Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

rhifyn: First Edition

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 6 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE WAR

THE WAR. Friday. ANOTHER ZEPPELIN RAID. Once more we have made an advance to. wards Thiepval. Yesterday afternoon our troops pushed forward 300 yards, capturing an enemy trench 400 yards in length. British Headquarters, reporting this last night, added that many prisoners are being taken in this sector. Sixty-two more came in yesterday. The exact number taken haa yet to be ascertained. On Wednesday night the enemy made strenuous efforts to retake the ground he had lost between the station and quarry of Guillemont. He began a severe bombard- ment just before 9 o'clock, and then launched a strong infantry attack. It was pressed with such determination that it reached our parapet in places, but after a sharp struggle was completely re- pulsed everywhere with heavy losses to the losses to the enemy. The French yesterday afternoon also re- carded an enemy attack against the Sove- court Wood. It was immediately checked i • u'r ^re" S

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS Lieutenant Jack Morris, SOil of the Rev. John Morris. M.A., vicar of Llanybyther, has been wounded, and is now at Reading recuperating. News has been received that Private Edgar Edwards son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwards Water-street Carmarthen has recently been wounded in France. Private Edwards has already been wounded on several other occa- sions. His many friends at Carmarthen wish him a speedy recovery; Lieutenant C. T. Morris-Davies, son of Mr. Morris-Davies. J.P., Ffosrhydgaled, near Aberystwyth, who a few weeks ag-o was reported missing, is now reported killed. He belonged to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. A message has been received from the War Office stating that Lieutenant Tom J. Lloyd, of the Royal Army Medioal Corps, son of Mrs. Llovd and the late Dr. Evan Lloyd, Llvs Einon, Tregaron, was wounded on August 17, and is aso suffering from shell shook. Lieutenant Lloyd, who is a brother to Dr. John Lloyd, Tregaron. passed his final medical examination,; last October, and joined the Army in December. He has been in France since March, and latterly was attached as medical officer to one of the battalions of tle. Bedfordshire Regiment. He is now in hospital in London, and stated to be progressing satisfactorily. ^Second -lieutenant Guy Bancroft. South Wales Borderers, has been wounded in France, but his injuries are not regarded as tvery serious. He is the fourth son of Mr. John Bancroft, until re ently his Majesty's inspector of schools in West Wales. Private Herbert Lewis, of the Monmouth- shire Regiment, is at present home on short leave staying with his sister at 2. John- street, Carmarthen, and is the youngest son of Mr. Daniel Lewis, late Taldre, Farmers. Officiia] news has just peen received bv Mr. ( Daniel Joiik-s. of Lower Lodge, near Llan- doverv. that his two sons. Private Jif Jones and Private Jaok Jones, have both been killed in action. Both men were reported nnssirig since June la-st. Extreme sympathy is extended to the bereaved parents. At Llaridingat Church on Sunday evening, the Vicar (Rev. D. Edmondes-Owen) made touching references to the brave young men. Lieut. P. A. Lewis, Welsh Regiment, son of Nlr- and Mrs. P. D. Lewis. Hamilton Housr-, Lammas-street, Carmarthen, is in hospital in France suffering from malaria and trench fever contracted as the result of a lengthy period in trenches. His numerous frieuds will be glad to hear that .g he is making satisfactory progress. He ex- pects to be ba^k in the trenches shortly. Private W. Pentland, nephew .of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Davies, Temperance-place, Lam- Mrs. Peter Davies, Temperance-place, Lam- mas-street, Carmarthen, has again been wounded and admitted into hospital at the ba.- £ in France. Private Pentland went out to France in 1914 with the orignial Expedi- tionary Force, and in October was invalided home from the Battle of the Aisne, suffer- ing from diabetes. He went out to France again in December, 1914. and has since been wounded four times. His many friends in Carmarthen wish him the best of luck, and a speedy recovery in the future. Mr. Glyndwr Richards, B.A., B.D., prin- cipal of the Carmarthen Old College School, who is at present somewhere in France in charge of a Y.M.C.A. tent. greeted re- cently quite a number of Welsh boys, amongst them being Morris Isaac, one of the former chauffeurs at Mr. D. E. Jones's West Wales Garage, and who was very popular at Carmarthen. Official news has been received that Pte. Jamas Davies has been wounded and is now in hospital. Private Davies is the son of Mr. David Davies, Carlton House, Ferrvside, who has three sons serving at the front. Corporal Henry Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs Evans, 39, Richmond-terrace, Carmar- then, has been wounded for the second time in France and is now in hospital there. The Military Cross has been awarded to Lieut. John Evans, of Llanellv. The honour was conferred on Lieut. Evans for gallantry in holding the line with half a regiment, which he took charge of while re- inforcing the Gloucester^ Lieut. Evans sustained a bullet wound in the head, and is now making satisfactory progress at a Reading hospital. He is the eon of Mr. David Evans, Pantyllyn, Trimaaran-road, Llanelly, and a few months ago returned home from the trenches to marry the youngest daughter of Mr. Joseph Williams, J.P., Caeglas, Llanelly, ex-High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire. The numerous friends of Private Fred Morgan, of Llandyssul, will learn with much regret that lie has been wounded in the "Big Push on July 18th by an explosive bullet which penetrated his right knee. Ho is at [/resent in hospital at Rouen, and it was found necessary to have his leg ampu- tated just above the knee. However, Pri- vate Morgan is steadily improving and is marvellously cheerful despite all he has suf- fered. In a letter written by him from hospital to Mr. Jonas, the manager of tho London City and Midland Bank, Llandyssul, where he was formerly a clerk. Private Morgan says: I am glad to have come out of the inferno alive. I could have been blown to atoms by a ahell or a mine. I consider mysolf lucky. The sights I have seen and the way men have been done to death, have brought tears to my eyes on more than one occasion. When I think of all thia, I fee], thankful to a merciful God that I have saved so well." Private Mor- gan. who joined the army at the beginning of the war, i,3 a native of Pontyberem. Hie many friends wish him a speedy recovery. The following local boys are now home on leaveLieut. W. D. Williams, son of the late Mr. Williams and Mrs. Williams, Park- ydrissy: Lieut. Basil Parry Griffiths, son of the Rev. B. Parry Griffiths and Mrs. Grif- fiths, St. Peter's Vicarage; Lance-corporal Ivor Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Evans, Priory-street; Private Owie Evane, son of Mr. David Evans, saddler, St. David's-street; Corporal R. O. Rowe. for- merly employed at the Official Receiver's office; Air Mechanic D. J. Davies. son of Mrs. Davies. 24, Union-street; Private Dick Lewis, son of Mi's. Lewis, 26, Union-street; Corporal Tudor Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Wood's-row; Private Ben. Evans, son of Mrs. Evans, 86. Priory-street; Private D. D. Thomas, son of Mr. Thomas. Little Water-street; Private Davies, son of Mrs. Davies, 40, Francis-terrace; Sergt. W. G. Hopkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins, The Avenue. Much sympathy was aroused in the neigh- bourhood of Newoastle-Emlyn when it be- came known that Private William David Hughes. Welsh Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Hughes, Llwynteg, Cwm- Morgan. Newcastle-Emlyn, had died on August 7th. 1916. at Citadel Hospital, Cairo, Egypt, from en- teric fever. De- ceased joined the army at Car- marthen on June 10th. 1915. and went out to the Dardanelles in September. He was orderly to Liout. D. O. Thomas, who is at present sta- tioned in Car- marthen. Ptc. Davie-s suffered from frost-bite while at the Dar- danelles and was sent to hospital at Cairo. After recovering- h e returned to his „ regiment in Eg'ypt, where lie remained until he con- tracted enteric fever. This young hero, who -)ii!N-twenty years of age. was a very ■popular and well-respected young man in the neighbourhood, i'nd his death was learnt with much regret. He was a faithful mem- ber at Rehoboth Baptist Chapel. We ex- tend our sympathy to the bertaved family. The following letter dated August 10th was seilt to the parents of the deceased by the senioi cha,piain, the Rev. T. Jones:-—"Dear Mi. Hu.gh,- Y ou will have only just had my letter informing you of the serious ill- ness of your son and before this the War Office will most likely have informed you of his death. I may say that the conversation i had with him last Friday was really the la-C time he said anything with full" con- sciousness. He slept a very great deal, and it was with eiffiouity he could "be aroused to take nourishment, and when I last saw him he was souui asleep; even the doctor exami- nin him did not arouse him. iind from this steep he passed through the portals of death When I had my last t'alk with him I spoka mostly in Welsh, which greatly pleased him. And I arr glad to say that rlw Faith in u- U ^.lt* keen brought up was that in which he died. This is your consolation in your sorrow and bereavement. I officiated at his funeral in the military cemetery, Old Cairo. His grave is No. 1123 F. You will,, no doubt, receive any personal property pe- 101 girig to him in due course. He leceived every attention possible, and could not have been better looked after had he been with you Commending you to Him who alone can comfort and heai the broken-hearted. He was buried with full military honours. the coffin was draped with the Union Jack, and the firing party fired three rounds and the Last Post was sounded bv the bugler. .1- am. with deep sympathy, yours faith- fully. Thomas Jones, senior chaplain.

INTERESTING WEST WALES WEDDING

INTERESTING WEST WALES WEDDING STEPHENS-LEWIS. The wedding of 2nd-Lieut. D. J. oM. Stephens, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephens-Davies, Trawsmawr, Car- marthen, and of Miss Isabel Lewis vounger daughter of the Rev. T. and Mrs." Lewis Lampeter Velfrey Rectory, Pembrokeshire, took place quietly at the Parish Church, Lampeter Velfrey, on Wednesday, August T T °"1Q,atmS clergy were the Rev Lincoln Lewis, cpusin of the bride, assisted by the Roy. I jL'hidlow, Llawhaden Vicar- The bride, was charmingly attired in white satin, and carried a spray of white lilies. Her bridesmaids were Miss Lewis (sister), Miss Stephens (sister of the bride- groom^, and Miss Enid Chidlow. Their gowns were of flowered, powder blue voile. and carried sweet pea bouquets, tied with the colours of the Ho\tJ.1 WEIA) Fusiliers, and wore gold brooches of the R.W.F. badge, the gifts of the bridegroom. The best man was Major E. Ball. London Regiment, and the groomsman. Captain J. Knowling, Argyl' and Sutheorland Highlanders The bride and bridegroom were recipients of a very large number of presents. It is an in- -ir o t.eresting fact to note that the biidegro m. best man and groomsman, were all in the Battle of Loos, in which the two former weie severely wounded, and finally arrived -it the same hospital in London, in which the bride was nursing. Captain Knowling has on1.- recently been wounded. After the t-eremony the bride and bridegroom left for the English Lakes.

POPULAR CARMARTHEN OFFICER

POPULAR CARMARTHEN OFFICER DEATH IX ACTION IN FRANCE. rfll,n'e we:'° expressions of sorrow and svm- pathv on all hands in Carmarthen on Tues- day when it became known that Se-ond- heutenant II. C. Reeves, Welsh Raiment only son of Mr. H. Reeves, jeweller,1 Kiii"- street, and Mrs. Reeves, had been killed in action in France on August 25th. The sad intelligence was conveyed to thb parents in a telegram from the War Office. Lieutenant Reeves was educated at the Carmarthen Grammar School, where he was a, oreat Grammar School, where ho was a. oreat favourite. He had taken a promi- nent part in the Scout movement in the town. Af- ter lea. ving school he proceeded to Halifax, where he Qualified for the iiplama of F.S.M.C. During his stay at this town he was a chorister at tho parish church, the choir of which is reckoned to be OliO of t he finest in England and on more than one occasion Lieut. Reeves was the i soloist («t the Sun- of^rSVisCCt n rfnd"r1°'i himself to « host ot friends at Halifax, who received the news of hid death with profound re-rrefc- Joined the Royal NaVal Division the day after he m ir^in nt7am'r,fti0n- wit|l w,^h was iantod l,f a f°-V m°ntl,s llntl! was granted Jus commas.on in the Welsh Re^i a-o °Ut !° Fr'T'° fivG mo*t Popular officer with < g.rne.i' amongst whom were manv Carmar h.„ boys. Qne of whom, PHvate l.i 1recently wrote home to sa\ that Lieut. Ree.'ves l,xl them into tho felt'w Tl'° df'°post sympathy is ft It with the berenved parents in the loss of W only son. who g.Hantly gave up his lite for his King and eountrv at. the early age of twent.v-two. Mr. and Mr«. Ree-vee desire to convey their thanks to nil those who have sympathised with them in their ereavement.

DEATH IN ACTION OF TW9 BROTHERS

DEATH IN ACTION OF TW9 BROTHERS Ihesc are photc,graphs of two brothers who. as reported in our la.t week's i^e have laid down their lives for their King and Country, viz., Private. David Thomas and Private Johnny Thomas, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Thomas, Pumpsaint, Llan- wrda. Private David Thomas was one of the 'heroes of CJal.lipoli and had been woun- ded there before being sent to France, I where lie was killed on July 1st. Ten days afterwards his brother. Private Johnny Thomas, fell in action. The sympathy of the whole ifisitrict is with the bereaved parents in the k>;s of ttheir heroic sons. • Another son, Private William Thomas. is out in France.

BOROUGH EDUCATION COMMITTEE

BOROUGH EDUCATION COMMITTEE THE HIGHER EDl/CATIOX RATE. A meeting of the Carmarthen Borough Education Committee was held at the Guild- hall on Tuesday. There were present: Re*v. D. J. Thomas (chairman), Mr. J. Crossman, Mr. E. Collier. Rev. K. McKeown, and Mr. W. Spurrell. A letter wis read from the Clerk to the Carmarthenshire Education Committee call- ing attention to the enquiry at Carmarthen next Thursday into the proposal to increase Hie Higher Education Bate. The Chairman said that thelcommittee have no locus standi, but any ratepayer could ap- pear at the enquiry to object. The rate was levied on the Borough. 40

Family Notices

DEATH. THOMAS.—Tn Cambridge. America, JuJy 17. Mrs. Jessie Thomas (nee Ferguson), widow of the late Gwilvm Thomas, for- merlv of Carmarthen. ON ACTIVE SERVICE. DAVIES. — Killed in action. Private Davies. sor; of Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Penc-nwe. Llansawel. TirCHES.— On August 7th, Pte. William David Him lies, died of fe».er contracted in action son of Mr. and Mrs. D.. Hughes Tlwvntpg, Cwmmargan. Newcastle-Emlyn. REEVES. —Killed in action on August 25th, Second.-Lieut. H. C. Recives (Charlie Reeves). Welsh Regiment, onlv son of Mr. H. Reeves, jeweller, King-street, Carmar- thpn. and Mrs. Reeves. I THOM AS. -Killed in action on July 1st, Pt j David Thomas, and on Julv Iltli. Tohniij, Thomas, both sons of Mr. and Mr. Thomas. Pumsaint. Llanwrda.

WILL OF In STAFFORD HOWARD

WILL OF In STAFFORD HOWARD. Sir Edward Stafford Howard. K.C.B., of Ciiyrnaenllwyd, Ca.rmarthetriishire, Mayor of Llanelly, who died on April 8th, left nn- settled estate of the value of E7,353, the net personalty being £ 3.146. Probate of the will, dated September 25th, 1911, with two codicils both of October 7th. 11912. is granted to Dame Catherine Merinl Howard, the widow, daughter of Lady Cowell-Stepney and the late Sir Arthur Cowell-Stepnerv. The testator left all his personal effects and belongings, other than these at Thoi-nbtiry Castle, and his shares in the Welsh Garden Village Investment, the Welsh Town PJan- ning and Housing Association, and the Ordinary Stock of the Western Ra.ilway to his wife. and the residue of the property to his son Algar Heirry Stafford. Howard.

A LETTER FROM THE REV J DYFNALLT OWEN

A LETTER FROM THE REV. J. DYFNALLT OWEN Dear Sir,—I shall feel obliged if you will allow the following letter to appear in your next issue. I should like to acknowledge gifts (if books from Miss Lewis, Cavendish House, King-street; Messrs. D. Williams- King-street; Owen Jones. Dark-gate; and D. H. Thomas, Water -street. -You 1-9 faithfully, ÍIERY HOWELL. Tessera House, Carmarthen, August 28th, 191(6. Dear Mr. Howell ,-I am deeply indebted to you for your interest in my work here. Will you kindly thank the Carmarthen friends through the papers not only for the books but for other gifts which have been so-it me direct. F-or the last fortnight I have been respon- sible for the work in another camp just two mile.s from the line. The work here is most interesting whatever the drawbacks, or may I say the adventures. This is the most advanced place we have in the direction I am at present. Last Sunday I had the greatest experienco of my life. I was a.sked to take the Brigade Service of a well- known Welsh Brigade. I slept on Saturday night in a. little village partly demolished by shells, and on Sunday morning before I got up they were dropping uncomfortably close. So we got up—the chaplain and myself—at 6 a.m. and were soon on our way towards trenches. We passed through a village in ruins—the oity of death and destruction: crossed a bridge which has figured much in the war and went along the communication trench until we came to a certain place, where I was /privileged just for a moment to look over a parapet and see the trenches and No Man's Land and beyond that awful place a historic battlefield and a big town looming in tne morning mist. We returned without any mishap in time for the 9 o'clock parade. I took both services, English and Welsh, in that battered village: then we cycled to another village, where I took both services again, in the open air. and cele- brated the Holy Communion in the open air on a little green in the afternoon. To me, it was a historic occasion to preach to my countrymen in the zone of fire. The officers ",?r.e, almost to a man not only •i J'" speech but Welsh in ideals and sentiments. The language of the mesb was Welsh. The little cemeterv where lies a young Carmarthen officer was near the secluded spot where I looked towards No Man s Land m the morning. I longed to go and see it, but it was too unhealthy," and the chaplain advised me to be satisfied with what I had seen. My work here is almost done, and though one's heart longs for dear old Wales and quiet Carmarthen, yet mv heart is Bore at the thought that the time. to part with these heroes is so neaiy. Again thanking you for your interest in the work.—I am. yours faithfully, J. DYFNALLT OWEX. B.E.F., France. A 24th. 1916.

NATIONAL MISSION

NATIONAL MISSION. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] Sir,—-Knowing that many of your readers are anxious to secure united services during the coming Church Mission, the following account of what has actually taken place for some time now will interest them. In a small country town in the North of England soon after the war broke out. the vicar of the parish called a meeting of the different denominations, and asked if they would join him in arranging to have a weekly united service of intercession and prayer. All readily agreed to this, it was settled to have the service on one evening in the week so as not to interfere with the Sunday services. One week the same is held in the Church of England, the next at the Baptist Chapel, and so on in turn. Many members of the different denominations attended at each place of worship and join thus in a hearty service. It has been a great help and benefit to the people, thus drawing them all together, and to crown all, although many men frum that town and district have gone to the front and to sea and been in great perils, not one had up to the last month been killed. When this fact was remarked upon, a member of the Congregational church replied: We believe that God has heard our united prayers and mercifully spared our sons." Surely this ought to be on example which our National Church in W ales should follow and sinking all pettv differences of creed, join in brotherly love in pleading before the Father of all. L. E.

CRXOGYES BARDIC CHAIR

CR\XOG\YE.S BARDIC CHAIR. A large gathering of temperance workers, especially members of the Merched y De, on Friday last attended the sale of property of the late Miss Cranogwen Rees, Llan- granag. their leader. The building sites which she possessed were purchased by Dr. Hughes, Ton Pentre, for £101 10s. The bardic chair, which was the first won by a lady at a National Eisteddfod. was pur- chased by the members of the Bankyfelin Calvimstic Methodist Chair (of which she Has an ardent worker) for JE6.

CARMARTHEN AUCTION MART

CARMARTHEN AUCTION MART. The weekly mart was held on Wednesday, when there was an enormous quantity of stock entered. An eKceptionally good all- round trade was experienced. A large entry of lambs met a good trade at fully late rates, in fact for some of the choicest lots, these were higlner, 7d. per lb. being the top price. There was a good demand for breed- ing ewes which made from 50s. to JE5 per head There was still a good demand for pigs, but the price was not quite as high as recently, some of the farmers, expecting to get late rates, were disappointed, and a few pens were unsold. For a large entry of fat cattle trade was particularly keen, late rates being fully maintained, and an absolute .clearance of nearly every lot. Prices made for fat oattle were from 918 to £ 33. A prime bunch of bullocks averaging jE32 apiece. The demand for cows and calves was very keen. 1:30 being, a very ordinary price; as much as J636 1Gs. was obtained for the best cow. Owing to the Annual Ram Sale the sale on Wednesday next will commence with the cows and calves at 10.30. Farmers are requested to note.

RHEUMA TlSMKIDNEY TROUBLE

RHEUMA TlSM-KIDNEY TROUBLE Rheumatism is due to uric acid and crystals in the joints and muscles, the resuh of excessive uric acid in the system that tho kidneys railed to remove a nature intended, and this acid is also the cause of backache lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble,- stone, lumbago, dropsy. The success of Estora Tablets for the treatment of rheumatism and other forms of kidney trouble is due to the fact that they restore the kidneys to healthy action and thereby remove the cause of the trouble, and have cured numberless cases after the failure of other remedies, which accounts for them superseding out-of-date medicines that are sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. All chemists, 18 3d. per box of 40 tab- let, or postage free from Estora Co., 132, Charing Cross Road, London, W.C. Carmarthen Agent: A. 1. Jones. M.P.S., Chemist, 16, Lammas Street. (P56—17-11

Advertising

J ■'ijiPjF | v||| BABY MORGAN. Despaired of saving him Mrs. CLIFFORD MORGAN, of Man- dalay," 2, Felsberg Road, Brixton Hill, S.W., writes;- When our little boy. age 9 months, was six weeks old. be could not retain any food, although we tried several well-known and expensive foods. We had absolutely despaired of saving him until persuaded to give your Virol a trial, and can say, with every confidence, that ever since his first battle he started to thrive with astonishing results. I enclose a photograph of him so that you can see what a beautiful child he is. We feel that Virol has saved our little one's life." VIROL For tiredness, nervous exhaustion and sleeplessness, the Virolised milk three times a day. (A teaspoonful in half-a-pint of warm milk.) In Glass& Stone Jars, 1/ 1/8 ft 2/11. VIBOL, LTD., 118-166, Old Street, E.C. British Made, British Owned. S.H.B.

PRESENTATION TO MR G W JHOPEJP

PRESENTATION TO MR. G, W. J- HOPEJ.P. At the conclusion of the ;v-i-hiwpal Sessions on Tuesday, the chairm^ Sir Marteine Lloyd, Bart., .announced that had a very pleasant duty to perform at the close 'of the business for the day, and that was to present on behalf (if ilis brother magistrates and himself, and the officials of the court, a piece of plate to Mr. Hope on the occasion of his marriasre. and thev all joined in wishing him long life and happi- ness. The plate, which was a handsome sil- ver piece, bore the following inscrq)tion:- Presented to C. W. W. Hope. Esq., on the occasion of his marriage. Jufv 18th. 1916. bv Sw Marteine Lloyd. Bart. C. H. L. Fitz- williams, Joshua Powell, Rev. Daniel Gri- ffiths, C. E. P. Tyler. E. Lewes Bowen, Thomas Davies, Pemrhiwpal Justices also D. T. George (clerk), and David Williams, deputy-chief constable." n' as magistrate next in seniority to bir Marteine. said he wished to endorse everything that their worthy chairman had said. Mr. Hope in thanking them for the pre- sent, whi/h should be kept as a famih- heir- loom said that his ancestor. Capt .Jonin1 was a member of that Bench and prided him- self upon his regular appearance on the j10 regretted that lately Tribunal work had prevented' him from attending as regularly as he would like to.

NEIGHBOURLY SOLICITUDE IN CARMARTHEN

NEIGHBOURLY SOLICITUDE IN CARMARTHEN thtn Zpleh™ oftentbt wojUd be hard to find this. bom'toll0'61" TQ' WOId- of what a nei'sh- bour tell* you here, and judge whether anv- tlung could be more helpful to a man or woman down with kidney trouble On February 16th, 1914, Mrs. E. A. James, of Pentremeurig Cottages, College Road. Carmarthen, said:—- Years ago I used to be troubled with pains in my back, and they made me feel tired and sleepy. I found the pains worse when I laid down. My head was bad, and I was subject to attacks of dizziness. The urinary system also showed signs of kidney disorder. But I was induced to take some of do™°s,„ Tfa„ch^l^'dM>, piu». "-<1 ■« £ no^tl i I J great relief- 1 have had my friend*°t i''y Others of and r !i e benefited by Doan's pills, T? ATays speak vve11 <>f them. (Signed. A. JAMES. On February 15th, 1916- TWO YEARS LATER-Mrs. James said:- "I keep in the best of health, I am glad to say-ever since Doan's Pill* cured me years ago." n S When the kidneys are ill the whole bodr is being slowly poisoned. That is whv kidney complaint is so serious, and way it so often end6 fatally. DoanV backachetidnev pills cleanse and gently heal the kidnevr and so arrest-the cauae of kidney trouble' backache, rheumatism, dropsv, urinarv dis orders, gravel, languor, weakness and un- natural drowsiness. Of all dealers, or 2/9 a box, from Foster-McClellan Co 8 iv°ii! St. 0,/°rdS. London, W. D^'a.kfS SctLY Zr DOA^S Cuf' P,m, the ,ame „ ,d"e?

I HENLLAN

I HENLLAN. newvdrlV^eaj"Iy audit of the Wv- HPTJI at? WiVs held at The Railway Inn Hen! an on beturday, the 26th August last.7 CWVVT? Bowejl- agent, attending. <-ongi adulations to Miss Br^.wen W L\ans ot Llwynderi, Sarnau. Hen.lan whA hfs be™ successful in obtainfn- p oma of A.F.C.L. in pianoforte° p 'av.n- at the first attempt. She was pr-pdred for toe examination by Mr. Harold L .tx.x .u., Carmarthen.

LLANSAWEL

LLANSAWEL. \l!3s'7v,X'irTthy ispextended to Mr. and thV ,wi Penenwc, Llansawel. m l ed t/ f son- Rees- who was killed in action while serving in France Deceased had been for many years in the n'm!'0 -°i dliafs, Gla nyrannell-isaf, LLnsawel prior to his enhstin"- some months ago. He belonged to the 3rd B-it tabon of the R.W. lulhers and greatly loved by his superior officers a^d comiades Mrs. Evans onlv reoentlv lost a .ho serving. whiofi hard øtiLl.