Teitl Casgliad: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
20 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
OLD COMRADES OF THE 24th o

OLD COMRADES OF THE 24th. o MEMORABLE GATHERING AT BRECON. -0- GRAND CHURCH PARADE. On Saturday evening the fifth annnal dinner I of the Old Comrades' Clob of the 24th Regiment Sooth Wales Borderers was held at I the Brecon Barracks, when an nnasaally large number of old comrades attended. It was a I memorable gathering in every respect- memorable for the presence of the last of the Rorke's Drift heroes, memorable also for the support of distinguished officers, including Major-General Paton, who gained his C.M.G. in the jillu War, and memorable also for the foundation of a new organisation intended to help veterans of the 21th who may fail on evil days. Prior to the dinner a meeting of the club was held, over which Major-General P^ton, C.M.G., hou. colonel of the regiment, presided. It was decided to bold the n dinner at Borden, at present the station of the 1st Battalion, and it was also decided to form an association to assist veterans of the 24th who may be in Deed. General Paton was re-elected president, Major Grant bon. treasurer, and Lieutenant and Quarter-Master R W Evans, Cardiff, secretary. Ex-Col.-Sergt. JGittens,andex-Qrt.- Mast. Sergt, G 0 Davies were ra-elected on the committee. I The Dinner. The dinner tock place in the Gymnasium at the Depot, and the room bad been most taste- fully decorated for the occasion by Col.-Sergt. Bruntnell and Qtr.-Mast. Sergt. Melsopp. It was draped in white and green, the colours of the regiment, while Btriking pictures of famous battles in which the regiment has figured, and portraits of well-known officers adorned the walls, while behind the bead table aa tbe famous picture of the Defence of Rorke's Drift, with the figures 24 on each side. The chair was taken by General Paton, and the other officers present were Col. Leach (commanding the 1st Battalion), Col. Lloyd, Col. du Travers, Col. Graham, Col. Trower, Major Walker, Major Grant, Major Gillespie t commanding Brecon Depot), Capt. Gwynne Thomas, M&jor A Sale, Lieut. Wilson, Capt. Lloyd, Lieut. Tippetts, Lieut, R P. Adams (Brynmawr), Lieut. and Qtr.-Master A Fry, Lieut. and Qtr.-Mast. R W Evans, Lieut. Tell, Capt. Taylor, Capt. Yates, Capt. Fowler, Lieut. Salmon, Capt. Barry, and Lieut. Monday. Sergt.-Major Shirley. Sergt. Major Marr, Sergt,- Major T Griffiths, Mr Ancliffe (bandmaster of the 1st Battalion), about 60 old comrades, a large pumber of the Permanent Staff at the Depot, and a few visitors made the company up to about 150. A flashlight photograph of the gathering waataken. The President gave The King," which was received in true military fashion, the band playing the National Anthem. CHILLIANWALLAH HERO'S MESSAGE AND A VOICE FROM IRELAND. ) Lieut. R. W. Evans, the secretary of the club, received a number of letters and tele- grams from old comrades regretting inability to attend. The first was from Drum-Major Harney, one of the Chillianwallah veterans, who, Mr Evans said, was at the dinner last year. He sent his good wishes to all, and hoped to be able to attend next year. (Ap. plause). In a letter written on March 31st last year, after his return home from the last dinner, Drum-Major Harney wrote that be read an account of the meeting in one paper, but there was one thing reported incorrectly, and that was that he joined the 24th 57 years ago, which would mean," added Harney, that I was Dot in the regiment at the Battle of Chillianwallah 64 years ago. I joined the regiment January, 1847." (Load applause and a Voice Quite a young fellow and laughter). Corpl. W. E. Balch also wrote, and Major Bourne Bent the followiog telegram Best wishes and good lock to you all. Ragret cannot be with you to-nigbt." He bad also received a telegram from 2988 Paddy Pearson, Dublin. (Applause). The President, who was cordially received, then proposed The Veterans of the 24tb Regiment." (Applause). He said be bad that pleasant privilege last year on the atftliver- sary of their dinner at Chatham. On that occasion those who were present at Chatham would remember bow excellently, charmingly well the dinner passed off everything passed I off thoroughly, as it had so far that evening. (Applause). He was very glad to say that since their last meeting very few of their old friends bad left them. That was a grand institution, that Old Comrades' Dinner. It brought together those who served in the regiment 50 years ago, and they talked over the old days with their friends and talked over the present days with those who were now serving and long might this continue. There was no doubt the Old Comrades' Dinner was going on excellently well. It was improving every time they met. It bad improved on that occasion, because another institution bad been started so as to aid those who bad left tbem. (Applause). It bad been started through the instrumentality of Col. Leach, who bad brought it to maturity, and others who were interested, and be hoped that by this time next year they would see it in sound going order. (Hear, hear). They knew the past history of the reoiment-(bear, bear) if they did not know it they ought to know it. (Laughter and applause). He would not say (because he bad the honour of being the honorary colonel of the regiment) that it was the finest in the service perhapti it was and perhaps it was not. He would say this, however: There was no regiment in the service which was a grander regiment than the 24th. (Load applause). They went back aud prided themselves upon being the regiment that was at Chillianwallah, Isandblwana, and Sorke's Drift, where hundreds laid down their lives for their regiment. (Loud applausr). They felt prood of those honours, and loog might they live to feel that pride. (Applause) They bad that evening gathered together in large nombers-tbey had a larger number of veterans than last jeir. He tboogbt tbty bad that evening-42 old veterans present last year they bad only about 80. The increase, only naturally, came about through their holding the dinner at Brecon, which was the head- quarters of the regiment, and where snob a large number of those who bad served in it had been spread about. It was only right that they should have one dinner at Brecon and the other at the station of the home battalion. Proceeding, the gallant colonel went on to refer to some of tt e old veterans. The first be mentioned was Col.-Sergt. Dooaghue, formerly of the 94tb R giment, who for many years was on the Peirra-tyaeat Staff of the 3rd Battalion, and who served in the Mutiny. These who served in the Zulu War were Col.-Sergt. Gittioa-(gpplau-,e),-Sergt. Care, S-Argt.- Major Hootton, Pte. Aikiu, Lee. Corpt. Kinp, and Qrt. Mast.-Sergt. Davies. (Applause). Now be came to the V.C. heroes of the regiment. (Loud applause). A PROUD BOAST-16 V.C.'s. No other regiment in the service bad ever had 16 holders of that glorious trophy-(Iond applause),-but the gallant 24th bad had that number. He was sotry to ray, however, there were only two remaining, but, he was glad that -tbey were present tfcat evening. He bad tbf- pleasure of meeting both at Newport. Ooe -was in the refrerobmellt room. (Loud laughter). It was Beil. (Applaua.). [At this stage Pte. Williams nr.d Pte. B. 11 stood up, and were accorded a magnifioent reception.] Proceeding, r the President said Ball got his V.C. at the Andaman Is'ands. His (the president's) dear old friend Sergeant Douglas was there he was in charge, and Bell was the only one living. (Cheers). The other V.C. man was John Williams. (Loud and prolonged cheering) He won his Victoria Cros at thp. memorable Rorke's Drift. (Loud Cheers). Having also referred to Pte Horlow and Col.-Sergt. Andrews, Gen. Paton continued that be was sorry to say that Qaarter Master Sergt. Letton, of the 24th; died in February last. Ha bad seen 36 years' service in the Regiment and held a meritorious medal, and had now two sons in the Regiment. Then there waa Corpl. McGreary, an old member who always took an interest in the doings of the Club. Ha thongbt the oldest officer of the Regiment was Major General de Berry, who lived at Rochdale, who was a very old man now, abcat 90 years of age. He wrote him some time ago and found that be still took a great interest in the Regiment. General Berry was in the Regiment long before be (the speaker) was, bat be went into the 12 b Regiment and if be bad not gone, he would have beeo in bis (General Paton's) place that day. Referring to the Committee who had carried oat the arrangements for the dinner. General Paton said Mr Evans the secretary, bad tak n the very greatest interest in the Old Comrades' Club and he was sore that they were ail pleased that quite recently he WI1", given a Ccmunasion as Lieutenant and Q iarter Master in the 5th Welsh Regiment (Applause). He was glad to say that Mr Evans would continue to ao5 as their secretary. The President went on to describe how the moveme nt was started to erect a memorial to the fallen in the Kaffir and Zala War, and which was unveiled quitb recently at Isandlwhans. I was 35 years ago that Isandlwbana and the ever to be remembered Rorke's Dfift took place, and 2 years ago Col. Travers, his good friend on the left, at a meeting at Pretoria. (-suggested, as the result of a visit paid by an officer to the scenes of the battle of Isandlwhana and the defence of Rorke's drift, that a memorial should be erected there, and this was decided upon. Col. Travers wrote and requested him (General Patofi) to take it up. Needless to say be was only too glad to do it, so he arranged for a committee composed of officers of the 1st and 2nd Battalions and they met in London. Tnere they weat into the matter and settled upon a man all of them knew, and who had lately commanded that Depot, Major Smith, to take it up. Major Smith he was glad to Ray, had now been promoted to be Lieutenant. Colonel Commanding the lOih Lincolnshire Regiment and be thoroughly deserved his reward. (Applause). Ha (the President) had had a great deal of correspondence with Col. Smith and be kn&w his worth very well. Col. Smith started the work and the sum of X401 16s. 4J. was collected for the erection of the memorial. (Applause). DESCRIPTION OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN MEMORIAL. The design was agreed upon, the upper part to be composed of marble and the lower of freestone. Unfortunately during this period the 2ud Battalion were removed from South Africa to China with the resalt that Col. Ciarke took the whole matter op, and every. thing was arranged for Sir Reginald Hart, the Commander-io cbief in South Africa to unveil the memorial and the Bishop of Zululand to perform the cousecratiou ceremony, on the 35th anniversary of Isandlwbaua and Rorke's Drift. Unfortunately martial law was pro- claimed in the Transvaal and General Hart was unable to carry Gut the duty then. It was left tu Col. Ciarke to carry out the arrange- ments as best be could, and on March 4tb last the memorial was unveiled. There were about 100 ZalOR present and a speech was delivered in boe Zola language. On one side of the memorial wan a bronze plate made at the Army and Navy btores and bearing the following inscription :—"Erected to the memory of 22 officers aud 590 N.C.O's and men of the 2ad Battalion of the 24th Regiment who fell in action on the field of Isandlwhana on January 22od, 1879 and in defence of Rorke's Drift on 22nd and 23rd January 1879. Erected by their comrades past aud present Anno 1913." Oa the other three side3 were a wreath, the Sphinx and the crown respectively. Oat of the sum they collected there was a balance of Elg 16s. 8(3. in hand. (Applause). That excellent good man (Col. Smith) bad done a great deal of work iu oonnection with the memorial and now he was about to devote that money to bring out a pamphlet concerning the memorial, and every subscriber would receive a copy as well as a balance sheet. He (the President) received a letter from General Hart stating that be much appreciated the honour of doing that little aot for the 24tib Regiment and trusted that it had been carried out to the satisfaction of the Regiment. (Hear, bear). In conclusion the President asked the company to join him in wishing long life and happiness to the Veterans. (Applause). The toast was received with the utmost enthusiasm. Col. Sirgt. Andrews, Lydbrook, responded and thanked the company for the way in which they had received the toast. He could assure them on behalf of the Vetsrans that they felt very grateful and proud of the Old Comrades Association which was improving year after year. (Hear, hear). The success of the gal bering was due to a very large extent to the interest which tho officers past and present took in the movement. (Hear, hear). That re union gave them as old comrades an opportunity of keeping in touch with the old Regiment, and be felt glad that a movement bad been started to assist the veterans who were in distress. (Applause). He was proad that he bad joined the 24th Regtment-(applaose)-and he was quite sure everyone eIge who bad joined would say that there was not a better or nobler Regiment in the service. (Applause); There was no Regiment whose officers took more interest in the welfare of the men and the Regiment in general than their officers did. (Cheers) He know Col. Leach years and years ago; be"bad served under him when he was a Captain of the 2nd Battalion, be was a thorough soldier. (Applause). Col. Lmch was there that evening, and showed that be took a keen interest in them. (Applause). Col Trower, in proposing The Regiment," coupled with the name of their excellent friend and comrade Col Leach—(applause)—said it was very interesting for them to come to Brecon, which was the starting point of the regiment from there many of them bad gone forth and attained high ranks. They had now gathered there from all parts of the kingdom and they joined ander one flag to cele- brate their reunin. HAPPY RELATIONS WITH BRECON. They always had kindness acd hospitality shown them in Brecon and county and he hoped the feeling would long continue. So long as they could get such excellent and sturdy sons from South Wales to act under the colours they could always look to the high name of the Regiment being kept up in the fuinre as ID the past. (Applause.) 80 long also as the 1st Battalion was in the excellent bands cf Col. Leach its high tradition wdald be main. tained. (Applause). He specially thanked Col. Leach for allowit g the excellent band to

OLD COMRADES OF THE 24th o

attend that dinner-(applause)-and be could assure him that the people of the town and neighbourhood were delighted to bear it. (Applanse). The toast was received with musical honours and the singing of "For be's a jolly good fellow." Col. Laach said that in responding to the toast of the Regiment" on that occasion be felt he had a peculiarly difficult task, as be bad jasfe snccesded one of the most popular com- manding officers which the Regiment ever had. (Applause). He was bound, however, to say that be did not feel on altogether unfamiliar soil, as be was breathing his native air. (Applause). Whenever he got through the Severn Tunnel he seemed to feel a different sort of man altogether. (Laughter and applause). It was only natural. Proceeding, Col. Leach said that when he talked of the Regiment be referred to the whole of the Regiment and if Col. Casson was only present he would throw the reponsibility upon him, because be was senior to bim. But be wax far away at Tientsin and would shortly pro. ceed to Singapore. With rpgard to Singapora, be was there for two years and he could only hope that Col. Casson would find a change there. They would all agree with him that they bad a great reputation to keep up as a Regiment. When recruits joined the 1st Battalion, it was the custom for the com- manding officer to say a few words to them of the great reputation of the Regiment. But they must not live on that renotation. (Loud Applause). Last year the 1st battalion took part in the army matKeavfes and they had about six weeks of very strenuous time; be did not recaecaber anything having been so stiff. 1ST BATTALION'S FINE FEAT. They marobed50 miles in 30 boars-(loud applause)-and during those thirty hoars all they bad was eome sodden bread-and butter and a cap of tea. Daring that march not one of the 24th Regiment fell out. (Loud cheers). There were only two other battalions, namely the Seafortb Highlanders and the Berkshire Regiment, who had no men to fall out. (Renewed cheering). They would be glad to bear that they bad bad a revival of boxing in the 1st Battiiion. Unfortunately during the last three years boxing seemed to have fallen off. Since they had baen et Borden, however, they had had tournaments -and they bad won the toornament. (Applause). With regard to the 2nd Battalion, be received letters from Col. Casson and the only thing that (iould be recorded was that the battalion rugby team went over to Shanghai to play the team there. The Shanghai team bad an adbeateo record, but the 2nd Battalion defeated them by 38 points to nil. (Loud cheering). He thanked Col. Trower for the kind wor4s be bad said coooerning the Regiment. Perhaps the words on the menu card, taken from ao account of the defence of Rorke's Drift, were very appro- priate for that occasion. The words were: The yoong soldiers backed each other up and fought splendidly; they never wavered for an instant, and glorioasly upheld the traditions of the old 24th Regiment." (Laod cheers). In conclusioa be appealed to the veterans, when ithey returned to their respective districts, to assist them io recroiting. (Applause). Major Gillespie (commanding the Brecon Depot) proposed" the committee," and said that the success of the evening was due to Capt. Gwynne Thomas—(Applause)—who car. ried oat the greater part of the work and bad the trouble of the arrangements. The dinner was catered by Sorgt.-Cook diles-(App-lause) —and be hoped that it was to their satisfaction. (Hear, hear). Sergt.-Major Marr responded, and referred to the trouble taken by Col. Sergt. Bruntnell and Qc.-Mr. Sargt. Melsopp to arrange the decorations. He also said that all the men on the staff at the Depot had voluntear^d their services. (Applause). The proceedings concluded with Hen wlad fy Nhadau." "Auld Lang Syne," and God Save the King." Daring the evening tbe band of the 1st Battn. played excellent music and there were frequent calls for encores. The Church Parade. On Sandav there was a grand church parade I of the old Veterans. They assembled at the barrackn at 10 15 and beaded by the band of the 1st Battn.—the drams and fifes playing for the maroh-walked in procession to the Priory Church. There were about a hundreJ old veterans, officers, and members of the per. manent staff at the Depot present, as well as a very large on*m ber of the local Territorial Corps. Tbe streets were lined by hundreds of people, and hardly ever has the town presented suoh an animated appearance. There was a huge congregation in the church. The service was an animated appearance. There was a huge congregation in the church. The service was intoned by the Rav E. E. Davies, while Arch- I deacon Bevan read the lessons and preached. Taking the opening words of the anthem rendered by the choir, namely "Now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that Blept," as his text, Archdeacon Bevan said that from east, west, north and south bad passed the message of their anthem and the message of St. Paul. It was the news of the great victory it was the solving of the great perplexity, and it was the tidings that the last stronghold of the enemy had fallen. So on Easter day the Church most rejoice. Proceeding the Archdeacon said "All our hopes for the comrades who have teen laid to rest hare at home, out yonder on tbe battle field lie in tbe promise of immortality by Jesns Christ rising from the dead. There are those happily here who have persevered when every- m 4 thing seemed dark and hopeless ontil their perseverance was rewarded by the victory, and their darkness bad been turned into a glotioas triumph." Uttering a word of coansel, the ptaacher said that if they lived unmanly, Iselfishly, and indifferently to the higher calls of the spirit they were not witnesses of the resurrection, they were making themselves living contraditions of that which actually hap- pened on Easter Day. Easter Day taught them that the victory over the lower things would be theirs if they woald only trample them down. The service concluded with the National Anthem. ———*———

Advertising

THE N taNut BBBafIt c S RALEIGH § | THE FILL-3TEEL EKYgLE S 1 is the bicycie for pleasure or business.. j |T ing 1 is the bicycie for pleasure or business.. j |T jj Its perfection of running makes cycling g \_As~ 1 £ for everyone a real and permanent joy. | jT jwl F 13 Fitted with Dunlop tyres, Brooks' saddle and | v( J fM t |j the Sturmey-Archer 3-speed gear, the Raleigh r & JR enables you to g; { ft jj ———J- 1 enjoy the glories | V 7?P1j IT 0 X *!T x °f &e country, g Qs a 3^ For there is co I I § □j *■ ^7^ exPense or trPub!e | jj it ic S that is built in 1 Li the greatest cycle P.j I factory m ail h'' !the world, the bicycle that is ^^4, GUARANTEED FOR EVER 0A & 13 few 10 Your holiday will be perfect on a Ralsjgh. I 8 No trouble, no expense and no exertion. Sc fj8 From £ 5 19s. 6d., or 9/4 per month. 1.1 pL Seed P.C. for the" Book of the Raleigh.' | « —E I B BRECON—Meredith & Sons, *'] i | ft High Street. Yf h I 1 1 BUIIiTH WELLS — Evan //f fj \f Jarman. I jnj 'pc || J lS CLYDACH—Will Jonas. WI ^§//i CRICKHOWELL—P.Wilks, NOT'TING'^ VtWSI N High St. "Cyclic for H -i'l and mx-x.j.MWigM.. mi I a TALGARTH—F.T. Morgan. '°'J 1 Pf T I W Ra:el jh Asen s ol Depots. i'rt |*g

jSergeants Mess Smoker

Sergeants' Mess Smoker. On Monday night the Warrant OffieeTS -and Sergeants of the Brecon Depot gave a smoking concert to the old comrades at the Sergeants' Mess. There was a large attendance, over which Sergt.-Major Marr presided, and the officers present were Col. Trower, Col. Travers, Major Giilespie (commanding the Depot), Capt. 1 Yates, Capt. Gwynne Thomas, Capt. Lloyd, Capt. Fowler, Lieut. Barry, Mr Tippetts, Mr Ancliffe, and Sergt.-Major Shirley. The loyal toast, given from the cha,ir, was enthusiastically received. The President, in proposing the health of the old comrades, said they bad entertained them for the last few days, and hoped they bad enjoyed tbc-mielv", just as they bad in the old days in their messes. He asked the company to drink "Long life, happiness, and prosperity to the old comrades." (Applause). The toast was warmly received. Ex Q r.-Maat.-Sergt. G. O. Davies responded, and rt-ferred to the kindness shown the old comrades on all occasions when they came to Brecon. He always felt a certain amonnt of sadness coupled with joy when attending those gatherings. He thanked them all for the kindness and hospitality extended to the old veterans daring the re-union. (Applause). The President gave the toast of the Officers Past and Present." He thanked the officers who attended that evening for their kindness in being present It bad considerably helped them in the carrying out of their duty. (Hear, hear). The toast was received with musical honours and the singing of For they are jolly good fellows." Col. Trower, in reply, said be was sore be could speak for all the officers in expressing their thanks for the excellent songs and recit- ations they had listened to. (Applause). They could not imagine, those of them who were still serving, what a pleasure it was for those who were on the -shelf like bimsalf-(Iaughter) —to be present at those gatherings and ecjoy a little bit of regimental life without feeling oneself a nuisance. (Laughter and applause). He thanked them all for the reception they gave -them. It was always a great pleasure for him to come to Brecon, wbare he bad spent so many happy years. (Applause). CoL Travers also replied and said be did not quite know the position he ocoupied. He bad left tbe Regiment, but he had not left active service yet. (Applause). He only hoped that be might go on yet farther. (Hear, hear). It was also one of the highest hopes of his life, if he rose sufficiently in rank, that be might yet be connected officially with the old Regi. msnt again. (Applause). It was a great pleasure for. him to come down to Brecou to see them year by year, and be agreed with Col. Trower that it helped them along. It had been said that all the officers took a deiight in the men. That had been shown by the !t"ge number of old comrades who met together. Since the early days when he joined the 24th Regiment-be thought he was one of the last to join the Regiment as it was then known (the 24th Regiment), and before it became the South Wales Borderers—it had always been inculcated into him that one must try to look after the men. (Applause). He thought the officers took a great interest in the men. He often met some old soldiers of the regiment at Cardiff, and he had been able to help them aloog and he would always try to do so. (Applause). In conclusion, he said it gave him extreme pleasure to be present that evening. He bad really been quite surprised to bear the excellent singing he never expected to bear; such bigh-clasn music. (Applause). During the evening an excellent programme: of music, recitations, etc., waa gone through,, among those who took part being Messrs C. Price, Evan Evans, W. T. Jone's, Gwilym Jones, Gifford, Charles Ancliffe, A Williamp, and Loe.-Corpi. Williams. At the close Mr G. O. Davies proposed a vote of thanks to the artistes, and Mr Ancliffe responded. The arrangement were carried oat in a capable manner by the President of the Sports Club of the Mess (Col.-Sergt. Spooner), who was assisted by Col.-Sergt. Harris.

1st Battalion Bands Recruiting Tour

1st Battalion Band's Recruiting Tour. The band of the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, who are making a recruiting tour through parts of Glamorgan and Monmouth- shire, arrived at Brecon by the 8 30 p.m. Brecon and Merthyr train on Thursday night. A large number of the inhabitants met the.,n at the station, indulging the hope-unauthorised by the published programme—that they would play to the barracks, but were disappointed. Good Friday WS8 observed as a day of rest," the actual programme commencing on Saturday afternoon, when the band gave an excellent per- formance on the Bulwark, opposite the Welling- ton Hotel. There was a huge gathering of inhabitants and visitors. The band, which was conducted by Mr Charles Ancliffe, played the following selections :-March, "Army and Marine" (Zehle) overture, "Poet and Peasant (Suppe) selection, ''Reminiscences of Gounod," arranged by Godffrey waltz, Night of Glad. ness," Ancliffe A Lancashire Ramble" (Arthur); Barcarolle (Offenbach), and the introduction of the 3rd act of "Lohengrin" (Wagner). The programme concluded with Hen Wad fy Nhadau," Men of Harlech," and God save the King." In the evening at 6-30 the drums beat the retreat, and the inspiriting scene attracted a very large number of people. The drummers were under the charge of Drum-Major Davies, and their smartness and precision were the subject of much comment. They were inspected by Gen. Paton, who was accompanied by Col. Leach, and the former expressed great satisfac- tion at the manner in which they went through their work. On Sunday afternoon the band gave another excellent promenade concert on the Barracks Square before a crowd of about 3,000 people. Many of the county gentry, who had been in- vited by the officers, were present. The band gave the following items, under the conductor- ship of Mr Ancliffe :—March, "Europe United" (Zehle), overture, "Maritana" (Wallace), tone poem, "Finlandia" (Sibelius), "Songs of the Bell" (Tburloan), and "Homage March" by Grieg. Afterwards they played two or three extras." Oc Monday morning the third and last pro. menade concert took place on the Captains' Walk and was listened to by a very large con. course of people. A delightful programme was made up as follows March, Old Comrades overture, "Miretia" (Gounod); "Ragtime Re. vue"; Smiles, then Kisses" (Ancliffe); Quaker Girl (Monckton); Elso Siludo (Ancliffe); "Night of Gladness" (Ancliffe); and Girl on the Film (Kolo) In the evening the drums beat the retreat again before a huge crowd and subsequently the fife and drum band gave excellent selections on the Barracks Square. On Tuesday morning the band proceeded by the 7 45 a.m. train to Brynmawr to continue their recruiting tour. They were accompanied by Capt. Gwynne Thomas, the recruiting officer' at the Depot, Brecon.

WHERE BRIAR PIPES COME FROM

WHERE BRIAR PIPES COME FROM. The briar pipe industry of France is for all practical purposes centred in the small town of St. Claude, in the Department of the Jura, where not only pipes, but cigarette and cigar-holders and other kindred necessi- ties of the smoking world are manufactured. The principal sources of supply from which French manufacturers obtain the briar roots are, in order of importance-, Sicily, Calabria. Corsica, and of late years Algeria. In the three first-named countries there exist rocky soil conditions, and the root therefore par- takes of a corresponding hardness, but in Al- geria the sandy soil gives a soft and spongy root. A small quantity is also obtained frof the French Departments of the Var, p-rc- nees Orientales, and the Alpes larititnes. These roots, fashioned into rough blocks, con- taining sufficient wood to make one Pipe, are sold at from 15s. to El 13s. per gross of twelve dozen.

POPLARS AND THEIR LEAVES

POPLARS AND THEIR LEAVES. The commonest kinds of poplar trees are the aspen, the white poplar, and the black poplar, and there is a marked difference in the leaves of the three. The characteristic movement of the leaves of poplars is most, pronolln,ced and continuous in the aspen. To "tremble like an aspen leaf" has become pro- verbial. The leaves of the white poplar arc much less mobile than those of the aspen and without their swing. The leaves cf the black poplar are variable in form, particularly at the lower end, where they may be rounded or wedge-shaped. Otherwise the general o-utline is triangular with long drawn-out 'r:p point.

A FISH THAT BEFRIENDS JAi

A FISH THAT BEFRIENDS :JA'i. In the South Seas there dwells a fish that, from its many bright colours, hears the popu- lar name of the parrot-fish. It seems to have but one end iu life, and that is to prevent the growth of coral i-eefw. Thus it well deserves to be called the friend of man, for these below-the-sea reefs would, were their exten- sion not checked, prove a source of danger to the numerous ships that plough the Pacific. These Pretty Po!l fishes break up the neW coral with their strong tedh-in a f-ense actu- ally feeding upon it. for they digest the- animal matter which it happens to contain- It must not be supposed, however, says a con- temporary, that the fish is aware" of the good it is doinrT. Tlm would be ab-uird. Still, it is a fact that the creature's habit makes, for' safety so far as ships and sailors are- concerned.

CHINESE COOKING

CHINESE COOKING. Chinese cooking has for its general basis- chicken broth, cr poultry jelly, and red sauce. The latter accompanies nearly all the dishes; it is a kind of dissolved meal, jelly flavouredi with pimento and coriander. As butcher s- meat, pork and mutton are almost exclusively eaten; horse and camel-meat, however, may be found at Pekin. The dog-meat which enters into the nourishment of the Chinese is obtained from a special race, raised for that purpose, of which the characteristic is the colour of its tongue. That organ should be of a blue-black colour, which exists in no other canine race. These dogs are fed on milk and rice for about two months, until they weigh from 1,000 to 1,500 grammes. The num- ber of edible dogs eaten annually in China is estimated at 5,000,000.;

INSIDE CLEOPATRAS NEEDLE

INSIDE CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, Few of the many thousands who dai-iy pas Cleopatra's Needle on the Thames Embank- ment know of the exceedingly miscellaneous collection of articles which was placed in the cavity in the base of the obelisk on its. erec- tion. The list included: Some pipes. Caee of cigars. A hilling razor. A London Directory. Jars of Doulton ware. Standard foot and pound. Portrait of Queen Victoria. Specimens of wire rope and submarine cables. Baby's feeding-bottle and children's toys- Standard gauge of 1,000th part of an inch- Copies of daily and illustrated newspapers- A hydraulic jack, as used in raisina the- obelisk. ° Bronze model of the obelisk, jin. scale to. the foot. Photographs of twelve beautiful English- women of the day. 0 Box of hairpins and sundry articles of feminine adornment. Complete set of British coinage, including an Empress of India rupee. Parchment copy of Dr. Bircih's translation of the obelisk's hieroglyphics. A fragment of the obelisk itself, chippy from it in the process of levelling the hhsc. BIbles in French and English, the Hebrew Pentateuch, the Arabic Genesis, and a trans- lation into 215 languages of the sixteenth rerse of the third chapter of S*. John's Gospel-

PAINS AFTER MEALS

PAINS AFTER MEALS. If your digestive organs are in a sound and healthy condition, if they are extracting nourishment from the food you eat, there ought to be no sign of pain or discomfort. But to-day thousands are afraid to eat because of the p&ins that follow even a light meal of good and whole- some food. Possibly the stomach is out of order, the liver a little sluggish, or the bowels constipated. Get them into a state of healthy activity by taking Mother Seigel's Syrup, and you will be able to eat without any painful after effects. Your food will be well digested. You won't know it is being digested, and that, after all, is the best test of good digestion-not to know about it. Thirty drops of Mother Seigel's Syrup, taken after meals, have helped tens of thousands to enjoy their food, and enabled them to avoid the pains and miseries of indigestion.

St Davids Society in the Argentine

St. David's Society in the Argentine. A Welshman settled at Parana, Entre Rios, Argentine, writes Thoaejrom the land of Leeks" who are to be found making up a part of the British com- munity in Argentine are slow to forget Cambria, no matter how far removed they are from her. The call of the mountain and river of the tight little Principality is not unheeded by her sons, and they respond no matter where they are. Can a Welshman forget the beautiful homeland? In all parts of the world—for the Celt is as a great wanderer as the Teuton-small bands of men from Gwynedd and PowJS join together to honour the homeland and to find pleasure in their own folk. I This is what the Welsh community of Argentina is attempting to do to-day. They wish to have a society that will in every way be a fitting branch of the great parent society of St. Dat id's. Such a Society has been in existence for two years, but little has been done Deyond holding an annual banquet, where leeks form the principal dish. This year the annual gathering took place at the Trianon Hotel, Buenos Aires, and amongst other things suggested a St. David's Lodge of Freemasons with a view to bringing together the sons of Walia in Argentine. But more than an annual banquet is wanted and there is no reason why a strong branch of the Society should not be formed in Argentina. The Chairman, speaking at the gathering said :—"We Welsh. men feel bound to preserve our integrity and broaden our own society. We want to make an appeal to all Welshmen in Argentina and are certain that every son of Cambria who bears the appeal will heartily and promptly respond. At present there are only thirty members in the Society. The paucity of members is not owing to lack of enthusiasm. Every Welshman is enthusiactic where his country is concerned, but we now feel the need for a large and represent- ative society as never before aDd we feel sure that such can be formed." Another red-hearted Welshman, Mr Erasmus Jones, endorsed the opinions expressed by the Chairman and went on to say be would like to see the Buenos Aires society affiliated to one of the great Welsh branches, preferably to the Honorably Society x>f Cymmrodorion, of which he is the sole surviving founder member. He wished to see a gathering at the end of the month that will do credit to Wales, and t6 the community of which they formed a great part.

UNCERTIFICATED TEACHERS

UNCERTIFICATED TEACHERS. What the New Scale will Cost. At a meeting of the Staffing and Salaries Committee of the Brecoasbire Education Authority held on April 3rd, the Secretary (Mr A. Leonard) reported tbat the cost of the pro- posed alteration in the scale of salaries for un- certificated teachers as defined in the minutes of the last meeting:, would amoant to £ 200 in the first year, X350 in the necond year and X400 in subsequent vears. This eum included an increase of JE2 103 to other teachers, who were in there first year, to bring them to the minimum of the revised scale. Mr W. S. Miller stated that his proposal was not intended to include an immediate increase for teachers in their first year and that the increased minimum would apply to new teachers only. After considerable discussion it wasagreed that the increased minimum would apply to new teachers only that teachers with from 5 to 9 years' service should receive the minimum increase of X2 10, with subsequent increases to take them to the mqximum and that the teachers with 10 to 14 years' service should receive an immediate increase of R5. The Secretary stated that on this basis the cost of tbe scale would work out as follows:- 1st year 160, 2nd year X300, and subsequent year3 X400. It was resolved that a special sub committee consisting of the chairman (Archdeacon Be ilan), Messrs D, Powell, W. S. Miller, Cooway Lloyd, and Principal Lewis be appointed to consider the whole question of payment of salaries of teachers during sickness.

Advertising

BALL PROGRAMMES.-Th, dominant note in ball programmes jast now is restraint in deooration. There is a set of new styles a the "Brecon County Time," Office which emphasises this excellent taste.

WORK IN THE GARDEN

WORK IN THE GARDEN. BY AN F.R.H.S. DRAFTING FRUIT TREES. Preparations for grafting should have been started several weeks before this by heading down the stocks to within three or four inches of the place where the graft is to be made. The scions should also be cut weeks in advance, and unless shoots suitable in this and other respects can be obtained grafting had better be left till next year in the case of stone fruit. Apples in the less forward dis- tricts can, however, be grafted up to the middle of May. Grafting is done for several reasons; it may be that the trees are unsuitable sorts, and that their branches are cankered. In either case, if suitable scions are properly grafted on a very big improvement may be expected. Then, again, tender varieties may be unsuitable for growing on their own roots ir certain districts; but if grafted on to healthy stocks they will flourish and bear fruit. The most satisfactory and. I suppose, the best-known graft is that called the tongue graft (see Fig. 1 of sketch). The success of this method depends upon the good fit of the stock and scion, and the cuts must, therefore. be very even. Probably the stock will be wider than the i,scion; if so. take care to get one outer edge of both in exact contact, so 1. A Tongue Graft. S. Crown or Rind Graft. that the cambium, or growing part jii.;zt uiifl^r the bark, may meet in both. The union is then bound with worsted or mffia. and covered over with grafting wax or clay. The other method which I am illustrating is the crown or rind graft. This is adopted when the stock has had to be headed down very severely. If scions about six inches long are. used they should have a tapering slice re- moved from about a third of their length. A shoulder is left at the top of the cut, so as to enable the inside of the scion to project a little over the stock, as shown in the sketch. Beforehand a slit is made in the bark of the stock, and this is worked away from the wood by a piece of hard wood or bone to make room for the scions. When complete the whole is bound np, and is then covered with grafting wax or clay. If the latter is used. see thnt it is well worked, and it will be improved bT beating it up with short hay or cow (Illpg. I have found it a good plan to tie over the clay a little damp moss, which prevents cracking. PRESENT TREATMENT OF FERNS. Old fronds of hardy outdoor ferns are best left on the roots throughout the winter. But they may be cut away now, and a top-dress- ing or mulch of leaf soil, short manure, or any fresh soil or vegetable matter laid about them will do them great good. With respect to those ferns grown in the greenhouse, if there has been enough warmth to keep them green all the winter, any old decaying fronds may now be cut away, and if the pots seem too small shift into larger ones, using a compost of turfy loam. leaf soil, peat, and sand for that purpose. Where in a cold house the ferns have been at rest all the winter, these should be got into light, be trimmed up, have some of the old surface soil removed and replaced with fresh, and then the plants can be watered. Growth will be slow, but it will be certain, and later good "Seciinens will result. A ROSE DISEASE. Diseases and pests often can bitter dis- appointment to inexperienced gardeners, as well as sometimes to those of long experience, and it is only by knowing how to prepare against them and acting on this knowledge that plants are kept healthy. I saw a very bad cs,se last year of a number of roses, on the leaves of which a disease known as black spot had been allowed to gain a strong hold. A few spots on the leaves might not attract much attention until it is I BLACK SPOT ON ltOSE LEAVES. realised how important are the functions of leaves, and that if they are diseased the health of the whole tree must suffer, the flowers being few in number and poor in quality. The disease appears on the upper parts of :the leaves in the form of black or pur- plish patches about iill. across, and suffi- ciently large to make the leaves look very un- sightly. They are not much noticed until about the middle of June, but my object in referring to the subject now is so that those growers whose trees were affected with the disease last year may take steps to remove it. for it pafses the winter on fallen leaves or on those which have remained on the trees from last year. Any of these that still remain should foe collected and burnt, or the new leaves will soon be infected. Then the trees should be sprayed with potassium sulphide, loz. in lOgal. of water, soft for preference. This spray will be a preventive also against rose mildew and rose rust, both of which are very eommon. The spraying costs little, and should be continued at intervals of three or four weeks. GROWING MELONS. In reply to "Amateur," melons can be grown on various soils, but a good, strong, yellow loam is the best. This should be broken up with the spade, and a little well- decayed manure added. If too rich, it starts the young plants into too luxuriant a growth. Planting on the ridge is best, as it allows the water to run away from the base of the stein, and will to some extent prevent canker. The plants will require the support of a stake till the trellis is reached. Rub off all side-shoots below the first wire, and pinch or stop the main stem when three feet high. Train the side-shoote right and left, and stop them one joint beyond the fruit; then cut out all weak and barren shoots. Setting the fruit should not be com- menced until sufficient are ready to complete the setting of the crop within the week. Water sparingly until the fruit is set, when a liberal supply ie needed. 1. R. R.

No title

All correspondence affecting1 this column should De addressed to the author, care of the Editor of this journal. Requests for special information must be accompanied by a itamped addressed envelope.

T1 FACTS AND FANCIES

T1 FACTS AND FANCIES. INDICATIONS OF SPRING. A wonderful list of Indications of Spring," started by an old gentleman who died ia 1797, at the age of ninety, and con- tainii.g the results of observations extending over a century and a-half, gives the following averages as medium dates when various flowers, birds, &c., appear: Srio- drops, Janu- ary 16th; hawthorn, May 8th; wood-anemone, April 4th. Rooks build February 9th; swal- lows appear April 13th; cuckoo sings April 23rd. In 175)0, a yellow butterfly was seen on January 14th. Frogs and toads start their ,ann'ua.l croaking concerts about March 24th. Ring-doves were heard to coo on Christmas Day. 1857. For ninety-three years the night- ingale was observed to sing about April 28th, although it has done so as early as the seventh day of that month.

CONCERNING CROSSES

• CONCERNING CROSSES. Do you know the difference between the Latin, Greek, and St. Andrew's crosses? Many grown people do not, and it is reason- able to assume that the younger readers may need the information. The Latin cross is the one with which we are all familiar. The lower iimb is a good dcil longer than the other three limbs. The Greek cross, on the con- trary, has all the limbs of ecpial length—two pieces crossed in the middle at right angles. St. Andrew's cross is in the form of the letter X. The Greek cross is sometimes called the cross of St. George, and is blended with that of St. Andrew to form the flag called the Union Jack.

o WHY MAN IS MORTAL

o ■ WHY MAN IS MORTAL. There is a strange tradition in vogue among the Bachilaiige tribe, in the Congo. The tra- dition is to the effect that God one day said to the sun: "Here is a gourd of Malafou; place it on the earth (and indicated the west), but if you wish to be immortal, drink not from what I have confided to thee." God spoke to the moon in the same way. The sun and the moon obeyed their instruc- tions. At length man appealed to God to make a journey from east to west, and re- ceived permission. He set out, accompanied by his dog. The dog raised up an evil spirit, and the man drank from the gourd before he finished bus journey. Immediately the firrna.- ment darkened like the skin of a black man, and God was angry, and faid: "You shall not live for ever," and the dog was driven out of the country of the Bachilaiige. and the people drank no more from the gourd of Malafou.

THE SEAWOLF

THE SEA-WOLF. Of all the inhabitants of the ocean few are more destructive than the sea-wolf-a kind of dolphin, which attains, when full grown, a length of fourteen feet and a weight of 3,000 pounds. When a mother walrus perceives » sea-wolf, she endeavours to throw her cub on to an iceberg, if one is near. Failing thi.s. 6he gets it on top of her head, and swims with it above water. But this is vain. Diving far below, the fish of prey comes up with tremen- dous force, striking the frantic mother a ter- rific blow, and jolting the cub off her head into the water. Here it falls an easy victim to the assailant, and is soon devoured.