber- nant, and Thos. Thomas, Talfan-ucha, Aber- nant, three farmers, were charged" with having aonsumed the drink. The magistrates on the bench were the Mayor (Mr. J. Lewie), Messrs. T. Bland Davies, H. El B. Riohar, Jas. Davies, Thos. Davies, J. B. Arthur, and Ilees Davies. The case against the landlord was heard first, and Mr. W. J. Wallis-Jones, who up- peared tor him, pleaded guilty. P S. Lodwick said that at 11.30 on Satur- day morning, 22nd July, in the company of P.C Llewellfyn, he visited the Three Salmon Inn. They were in plain clothes. After ho got into the bar he saw a girl take a tray from off the counter with two glasses of what appeared to be beer, and a bottle of soda and a gIaæ of whisky. She went in the direction of -tlio back of the house and to follow lwr they had to get out of the bar and through ifie passage, anl when they got to the door of the baok kitchen they found it was 'bolted from the inside. In a thort time the door was opened and they (the jjolice) went inside and found three men sitting at a table. Thos. Lewis had a whisky and soda in front of him and the other two men had a glass of beer each. The girl, Maggie Morgan, had got out of the room, and he found her in the passage. He asked her for an explanation for tervnig the men and she said, I haven't been here long and I didn't know there was any harm in it." Mrs. Thomas, the landlady, came down from upstairs and he told her, There are three men in the kitchen with beer and whisky in front of them. How can you account for serving them?' She replied, Well, I know nothing about it. I was up- stairs at the time. The girl hasn't b»en here long. and she doesn't know the way to eervp." The landlord was not in the house. Nir. Walhis-Jones said there were miti- gating circumstances in the case, and the landlord was not morally, if legally, guilty of the offence. The landlord had proceeded to markfctt. to buy provision for the house, and the girl Maggie Morgan had come dow n from Cwmllynfell to look after the wiiV, who was ill, and knew nothing about The business. The charge a.gainst the three farmer.- of consuming the drink was then heard. P.C. Llewellyn, who accompanied P.S. Lodwick to the Three Salmon Inn. said that he asked the three defendants to account for having the drinks in 'front of them at 11.30 in the morning. Thos. Lewis said, We felt it very warm after coming to market." They then consumed their drinks and left the premises. D I Mr. Davies—Did you taste the drink before Thos. Lewis?—No, sir; but I smelt the glass. Do you know the difference between whisky and lemonade? (laughter)-Y". P.S. Lodwick said that he knew that the two Thomases had beer in front of r.i;« ru because lie tasted it. Mr. Davies-Are you an authority? (Laughter)—I tasted it, anyhow. Head Constable Mayall—Do v

DARKER CARMARTHEN

DARKER CARMARTHEN LIGHTING ORDER RESTRICTIONS IN THE TOWN. Head Constable Mayall draws the atten- tion of the inhabitants of Carmarthen to the fact that the new restrictions of the Lighting Order in connection with the De- fence of the Realm Act comes into force in Carmarthen, as in every part of Wales, on Monday next. the 7th in-st. The Order stales that all external lamps, flares, and lights of nil descriptions, and all congrega- tions of Uynt's, whether public or private, must be extinguished, except such public lamp!" as the Chief Officer of Police directs should he kept in use for the public safety and any other lights approved' by him. Lights not extinguished must be reduced to a minimum of intensity consistent with safety. In dwellingfhousea hotels, shops, factories, etc., all inside lights must be so reduced and shaded, or the windows, roof, skylights, glass doors, etc. so screened by darkened blinds or darkened curtains that no more thrtn a dull "uhrllued light is visible from n.nv direction outside. In his observation on the above, Head Constable Mayall states that many Venetian bhiiids in the town are quite unsatisfactory. Blin,ds. he says, should be wide enough to prevent the emission of lights from the si Jew of the windows. Skylights should have particular attention. The Home Office ex- piwos th(" £ ->Howrtig information shop-front, which is brightly lit, but hasasnn- blind pulled down over it does not comply with the nrdrr. A section of the Order stntc.. The ringing and chiming of bells, and the striking of clocks audible at such a destance H'. to bo capable of serving as a su-dc for hoczfii, "ircraft shaH be prohibi- i^'i f o bours during which the jr° '*?fl",rf>d to be extinguished or obscured unless special permission be ob- riVvcomPctent military autho- rity."

Family Notices

I Births, Marriages, and Deaths DEATHS. WINDS.—Julv 31st. at Brynteg, near Car- marthen, Afra Marv Hind's, aged 81 yearg. R FES.-Killed in action, July 9tih, Second- lieutenant Laurie Roes, Wrolsh Regiment, aged 26. youngest son of the late Ir. torn BOOH and Mrs. Re^es, Trehvfrvdl Llandovery. SAI-N-DERS-MORGAN.-July 31st, at his residence. Cilycwm House, Llandovery, Morgan Saunders-Morgan. Printed and Published for the Proprietorl TO \he "Carmarthen Printing' Work*, 8, King 8tre*t,