Teitl Casgliad: Flintshire Observer

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

TELEPHONP ESTABLISHED 1805. TELEPHON^ No. 205. -p T") jo BSIuKLAND, Mà High-class Fish, Game, and Poultry Salesman, Im BRIDGE STREET, CHESTER. Country Orders receive Special Attention Local Business Guide. 4 I HOLYWELL. ++++++++.+++++++++++++++++.++ I DAVID ROBERTS, Melange House, HOLYWELL. I Currier & Leather Merchant, Saddler, Harness Maker &. Upholsterer. ESTABLISHED 50 YEARS. ♦> Competent Workmen kept 011 the premise?. Repairs of^all descriptions. £ t^++&^z*+X*+><*<++X++X*<++X+<*<+ ..+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I FRED. E. MORRIS, | ST ATIONER and BOOKSELLER, 44 Observer" Shop, High Street, HOLYWELL. :.++++++++++++<.+++++++++++++++++++++)+ IvdZOLID. I J. SAUM, WATCHMAKER; High St., MOLD. I J Best selection of RINGS, Wedding and Engagement. J J GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, SOUVENIRS AND TRINKETS. ? ]zT J GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, SOUVENIRS AND TRINKETS. ? ++++)+<.++++++++++++++++++++++++++ | THE ARMONIC, Ltd., I 15, High Street, MOLD. 7 Call and Inspsct our Large Selection of Novels bv World-famous Authors, at 4 £ d., 6d. and 7d. *!♦ *X* ♦$» *X* *X* *X* ❖ ♦♦♦ *X* *X+ *X* *X* 'X* *X+& ♦> ❖ ♦> *X* *X* *X* *X* *X* *X* *X* *Xf ♦> *X* *X* *X* ❖ <♦ ♦> *X* «*» ❖ ♦> *$♦ »> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ | jr. s. STOnraFT,$ W ine and Spirit Merchant, •*• 44, High Street, MOLD.$ Telephone 23. BASS'S ALE AND GUINNESS'S STOUT. <& CHESTER. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ $JOSEPH MUSGRAVE & Co., I «f» (Successors to Thomas Dixon & Co.) V |[ Timber and Slate Merchants, J T36?° St. John Street, CHESTER, | ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++; +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Hi SHAlAf$L Oo.y 0en

BUTTER FOR WORKHOUSE INMATES

BUTTER FOR WORKHOUSE INMATES. PROPOSAL TO SUBSTITUTE MARGARINE LOST. At Wrexham Board of Guardians on Thursday the House Committee recommen- ded that the Board should consider the ad- visability of substituting margarine for butter in the dietary for the inmates of the work- house. Mr. T. B. Taylor (chairman of the House Committee) said he did not agree with the suggestion that they should give the inmates 1:1 y 0 margarine instead of butter. The inmatea did not: have luxuri but what they did en- joy was their bread and butter. He did not think it was extravagant to give it to t'ltin, and if they wanted to economise he thought they -hould do so in other directions—on salaries, which amounted to £ 1,300 per an- num. He did not think they should econo- mise on the food of the poor. Margarine (.ost 1-. per !b., and butter Is. 3d. or ts. 4d., so that there was not much difference. He moved that butter be given to the inmates as in the past. Mr. E. J. Williams seconded. Mr. R. W. Egerton said margarine was used in other unions. A good deal of pre- judice was aroused by the name "margarine." He had tried it himself, and intedded doing so. Good margarine was better than ordin- ary butter. Oh !") Wrexham was full of grocers' -hops where margarine was sold to the working men. They were keeping the inmates at the expense of the working men who ate margarine, and an atmosjdiere of prejudice was created because they proposed — i to substitute margarine for butter in the dietary for the inmates of the workhouse. There was a good deal of cant about the matter. By 21 votes to five it was decided to con- tinue to give butter to the inmates, and not to substitute margarine for it.

X VERSATILE WELSH BARD

*X* VERSATILE WELSH BARD. Mr. Isgaer Lewis, the well-known Welsh bard of Carnarvon, has won the prize of $100 offered by the promoters of the International Exposition Eisteddfod, San Francisco, for the best pastoral poem. There were about fifty competitors. Mr. Lewis has won many eisteddfodic honours, and is regarded as among the foremost of A\ elsh lyric poets. At the Carnarvon National Eisteddfod of 1894 he eai-i-ied off the prize for a pastoral poem entitled" Bugail yr Hafod," which the ad- judicators declared to be among the best works of it, kind in the Welsh language. He is also a musician of considerable ability, and some of his compositions have become exceedingly popular. He was the winner of the libretto prize at the Colwyn Bay National Eisteddfod.

CHATEAU AS HOSPITAL

CHATEAU AS HOSPITAL. In a letter to his uncle (the Rev. W. Vaughan Jones, Vicar of Mostyn), Dr. R. W. aughan. who is with the French Arniv, in the Urgency Cases Hospital, says the hospital is being located in an old chateau and wooden huts are erected in the grounds, each capable of holding 30 patients. A tight raged about the chateau during the Battle of the Marne. Villages were completely (I y ruined, but the chateau marvellously escaped.

No title

The latest time for receiving advertisements for the Flint Observer and News" is tcle first post on Wednesday morning; otherwise insertion cannot be guaranteed. Alterations of ad- vertisements should reach us not later ths.,n Tuesday.

Futile Zeppelins

Futile Zeppelins. In a letter which lie has addressed to a correspondent, Mr. Balfour, the First Lord of tke Admiralty, points out that judged by numbers the cumulative results achieved by the various Zeppelin raids do not equal the single effort of the submarine which to the unconcealed pride of Germany and the hor- ror of the world sent 1,198 unoffending vic- tims to the bottom in the Lusitania." The Home Office state that during the last twelve months 71 civilian adults and 18 chil- dren have been killed, 189 civilian adults and 31 children have been injured. As Mr. Balfour remarks this is "bad enough," be- cause it has caused suffering to many inno- cent people; but even this result with all its tragedy has been magnified out of all pro- portion by ill-founded rumour." What mili- tary advantage has been secured by the shed- ding of this innocent blood? This is Mr. Balfour's answer:—" No soldier or sailor has been killed, seven have been wounded, and only on one occasion has damage been in- flicted which could by any stretch of lan- guage be described as of the smallest military importance. Zeppelin raids have been bru- tal, but so far they have not been effective, they have served no hostile purpose, moral or material." The reasons for the policy of secrecy ad- opted by the Government are clearly ex- plained by the First Lord of the Admiralty. A typically lurid account of an airship raid as issued by the Germans is cited, together with the British official announcement of the same raid. Now it is plain," proceeds Mr. Balfour, that if one of these stories is true the other is false. Why not, then, explain the discrepancy and tell the world in detail wh'erein the German account dis- torts the facts. The reason is quite simple. Zeppelins attack under cover of night, and by preference a moonless night. In such conditions landmarks are elusive and navi- gation difficult. Errors are inevitable, and sometimes of surpassing magnitude, and Germans constantly assert, and may some- times believe, that they have dropped bombs on places which, in fact, they never ap- proached. Why make their future voyages easier by telling them where they have blun- dered in the past? Since their errors are our gain, why dissipate them? Let us learn what we can from the enemy, let us teach him only what we must. Nobody will, I think, be disposed to doubt that this reti- cence is judicious, but the question may still be asked whether it is used not merely to embarrass the Germans but unduly to re- assure the British." There is no doubt that the policy of the Government has been well justified in every respect. The real object of the Zeppelin raids was to frighten the people of this country. The Germans wrongly imagined that their heroic" nocturnal baby-killing exploits would create panic and terror in Britain, and dampen our enthusiasm in the prosecution of the war. It is a colossal mistake, quite characteristic of the Germans. Frightful- ness has only one tangible effect upon this country, and that is to swell the volume of recruiting.

V Military Appointments

V Military Appointments. FROM THE GAZETTE," AUGUST 26th. ROYAL WELCH FUSILIERS. To be temporary second-lieutenants: C. M. Lea and T. H. Burns. Sergeant-Major R. P. Davies to be second-lieutenant of Terri- torials. FROM THE "GAZETTE," AUGUST 28th. Territorial Force. Denbighshire (Hus- sarf-) Yeomanry: Squadron Quartermaster- Sergeant William Augustus Gillmore to be second-lieutenant. FROM THE GAZETTE," AUGUST 30th. INFANTRY & SERVICE BATTALIONS. Royal Welch Fusil iers. Temporary Sec- ond-Lieutenant R. M. Wililams to be tem- porary lieutenant. V elsh Regiment.—Temporary Lieutenants C. S. Dunkley, E. W. Edwards, and H. R. Wood to be captains; Temporary Second- Lieutenant F. M. Mathias to be temporary lieutenant; F. C. Austin and T. Llewellyn to be temporary second-lieutenants. Royal Welch Fusiliers.—W. E. Phillips, S. G. White, D. L. Jones, and P. Williams to be temporary second-lieutenants. SPECIAL RESERVE OF OFFICERS. Royal Welch Fusiliers. Captain L. S. Lloyd is seconded for service with the Egyp- tian Army. ❖ A number of men from Canada arrived in England on Monday to become ammunition workers.

Volunteer Training Corps

Volunteer Training Corps. Tite laoa. secretary of the Central Associa- tion NoJunteer Training Corps has received a letter from the War Office with reference to the provision of rifles, in which it is stated that, those Yolunteer corps which are affiliated to the Central Association Volunteer Train- ing Corps may provide themselves, at their own expense, with rifles under local and in- dividual arrangements under certain condi- tions. Eisteddfod on Battlefield. Writing to a friend at Abergele, Licut. M. H. Davies, 9th Royal Welch Fusiliers, says that the troops are particularly cheer- ful in France. "Our battalion," he said, "held an Eisteddfod the other day, and the lads entered into it with all the Welshman's keenness for musical competitions. It was held just behind the barn of our farm. We hired a tin-canny piano, and the singing went on until 10 p.m. Candles were lit and stuck on empty jam tins. The male voice competi- tion was especially good. The test pieces were 'Aberystwyth and Paham mae digter, O Myfanwy?' It was fine and yet wierd, because the darkness of the night was broken by the flashes of cannon and star shells, and the booming of the guns was incessant." Dairyman Bard's Success. Mr. William Roberts (Gwilym Ceiriog), Brooklyn House, Llangollen, has received an intimation that he is the winner of the prize of §100 offered at the International Exposi- tion Eisteddfod, held at San Francisco in July, for the best Cywydd (not over 300 lines) on the Pioneer." In 1913 Gwilym Ceiriog" won the chair and a money prize of ,9130 at the International Eisteddfod at Pitts- burg for a poem on Roger Williams, and two years earlier, in 1911, he was the chaired bard at the Welsh National Eisteddfod at Carmarthen, with an Adwl on King Edward VII. Prior to this, he carried off the better part of a dozen chairs for poetical composi- tions at the Eisteddfodau in Wales. lie was born about fifty-two years ago almost within a stone's thi-ow of Huw Morris and the famous Ceiriog in the GIYll Valley, and follows the calling of a dairyman. King Edward Memorial. A large volume has just been issued des- criptive of the third year's work of the King Edward VII. Welsh National Memorial Association. The council of the Association report that, great as have been the difficul- ties encountered in the task the Association set out to accomplish—the creation of an efficient organisation for the prevention, treatment and eradication of tuberculosis in Wales and Monmouthshire—the measure of success attained has been distinctly gratify- ing. In the completeness of the machinery thus rendered available for the treatment of sufferers from the dread disease Wales now occupies a position of pre-eminence. Prompt Treatment. At the end of March last the fund, in re- spect of promises and donations, totalled £ 217.326, of which Y.11,233 remained out- standing. At the same date no fewer than 20,505 persons, or one per cent. of the entire population of Wales and Monmouthshire, had been examined, treated, or rec-ommended for treatment at the institutes and visiting stations established by the Association. Of those examined 4,669 were recommended for treatment in hospitals and sanatoria, and that treatment was provided with all possible promptitude. Many Advanced Cases. In the district report dealing with the Flintshire and Denbighshire area Dr. Wm. E. Hopkins, acting tuberculosis physician, who is filling the place of Dr. E. L. Middle- ton, at present serving with His Majesty's forces, thanks the medical officers of health and the members of the medical profession in both counties for the generous help they have given him. He states that it is a mat- ter of serious consideration that many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis sent to the Asso- ciation are so advanced that treatment, I either institutional or otherwise, is in the majority of such cases only a palliative, and often is simply a means of prolonging life for only a short time. ) V Educational Results. I Fortunately there is a brighter side to this I in the fact that valuable educational results are slowly being obtained by treatment even ) of those hopeless cases in the institutions, both patients and their visitors on their re- turn home spreading the simple but vital truths that good plain feeding, cleanliness of house and of person, sunlight, clean air night and day, rest, etc., are the great essentials both in treatment and, above all, in preven- tion. Appeal to Medical Men In an appeal to his fellow medical men to assist him in finding the earlier cases, Dr. Hopkins suggested that they could help :—(1) By the detection of the cases in an earlier stage, pointing out that so-called colds," "influenzas," pneumonias," "pains in var- ious regions," diagnosed possibly as rheu- matic, etc., were on careful scrutiny simply acute manifestations of pulmonary tuber- culosis and its toxic effects, and, if accurately differentiated, would yield many earlier cases. (2) By the domiciliary visit, which could be made of very great educational value. In conclusion Dr. Hopkins refers to the formation of care committees for both counties, and to the effect of the war on the work in his area. Former Patients and the Army. In connection with the latter lie mentions that many patients who have been through the institutions have been accepted in the Army. But unfortunately the great strain, physically and otherwise, is too much for them, as lie has dealt with several who have broken down under it. He considers, there- fore, that it would be in the best interests of these patients not to accept them for mili- tary service. Grateful acknowledgment is made of the services of the staff at the Meadowslea Tuberculosis Hospital, Peny- ffordd, and of those of the tuberculosis sister for the two counties. Welsh National Monuments. The war has had its effect even upon the work of a body so far removed from modern events as the Royal Commission on Ancient Monuments in Wales and Monmoutlishirc. Commenting upon the Commission's contin- uance of the inspection of the monuments of Pembrokeshire, the sixth report, that for last year, remarks that much of the county lies within the military protected area, and the necessary restrictions upon the move- ments and occupations of civilians have slightly retarded the progress of the work of the Commission." A Big Task. During the year the Commission issued a volume on the ancient monuments of Den- bighshire, practically completed that dealing with those of Carmarthenshire, and Icom- pleted the inspection of the monuments of Merionethshire. They also finished the task of examining the tithe schedules and maps of the entire Principality. The latter under- taking involved the examination of hundreds of documents, many containing several thou- | sands of place names, mainly of fields, the discovery of the position of the field or 6ite upon the tithe map, and fTie location of the field or site on the modern six-inch ordnance sheet. Value of Place Names. The Commissioners declare that there can be no two opinions regarding the importance of farm and field names to the Welsh arelim- ologist. The fact that the Welsh place- names are being rapidly replaced by English names, so that the local lore which is often enshrined in the former is in danger of being lost, was in itself a sufficient reason for the undertaking. The results have more than justified the decision. There is hardly a parish, certainly not one of the ancient par- ishes, of the Principality whex-e the schedule of field names has not yielded some valuable results. Scores of small, but in some cases important, antiquities would have passed un- recorded had it not been for the clue to their presence given by the place-name. Preservation of Monuments. Continuing their policy of visiting the principal monuments, the Commissioners made special tours of inspection to the counties of Merioneth and Pembroke during last year, and they remark that they arc con- vinced that these visits had considerable effect in quickening the interest of residents, and in promoting the growth of local opinion in favour of the preservation, not merely of the large and notable monuments, but of those smaller and less imposing remains which are always in danger of removal or destruction.

CRUELTY CHARGE AT RHYL

CRUELTY CHARGE AT RHYL HORSES UNFIT FOR WORK. A case of considerable importance to owners of horses was heard at Rhyl on Thursday. The case first came before a special court on Tuesday within two hours of the horses being stopped, and it was ad. journed until Thursday. Evan Lloyd, driver, 46, Millbank Road, Rhyl, was charged on remand with cruelty to two horses by working them in an unfit state. Inspector Gladstone proved stopping the p 0 horses when they were attached to a laundry van, and about to undertake a journey to Colwyn Bay. He found two wounds on each of the horses' shoulders, and all had been blackened over. On three there was a slight skin, but the fourth wound was raw. The animals were totally unfit for work, and would not be in condition for ten days. The Bench fined defendant £ 2 and Y.1 Is. costs. Roger Worrall, laundry proprietor, was then charged with permitting the horses to be worked, and with failing to exercise proper care and attention. Giving evidence, Worrall said that other than casually looking at the horses to see that they were well fed, he did not examine them. He had four drivers and an ostler to look after nine horses, and he expected them to see that they were all right. The man Lloyd had the choice of nine horses when he took out the two in question. The Chairman (Mr. Perks) said the Bench had decided to dismiss the case, as there was no evidence that Mr. Worrall had direct control of the horses, but it was his personal view that if Mr. Worrall did not lofolc after the horses himself he should appoint some- one to do so. As the cases were proper ones to bring forward, the SDoietys' costs would be remitted.

HOLYWELL FAMILYS RECORD

HOLYWELL FAMILY'S RECORD. Four members of the family or Mr. Edwin Hughes, builder, etc., Whitford Street, IIolywcll, arc on war service. One son, ) Vet-clon, is in the Navy; Herbert and Evcrard on war service, and Evelyn, his daughter, is nursing.

In Lighter Vein

In Lighter Vein. As to the invaders wiping the Russians off the map—there is too much map. — Pitts- burg Dispatch." A British surgeon is authority for the statement that cases of incipient baldness have been checked by service in the trenches, and lie believes that the open-air life will cure baldness. This is one of the hair-rais- ing experiences at the front. Seattle Post- Intelligencer." 0 The claim that Shakespeare was a brewer seems to be effectively disposed of by the fact that he left little or no estate to his relatives. As a measure of economy for women a standard hat is suggested. But even if they adopted it the fair wearers would demand both a morning and evening edition of it.- Globe." A Canadian officer, describing General 0 Joffre, Bays" he looked to me exactly like an American politician." He omits, however, to mention the occasion on which the French generalissimo said he was too proud to fight. I —" Punch." An old negro was taken ill, and called for a doctor of his own colour. As he did not get better, he asked for a white doctor. Dr. White accordingly turned up, and asked the patient: Did your other doctor take your temper- ature?" I do' know, sah," answered the patient. I hasn't missed nothin' but my watch as yet."—" Passing Show." The Bishop of London tells the following story against himself. In his curate days he once asked a Sunday School class, Why did David wish to be a door-keeper in the House of the Lord?" The head boy answered with feeling: Because he could walk out- side while the sermon was being preached." —" Passing Show." The Last Straw. Visitor: How many times were you hit?" Tommy: "Only once, mum." Visitor (disappointed): "What! Only once?" Tommy: "Blimey, 'ow often did yer want me to be 'it—yer old cannerbal?"—The By- stander." No Equipment. "Why don't you become civilised?" asked the missionary. We're willing," replied the savage chief. "But we have no facilities for studying high explosives."—" Washington Star." zn Who said Benign ? And think of a torpedo boat being known as the B9.—"Washington Herald." Prerequisite. "Are you unmarried?" inquired the census man. Oh, dear, no," said the little lady, blush- ing; "I've never even been married." — Ladies' Home Journal." The Reason Why. The editor of a country newspaper always did his best to arouse the patriotism of his readers. One day a compositor came in from the composing room and planted himself be- fore him. "Well, sir," he said, "I have determined to enlist." With mingled sensations of pride and re- sponsibility the editor replied that, although sorry to part with such a good compositor, he was glad to see that lie felt the call of duty. Oli, it isn't that," answered the composi- tor; but I'd rather be shot than try to set any more of your copy 1" — Pearson's Weekly." Why It Is. Why do they call 'em fountain pens? I should say reservoir pen would be the better name. A reservoir contains liquids; a foun- tain throws 'em around." I think fountain pen is the proper name," said the party of the second part.—" Louis- ville Courier-Journal." 'Phone Frenzy. I believe," said the impatient man, as he put aside the telephone, that I'll go fish- ing." Didn't know you cared for fishing." I don't ordinarily. But it's the only chance I have of finding myself at the end of a line that isn't busy."—" Washington Star." N Recognised. Doctor, every time that I incline my body forward and extend my arms horizontally, giving them at the same time a circular mo- tion, I feel an acute pain in my left shoul- der." "But what necessity is there to make such ridiculous movements?" Pardon me, doctor; can you tell me any other wayto put on my coat?" "Mondo Umoristico." First Catch Your Hare." Two sunburnt, muddy, returned soldiers at Victoria Underground gazed at the "Mind Your Pockets warning of the District Rail- way authorities. Well, it would take two to pick my pockets at present," said one of them. "One to put it in. and the other to take it out."— Evening News."

Advertising

■ M I I? A Should WRITE TO-DAY ■ MM ■ ■ ■ enclosing Id. stamp for I mm VALUABLE BOOKLET, ? TESTIMONIALS and FREE SAMPLE of They arc unrivalled for all Ladies'Ailments, Ac. and speedily BLANCHARDS PILLS afford relief, and never fail to alleviate all suffering. Thev supersede l'ennyroya!, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple, &e. Sold iù boxe,.1. 14. bv ali Cheini, ts, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN. LTD. CHEMISTS. 34, DALSTON LANE. LOMBOK

FLINTSHIRE VOLUNTARY AID MILITARY HOSPITAL

FLINTSHIRE VOLUNTARY AID MILITARY HOSPITAL. (British Red Cross Society). An Appeal. The committee will be very glad if any of the following articles can be given or lent for the period of the war for the equipment of the hospital at Leeswood Hall, Mold Chairs, plain wooden or cane-seated. Easy chairs. Garden seats. Tables for the wards. Plates, jugs, dishes, teacups, etc. House linen of all kinds. Saucepans and other articles for use in tha- kitchen. Washstand ware. Games, both outdoor and indoor. Iron enamel jugs, pails, basins, etc., wilt: be most useful. Large fenders and sets of fire-irons. The smallest contribution will be most- gratefully revived, and should be sent to the- Red Cross Vice-President for the district, or to the Quartermaster, Miss Lloyd Parry,. Pont-y-Garrcg, Mold, to whom all inquiries- should be addressed.

II IOTHER WELSH CASUALTIES

--+; OTHER WELSH CASUALTIES. Roll of Honour. SECOND-LIEUT. BEANLAND (KILLED)- Second-Lieutenant Beanland, l/7th Royal Welch Fusiliers, Montgomeryshire and Mer- ionethshire Territorials, who has been killed on the Gallipoli Peninsula, was the son of the Rev. Joseph Beanland, Wilsden Vicar- age, Bradford. Lieutenant Beanland obtained his commis- sion in the 2/7th Royal Welch Fusiliers last September, but in about a month was trana- ferred to the Service regiment. CAPTAIN G. E. HARRIES (DIED OF" WOUNDS). Captain Guy E. Harries, of the l/7th Royat Welch Fusiliers (Montgomeryshire and Mer- ionethshire Territorials), has died of wounds.. Captain Harries was a son of Dr. Harries,. of Aberystwyth, a member of the Town Council of that place. Before the war he- had served three years as an engineering pupil in the Locomotive Works of the Cam- brian Railways at Oswestry. In April he patented a tripod for anti- aircraft guns, and demonstrated his inven- tion at the War Office, by whom it was takers over. SECOND LIEUTENANT A. GRANT (MISSING). In the casualty list of the 7th Royal Welch Fusiliers, in action in Gallipoli, it is now re- ported that among the missing is Second- Leutenant Albion Grant, the youngest son of Mr. James Grant, Llanidloes, estat& agent for Colonel David Davies, M.P. Lieutenant Grant is twenty-two years of age, and when war broke out he joined the Public Schools Battalion. He was later transferred to the 2/7th Battalion Royal Weleli Fusiliers, with the rank of second- lieutenant. He was attached to the 1st Bat- talion when it went on foreign service.

TRADE UNION MEETING AT HOLYWELL

TRADE UNION MEETING AT HOLYWELL. On Saturday evening at the New Hally. New Road, a meeting was held under the- auspices of the Dockers' and General Work- ers' Union, with which workpeople at the Holywell Textile Mills are associated. Mr. John Hughes presided. The Chairman briefly opened the meeting, and addresses were delivered. Mr. Isaiah Morgan said the one thing they had to keep in mind was that they should continue their membership in the Union, and keep up the interest in it if they were to get the best advantages out of it. As time went on the results would be' satisfactory. They could not get all they would like at onfe. He asked them to help. their officers to make a successful branch at Holywell, and the benefits would come in the end.—Mr. Skelton, the local organiser and secretary of the Union, speaking of the Union locally, remarked that there were those who boasted of obtaining benefits de- rived through the organisation without their being members of the Union. They had. better rates of pay at the local mills now,, and he claimed that that was due to the ad- vent of the Union and of organisation among; the workers. It was because of their being, organised that they now received war bonus. Those who were lukewarm to the Union were. not doing themselves and the cause any good, but were injuring themselves and those with whom they worked. They had to look to the future, and he could assure them that the' light of trades unionism in Holywell was coming out brighter, but the people required to broaden their outlook. Though they had a good number in the Union, there were a, number who preferred to sit on the fence." Why could not mills outside Lancashire be consistently loyal to the Union? He wanted them to have enthusiasm. They had to fight for what they got, and having got it they had to hold it. He counselled members to be loyal to one another.—Mr. Jas. Wignall, the national organiser, said there seemed a lack of enthusiasm among the workers as regards the Holywell branch. He had the question asked—What good can textile workers derive by becoming members of the Dockers' Union? They did not go to the workers—the workers came to them—and though they might not have known much about textile work, they knew the principle of wages, and a branch was formed, and they could now after twelve months look back and honestly say that no one was the worse off, but everyone had been benefited as a result of the Union. Since forming the Holywell branch they had re- ceived application to form a branch and or- ganis1 the workers in other flannel mills in Mid-Wales. Proceeding, the speaker said that if they kept up their membership they see they had done the right thing. At the conclusion a vote of thanks was accorded" to the Chairman and speakers.