Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
34 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

DENTAL CHAMBERS, 10, TALBOT ST., MAESTEG (above Mr. Phillips, Grocer). D r BAMFORD, d. d s (u.s.a.) attecds Pers"nal^oMaoryto 8T:rs and Saturdays, D, So UOS,*AO) 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. ——————— Do not entrust your mouth to firms employing canvassers, these men have picked up their Dental Knowledge and you are risking Extractions with injection, i/- per tcoth. Extractions with Gas, 5/- first tooth, i a tooth after. your life in allowing them to operate on you. Our head Surgery for this district at Port Talbot is the finest equipped in Wales. Extraction by our Secret Process, 2/6 fiPSt tooth, 1/- a tooth after. Patients Faies paid up to 40 miles on approved orders. £50 will be paid to anyone feeling a twinge of pain.  TALBOT. Entrance opposite Theatre Side DoQr. HEAD OFFICE: DENTAL CHAMBERS, COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, PORT TALBOT. Entrance opposite Theatre Side Door.

IPRINCE OF WrtttS NATIONALi RELIEF FUND

I PRINCE OF Wrtt-tS' NATIONAL i RELIEF FUND. MAESTEG. I I I £ s d David Morris 0 8 0 Thomas Bros 0 12 0 Morgan and Lucas 0 8 0 W. Price 0 8 0 Workmen 2 9 0 T. Thomas aaù Son 0 8 0 Workmen 0 5 9 W. T. Lewis 0 8 0 Garth Colliery Examiners and Officials (per Wm. Thomas) 5 15 6 Drill Hail Dance (per E.R.G.) 0 19 8 Ditto 2 9 0 Ditto 1 4. 3 Maesteg Council Employees 19 0 Garth Colliery Workmen 7 17 9 faesg Teachers' Association (per J. J. Griffiths) 5 3 Maesteg Master Builders and their Workmen 5 6 9 C. C. J. Evans 0 12 0 J. 010 0 Drill Hall Dance (per E.R.G.) 110 5 "Maesteg Council Employees. 19 0 Drill Hall Dance (per E.R.G.) 3 2 0 Mr. A. J. Hicks 010 0

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. | Previously acknowledged 318 13 5 Collected by Mrs. W. Price (20th week) 12 6 By Messrs. L. C. Joyce and L. Thom- as from Staff Angletcn Asylum (13th week) 0 19 0 Mrs. W. Evans and Mrs. J. Keen (22nd week) 0 18 3 Mrs. T. Evans and Mrs. E. Hop- kins (20th week) 0 4 0 Mrs. Heaven and Mrs. Guiwell (16th week) 0 4 6 Miss Williams and Miss Griffiths. Brvncethin (10th week) 15 3 Total 322 16 11 Of this amount Bryneetliin has contributed £-10 7s. 4id. LOCAL FUND. Previously acknowledeged 27 9 10 TOBACCO FUND. Previously acknowled- ged 8 1 9

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS FAMILIES j ASSOCIATION I

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' FAMILIES' ASSOCIATION. BRIDGEND. 1 £ s d Coychurch Lower, War Fund 1 0 0 Mrs. Lambert 0 5 0 Miss Verity (Sheppard's £2 10s.). 2 10 7 Mrs. Williams 0 5 6 Miss Jones 0 3 6 Mrs. L. O. Lloyd 0 3 0 JIrs. SIlly 0 3 9 Miss Stockwood 0.2 6 Mrs. Hopper 0 2 0 Mrs. Hughes I 0 8 6 Mrs. Evans 0 12 0 Merthyrmawr 1 1 2 Hurst, Nelson and Co 2 10 0 Mrs. Phillips 0 16 2 L10 3 8

WOUNDED BY GERMAN SNIPER

WOUNDED BY GERMAN SNIPER OGMORE VALE SOLDIER HOME AGAIN. On Friday last another of Ogmore s soldiers who have been doing duty in the great war returned home suffering from wounds sus- tained at the front. Private George Davies, of the 2nd Welsh, who is now staying with his sister, Mrs. Osborne, of Meadow-street, joined the Welsh Regiment in August, and after only a few months' training, proc 'ded to the front eadyin November. On Lvcem- ber 22nd he was wounded in the thigh by a bullet from a sniper, and was sent to Birming- ham Hospital. He left Birmingham on Fri- day morning, and a. huge crowd awaited his arrival by the 5.20 train at Ogmore Vale. Thanks to the Reception Committee, news of his intended arrival soon spread. The Nan- tymoel Band, under the leadership of Mr.S. Gillard, was in attendance, and Private Davies was taken in a waggonette round the principal streets before going to his home. Speeches were made by Mr. G. H. Morgan and Mr. John Hodgson, and Private Davies responded, thanking all Ogmorians for the magnificent reception he had received. Priv. Davies received his wound near La Brassee. —www

EXPOLICEMAN MARRIED AT I PORT TALBOT

EX-POLICEMAN MARRIED AT PORT TALBOT. On Wednesday, test week, at the Chapel of j Ease, Annie Jenkins, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, of 19 Gwarycaeau, Port Talbot, was married to Gus Sims, who was, a few years ago, a police officer in the Glamorgan Constabulary, and who is now at the Doeks. The bride who was given away by her father, was dressed in » snake coloured dress with picture hat and white feathers. Her two bridesmaids were Miss E. Jenkins, her sister, w ho wore a snake coloured grey costume, and Miss Pulling, who wore a navy blue costume. The duties of best man were performed by Police Consta ble Squires, stationed at Port Talbot, and the ceremony was performed by the Rev. J. Jones. After the ceremony a j reception was held at the bride's home. Among the guests at the Church were Mr. F, Mullins, Dry Dock manager, and Mrs. Mul- lins and Mr. J. W. McCoam, rate collector for Margam. j

OGMORE VALE CHAMBER OF tSADE i

OGMORE VALE CHAMBER OF tSADE. A general meeting of the Ogmore Vale Chamber of Trade was held on Thursday ere- ning at the Workmen's Hall. Mr Tom Llewellyn presided. The following officials were elected for the yearPresident, Mr. J. S. Chappell; vice-presidents, Mr A. H. Glad- win and Mr. Wm. Rees. The following Were i unanimously re-elected :-Secretary, Mr. D. j Lewis; treasurer, Mr. J. J. Williams; execu- tive committee, Messrs. A. H. Gladwin, Tom Llewellyn, W. J. George, Wm. Rees and J. Williams. In the absence of the auditor, Mr. A. H. Gladwin (treasurer) gave the audi- tor's report of the working of the chamber.

MAESTEG SOLDIERS EXPERIENCE

MAESTEG SOLDIER'S EX- PERIENCE. LYING WOUNDED BENEATH A PILE OF I GERMAN DEAD. Sergeant Edmunds, of the South Wiles Borderers, who, having returned from the front badly wounded was interviewed by a "Gazette" reported while spending an after- noon with Mr. J. Thomas, Chief of the Brid- gend Post Office. It might be stated here that Sergeant Edmunds had served for eight years in the Army, and had then taken up a position in the Maesteg Post Office, where he had become very popular. r On the 5th August, 1914, he rejoined the Colours, and after a short preparation at Pembroke, he sailel away to France. Landing at Havre he and his Regi- ment were quickly ushered on to the ghastly scene at Mons. It was a terrible awakening for these gallant fellows, and espally to Sergeant Edmunds, whd, for some years past had lived peacefully in Maesteg. However, midst the hellish fire from the German guns and the terrible conditions under which they had to exist, the gallant Welshmen stuck to their guns. But only for a while; the pressure j of the German myriads proved too great and the thin line of khaki clad boys fell back. j However, the retreat was continual with the exception of a few firm stands by the Allies, when the German lines became considerably weakened. Then came the battle of the Aisne -a terrible carnage—and then to Vepdrecies. Here another stand was made, and the Com- I pany to which Sergeant Edmunds was at- tached was put to hold on to an Old Quarry. The Sergeant himself was in an advanced position making an observation. All went I well for a while, and all night the Welsh boys gallantly defended their position, but at 4-30 in the morning when the grey streaks of dawn became visible after the blackness of the night the Germans rose in one mighty force and hurled themselves like an avalanche upon the sturdy Welsh. Sergeant Edmunds, seeing there was nothing for it, left his posi- tion to join the men in the trenches, but ere he had gone ten yards a bullet, which he des- cribed as a dum-dum bullet, struck him in the leg: and strange to say Sergeant Edmunds thinks hundreds of bullets must have passed him as he ran that 10 yards. Of course, he j' fell to the ground and the fearful havoc con- tinued. Bullets whistled as they passed be- tween the Welshmen and the foe. Shells I shrieked overhead and shrapnel burst in an I erratic manner, but still the fight grew hotter. It was a pandemonium; the Germans came right up to the trenches, but by sheer pluck the Welshmen hurled them back, and the ground was strewn with German dead. In fact so terrible was the fight that the Ger- mans in their advance rushed over the woun- ded body of Sergeant Edmunds, and they fell; not wounded but dead. The firing of the khaki boys was deadly accurate. From 4-30 in the morning, suffering terrible agony, and lying beneath a pile of German dead, Sergeant Edmunds remained until 9 o'clock that night, and then he was, with some difficulty, extricated from the dead pile by B: :tish stretcher bearers. He was then carried to the hospital in the firing line and ultimatley cross the Channel to Netlev. Becoming convalescent Sergeant Edmunds went to stay at Cosham and afterwards to Waterlooville, a quaint, yet healthy village on the hills to the rear of Portsmouth. The conduct of the Germans said Sergeant Edmunds, was too aw- ful for words. They care nothing for the living, for the dead, or for the dying. They are not particular. He had seen them finish- ing off the wounded men. The German snipers are very clever workmen and very cunningly concealed. The Welsh lads would search for them. and often burn hayricks upside down, ( but could not find them, but no sooner were they back again than the snipers were at it again; ping ping came the bullets. It was a. terrible sight said the Sergeant cheerfully, but it has got to be -done. PM

SENSATIONS IN THE AIR 1

[ SENSATIONS IN THE AIR. EXPERIENCES OF PORT TALBOT AVIATOR. An interesting letter has been receieved f from Second Aerial Mechanic J. J. Cox, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Cox, of Port Talbot, who is in the Flying Corps now stationed at Salis- bury Plain. Writing home after his first flight in the air he says:— j Last Thursday I had my first ride in the air; it's grand; it's absolutely great. I only wish you could have a ride. It's a lovely sensation when you are coming down to earth nearly perpendicular at the rate of 75 to 80 miles an hour. Well Jack Cox and Sergeant Turner sat in the aeroplane and gently- moved along the ground. Eventually we increased speed, and when reaching about forty miles an hour we started rising from the ground, and to express my feeling better the ground started dropping from underneath us. That is the sensation which tickled our ribs in climb- ing up. When we reached the height of 1,500 feet from the earth we travelled level or there- abouts and made a great circle of the aero- drome. The camp looked like a little dolls house, sheep looked like young mice. It's a feeling which I cannot express, but it has a great fascination for some people. When you are up that height you can see for miles. I almost thought I could see Port Talbot! There is little flying, for the weather is ter- ribly rough. The sea winds cannot toueh those here. The writer proceeds to say he has very little time off and continues: In the summer months they start flying at three, four, and five o'clock in the morning, and do not finish up till nearly eight or nine o'clock at night. There is a lot of overtime, but we are paid by the day in the Army, and a dav is twe tv-foiir hours. J i

No title

The Morfa Fund Relief Committee at Aber- avon on Friday appointed Mr. Ernest Ten- nant secretary, in succession to his father, the late Mr. Marmaduke Tennant, J.P. The position carries a salary of L25 a year. A vote of condolence was passed with the family in their bereavement.

ABEKAVON MAGISTRATES CLERKSHIP

ABEKAVON MAGISTRATES' CLERKSHIP. I MR TENNANT UNAIMOUSL Y ELECTED I CANDIDATE WITHDRAWS. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, the well- known and popular solicitors, of Aber- avon, who was the favourite" among the three candidates for the post of clerk to the Aberavon Borough Magistrates, withdrew his application at the eleventh hour and Mr. Ernest Tennant, son of the late Town Clerk and Magistrates' Clerk, was unanimously elected. The appointment was made on Saturday, when a special meeting of the Magistrates was held. There were three candidates:— Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, A beravon and Port Talbot; Mr. Ernest Tennant, Aberavon; Mr. Calmon Rees, Cardiff. The Mayor (Councillor W. J. Williams), who presided, announced that he had received a letter from Mr. Thomas withdrawing his application. Mr. Thomas was sent for, and he declared that he felt that his old friendship with the Tennant family, and in view of the fact that he had worked in the,office of the late Magistrates' Clerk by the side of Mr. Ernest Tennant. he thought it proper to withdraw his candidature. It was thereupon unanimously decided to appoint Mr. Ernest Tennant to the post. Mr. Tennant was sent for, and the Magis- trates congratulated him upon his appoint- ment, and wished him long life and an hon- ourable career. j Mr. Tennant responded, and remarked that he was particularly indebted to Mr. Lewis M. Thomas. He was more indebted to Mr. Thomas than to anyone else for the appoint- ment, but he thanked the Magistrates for unanimously electing him. He wished it to be understood that any sore which had been created during the past week would be closed, and he would render every service he could to the new Town Clerk, and form what he knew of Mr. Moses Thomas he felt sure they would be able to work harmoniously to- gether.

No title

The new Magistrates' Clerk was educated at Shrewsbury School. He was articled to his father, and was admitted a solicitor in 1906. Four years later he became a part- ner in the firm. During the eighteen months the late Mr. Marmaduke Tennant was ill, Mr. Ernest Tennant acted as Magis- trates' Clerk, Town Clerk, clerk to the Port Talbot County School Governors, secretary to the Morfa Relief Committee, and secretary to the Briton Ferry Cottage Company. He has been closely associated with religious and philanthropic organisations in the district, as well as with the Margam Cricket Club and the Aberavon Golf Club, of which he was one of the founders. Mr. Tennant was a mem- ber of the old Volunteers, and held a com- mission in the Glamorgan Battery of the R.H.A.

ABERAVON COUNCILLOR I RESIGNSI I

ABERAVON COUNCILLOR RESIGNS. I THE MAYOR'S REGRET. I — I A special meeting of the Aberavon Town Council was held on Saturday morning when the Mayor (Mr. W. J. Williams) announced that he had received a communication from Mr. Lewis M. -Thomas resigning his seat on the Council. He regretted Mr. Thomas had seen fit to tender his resignation for he had been of great assistance to the Council, of which he was a valued member. The resignation was accepted, Messrs. D. Rees, D. J. Jones, T. S. Goslin, and H. Wil- liams testifying to the high esteem in which Mr. Thomas was held. I y:- =- ->I-

GERMANS ARRESTED AT j PORT TALBOT

GERMANS ARRESTED AT j PORT TALBOT. I ON NORWEGIAN STEAMER. I On the arrival of the Norwegian steamer "Gustave Adolf" from Buenos Aires at the Port Talbot docks on Saturday evening the military and police boarded the vessel and arrested three Germans. A thorough search of the ship was made and all firearms were moved by the military. It was stated that I the whole of the ship's crew was placed under arrest for a while, but this was later denied. At the time of writing the Germans have not been removed.

OUT OF PRISON

OUT OF PRISON. SAD PORT TALBOT TRAGEDY RECALLED. A Port Talbot murder charge of a few years ago is recalled from the fact that the accused, Mabel Blackmore, has just been released from prison after serving about three years of her sentence. She was released from Aylesbury Prison, and the action of the Home Office has been taken in consequence of the exceptionally good chduct of the woman, who is now com- fcrtably placed in a home in London. During her incarceration Sister Wray, the late police- court missionary at Swansea, who took a very sympathetic view of her case, frequently Iteard from her. It will be re-called that the young woman, who was only 24, was in domestic service at Aberavon, and that site threw into a pond the body of her child. Sentence of death was passed, but consider- able sympathy was felt by the general public, and a largely-signed petition was got up, with the result that the sentence was commuted to one of penal servitude for life.

No title

Friends of Mr. J. J. Cox, of Port Talbot, who is in the Flying Corps, will be interested to hear that he has taken his first flight in the air. His sensations he describes in a letter which he has sent home to his parents, and which we are able to print in another column.

CENSORED PARAGRAPHS CENSORED ARAGBAPHS I

CENSORED PARAGRAPHS. CENSORED ARAGBAPHS.. I Three little children are lying dead to- gether in a house in Swansea. The mother died about four months ago. • • • On the arrival of the Norwegian steamer, Gustus Adolth, at Port Talbot on Satur- day night, it was discovered that there were three Germans on board, and these were taken 1:1 charge by the military authorities. On Sunday the captain of the vessel strongly resented the action of the military authori- ties. • • • At. St. Ives, Huilts, corn market on Mon- day the prices for wheat dropped 2s. on the week. • • • At Swansea flour has declined 6d. to Is. per sack of 2801bs. < While Mr. Bonar Law was speaking in tho House of Commons on Monday night the light went out suddenly. One M.P. re- marked, 11 Hullo, the Germans have ar- rived." Lights were soon restored. • • • It is suggested that the motto of the Welsh Guards should be Eich Dein," and its badge should be similar to the arms of Cadwaladr Fenigaid, the Blessed. Kyig of the Britons between 634 and 664, which were a cross pattee fetchee or. < At a meeting of the East Glamorgan Pres- bytery English Calvinistic Methodists, held at the Memorial Hall, Cardiff, resolutions were passed: (1) Holding it to be imperative that at least for the period of the present war business at licensed premises and all registered clubs should be suspended by Statute between the hours of 8 p.m. and 10 a.m.; (2) that powers should be conferred upon local licensing authorities to impose further conditions; (3) that all emergency Temperance legislation should be made operative for twelve months after the war. 0 0 Austrian airmen flew over the Montenegrin Royal Palace on Sunday, and fired at the I Royal group who had gone on to the terrace to watch them. <* Addressing a men's meeting at Birming- ham on the war, Sir Oliver Lodge said he did not suppose at its end we should have an acre more territory, certainly not in Europe, and in every material respect we should be much poorer for the amount of waste, but we should be spiritually richer if we fought the battle for the right. < < Old Lady (to fruiterer): I'll take three penn'orth of Brussel sprouts, please, so as to 'elp the pore Belgians. < A force of Germans who succeeded in get- ting into Givenchy on the morning of the 2.5th January, met the Reserve of the 2nd Welsh Regiment, the South Wales Borderers, and a company of the 1st Royal Highlanders. So effective was the work of the Britishers that not one of the Germans escaped.—Vide General French's Despatch. < < The Secretary of the Admiralty announces that information has been received that two persons posing as an officer and a sergeant, and dressed in khaki, are going about the country attempting to visit military works, etc. They were last seen in the Midlands on the 6th inst., when they effected an entry into the works of a firm who are doing engi- neering work for the Admiralty. They made certain inquiries as to the presence or other- wise of anti-aircraft guns, which makes it probable that they are foreign agents in dis- guise. All contractors engaged on work for his Majesty's Navy are herehy notified with a view to the apprehension of these individuals, and are advised that no person should be ad- mitted to their works unless notice has been received beforehand of their coming. A wounded soldier in khaki and a nurse figured in a little scene in a Bakerloo tube train. The train was packed with homeward- bound passengers, and both the soldier—a corporal in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers—and the nurse were "strap-hanging." Just before Oxford Circus the nurse lost her balance and would have fallen had not the corporal, whose left arm was heavily ban- daged, seized her by the shoulder. In his rescue work the soldier's bandages broke loose, and when the train emptied at Charing Cross the nurse, sitting by his side, smilingly offered to strap up the wounded arm. By the time the corporal left the train at Waterloo the couple had exchanged ad- dresses. At a recent parade on Salisbury Plain the 8th Welsh Battalion were invited to supply 500 men to form a pioneer battalion for ac- tive service abroad. They were informed by the commanding officer that the work would be dangerous, but, neverthless, every man intimated his readiness to go. • • m When are bands going to be employed in this district for recruiting purposes ? There are still hundreds of eligible single young men hanging about. 0 Mr. R. L. Roberts, of East Cowes, opened a box of Canadian eggs and found written on one the following:—" Write to Molly McGregor, 33 Perth-street, Brockville, On- tario, Canada, age 17, brunette." > Because of the war men are so scarce that the London County Council cannot find suitable men to fill temporary employment as clerical assistants, and is arranging to employ women. Now the Council is experiencing difficulty in getting women at the old wages, and propose to increase the wages from 25s. to 35s. a week. The Aberavon Council at their meeting on Wednesday adopted a resolution protesting against the ri se in the price of foodstuffs, and calling upon the Government to intervene in »

No title

I Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES I

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES I PYLE v. TONDU. By arrangement this match, due later in the season, was shot last Saturday at Pyle, when the home team was strongly represen- ted, in spite of the fact that the veteran, Mr. C. Phillips, was laid up with influenza (a speedy recovery to him). There was good shooting on both sides, evidenced by each I side putting up their top score this season. The blue ribbon of the match in regard to scores went to Pyle, two of their men putting up top scores of 100 each—Messrs. O. Evans and E. J. Phillips-while, for Tondu, Vice- Captain J. T. Hopkins also registered the much coveted century. Each of these marksmen have frequently ma-le "possibles" in practice, as well as 99's in matches; but in this match each broke his own record by I roping in the elusive one point, and securing his first match three-figure score—congratu- lations. Pyle put up the excellent score of 767, but Tondu, with the fine score of 781, won the match with a good margin in hand. For the winners, J. T. Hopkins came first with an undoubted highest possible. J. Power, the maker of many 99's, added yet another to his long list. D. Hopkins, a most promising shot for his first season, is rapidly coming to the front with improved scores in each match. He added a good 98 to the score. A string of four 97's followed, from Secretary Tapp, S. Mead, J. Lewis, and T. Henry, the latter having very hard luck. Mr. J. P. Leat closed the score with 96. C. Berryman (96), W. Evans (93), and the skipper, Hy. C. Riley (96) were counted out. For Pyle, Secretary Evans and E. J. Phil- lips shared the honour of top place with a fine score of 100 each. Then came a drop to two 96's by Wm. Mort and T. J. Jenkins. William Morgan had a good 95, while C. Mor- gan was close up with 94. C. J. Phillips was low with 93, and so was Tom Evans with 93. Totals:—Tondu, 781; Pyle, 767. Next week Gelly will receive a visit fron Tondu, and, bar some very unforeseen acci- dent, the visitors will win this their last match this season, and so preserve their un- beaten record for two successive seasons. Matches for next Saturday (reb. 20th):— Gelly v. Tondu; Garw v. Bridgend; Cymmer v. Pyle. Bryn shot against Cymmer last Saturday, according to the fixture list, but, as usual, Bryn, who on form should have won, have not reported the tesult. Is Bryn too shy to face the7 fierce limelight with which the "Gazette" illuminates that part of Glamor- gan?

ITHINGS THAT MATTERi

THINGS THAT MATTER. ADDRESS AT PONTYCYMMER. I At a meeting at the Hippodrome, Ponty- cymmer, on Sunday, Mr. Robert Williams, of the Transport Workers' Federation, gave an address on "Things that matter." In the course of his address he showed how just six months ago "Home Rule," "The Land Question," and "Church Disestablish- ment were among the things that mattered. Now the war and all that followed it were things that mattered. Since 1910 he had been to National and International Conferences, at which resolutions were passed by all the nations in Europe embodying ideas of in- ternational peace. In spite of these inter- national views expressed by the workers of Europe the forces of diplomacy had made the war necessary. The war brought with it in- creased cost of living. In Germany the prices in the first months of th war rose thirty per cent., and the capitalist classes explained I this by saying they had no ships. In England the buying price of a sovereign was only what 14s. had been before the war. English ship- j owners said the cause of this was the addition- al risks and the congestion at the docks. The capitalist shipowners were making increased and unjust profits because of the war, and contractors were resorting to all manner of subterfuges to gain increased profits because of the war. He urged that the earliest oppor- tunity should be taken to bring about peace, as both sides had their honour satisfied. He argued that a crushing victory for Eng- land would not destroy Prussian militarism, and that the only way to crush the spi i of militarism was from inside and not from the outside. During the evening the following rendered solos: Madam Jane Ellis, Messrs. B. Davies and Richard Vaughan. Mr. W. T. Hengoed gave a recitation. Mr. John Williams (Blaen- garw) made an ideal Chairman. A silver col- lection was taken in aid of the local relief funds.

I WELLKNOWN PONTYCYMMER 1 MANI

I WELL-KNOWN PONTYCYMMER MAN I PASSES AWAY. By the death of Mr. Thomas Jones, Wel- lington House, Pontycymmer, on Tuesday, Welsh Congregationalism loses a widely known and faithful member. He was con- nected with the Tabernacle Church at Ponty- cymmer, and was for the past fifteen years the Church Secretary. He had acted on many of the denominational Committees, and had presided at one of the Union meetings. He was a native of Llanarth, Cardiganshire. Mr Jones leaves a widow and a daughter (Mrs. Rhys, wife of the Rev. J. T. Rhys, of Swan- sea). While spending his holiday last sum- mer with his daughter and son-in-law at Swansea, Mr. Jones took his little grandson for a walk along the Mumbles Road. A motor-car knocked down the little boy, and though the lad afterwards completely re- covered, the shock told on Mr. Jones, and his health gradually gave way.

Advertising

A FEW PENCE PER ACRE. Will protect your cornfields of Wheat, Barley, Peas, Beans, Vetches, Maize, etc., from Rooks, Pheasants, Pigeons, Vermin. No need to use bovs, men or dummies to keep away the birds if you use CORVUSINE D.G. Also prevents Premature Ground Rot and is a Smut Dressing. Don't be robbed of your profits. Stocked and Sold by John Lewis, Saddler,* Bridgend; R. Mumford, Chemist, Bridgend; I Morris and Dobbins, Implement Agents, Bridg- J end. 4563

GREAT RECRUITING MEETING I f

GREAT RECRUITING MEETING I _— f YOUNG MEN FROM THE MINES. I I. A STRAIGHT TALK. I I A great I A great recruiting meeting under the aus- pices of the Mid-Glamorgan Joint Parlia- mentary Recruiting Committee was held at the Garnwen Council School, Nantyffyllon, 0.7. Tuesday. The chair was taken by Mr. Mile;- Hardcastle. At the commencement the R.H.A. Band played a selection of music. The Chairman said he did not believe in war, but there was such a thing as a righteous war. Ho thought that Maesteg stood promi- nent to-day r.s one' of the best recruiting grounds in South Wales. Mr. A. Beveridge, Stockport, said he wan- ted it to be clearly understod that he was not asking them any favour by asking them to come forward, but only asking them to do their duty to their own country, as the Chair- man had said. He, teo, did not believe in war unless it was a. necessary war. He knew what war was because he had been through one, and were it not for the affliction sus- tained in that one he would be in the trenches to-day. We could only beat the Germans by having more men. They were at war for one purpose, that was to show the Germans that small nations were entitled to freedom and liberty, and they were going to stand firmly shoulder to shoulder with that end in view. They had a debt to pay to gallant little Bel- gium which had always been the cockpit for European quarrels. Belgium has saved us. What are we going to do in return? He was proud of the fact, although not a Welshman, that Wales was second to none in the answer to the call to arms. Germany had said: "These are our teritis: Death, Destruction, or Annihilation for. one or other of our ene- mies." Britain had answered: "We accept your terms, and having drawn the sword it will not be sheathed until we get peace with honour." We intend to smash up the depot- ism of. Prussianism. This they could accom- plish only by having more men. There were one or two men in the audience who had come from the trenches. Why had they been com- pelled to remain so long in the trenches at a stretch ? Because they had no one to relieve them; they did not have sufficient men to re- place them. More men meant less suffering, and would quicken the time for making the terms of peace at Berlin. They might say, what difference does the war make to me? I may as well live under the rule of Germany as our present Government. He did not under- stand a Britisher talking like that; he was amazed to hear it. Was it not grand to be a Britisher; freedom they were after and free- dom they would have. (Cheers.) Seventy five per cent. of Lord Kitchener's New Army were married. He felt ashamed of the single men. They thought too much of frivolity and too little of responsibility. It was for the youth of this country to see that this war was kept on the Continent. No man had a right to shield himself at the back of another. Sergeant Lon,-x-ill-, of the'10th Welsh, said one would never iiu. there was a war in evidence to-day by the cool manner in which young men were sitting in the audience smoking cigarettes. They seemed to be proud that they belonged to this great Empire, but they must maintain it. Did they realise that there was a call for them ? A call to each in- dividual; every individual was required for the building up of the Army, like every brick was required for the building of a wall. Captain Bryce Jones, Port Talblot, asked them to imagine that they lived in Hartle- pool, Whitby, or Scarborough, and had seen their wives, children and mothers killed by the shells of Germans: then would they hesi- tate to offer their services to punish these people for the crimes they had committed? He was present to appeal for recruits for the Glamorgan Royal Hors-e Artillery. It was his duty to form a Reserve Battery to feed the Service Battery. The Battery to which lie belonged had its headquarters at Port Tal- bot. Recruits there were taught the first lessons in riding. They were billeted out in very nice houses, and as far as they could would put pals together. Two lots came from Abergwynfi after their meeting the previous evening. In the R.H.A. the scale of payment was the highest they could get in the Army, from Is. 5d. to 3s. 6d. per day, and they were fitted out with everything that was necessary, even to a tooth-brush. (Applause.) Mr. R. J. Allen, London, said after all that had been said he thought it best to get to business. Lord Kitchener had said it was best to get an army of men who knew what they were fighting for. There were men yet in this country who said they did not mind whether they lived under the rule of the King or the Kaiser. Most of the young men present were Trade Unionists. -Had their leader ever been arrested because he advocated trade union- ism? They called upon them in the name of humanity and civilisation to enlist to-day. Britain would never surrender. (Cheers). Major Llewellyn David, Port Talbot, urged upon the men of Nantyffyllon to join. It was for them to say which Corps they would join. He urged them to join the R.H.A., if it was only a few coppers a day more that was some- thing for a family. He exhibited a German shell which had not exploded, and gave in- teresting illustrations of'the Battery's work. Lieutenant A. W. Hartshorn could not help feeling that, whilst Germany had been pre- paring for so many years for this war we in this country had been stra,ining every nerve for the last six months to prepare an Army. There ought to be no question as to who the aggressors were, and if it were not for the fact that they had a good Navy the position to-day would be very serious for them. They needed more men. They had men ready trained in this country, but could not send them out because they wanted men to tako their places. He felt that women had done splendid work in this business. They had encouraged their husbands to join, and cheered them as to their own comforts at home. There could never be a more righteous war. Every young man ought to enlist. He hoped he was not appealing in vain. For the honour of our King and country, Join. (Cheers.) Mr. Meth Jones said the Government were (Continued on bottom of next Column.)

GREAT RECRUITING MEETING I f

(Continued from previous column.) very anxious that every corner of the country should know that they had a. just cause, and a. cause that must have a just answer. The Government were going to get the men one way or the other. They knew they had suffi- cient men between the ages of 19 and 35. He appealed to young men not to wait for married men to go first. It was not good enough.

SLAENGARW I

SLAENGARW. I BETHAXIA M.I.S.-On Thursday evening of last week the above Society held its I weekly meeting, Mr. David James Davies presiding. A duet was given by Miss Ethel Francis and Master Emlyn Francis; a reci- tation by Mr. Wm. John, and a pianoforte solo by Mr. Brinley Richards. An instruc- tive and able paper was read by Mr. Wm. Griffiths (Queen Street) on The Importance of the Baptists of Wales to cling to Closed Communion." The paper was highly com- mented upon by the followingMessrs. I Samclel Jenkins, David Hughes, Edward Evans. John Francis, H. R. Hughes, W. H. John, and John Bowen. Mrs. J. Griffiths was the accompanist.

I BETTWS

I BETTWS. I PROMOTION.— Corporal Robert Hitch- I iugs. Pcntraddi, has been promoted to Ser- genat III the Lancashire Fusiliers. Ser- geant in the Lancashire Fusiliers. Ser- Fusliers last September as a private, and has passed through the ranks of lance-corporal and corporal in the short period of five months. The new Sergeant is well known in the district as a footballer. He played for Bridgend in the memorable football match between Bridgend and Swansea when end won. He also holds a Home Office mining certificate: also a diploma of mining frnm a mining college. He is a staunch teetotaler.

COWBRIDGEi

COWBRIDGE. OEITljAKY.—Another old inhabitant, in the person of Mrs. Watkins, mother ol Coun- cillor R. E. Watkins, has passed away at an advanced age. The deceased lady, who had spent many years of her life in C'owbridse, was highly esteemed.

ILLANMAES

LLANMAES. FUNERAL OF MR. W. H. EVANS.—The funeral of Mr. William Henry Evans, of the Great House, Llanmaes, who passed away after a long, illness, at his residence, the Great Yloii-K-e. took place at the Parish Churchyard. The deceased gentleman and Mrs. Evans, who predecetsed him in 1913, had lived at Llanmaes for over 24 years, and had endeared them- selves to all the villagers, by whom they will be much missed for their benevolence and kindness. The mourners at the funeral were Mrs. Englehart (daughter) and Miss Engle- hart (grand-daughter), Mrs. John Williams, Court House, Llantwit Major (daughter) and Mr. J. Williams (son-in-law), Miss Margaret Williams (grand-daughter), Miss May Wil- liams (grand-daughter), Mr. A. Williams (grandson), Mr. L. Williams (grandson). Wreaths were sent by the villagers, the de- ceased daughters, grand-children, Mr. 1. B. Nicholl, and others.

PONTYCLUN

PONTYCLUN. OBITUARY.—Last Wednesday afternoon the funeral took place at Trealaw Cemetery of the late Miss Jennie Thomas, of Brynamlwg House, Derwen Iioad, Poiityciun. The deceased passed away on Friday morning, February 5th. She was the second daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. J. J. Thomas, formerly of Dunraven Street, Tonypandy. Both she and her widowed mother had made their home at Pontyclun with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Griffiths. jiss Thomas was a young lady of exceileut moral qualities, and before her health failed she was engaged as assistant mis- tress at the School, under the supervision of Miss Wutkin. She served in that school for fourteen years. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of the Rev. Rhys Davies (C.M.), Pontyclun (the minister of the church where Miss Thomas used to attend). The service in the house was p2rformed by the Rev. E. A. Jones, of Llantrisant, and at the graveside by the Revs. Rhys Davies, Pontyclun; M. H. Ellis (C.M.), Trealaw; J. Nicholas (B.), Tonypandy; and Taliesin Williams (C.), Ponty- clun. The chief mourners were Mrs. Thomas (mother) and Mr. Edward A. Bevan; Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Griffiths (brother-in-law and sister), and Master John Griffiths (nephew). large number of'floral tributes were sent by re- latives and friends. Besides the above-mcn- tional rev. gentlemen there were also prese)l t the Revs. Daniel Davies (B.), Tonypandy; Illtyd Jones (M.C.), Tonypandy; J. G. Lewis (B.), Trealaw, and a large number of friends and children who had been under the teaching influence of Miss Thomas.

TONYREFAIL

TONYREFAIL. TONYP.EFAIL noy's S-UCCESS.-I-lr. W. E. Davies, son of Mr. Davies, cashier of the Cilely Collieries, Tonyrefail, has passed the Home Office surveying examination, qualify- ing as a mines surveyor under the Mines Act. He is only eighteen years of age. MB—WMIMIH—11,1 laBBBOMmiiilnl

YALE NOTESI

YALE NOTES. (By PELA-GIUS.) If we can judge by the earnestness dis- played by the farmers in the movement for co-operation, it will be a success. j The .vandals who deliberately threw the public seat, placed by tho Parish Council on the .hill side at Dimhole, must have been trying to emulate the Huns.. If we ara to take Monday's sale as a cri- j terion, the supply of fat stock in the district is very large, the auctioneer not finishing his labours until 3.30 p.m. The long spell of wet weather has preven- ted those who intended sowing early wheat from ploughing the land. It is another illustration of the old say- ing, The early bird catches the worm," the worm in this case being the season, which was, In the autumn, more than usually fav- ourable.

NANTYMOEL

NANTYMOEL NANIYMUEi, .S.P.C.c.-On Tuesday last the ladies' committee in connection with the above society met at Brynbedw, to ar- range for the annual collection. The com- mittee decided to make a house-to-house col- lection agai n this year. Mrs. Thomas, the president, entertained the ladies to tea. BETHEL CHAPEL.—On Tuesday evening a goodly crowd gathered together at Bethel \>stiy to spend a pleasant evening. The meeting was presided over in a pleasant man- ner by the Rev. 11. T. Gregory. The child- ren acquitt-ed themselves well in their recita- tions, songs, etc., and the credit of their pre- parations for the work was due to Miss E. Davies and Miss Carrie Jones. Recitations were given by the following:—Muriel James and her class, Ruth Edwards, Annie Mary Williams, Catherine Williams, Dillwyn Thomas, David John Evans, Ebrie James, Gwennie Williams and Grawys Jones, David John Davies, Frances May Jones, May Evans, Mona Thomas, Gwyneth Griffiths; and songs by the following:—Doroth and Etirona Jen- kins, Olwen Thomas. Gwyneth Griffiths. Mona Evans, Vyrnwy Williams, Myfamvy Perkins, Lily May Goivin, RlIthand Gwyneth Davies, Gwladys Williams, Richard Elfyn Morris. A violin solo was also given by Annie Lloyd. Miss Olwen Williams and Mr. W. Lloyd ren- dered useful service as accompanists. The meeting was an entire success throughout.

I LLANTWIT MAJOR

LLANTWIT MAJOR AGRICULTURAL CO-OPEH ATIOXTho adjourned meeting of the farmers and small- holders, com-eued by those appointe-l at tihe meeting held on the 3rd inst., as reported in our last issue, was held on Monday. The long dining room of the Swan Inn was crow- j ded by these interested in the movement. Mr. Osmond Smith again, for the benefit of those that did not attend the previous meet- iug, explained the benefits of co-operation, and was followed by Mr. was unanimously resolved to form n branch of the Agricultural Co-operation Society. Mr. Morgan, jum\, Marcross, was elected secre- tary, and a strong committee v. <13 chosen to draft rules and make all a rangements to get the Society into wo living order. Nearly all p resent pledged themselves to become members. A vote of thanks to Messrs. Smith and Williams for their help was unanimously passed. ■ CONCERT.—The Llantwit Major Church Society gave a splendid concert of vocal and instrumental music at the Town Hall on the 10th inst. They were assisted by the fol- lowing artistes :—Soprano, Airs. B. Richards, Maesteg; contralto, Miss Doris Davies, Bridgend. Orchestra: Conductor and 1st violin, Mr. G-omer Jones; 1st violin. Miss Morfydd Williams; 2nd violins. Mrs. Gomer Jones and Master Edward Lewis: viola, Miss Dolly Williams; 'cello, Mr. C. Davies; flute, Mr. Thompson; oboe, Mr. R. Williams; clarionet, Mr. O. Griffiths; pianist, )1rs. Ayre. Mr. 1). J. Williams conducted in his usual able manner. Both voices and instru- ments shewed the thorough care that ha(t- been taken in the preparatory work of re- hearsals. The difficulty of training a choir- in a rural district, because of continual mi- gration, can only be appreciated by those who have attempted the task. This handi- cap adds to the merit of the splendid render- ing of the pieces given by the choir. The reception given to the artistes and the choir was most flattering. If one piece more than another rendered by the choir found favour it was tIle glee, "Land of Hope and Glory, for the simultaneous unfurling of the nar- tional flags by the choir in the chorus fairly brought down the house. Programme:— Part song, "Song of the Vikings," the party; song, "Floral Dance," Miss Doris Davies (en- cored); violin solo, Master E. Lewis; song, "An Englishman's Homes," Mrs. B. Rich- ards (encored); 'cello solo, Mr. E. Davies choral ballad, "The Village Blacksmith," Glee Party; violin solo, Mr. Gome:* Jones (en(o)'td);song, "Ang)]s Macdonald," Mi» Doris Davies ((scored); part Hong, Th? Miller's Wccin; ?Glec Party; trio (violin, 'cello, ami piano), Messrs. Jone? and Davie? and Mrs..Ayre; song, "There is a Land, Mrs. B. Richards (encored): part songr "Land of Hope and Glory," Glee Party. The proceeds will be given to the war funds, and we are glad to learn that the Society intend to give repeat concerts at St. Athan. Cowbridge and Penmark.

Advertising

MEN OF MAESTEG You are Wanted Now! The Recruiting Office: Drill Hall, Maesteg. Is low Open For the purpose of Attes- ting You. Roll up i., Hundreds We peed You all. Prinq and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com. pany Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offices, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- can ga,n FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19th, 1915.