Teitl Casgliad: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

git ROBERT WILLIAMS AND SONS, Limited, HAY.^>; QJ ft. FURNITURE DEPARTMENT. i LARGE VARIETY of Good (wS.) Household FURNITURE. .¡ Bedsteads and Bedding. Wire and Wool Mattresses. -u Carpets and Rugs. Mats and Linoleums. China and Glass. Earthenware. IROIMOGERY DEPARTMENT, LARGE SELECTION j of SPRING TOOLS. 1-. Guaranteed Quality and Exchanged if Faulty. Lawn Mowers. Garden Rollers. Flower Pots. Trellis Work. Tanned Netting. I AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENIs UP-TO-DATE STOCK. Ploughs, Harrows, Land Rollers, Corn Drills Churns, Butter Workers, Cream Separators, and all kinds 1 DAIRY UTENSILS. I A ° ALL GOODS MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES. J

STATE OF EMPLOYMENT INI CANADA

STATE OF EMPLOYMENT IN 'I CANADA. Interview with Mr. Sydney W. Pugh. Mr. Sydney W. Pugb, Canadian Government I special representative in Wales, has just re- turned to Adrian Court, Usk, after a visit to Winnipeg and other important Canadian centres. Interviewed by onr representative with refer- ence to present industrial and other conditions in Canada,and also in regard to the prospects for i the immediate future, Mr Pugh had some in- teresting statements to make. He entirely repudiated many of the assertions published in the Press of this country during the last few months in regard to unemployment in Canada. This, be said, bad been jprossly exaggerated and where the statements bad been accepted it r could only have been in consequence of an entire misapprehension of the conditions which prevail in Canada at certain seasons of the year, due to climatic conditions. In the Dominion, be said, there must for a portion of the winter be a certain amount of what might be described as seasonal" un- employment, during wbLh period a number of outdoor trades bad more or less to suspend operations. At the same time Mr Pugh pointed out that during the winter now ended a very considerable amount of building work was carried on right through the season, the men suffering no inconvenience in the form suggested. While such was the case in certain branches of outdoor activity, however, Mr Pugh said that there was no excuse for anything in the nature of poverty among the vast majority of the people; nor indeed was such in evidence. Wages in Canada were such that men should easily be able to save a considerable sum of mODey to tide the mover aifew weeks of enforced idleness which must haver been foreseen by them. Men, he added, who were earning from 50 to 70 cents, per hour for an eight hours day ought surely to be able to lay aside a good portion of this. Mr Pugh quite admitted, however, that this season there bad been an increase in unemploy- ment, due to the mouey stringency which was felt all over the world, but particularly in new countries such as Canada which are largely dependent upon borrowed money for their development. Thi# increase, however, did not amount to more than 10 per cent. over the figures of previous years, and the situation was J nothing like so severe as it was in 1907, from which the country rapidly recovered in the following year. I In every industrial centre in Canada, said Mr Pugh, one met with large numbers of men who had been engaged all during the summer at good I wages on the farms, who had money in their pockets, were unmarried men, and had gone I into the cities both on account of the social ¡ amenities which these presented, and in the hope, not particularly pronounced in many cases, of obtaining enough work to pay their I expenses during the winter and until agricul- tural operations opened again in the spring. Mr Pugh pointed out that the officiate of the Deparment of the Interior insisted on farmers giving their labourers a year's engagement at stated wages; but that in many cases the labourers themselves preferred to accept the summer's work only, at the higher rate of wages offered for such, in the expectation of securing I some other form of employment over the winter. At no time had the Government Employment Registers been devoid of vacancies for men who were willing to work. Right through the winter, when trade was allpged to be at its worst, every official Labour Bureau in the Dominion had vacancies on its books for men who were not .« forthcoming. This, said Mr Pugh, was a strik. ing commentary on the allegations of unemploy- ment that were circulated in this country from correspondents, usually anonymous. It i,as correq, < most remarkable, he added, that in no case coming under his notice had a single corres- II pondent referred to the unemployment much more pronounced which existed within a few hundred miles of the Canadian centres said to be so afflicted. Canada was made to appear the only place in the world where men were out of work. In regard to the future, Mr Pugh was thoroughly optimistic. The country, be said, I' would continue to develop and absorb as many r < emigrants of the right class as were willing to accept the offer it .extended to them. He f • guaranteed work at good wages to erery maa willing to go upon the land he could not do I I fc* v H more and be similarly guaranteed work at good I' wages to every young woman willing to enter domestic service. I Mr Pugh remarked that if was not gener ally I known that the Dominion Government did net end its beneficent efforts here. On the con- trary, its officials wers at all times at the service of any settler who felt that he was not being quite fairly treated, and the employer who was once found endeavouring to take advantage of a newcomer was not likely to be afforded an opportunity of repeating the performance. I To every man and woman willing to accept what Canada offered, and to make a genuine effort, Mr Pugh had not the slightest hesitancy in saying Test what the Dominion has in store." It was no good, he said, hoping for the best here let them go to Canada and get it.

Evening Schools

Evening Schools. The Evening Schools Snb Committee, after conference with the representatives of the teachers to discuss their objections to the Even- ing School Regulations, reported to the Brecon- shire Higher Education Committee on April 3rd last, and suggested a number of amendments, amongst others teing a propo?a! to introduce a saving clause to meet exceptional cases of attendance below the niiiiimum of the regulation. The committee could not seo their way to in- crease the remuneration of the teachers, and they were not satisfied that the decline in the number of students attending the classes at Ystradgynlais was due to "the removal of the organiser. organiser.

Advertising

s "Always Good Alike." Sold by BBECON J. Arnold, Grocer, 90, Waiton A. Hughes & Son, Booksellers, High Street S. H. Powell, 20, The Struet; W. Morris, 17, Bridge Street, Llanvasa. BRYNMAWR Daviea, Connop Stores. (Sole wholesale ageni). CB.ICKHOWELL/. J. Isaac, Emlyn Supply Stores, (Wholesale Agent). [ CWMDU Edwards, Grocer, Post Office. ¡ ERWOOD Stephens, Grocer, Post Office1 GLASBUEY-ON-WYE Price, Bridge Stores. HAY H. W. Gwatkin, 47, Lion Street, Whole. I' sale Agent Kedwards, Grocer, Broad Streel. LLANDOVERY: Nicholas, Che-nist, High LLETTY DAFYDD Jones, Grocer. '0 U' R I

R SMALL HOLDINGS j

-R_ < SMALL HOLDINGS. j ) Difficulties at Gray. At a meeting of the Breconsbire Small Holdings Committee hel3 ou March Slsfc, Mr W. S. Miller was elected chairman for the ensuing year, on the motion of Mr E. F. Cock- croft, seconded by Mr H. A, Christy. In the absence of Mr Miller, Mr Cookcrcf. ook the chair that day. The Clerk (Mr H. F. W. Harries) reported that he bad forwarded to the Board of Agri. culture the sobeme for the establishment of small holdings on the Glwydcaenewydd farm, ) Cray, and when doing so pointed oat that the committee, in deciding to proceed with the compolsory hiring order, were influenced to a great rxtent by a letter to thsm written by Mr T. Price, Tygwyn, Cray, stating that he had promised Mr Roberts, one of the Bonrd's inspectors, to take all the land and buildings not required by other smali holders also that the committee considered the action cf the inspector. Mr Robertp, ought to have been officially communicated through the Board to them, and that they fsbonld not learn of it throogh an applying small holder. Ho also pointed out that tbo Committee's difficulties were greaUy increased if applica- tions for, and undertakings to take op land for small holdings were directly dealt with by the Board, without any reference to the committee, who were, perhaps, the beet judges of the fit- ness of applicants and their capacity to farm the land to a profit and also of the proper allocation of tb& land among applicants for it. The Clerk added that op to the present bo had received no reply from the Board to that letter. A letter was also read frtim Mr T. Price, Tygwyn, Cray, stating that be bad agreed to take the land and buildings on Glwydcae- newydd and bad paid the compensation, and agreed to pay rent from September last, but complaining that he had not obtained possession of the house owing to a servant man who was employed by the late tenant refusing to qait. He bold the Council responsible for his stock should anything happen to them. The Clerk reported on this letter that he communicated with Mr D T Jeffreys, the solicitor to the owner, and informed him that the Committee expected vacant possession of the bonss at once. Mr Jeffreys promised to give the matter his immediate attention and on Feb. 24h he (the Clerk) wrota to Mr Price to that effect. Mr Price wrote liter tbat he Raw no signs d Glwydcaenewydd houso becoming vacant and if he did not have possession in a fortnight's time be would be bound to se!l his stock and leave the land farther that one dinner time when he was away from Glwydcaanewydd someone took two gates away and left the I place open. The Clerk- added that he hadnvritten again I to Mr Jeffreys calling attention to the alleged treepaS8 and the removal of the two gates. Fortber correspondence was read and it was ■ eventually resolved that the Clerk write to Mr I Price calling attention to the fact that field No. 1594 bad been hot to him and sot to another person named, that tbs Committee looked to him for payment of the rent also, if any stock of the other party were on the field, instracting him to remove at once and take proceedings if there was a further trespass. It was i.)iio resolved that if Mr Price gave up possession of the field and thera was a persis- tence on the other person's part in trespassing, the Committee would take proceedings. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE HARD. HEARTED? I A letter waa read from the Board of Agri- culture, with reference 6o tha conference be- tween Mr Baines, a Small Holdings Com- missioner, nod members of the committee, as to tbo repayment cf the sum of £ 19 4., com- pensation paid to the tenant of Esgaer Moel Uchaf farm, stating that Mr Baines reported that be had explained that the Board were de- battel by the terms of section 21 of the Act, from repaying any part of the compensation as expenses incurred in relation to the ac- quisition of land for small holdings, also that owing to the non submission of a soberao as requested by their letter of Oct. 6tb, 1910, the Boa?d were debarred from treating the com- pensation as a loaa incurred in carrying out the Schema confirmed by them. If such schema had been submitted to tliem, they would have been able to repay half of tbe compensation as an irrecoverable less in accordance with section 6 (4) of the Act, as was done in caso of l Gorwydd farm. In the ciroamstances it I appeared to the Board that the committee were responsible for tbA fact that no part of tbe compensation could be paid by the Board, and this being so they could not take any further action in the matter. The Cbrk adJEld that he replied to the Board saying that the points put before Mr Bgiaefl related to the question of initial ex- pennes generally and not to the particular CB66 of Esgaer Moel Uohaf. APPLICATIONS. II A letter was read from the Rev. D A Griffith, Garth, stating that is was tho wish of the parish Council • that Mrs Jane Williams, on whose behalf an application was received at the last meeting for a holding, should go to the landlord of Lletherda and now the landlord was willing to let her have the land, bat not so much as she wanted, and that the price was prohibitive. Mr Benjamin Davies informed the meeting that tbe landlord of Llethsrdu sod Mrs Williams bad come to terms. An application from Mr Morgan Watkins, Poet Office, Bronllys, for land near his boose was referred to a ooinraiitee consisting of Messrs J R Griffiths aud E F Cockcroft. There was also an application from Mr Albert Jones, Llacdewir'-cwm, and it was decided that the County Land Agent should write him asking if be could suggest land.

The Cure for indigestion

The Cure for indigestion. Young business man's story. Made well, strong, and fit by DR. CASSELL'S TABLETS. The certainty with which D:. Cissell's Tab- let* cure Iriigwtion and restore fitness is well 88hU in the case of Mr L Wehb u young business man, of Grosvecor Villas, Lawnswood Road, Wordealey, Stourbridge. He says -My food di,,i V.Vt, digest properly, aurl I suffered a lot with flatu- lence and headache. Another thing that troubled me greatly was that a sour flaid would rise in my tbroit hot and acrid. I triad all sorts of things recommended to me, but foand no relief at vlllwW in the end I got Dr. Ca83eH's Tablets. Tuey Mr. Webb, Stourbridge, pat me right iu It surprising short time, andlam r, now as well aad íi as anyone could wiab to be." Caro after car*?, even in the most severe eases, have proved Dr. Cassfli's Tablets to be the surest remedy ever devised for Nervous Breakdown, AnEenis, Debility, Sleeplessness, Nerve Pains, Heart Weakness, Kidney and Stomach Disorde rs, Children's Weakness, Spinal and -N- ervo Paralyt,a, General Vital Exbau,;tiou, Brain Fag, end all ran down conditions. Send 2d. to-day to Dr. Casaeil's Co., Ltd. (Box 418). Chester Road, Manchester, for a free sample, All Chemists sell Dr. Casaeil's Tablets at lOiJ., Is. IJd., and 2j. 9d.—the 2a. 9d. size being the 2 most economical.

No title

THE TELEPHONE ON* THE FARM.—A feature of life on the Canadian farm is the presence of the telephone, the value of which both for social and business purposes has long been rea)ised. It brings the mcst isolated homestead into touch with the most distant communities. The net earnings of the Manitoba Government tele phones for the month of January amounted to 31,254'73 dollars. For the two months since November 30th, 1913, the net earnings have been 70,378*87 doliap. In the condensed report recently issued toul revenue shown for the month of January amounts to 143.193'76 dollars. The expenses for the same period were 111,939 dollars, leaving the net balance as ab ye stated.

rG 0 L F

"♦r? G 0 L F. Llangamraarcb Wellq President's cup. Winner—Miss Mab&l Williams (Shrewsbury). Score 93 24 69 netfc. 4

EXHIBITION BUILDING IN i BRISTOL

EXHIBITION BUILDING IN BRISTOL. Expenditure of 9300,000 on Great Summer Fixture. On the 28th May the Bristol International Exhibition, which may easily be described as The Event of 1914 so far as the West of England is concerned, will open its gates at Ashton Avenue, Bristol. In fact, as a centre for amusement during this summer it will be without parallel, for it is one of the finest Exhibitions ever organised in the Provinces. It has been designed upon the same lines as the great exhibitions of London and the Continent, and will be thoroughly repre- sentative of home manufactures and com- J merce as well as of the industries of the Overseas Dominions. The exhibition grounds extend over an area of forty acres on the banks of the River Avon, with the magni- ficent Clifton Suspension Bridge and Leigh Woods in the background. The extensive grounds are studded with beautiful exhibit palaces. Although amusements of every suitable description will be provided in ample quanti- ties, education is the grand purpose of the whole enterprise, and from all parts of the globe have been gathered exhibits of the things of paramount interest to visitors. Art is displayed in a magnificent pavilion and illustrates what the artists of to-day are doing; manufactures are demonstrated by working exhibits of the processes and methods of production"; and mineral wealth and metallurgy are displayed in a very effective manner. Two days a week for two months Music Competitions upon a national scale will be held in the Concert Pavilion, tbe orchestra of which will accommodate 1,200 persons, while the auditorium will seat 4,000. Mr W. E. Fowler, L.R.A.M., is the competitions secretary, and Mr G. Herbert Riseley, L.R.A.M., the general music secretary. Choirs comprising a total of 15,000 voices have already entered and this number will probably be increased to 24,000 before the contests begin. The choirs are coming from all parts of the Kingdom and include the largest combinations. Dr. Charles Harriss and his Imperial Choir of 1,200 voices will come down from London on the 13th June to give a concert, and the hall will also be frequently used for special purposes—for instance, the National Brotherhood Move- ment will be holding its annual demonstra- tion there on the 31st May on the same lines and scale as last year's demonstration at the Crystal Palace. Flower shows, bird and poultry shows, and similar events will take place there when the competitions are over, Lavish arrangements have b4en made for the general scheme of music and a succession of the principal bands of His Majesty's Guards will play. The reconstruction of Bristol Castle which was destroyed by order of Oliver Cromwell, will be another striking feature of the Exhibition, and its interior will be as interesting as its exterior for it will contain a large collection of naval and military relics, in the formation of which several distinguished people-Lord Roberts sud Lord Methuen among them-are taking a personal interest, whilst their Majesties the King and (ueen have graciously promised to contribute valuable souvenirs to the col-i lection. About 2,000 people will take part in the Pageant of Bristol which will be produced upon Monday, the 22nd June, and each fol-' lowing evening until the 4th July. After the 4th July, the Pageant Ground will be available for all sorts of purposes. There will be firework carnivals twice a week, and i each Saturday evening a Military Tattoo a whole week will be devoted to the West of England Athletic Championships which will 1 include eliminating trials in connection with ♦- M V the Olympic Games, and will require four meetings. Another feature of this great Exhibition will be Shakespeare's England-Elizabethan houses, with a village green where Morris and Folk Dancing will take place, and a demonstration of old-fashioned sports, pastimes and dresses. There will also be a full-sized reproduction of Drake's flagship the Revenge." At the present moment 2,OCO men are at work erecting all the magnificent buildings, I upon which alone a sum of Y,6,000 is being spent. But altogether the total expenditure of the Exhibition Company, of which the general director is Mr Leolyn G. Hart, who had a great deal to do with the organisation of the Festival of Empire at the Crystal Palace in 1911, will be not less than £ 150,000 and the exhibitors may be expected to spend an equal amount. For the supply of electricity a guarantee for the consump- tion of at least XG,000 worth of current during the run of the Exhibition has been given by the Company to the City Electrical Department, who, on their side, are laying down cables through two-and-a-half miles of road at a cost of something like £ 8,000.

Advertising

_¡ I'I- ■■j" H ARCHER [if GOLDENRETURffS ,;tA» REGISTERED ZSfe- XI! ■ I Facsimile oj One-Ounce Packet. Archer's I The Perfection of Pipe Tobacco* Golden Returns S COOL, SWEET QD FRACR T.

BRECONSHIRE AGRICULTURE

BRECONSHIRE AGRICULTURE The Tale of Statistics. The Board of Agriculture have just issued their revised return of the agricultural statistics for England and Wales for 1913 These pretty well agree with the preliminary return of last autamn. The following particulars are given for Breconshire Total acreage under crops. 199,181, being a decrease as compared with 1912, when it was 200,521 acres. The acreage under permanent grass was 162,611, and in 1912 it was 1G1.697. Thece were 10,979 acres under oats in 1913, as compared with 11,259 acres in 1912. As regards live stock, there was a total of 12 732 horses in the county in 1913, a slight decrease as compared with 1912, when there were 12,807. There were 5.352 horses used for agricultural purposes in 1913 against 6,165 in 1912, an extraordinary decrease. The total number of cattle in the county in 1913 was 39,394 against 40,951 in 1912. In 1913 there were 484,949 sheep in Breconshire, while in 1912 there were 491,134. The return of produce of crops show that the total produce of wheat in Breconsbire for 1913 was 6,522 quarters, the yield per acre being 23'16 bushels, as compared with 20'97 bushels in 1912, and an average for the last ten years of 26'71 bushels. The total produce of barley was 8,291 quarters, the yield per acre being 20 29 bushels. 48,157 quarters of oats were produced in 1913 on an acreage of 10,131, the yield per acre being 38 03 bushe!?. There were no beans produced last year, and only three quarters of peas. There were 3,077 tons of potatoes grown on an acreage of 764, a yield (.f 40;: tons per acre. Turnips and swedes were produced as follows 62,896 tons on an acreige of 4 263, a I yield of 14 75 tons per acre. 10 212 tons of mangolds were produced, being a yield of 20 02 tons per acre, while 4,722 tons of hay were produced on 7,762 acres.

No title

BILLHEADS, Labels (Plain and Gammed), Price Lists, aui) every other kind 0; Busincse3 Printing and Stationery.—" County Times Office, Breoou. p.

BRECON BOARD OF GUARDIAtfS

BRECON BOARD OF GUARDIAtfS A Little Triumph for Loofil Government. Mr John Jones (vice-chairman) presided the fortnightly meeting of the Brecon Boar" Guardians, held on Thursday morning. O present were Miss Adelaide Williams, Philip Morgan, Archdeacon Bevan, the I T. Griffiths, A. E. Evans and H. J. CJjp- f Jones, Messrs E. T. Hyde, W. Morgan frynach), W. Parry, C. W. Best, J. F. John Jones (Llandefalle), John Jones l John James Williams, John Price, D. WatM J David Davies, Rees Williams, A. A. Mitcb I Edgar Morgan, W. C. Davies, Tom Morgan* I G. Dickinson, G. P. Jones, John Tho&\ 1 Jenkin Williams, with the clerk (Mr Molyo0 F. Thomas) and other officials. The total number of vagrants relieved dl1 the last fortnight both at the workhouse lodging-houses was 131, being a three as compared with the same period year. The Clerk stated that under the new Law Institutions Order there would be jj visitors' book, the Local Government thinking it unnecessary, if the House Comtoi'1^, met once a week or fortnight, to have visit0 j The new order came into operation on 1st, but they did cot appoint their Committee until tbe annual meeting. master's journal bad also been altered under order, and in fuure the master would repO every admission to the house, and all inmate? would have to be irterviewed by 1 House Committee. trsf, The Clerk read a letter from the Regis*1* General regretting that tbe Board opposed suggestion to divide the sub-division of Broo, 0 as a registration district of births and marriag on the resignation of Mr J. Moes, but he WOO tl not pres-i the matter further at this stage, 90 he enclosed forms for appointment. The Yice-chairman That is very satisfactor1 to us all, no doubt. to Mr Best Notwithstanding the regr (Liughter.) » The Vice-chairman Take no notice of 10 a It was decided to advertise the appointl118 and that it be made a month hence.

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL COUNt1

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL COUN't1 A Plea for Breconshire. Correspondents of tbe 'Daily Mail" been expressing their views as to which l8J0f most beautiful county in the favoured laud < ■ Britain. Mr Vincent Davies, formerly » ■ Erwood, now a resident in the Metropolis ■ in the following plea for Breconshire, was published in Friday's "Mail" 1l,Sir,—1 Bretherton is not the only one to be pitied. I apparently Mr Maddock also does not kno«*L | tbe beautiful scenery which exists in the H1' 9 county of Brecknock. The Mid-Wales sPgj are within easy reach of some of the views in the whole kingdom, and a particularA fine one, which is very little known, is to obtained by walking from the Erwood Stati?jj across the Wye Bridge, and then up the bill 0 locally known as the Twmpatb. From tblø elevation—it is about 35 minutes' walk-Yot, have a view of the Wye Valley below Yoof extending for many miles between grassy e well as wooded slopes. In the distance to the south are the Brecknock Beacons, and to j east the Black Mountains. Between these tbe view point lie greensward and woodland, & and dale of wonderful variety, probably most varied scenery it is possible to cram it, to space of equal area, while to the north over banks of the Wye, the ru^ge i rocks of Abere stand out in bold contrast to the peaceful vaIit below. There are many views in other rarts e the country which can hardly fail to delight 1 eye cf a lover of the beautiful." Bre Mining and

conshire Mining and Scholarships

> Scholarships. It was decided at a meeting of tbe Hi| Education Committee for Breconsbire, held g March 27th, that four scholarships, value the each, be offered this year, tenable at Glamorgan Summer Mining School.. j,fc It was also decided tp recommend that e'fb8 scholarships, value £ 3 each, be offered for t- 0 Welsh Summer School to be held at Brecoo August.