Teitl Casgliad: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEOR +E'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS ftl £ ORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL REMEDY IS -'4" k EORGES ||ILE^GRArey^^P' Rj PILLS I' 'I SAFE to take. f I PROMPT In action. EFFECTUAL In results. I FOR UPWARDS OF FORTY TEARS THESE F PILLS HAVE HELD THE FIRST PLACE IN THE. WORLD AS A REMEDY FOR f Piles and Gravel, And all the Common Disorders of the Stomach, Bowels, Liver and Kidneys, Such as Piles, Gravel, Pain in the Back and Loins, Constipation, Sup- pression and Retention of Urine, Irritation of the Ijladder, Sluggishnesn of the Liver and Kidneys, Biliousness, Flatulence, Palpitation, Nervous- i lqefm, Sleeplessness, Dimness of Vision, Depression of Spirits, all Pains [ %"ising from Indigestion, &c. ) THEIR FAME IS AS WIDE AS CIVILIZATION. A TESTIMONIb. < r: i i- » There is no necessity to despair of relief even i. [ though your Doctor gives your case up as hopeless. « Read the following :—After having been under < medical treatment for some time and sufferingm I acute pain, I was induced tc try your Pills. One K box relieved me and the second completely cured B me. I gave what Pills I had lef^to a friend of if mine—a sea captain, and he has also been cured after long suffering T. WOOD, L Wood Street, Middlesbro'. r t k- THE CONTINUED DEMAND FOR THESE PILLS IS THEIR BEST RECOMMENDATION. The Three Forms of this Remedy: Wo. 1.—GEORGE'S PILE AND GRAVEL PILLS (White label). No. 2.—GEORGE'S GRAVEL PILLS (Blue label). No.S.-GEORGE'S PILLS FOR THE PILES (Red label) „ i Sold Everywhere. In Boxes, 1/li & 2/9 each; By Post, 1/2 & 2/101 Proprietor, J. E. GEORGE, M.R.P.S., Hlrwaln, Absrdare. SAGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS JORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLF SJOKGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS S^IIUE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PIL&I J* £ OL?GE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS S^OIVGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRA.VEL PILLS J^OPVGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GR- VEL PIKLF! GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS i>L L'

DRESSMAKING AT HOME

DRESSMAKING AT HOME. By SYLVIA. A Summer Coatee. A feature of the fashions of the present season is the return of the short ooat to favour, and for those who are no longer in their "first youth," and therefore do not care to go out of doors without a wrap of some kind, it has much to com.mend it. There are many varieties, of course, but the wrap sketched in No. 1,802 is as smart a model as can be desired, combined with simplicity of make, whilst the killed basque will commend itself to many as a novel finish to a coat of washing or thin materials. I»\ 1/ i FATTERN NO. 1,802. As we are now in the season when the former are much in request, I have arranged the pattern in the accompanying diagram on 40ill. goo^s>. which is the usual width of wash- ing fabrics nowadays; so if you wish to make it up in something smarter or more durable the placing will be the same, but a lining will be required. Having placed the patt-ern as shown in the diagram, with the centre-back to the fold, mark round very carefully, indicating the notches; then thread-mark or outline the ✓ -T DIAGRAM FOR •PATTERN NO. 1,802. other side with tailor's chalk, as when placed as I have shown jou will only be able to mark one side. Now take the sleeve, turn in the arm- hole edge, pin and tack it over the corresponding sleeve top edge, and stitch evenly and neaten on the wrong side. Next join up the under-arm seams, which in- clude those of the sleeves, and neaten and press. With regard to the collar, I have shown this all in one piece, as it were but it has to be joined at the back and sides, so yon can cut the fac- ing from the bits remaining, as each section only takes quite ,,T)i-,ill pieecs. Having jonled the collar, opened, notched, and I pressed the seams, j proceed to turn in the edges and stitch, llien arrange the neck of the blouse, stitch firmly in place, and face the fronts with the strip remaining after cutting these out, which' should be stitched at each edge. Next join the kilted basque, hem and press this and the seams, then arrange and secure'to the waist- part of the bodice, which is pleated in a trifle, and neaten at the back with wide rib- bon. A couple of buttons, one on each side of the waist,' secured by cords, form the fastenings. The sleeves now require finishing off, the wrist-part being slightly gathered and set into rather wide bands, which are brought round in front and fastened off by buttons corresponding with those of the waist-part. About two yards of 40-inch goods will be required for a figure of medium size. A Summer Nightdress. I am sure that those of you who are on the look-out for a summer "nightie" pattern, or one for trousseau purposes, will like that sketched in No. 1,803, as you could have nothing daintier and simpler. Indeed, the I PATTERN --NO. 1,803. making is a form of "eaten up work, which is more satisfactory to the thrifty maiden than a more or less useless piece of fancy work. In this pattern the kimono bodice is made of wide embroidery, the sleeve portions be- ing joined on to the straight shoulder part, so that the embroidered edge forms that of the elbow sleeves. The back is crossed over like the front, the effect of which is very pretty, and at the same time extremely simple. The edges cross each other a little more there, in order to have the opening less; but if you want the back quite high, you can have this by joining up the centre; but the effect is not so dainty or pretty. The lower portion consists of two pieces, joined at the sides, and gathered to the lower edge of the insertion which forms the band, and to which the bodice is secured at the top edge. The opening, which corre- sponds with the fastening, is finished off with two ratheir wide hems, the right folded over the left and stitched at the bottom to prevent tearing down. For the lower edge a good wide hem is a i necessity whilst the only fastening needed is ribbon run through the waist insertion, and tied here in a bow. About two and a-half ynrtjs of nainsook and three, yards of embroidery will be required.

HOW TO OBTAIN PATTERNS

HOW TO OBTAIN PATTERNS. Our paper patterns are specially cut for us from designs expressly prepared for this column, and the cost of each complete pattern 13 6d. post free, Address all letters, enclosing stamps for patterns, to "Sylvia." Whitefriars House, Carmelite- street, London, E.C. Be sure and mention the number of the pattern required when order- ing. Patterns will be despatched within threi days of the application being received. V

Advertising

L-r t FORD, the Universal Car. VERILY appearances are deceptive. Rub out its name. Judge it upon the appearance of its BRITISH-BUILT BODY upon the Material in it; upon its Running Life and you must say that this Car cost £ 300 or more. Instead of which it is a FORD, costing less than half. i j 450,000 FORD Cars sold during the life of the Ford Organisation. t Runabout Car, £ 125; Touring, £135; Town Car, £180. "'r i RICH and SONS, BRECON. The Chief Corrective This is a title which may be applied with- out exaggeration to the celebrated specific—Beecham's Pills. So very try ing to the average constitution is the strenuous character of modern life, that one becomes increasingly liable to get "run down." Such a condition of lowered vitality is fraught with considerable- danger to health, for the bodily system is less able to withstand the attacks of I disease. Beecham's Pills are an excellent medicine for modern times. They suit our requirements. They meet our needs, j Their gentle, yet thorough influence as i an aperient speedily stimulates the liver to J healthy activity, and their excellent tonic propel Jes strengthen the stomach in a maiaed degree. Such distressing ail- ments as biliousness, constipation flatu lence, indigestion and headache—in- dications that the health is below the normal-are quickly dispelled and the return to a more vigorous state is estab- lished. Beecham's Pills are prepared with the most scrupulous care from in- gredients of vegetable origin having great curative value, and they cannot fail to prove beneficial to all who use them, if the directions are followed. Be- yond all doubt, i the,medicin e for modern times, jand for gi^jjijj tone and vim to the system is BEECHAM'S PILLS. Sold everywhere inlboxes I price 1/11 (56 pills) & 2/9 (168 pills) I E. LICHFIELD 'I (Late Hannah Price), Fishmonger & Game Dealer CASTLE STREET, BRECON. Freen Fish Twice Daily. Agent for Palethorpe's Rdyal Cambridge Sausage Springfield Potted Meats, &a ESTABLISHED 1775. Telephone,P.O. 75. Telegrams, Lichfield Brecon l Before deciding upon Anthracite Stoves See the World's Best 11 at À. H. TYLER & Son, I Builders, Decorators. Plumbers, &c., Bulwark &> Lion St., BRECON. 6 THESE STOVES elegan^ in design |and finish, and embodies the very latest improvements, at the same time being the lowest prices. Promptly fixed with sheet iron, or tiled back and with tiled hearths complete. Specially recommended by Institute of Hygiene and Medical faculty. Highest Award and Medal, royal Sanitary Institutes and Health Exhibition, 1910. Good Lines in GRATES, RANGES, MANTLE- PIECES, &c., at LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. A.H.T. & Son having in their employ a large stafffcf competent tradesmen in all lines of the Building Trade, StoveF, Ranges, Grates, &o., can be fixed promptly at first cost, by complete estimate or otherwise. I Workshops &,Building Material Yard: CANAL BASIN WHAEF, P 1 < Ii The New Bath If you are thinking of putting in a New Bath now is the time (before Spring Cleaning) to have it done. Let us give you an estimate for supplying and fitting ic in complete or for any repairs or alterations you may require in connection with your present Sanitary Arrangements. Range and Hot Water System Re- pairs by Competent Workmeo. Boilers Cleaned, Iron and Brick Parti3 Re- placed. Heating and Lighting Installations and Repairs. Foundry & Engineering Works, H IE THE I High=Class I I BMlagLyjq Roc e r51 ■ ESTABLISHED 1858. I I SPECIAL LINE. I I DELICIOUS NEW SEASON'S I | STRAWBERRY JAM, I ONLY 3 TO lb. BE Jars OBTAINED JAR Free. lFRsO.M- HI jj! The India and China Tea Co., I II Grocers and Provision Dealers, ,r' I gj| Wine and Spirit Merchants, B I HIGH STREET, BRECON, t H and at Hay, Knighton, Llandrindod Wells ■ Nt and Builth Wells. WHrr £ THE A7-,t FCLLOWED SUlmijilL tSIABUStfED tRONMOKERS 6c 1 T rAt, C 0 L 0 U gm E.4f REQLRRES 0 %4WFACIZA?" fop WATER OMY iwDMAN p ) AGENT FOR BRECON: ;¿;¿¡ A H TYLER Housa Decorator & Plumber, Bulwark & Lion at j

WORK IN THE GARDEN

WORK IN THE GARDEN. BT AN F.R.H.S. GROWING CHOICE LEEKS. Large numbers of leeks are planted out at the present time, and it is well to remember that this useful vegetable differs from celery and other plants which require blanching, in that it should be drawn up and blanched in the early stages of its growth—in fact, about ten days after planting out. Blanching is necessary in order to make the growth more tender and less coarse and strong than it would be otherwise, and also to make it grow longer and prevent the leaves spreading out. The best leeks are grown with the aid of stiff cardboard or brown paper collars, and the method of growing these and of manur- ing and earthing up is shown in the two sketches. The leeks are planted out in trenches made up at the bottom—(1) a layer of about 15in. of horse manure; at (2) about Sin. of old, well-rotted manure; and on top at (3) 6in. or Sin. of good soil. The collar is 6in. deep, and after being put over the young plant is kept in position by raising a little soil round it. When itlie heart of the plant has grown above it, it is raised, and the earth further drawn up. When fully blanched they should be 12in. or 13in. long. When the leeks are about 9in. long some growers slip zinc collars over the paper collarSj holding them in position with earth, I BLANCHING AND EARTHING-UP LEEKS. and later adding another short collar. All the time it is necessary to take great care to avoid letting any soil fall into the heart of the plant. Meantime, it is necessary to water xreely and give liquid manure at every third application. The need of care in lifting will suggest itself to everyone who wishes to ex- hibit specimens. Leeks can be left in the ground till required for use, as no vegetable is hardier, and even. the severest weather in winter fails to harm them. They may be used as late as March or April if desired. SUCCESS WITH CUCUMBERS. It is to be feared that many gardeners who undertake the culture of cucumbers have to put up with a great deal of disappointment, though it is an excellent way of utilising the spare garden frame through the summer. Usually, if no accident happens, a fine num- ber of fruits are produced early in June, but after that there is a rapid falling off, and such fruits as are produced are short, thin, and curled, and altogether unsatisfactory. Probably this is what has been the experi- ence of "W. R. B. who writes to ask whether there is not some device for making cucumbers grow straight. With proper cul- ture, most of the fruits of a good variety will give us no trouble in this way; but I have seen growers using glass tubes like that shown in the sketch. Where it is wanted to grow a number of fine, shapely fruits, a de- vice of this sort may be worth using, in order to avoid wasting any single fruit. But it is on good culture that we must mainly depend for quality of fruits and also for steadily maintained production. Plants that have ceased to bear well should have all unhealthy leaves removed, and old, worn-out shoots cut away at their base. Spread some fresh, rich soil over the surface, and then peg down in it the young, healthy shoots, afterwards watering thoroughly with warm water through a fine rose. The frame is kept close and shaded from strong sun- shine. but the atmosphere must be kept moist by syringing three or four times a day. More soil should be added when new growth is made. Many fruits will show on" the new GLASS TUFEB FOR CUCUMBERS. shoots, but the two last should be removed., and the point of the shoot pinched out at the leaf beyond the fruit retained. This will cause other fruit-bearing shoots to be pro- duced, and will assist the selected fruit to swell more rapidly. About twice or even three times a week give good waterings of liquid manure, and keep the soil always moist though never water-logged. The fruits should be gathered as soon as ready, not left and allowed to become old and yellow. Any fruits that, in spite of good culture, show piomise of distortion should be removed while still small to give the others a better chance. CULTURE OF GOURDS. Gourds are grown in this country princi- pally for their huge size, quaint appearance, and decorative effect. Some o

No title

All correspondence afTeeting this column should be addressed to the author, care of the Editor of L this journal. Requests for special information must be aooompanied by & stamped addressed envelop*.