Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

THIS HAPPY COUPLE With the beautiful goods applied by SEVAN & COMPANY, HOUSE which has been so etmiortably FURNISHED by that well-known Firm Eijcrnjcus Selection! Newest Desi§t?s! free Delivery! Everytbip4 for Ftirpisl?ii?g I Astopisbil74 Prices! Catalogues Gratis! BEVAN & COMPANY LTD., '-=- ■HnBnmHaanBBBaHaBnmMMMBaHnHmnBHBHMBBMBHHnnBiMi FELL DEEPLY IN LOVE And are confidently looking forward to a long and happy life in the l' ———.— The finest array of DINING, DRAWING and BEDROOM SUITES, in the Principality from 31- to 35 guineas per suite! Really reliable Full. cornpas Pianofortes in handsomely figured Walnut Cases from 15 guineas! Woaderful Value!! Queen Street and St. Mary Street, CARDIFF. MCM0 IL xqm-Px lp IF 0

PeeDS at Porth camri I

PeeDS at Porth camri, I By MARINER. The name of one of the prospective candi- dates for Council honours has been given out —and has everywhere been received with ex- pressions of gratification. For a long time now strenuous efforts have been made to get the Rev. A. J. Arthur, the popular curate, to allow his name to go forward as a candidate at the next election. Even now, from what I can gather, his admirers are not quite cer- tain of success, but I hope they will manage a few days before nomination day at any rate to secure his approval of the proposal, and that the rev. gentleman will then go heart and soul into the fight, and win, as I have no doubt he will. It will not be the first time that the rev. gentleman has taken part in public affairs, and he would be a welcome ac- quisition to Porthcawl Council. In the town he is extremely popular with all classes, as he actively associates himself with all good causes, no matter whether it be a sacred concert, a smoking concert, or a whist drive, so long as the object is a deserving one. As a Councillor I fancy he would be a great success, for although mainly engaged in spiritual work, he has got a good business head upon his shoulders. o o Regarding the other prospective candidates matters are not quite settled, but efforts are still being made to get two more strong men in the field. Whether those efforts will be successful I will be better able to say next week. Mr. D. J. Rees, however, is certain to stand this year, and having regard to the good fight he put up last year, a better posi- tion is almost certain this year. He has done much to improve his chances. He has been an indefatigable worker on behalf of the soldiers for the last four or five months, and has made the. Porthcawl Y.M.C.A. more famous than it has ever been before. The Porthcawl branch of the Association should indeed be glad to think that they have been able to find a secretary to work so enthusias- tically as Mr. Rees has done for the cause. The soldiers have appreciated these efforts, as the townspeople have also. If Mr. Rees can work as hard for the Y.M.C.A. he should work still harder for the town as a whole. For many years he has- represented Porthcawl on the Board of Guardians, and no man is more concerned for the welfare of the poor than the popular secretary of the Y.M.C.A. • • • I have heard it rumoured that one of the retiring Councillors is not seeking re-election. The reason for the step, if the rumour is true, I have not been able to ascertain, but it is suggested that he is not satisfied with the business methods of the Council. If he does not stand, then the new candidates who are spoken of should have a walk over. I v It is unfortunate for the residents in that part ok our town, removed from the immediate vicinity of the Esplanade, that the officers res- ponsible for the billeting arrangements have deemed it necessary to take all the recruits awav,an-d billet them in houses nearer to the front. The unfortunate tenants feel that the measure is somewhat harsh and hardly neces- sary, and that military exigencies do not de- mand such an alteration, in arrangements that have apparently worked satisfactorily up to the present. Yet from the other side comes the explanation that the men have to be punc- tual on parade, and that the distance some of them have to walk home to meals is too far to enable them to have their meals in comfort and get back in time for the "fall in." • a • St. David's Day was not allowed to pass un- honoured in our town, although I should like to see greater efforts of a public nature made tø commemorate the day, which is of such significance to Wales- At the day schools in the town patriotic songs were sung and les- sons were given on stirring events in Welsh history. Outside the schools, however, there was little to denote that the day was a day recogniscd by Welshmen all the world over. There was no public manifestation, and only the 3rd Welsh at Danygraig House made any display, and they were enthusiastic in all they did. The leek was in every soldier's hat. May I suggest that a strong Cymrodorion So- ciety should bt- formed in the town to foster the Welsh language and things Welsh. I am sure a Society of the kind, if run on right lines, would find much scope for work, and would prove of great service to the town. < w There were two Flag Days art Porthcawl, Pyle, and Corneily—Saturday and Monday; and it was indeed surprising to find so many young ladies gifted with keen business in- stincts. They clung to men as if they had loved them all their lives—until they bought a flag. More than one male was ma,de ever- lastingly happy by the bewitching smile of a pretty maiden out to make the most of Flag Day. Not a few old bachelors felt their heart flutter for the first time, and not a few married men, who ought to' have known better, allowed themselves to be carried away by the charms of a persuasive flag seller- I and they spent the only sixpence left of the pocket money allowed by the wife for the week. A smile is a very fleeting thing, they thought afterwards when they saw a old. an ounce packet of tobacco in the tobacconist's window. Still, they bought flags. It was a real sacrifice by some of. them, but the Welsh Troops will benefit, and the ladies will be happy in having done so much damage to the hearts of the "stronger" sex and collared their money for such a noble purpose. There were energetic workers at Pyle and Corneily, too, who did remarkably well. Especially successful were the dainty and extremely win- ning young ladies on Pyle Railway Station, j whef did good business. As a result of all t?e, enthusiastic efforts, a sum of £ 124, as near as can be judged at pl-.e-ent, will be dispatched to the Central Fund, and Mr. T. E. Davies. the hard-work- ing secretary, is to be congratulated on the result of his organisation. Our townspeople were generous, and I believe that Porthcawl has done as well as any town in the kingdom, and excels scores of places of similar size and population. But there, we always do come out on top. At Pyle and Corneily the workers were under the able superintendence (Continued on Bottom of next Column).

PeeDS at Porth camri I

(Continued from Previous Column). of Mrs. Maddoek. All the ladies worked hard. On Monday night the celebration of St. David's Day was brought to a close by a whist drive and dance. It is a pity that there appears to be abroad a belief that this was a private function. Jit was nothing of the kind. Tickets were 2s. each, and all who desired could have attended. As it was. there were 56 players present, and an enjoy- able time was spent. I On the motion of Mr. T. E. Deere, the Councillors have agreed to join hands in ar- ranging a smoking concert for troops in the t- .in nc, town, to be held shortly, and as a result of the editorial comments in last week's "Gaz- ette," Mr. Deere also succeeded in getting a committee formed to officially receive I n^al soldiers who may return wounded from tie front. Mr. Deere is to be praised for the, prompt steps he has taken to put the pro posal into practice.

HAPPY FAMILY AT PORTHI CAWL

HAPPY FAMILY AT PORTH-I CAWL. WITH THE 3rd WELSH AT DANYGRAIG HOUSE. "He is the most popular officer living and ft serving with the British troops." Such was the opinion of a responsible non-commissioned officer at Danygraig House, Porthcawl, on Monday. The subject of the conversation was Major Masterman, who is in command of the 2o0 men of the 3rd Welsh, billeted at this old-fashioned mansion abutting Danygraig Hill. faior Masterman, at the moment, was J having a breather after a spell of strenuous football. Wearing a. green jersey and shorts he looked every inch a sport, hard as nails, good-humoured and good-looking. An expan- sive smile covered, his rosy face as a Private respectfully remarked that the game was a stiff one. The Major was shaking his left hand, a finger of which had been dislocated, and puffing away with evident enjoyment at a cigarette. And as he stood there I had the non- commissioned ofifcer's opinion confirmed by every Private I spoke to. "He's a thorough toff," "a real good un," apd such like. There was no doubt about the genuineness of the ad- miration—aye something approaching love, that these men in khaki felt for that tall, muscular, amiable personality—the Major. There was the same admiration for the other officers, particularly for Capt. Carleton, who has seen active service, and has returned to Porthcawl with the coveted honour, the D.S.O. The Captain is one of those typical British Army officers with a breezy, un- assuming manner, who can make use of a delightfully expressive sentence without hurt- ing one's feelings. It is men like Captain Carleton—beloved by the men—who have made the Army what it is to-day. The men would do anything for him-.ves, and for any of the officers. This was evident when the ofifcers entered the marquee while the men were wait- ing for dinner on St. David's Day. Eadh one that appeared was greeted with deafening cheers, repeated again and again. Then there was another figure who is regar- ded as something of a Regimental Pet. He goes by the name of Scout Georgie, a clear blue-eyed boy of fresh complexion, who had been a Boy Scout in Major Masterman's troop before the war broke out. He is still under the Major, although he was a cadet with the King's Royal Rifles, and I noticed he wore a Lance-Corporal's stripe. Another nop-commissioned officer who holds the respect of the men is Sergeant Choate, who was in the great retreat from Mons, and was wounded by shrapnel, which entered his nose. Unfortunately the Sergeant was injured while playing football on Monday, getting a smack on the injured organ, which caused it to bleed, but happily the old wound was not re-opened. Quartermaster-Sergeant Griffiths has the appearance of an Irishman. I heard some- body call him "Paddy," and the light-hearted way he rushed from house tent and tent to house while the dinner was in progress, con- firmedi the opinion that he was one of the good natured "Paddys" from the Isle of Erin. Sergeant Milner is another popular officer. The house where the men are billeted is one of those spacious, old-fashioned buildings, which recall pictures of Cromwellian days, when the groat dining halls of country man- sions were filled with Roundheads, ready to do justice to steaming viands. Savoury smells came round the corners, for the regi- mental cook had got a few score pounds of beef roasting and parsnips and potatoes boil- ing on the huge kitchen fire. A photographer was in front of the house busy taking pictures of handsome Tommies with their leeks stuck proudly in their hats. It was St. David's Day, and one huge happy family, the Major, the happy father of them all, was making the most or the day of celebration. Some of them will leave this week. They are leaving for service and are anxious for ser- vice. Drafts are continually being sent from Porthcawl, as they are wanted, and it is not improbable that all the troops at Danygraig House, with the exception of the recruits, will be shifted this week. They have been undergoing strenuous training, working hard and enthusiastically from dawn till daybreak. Rapid progress has been made, and one of the greatest surprises to tried veterans who have been with our soldiers in all parts of the world is the remarka.ble standard of efficiency attained by recruits of two months' standing. It has almost taken their breath away. But in paying this tribute to the men they are unconsciously paying a tribute to their own skill and patience as instructors.

I STICK IT WELSH

I STICK IT, WELSH." I THE GUARDS" MOTTO. A highly-placed Welsh field officer in close touch with the Prince of Wales informs a cor- respondent that the Prince favours the adop- tion of the Red Dragon as the badge and standard of the newly-formed battalion of Welsh Guards. The motto for the Welsh Guards will probably be "Dal ati Gymro" ("Stic-k it, Welsh"), the dying battle-cry of Captain Haggard (nephew of Mr. Rider Hag- gard), of the 2nd Welsh Regiment, the story of whose striking heroism is one of the finest told during the war.

PORTHCAWL SMALLHOLDERSI

PORTHCAWL SMALL-HOLDERS I BOARD OF AGRICULTURE'S ADVICE. I NO LAND FOR THE ASSOCIATION. I During the meeting of the Small foldings Committee of the Glamorgan County Council at Cardiff on Monday, there were one or two mild pa.s»sages-at-arms between the Deputy Clerk to the Council (Mr. Allen) and the County Land Agent (Mr. Osmond-Smith), which culminated in some straight talking by some of the mem bers. Arising out of a particular negotiation it transpired that the Deputy Clerk (who acts as Clerk to the Committee) had complained that certain correspondence conducted by the Land Agent was not brought to his knowledge. Councillor J. R. Llewellyn thereupon made a protest: 'We have had this sort of thing two or three times this morning," he said. "Where are we? If we have two heads of departments communicating differently to the Board of Agriculture with reference to one thing we shall find ourselves landed in no end of a difficulty. If this were a business house, and two heads of departments iac-t-ed in this way, they would be out of that commercial house very quickly. I feel that this is a very serious matter, and we ought to face it, and not allow officials to settle it between them- selves. The Chairman (Councillor J. M. Randall), said the difficulty in this matter, to his mind, was the separating of what were formal, or legal, matters, from what were purely tech- nical matters. All formal matters should be in the hands of the Clerk, and all technical matters in the hands of the land agent. Mr. Osmond-Smith remarked that he would, be glad if the Committee would consider what the County Councils Association thought with regard to the position. All he wanted to avoid friction was that his duties should be pre- scribed by the Committee. Alderman Richard Lewis said that if the officials could not agree they could chuck it up. (Laughter.) One or the other ought to go. He thought they ought to have a report from Mr. Franklen, the clerk, as to the diffi- culties in the present working between the Committee's officials. Councillor J. Howells observed that friction was admitted, and that interfered with the smooth running of the machinery. Person- ally, he thought the Clerk should be deferred to in certain matters, seeing that the Clerk was responsible to the County Council. On the motion of Alderman Lewis it was unanimously agreed that Mr. Mansel Frank- ten should report to the Committee on the lines suggested. The complaint of the Small Holdings As- sociation at Porthcawl, regarding which ques- tions have been asked in the House of Commons, was dealt with in a report by the land: agent. Mr. Osmond-Smith stated that the Board of Agriculture's Inspector had called upon him and asked. fgr,a report for the information of the Boa yd. This was duly furnished, the gist of it being that in his (the land agent's) opinion the Association was not a properly constituted one. Since then the Inspector had visited Porthcawl, and the Board of Agriculture had now written to the Association stating that they could not press the County Council to let land to the Asso- ciation, constituted as it was. The Land Agent reported that a strong society for agricultural co-operation had been formed at Llantwit Major, and that, many of the leading agriculturists of the Vale were connected with it. Similar societies were also being formed for Ely, St. Fagans, St. Brides, Peterston, and Pendoylan districts. It was hoped to get a grant of £ 25 from the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries for pro- moting this agricultural organisation.

I THE 3rd WELSH

I THE 3rd WELSH I CELEBRATE ST. DAVID'S DAY AT PORTHCAWL, Nowhere was St. David's Day more enthusias- tically celebrated than at the headquarters of the 3rd Welsh, who are under -Major Master- man. They are at Danygraig House, Newton, Porthcawl, and the spacious building and grounds admirably suit the purposes to which they are being adapted. Early on Monday morning officers and men were out mingling together with the best of good feeling, and at 9 o'clock the fun com- menced by the first event in the sports pro- gramme taking place. From then up till three o'clock in the afternoon there was net a dull moment. Major Masterman saw to it, and he had the whole-hearted assistance of his staff, that the men enjoyed themselves, for this was something more than a St. David's Day celebration. It was also a farewell to over seventy of the men who are all being drafted to the front this weeS. Various con- tests were engaged in, and there was keen rivalry between No. 1 Platoon, No*. 2 Platoon, and the Recruits' Platoon and, peculiarly enough, the Recruits' Platoon distinguished themselves, particularly in the bayonet fight- ing, by beating old members of the Army. As the Quartermaster-Sergeant remarked the re- cruits were a surprise to the lot of them, more especially to those who had seen many years' service, and their successes were greeted, with deafening cheers by the losers and their supporters, as well as by those who had urged them to victory. The officers took part, in all the sports, and were particularly prominent in the Soccer and Rugby football games. In the Association Match between No. 1 Platoon, under Lieutenant Lomax.. and the Recruits', under Major Masterman, No. 1 Platoon won by a goal to nil, Priv. Costin scoring. The Rugby game was keenly contested, the teams being No. 2 Platoon, under Lieutenajit Dovkl, and the Recruits' Platoon. No. 2 Platon won by three tries to nil, Lieutenant David scoring twice and Sparkes once. During this game Major Masterman dislocated his finger. The other results were:— Sack melee: Private (1310) Howells, and Private Costin (No. 1 Platoon). Tilting the bucket: Private (19456) Wilson and Private Moore o. 2 Platoon). Boat Race Privates Allen, Garrett, Lewis and Gibbs (Sergeant James Recruits' Platoon). (Continued on Bottom of next Column). j

I THE 3rd WELSH

(Continued from previous column. ) Obstacle Race: 1, Private Glover; 2, Private Garrett; 3, Scout Georgie. Recruits' Platoon. Potato Race: 1, Private Ware; 2, Private Allen; 3, Private (69) Davies. 100 Yards Race: Private (32) Williams, Private (93) Thomas, Private (88) George. Bayonet Fighting: 1, Private (31) Griffiths; 2. Private McMann; 3, Private Pole. (Col. Sergeant James Recruits' Platoon). Tug of War: Sergeant Choate's Recruits' team. After sports were over dinner was served in a large marquee, which had been erected in the grounds, and it was not long before the men were engaged in a fight with i-oasit beef, potatoes and parsnips, which were served up boiling hot, and were followed by "plum duff" and mineral waters or beer. Leeks also occu- pied a prominent place on the table. Dinner over, the tables were cleared, and a concert arranged by Mr. D. J. Rees was pl

PORTHCAWL BOYS CHOCO LATE MACHINESI

PORTHCAWL BOYS & CHOCO- LATE MACHINES. I ♦ BOYS ORDERED TO BE BIRCHED. I The case of breaking into and stealing money and chocolate from certain sweetmeat machines on the front at Porthcawl, which was part heard the previous Monday, was again before the Magistrates at Bridgend Police Court on Monday last. David John Jones (13), Caswallen Lewis (13), and John Stewart Percy (13) were charged with having stolen 7s. Id. in money, and sweetmeats valued at 2s. 4d., from two sweetmeat machines at Porthcawl, and also with having maliciously damaged certain automatic chocolate ma chines to the extentfof X5. < Mr. W. M. Thomas appeared to prosecute, and said the charge—one of having stolen the sum of 7s. Id. and chocolates to the value of 2s. 4d.—was preferred by Mr. G. E. Thomas, G.W. Shop, Porthcawl, against the defendants. There was also a further charge before the Court. The facts of the case were that Mr. Thomas was the local agent for Nestle's Milk people, and there was an arrangement whereby he bought certain sweetmeats, and as part of the bargain Messrs. Nestles supplied six auto- matic machines which they had put on the front at Porthcawl. On the 18th February the defendants together went to the front with a golf club, with a very heavy end, and smashed in the sides of two machines, and made a hole big enough to put their hand in and take the money and the sweets. The machines were all cast in one block, and if the side was smashed in it rendered the whole machine useless; it was not' the sort of thing that could be re- paired. The value of the machines was X14, and they were not by any means old machines and were in good order; and Mr. Thomas thought they would have to be replaced by new ones. He would also call the attention of the Bench to the fact that Mr. Thomas, who had the agency in Porthcawl, had on innumerable occasions during the last twelve months, suf- fered through having the machines pilfered from, and therefore he was asked to press the case as severely as was possible, and he asked the Bench to deal with the case as they con- sidered they ought to do. John Edward Thomas, of the G.W. Shop, t Porthcawl, said he had entered iilto a contract with Messrs. Nestle's people, and the six auto- matic machines on the front at Porthcawl were part of the bargain. It was his custom to in- spect the machines in order to take the money laway and to replace the sweetmeats which had been bought or taken from the machine.* On the Friday previous to the 19th February he inspected the machines and left them in perfect order. On the 19th February he again inspec- ted the machines and found that two of them had been broken into and the goods stolen. On the week previous he had placed 12«. worth of chocolate in the machines, but on this occasion there was only 2s. 7d. worth, leaving 9s. 5d. as a net loss. The machines, which were smashed in at the sides, were the property of Messrs. Nestle's, and they stood on the ground of the Porthcawl U.D. Council, for which they paid a handsome rent. The two machines were abso- lutely useless, and he had received instructions to send them back to be scrapped. During the last 12 months, he had suffered greatly from stuff being pilfered. P.C. Richardson said a complaint was made to him with respect to the damage and loss, and in consequence he arrested the boys. Jones said he broke one machine open, and Lewis said We shared the money between us." Percy said, "We broke one open." The golf club (produced) was the one used to break them open, on the admission of the boys. He quite agreed that the machines were damaged beyond repair. Mrs. Percy said her boy had always borne a good character until he got mixed up with the other two boys. P.C. Richardson said he could say nothing against the boy Percy, but as regards thp other two boys they were a perfect nuisance and a! J pest to the place, and Jones' father would han toothing to do with him. David John Jones had been convicted in that Court in January when he was bound over for six months. The Chairman said this sort of thing would have to be stopped; it was getting a very com- mon occurrence. David John Jone* and Caswallen Lewis were each ordered to receive six strokes with the birch, and the boy Percy was bound over to be of good behaviour. On the charge of malicious damage, each boy was fined 5s.

No title

Herbert Leech, of Wenhaston, Suffolk, has been presented with the Humane Society's silver medal. He was on the smack Fraternal when it was mined off Lowestoft during November last. At great personal risk he went to the assistance of an old fisherman, who was caught in the wreckage.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR 4

Gathered Comments ON THE. WAR. *4* German Ambition. I "In its soaring ambition, careful calculation of racial and religious antagonisms and per- ception of the strategic value of Africa, Ger- man policy may challenge comparison with the world policy of Napoleon. Like him the Kaiser will fail owing to overweening confi- dence, precipitation, and under-estimation of the effects of sea power," says Professor J. Holland Rose in the Spectator." Dispute Settled. I The dispute between the railway companies I and the Government as to the payment of the recent advances to railway servants has been settled. The Government at first offered to bear two-thirds of the cost, but have now,, under pressure from the companies, agreed to pay three-quarters, and this will probably be re- garded by the companies as satisfactory. The sum involved is five and a quarter millions a year. Philosophers as Soldiers. { "This afternoon I saw the Oxford City Volunteer Training Corps-of whom the Poet Laureate is a member—as they swung along the street," says a writer in "The Magazine," 'Town and Gown' marched side by side. I caught sight of Private Gilbert Murray (Regius Professor of Greek). iand Private W. M. Geidart (Vinerian Professor of Law); close by him marched a well-known Oxford philo- sopher; and towering a head taller than any- one else was our great Professor of Litera- ture, Sir Walter Raleigh." Will There Be Change? I I Will the war change England? Mr. H. G. Wells discusses this question in a specially written and highly interesting contribution to the "War Illustrated." So far as super- ficialities go, he says, there is no answer but Yes. There will be the widest modification of fashions and appearance all over the world as the outcome of this world convulsion. There will be at least a temporary and conceivably even a permanent impoverishment that will leave its mark upon the arts, upon the way of living, upon the social progress of several generations. The Starving Belgians. An important fetter from Sir E. Grey to Mr. Hoover, the Chairman of the Belgian Re- lief Committee, is published, which shows that the British Government, in addition to grant- ing facilities for the import of food into Bel- gium, offered the Commission a monthly grant to carry on its work. This condition was im- posed, that the German authorities must cease their requisitions of food and stop their monthly tax of CI,600,000 on the starving Belgians. Germany has refused to agree to the condition, and the British Government cannot therefore fulfil their wish as it would be an indirect subsidy to the German forces. War Expenditure. An Estimate of £ 250,000,000 was issued on Fri- day for war purposes during the year ending March 31st, 1916. It is pointed out that the vote of credit is intended to cover not only the cost of Navy and Army services and warlike operations, but also all expenditure which may be necessary or desirable in view of the condi- tions created by the war, e.g., payments under guarantees given by the Treasury for the pur- pose of the restoration of credit, the encourage- ment of trade and industry, and advances by way of loans or grants to his Majesty's do- minions or protectorates outside the United Kingdom and to Allied Powers. A Supplemen- tary Estimate of £ 37,000,000 to meet war expen- diture incurred during the year ending March 31st, 1915, was also published, the figures for the whole year being:- Original Vote of Credit, 1914-15 tI00,000,000 Add previous Supplementary Vote E225,000,000 Sum now required £37,000,000 Total .£362,OOO,OOQ I • Britain and History, It is pointed out in the "Round Table" that democratic nations have a certain responsi- bility to bear for the prseent ordeal, which has found them so imperfectly prepared. "We condemned as larniists and fools the far- sighted prophets who sought to bring home to us what our responsibilities were. The charge which history will level against England is not that she has hemmed Germany in and been selfish and grasping. It will rather be that in the face of a manifest plot against democracy ,and liberty, after overtures of friendliness, supplemented by acts, not promises, of dis- armament, had been scornfully rejected, she did not face the facts, make good her prepara- tioas, establish definite and avowed relations with other threatened Powers, and so malve it clear to Germany that she could not make herself the tyrant of Europe by force of arms. The practical lessons of the war for democracy is that, in its zeal for internal reforms, it cannot afford to neglect the need for a resolute and definite foreign policy," adds the "Round Table." Defence of the Realm Act. I The text is published of the Government Bill to amend the Defence of the Realm Acts. It embodies the reform advocated in principle by Lord Parmoor in the House of Lorcls- namely, that a British subject charged with an offence has a right to be tried by a, civil court. The enacting clause begins as follows: "Where a person, being a British subject but not being a. person subject to the Naval Discipline Act or to military law, is alleged to be guilty of an offence against any regulations made under the Defence of the Realm Consoli- dation Act, 1914, he shall be entitled, within four clear days from the time when the general nature of the charge is communicated to him, to claim to be tried by a civil court wit-li "It jury, instead of being tried by court-martial, and where such a claim is made in manner provided by regulations under the last- mentioned Act, the offence shall, as respects the person so charged, be deemed to be a felony punishable with the like punishment as might have been inflicted if the offence had been tried by court-martial, and any prosecu- tion and trial of the offence shall be conducted accordingly." A Candid Admission. j Dr. Iiytteiton, headmaster of Eton, preach- ing a Lenten sermon at Bow Church, said he had been reading lately one of the Socialistic newspapers, and was struck by the extra- ordinary bitterness displayed towards the well- to-do. He did not see, however, how the working classes could take any other view considering the life led by people in more l by l?-eople in iii,o.iv fortunate positions. Young men were learn- ing the meaning of self-sacrifice, but what would happen when the war was over? Already for one excuse or another people were resuming their old habits and taking up the luxuries they put aside. The Barabbas we called for might not be the German Barabbas. We had chofSn a Barabbas which suited the English temperament; not so vulgar, not so ungentlemanly, not so grossly wanting in humour as the type of Barabbas chosen in Germany, but just as contrary to the Christ. U.S.A.'s Serious Problem. I Ex-President Taft, speaking at the local celebration of the anniversary of the birth of George Washington, said he was of opinion that the United States was face to face with a serious crisis in its relations to the warring I nations of Europe. To solve that crisis, should it arise, he advised that no Jingo spirit should be allowed to prevail. Neither must pride nor momentary passion be permitted to influence the judgment of this country. "And when the President acts" —continued Mr. T.i.ft-Ilwe must stand by him to the end. In this determination we may be sure all wilil .v be sure all will join, no matter what their previous views, no matter what their European origin. All must forget their differences in self-sacrificing loyalty to the common flag and to the colnmon country." -Mr. Taft argued that the plant- ing of mines in the open sea and the use of submarines to send neutral vessels to the bottom without inquiry when they were found in the so-called war zone of the open sea were all at variance with the rules of international law governing the action of belligerents to- wards neutral .trade. He reiterated his for- mer opinion that it would be an un-neutnal act to refrain from sending war materials to the Allies, notwithstanding that it was just now impossible to send also to Germany and Austria. A Law of Humanity. Romain Rolland has sent a letter to the leading weekly of Holland, which the "Cam- bridge Magazine" thus translates: -"At a time like this it is good to take one's stand with those free souls who resist tho uni-es- trained fury of national passions. In this hideous struggle, with which the conflicting peoples are rending Europe, let us at least pre- serve our flag, and rally round that. We must re-create European opinion. That as our first duty. Among these millions who are only conscious of being Germans, Austrians, Frenchmen, Russians, English, etc., let us strive to be men, who are men, Pnd who, rising above the selfish aims of short-lived nations, do not lose sight of the interests of civilisation as a whole-that civilisation which each race mistakenly identifies with its own, as opposed to the other races. We caoinot prevent this war now being what it is, but at least we must try to make the scourge pro- ductive of as little evil and as much good as possible. And inni-,dei- to do this we must get public opinion all the world over to see to it that the peace of the. future shall be just, that the greed of the conqueror (whoever it may be) and the intrigues of diplomacy, do not make it the seed of a new war of revenge; and that the moral crimes committed in the past are not repeated or allowed to stain yet darker the record of humanity. That is why I hold the first article of 'Union of Democratic Control' as a,,F-icrefl principle:—'No Province shall be transferred from one Government to another without the consent by plebiscite of the population of such Province.' From the principle we can deduce an imme.diate appli- cation. Since the whole of Europe is dis- organised, let us profit by it to spring-clean the untidy house! Above all race questions there is a law of humanity, eternal and uni- versal, of which we are all the servants and guardians it is that of the right of a people to rule themselves. And he who violates it is the world's enemy."

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prices, at the | "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

ILOCAL SOLDIERS AT FOOTBALL

I LOCAL SOLDIERS AT FOOTBALL. I RUGBY IN SUSSEX. An interesting football match took place on Saturday at Hickman's Field, Hastings, be- tween two XV.'s selected from the 7th Battalion of the South Wales Borderers, and the 11th Royal Welch Fusiliers. The former had the assistance of two officers. The S.W.B. won the toss, and took up the attack, scoring an early try in a rush. The R.W.F. were defending the first half, and had a difficult task owing to the high wind. In the second half the Fusiliers scored two tries in about five minutes, Bunston and Wright being the scorers. A fine move- ment, started by Sergt. Elias, ended in a lovely tryt being scored by Private W. Grace. It was a very fast game, but the backs of the Royal Welch were superior in attack to the Borderers. Credit for the win must be given to the three- quarters. Grace played a great game, as also did Webster and W. Davies. Elias was very fleet on the 140t wing. The Borderers had a splendid pack of forwards. A notable fact to Bridgend and district people will be that nearly all the Royal Welch players were ex-Ogmore and Tynybryn footballers. They are in-splen- did form, although only recently inoculated. Private Bert Ellis was touch judge. The game was ably refereed by Sergt. Walter J. Martin. (ex-Welsh International), who is now serving I his country with the South Wales Borderers. There was a good gate. PLUTO. P.S.—Three members of our Battalion have won silver clips in boxing contest*.

Advertising

LADIES. BLANCHARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Penny!aI. Pil Cochia, Bitter B I&r?, 9 &re the Beat of &1I PiUs for Women. Sold in boxes Is. lid., by BOOTS* Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYy, Ltd., Chemists, 34, Dalston Lane, London. ftissgle and valuable Booklet post free Id. u. -dt\IUIFi"y- -"D:f1 .¡, —— IMPORTANT TO PIANO BUYERS. —— THE BEST VALUE CAN BE OBTAINED BY PLACING THE ORDER WITH Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), WHO HAVE ALWAYS IN STOCK A GREAT VARIETY OF —— The CELEBRATED BRINSMEAD PIANOS, -— AND ALSO THE NEWEST MODELS OF Challen & Son, Ibach, Collard & Collard, Broadwood Player Pianos, Simplex Player Pianos, J. & J. Hopkinson, J. H. Crowley, Ernst Kaps, Schiedmayer, Moore & Moore, Justin Browne, Neumeyer, and many others to select from. Largest Discounts fov Cash. SOLE AGENTS FOR the Celebrated ESTEY ORGANS. Cue Terms for Cash are low, ————— Our Hire System is Equitable. ————— Beautifully Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue sent on application, with full particulars of a splendid selection of SECOND-HAND PIANOS and ORGANS, returned from hire and taken in exchange-now offered at Bargain Prices. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Written Warranty with Each Instrument. Turnings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd., X, Wyndham Street, BRIDG END. ALSO AT :— 8, High Street, NANTYFFYLON, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, NEWPORT, BRISTOL, ETC A LARGE VARIETY OF RELIABLE < WELSH FLANNEL Fron1 1/2 per yard. Plain & Stripe Fawn Shirting. Plain & Stripe Grey Shirting COLOURED DRESS FLANNELS. iBENMNEitMNM Cream Stripe Shirting and Blouse Flannels Home Made Shirts from 5s. each Raft% BOYS' SHIRTS from Size 1 to 9. Plenty of Patterns to /■ > l\ Choose from. HUNDREDS IN STOCK. 'f¡ tt /J ? h? mmm? mi STOCKINGS and SOCKS of all kinds from 6d. per pair ? ? ly. J N? j? PANTS and VESTS from Is. each. Fleecy and Meriiio.  ? ?M J PANTS and VESTS from Is. each. Fleecy and Merino. I Also a variety of Cashmere Pants and Vests from 2/3 each. I N NOTE ADDRESS: ? ? ? ?) J W. T. JONES. Manchester House, Not 5 minutes from Station. BRIDGEND. TEN REASONS Why you should Advertise in the GLAMORGAN GAZETTE The LOCAL PAPER FOR CENTRAL GLAMORGAN. BECAUSE it is found in practically every House in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE it is the recognised medium for all local official advertisements. BECAUSE it circulates amongst people who have money to spend. < BECAUSE it secures to every advertiser the greatest possible publicity. BECAUSE it is the Oldest Local Newspaper in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE its rates are low compared with the. extent and character of circulation. BECAUSE it circulates in a densely populated. industrial district. BECAUSE no advertising scheme is complete; without it. BECAUSE it has been used for years by all the most successful advertisers. BECAUSE it stands in the Front Rank of News- papers as a Business Bringer. Rates on application. HEAD OFFICES- Queen Street, Bridgend.