Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

"'7 II you are not joining the British Forces for the War why not ENLIST FORTHWITH IN THE GREAT MATRIMONIAL ARMY ? You may depend that the sooner you do so the more money you will save. Timber lias doubled in price! Plateglass is almost unobtainable I All Furnishings are rapidly advancing I But notwithstandin these important facts BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., CARDIFF, SWANSEA, &c., Have made GREAT REDUCTIONS in all Departments prior to their ANNUAL STOCKTAKING for the SALE Now Proceeding Immense Reductions Vast Stocks must be Cleared jIIi.:II: wrc.o. _l\.k".r8Æ_a øœh.t..r.iI:I.t.TŒ2.;R _mø::GtIr:Jn:.t_g- œJr!II,

ll PeeDS at Porthcawl

ll PeeDS at Porthcawl A. By MARINER. -i I lk* Well, it is only natural that the gas award has this week overshadowed every other local topic of conversation, and none of us can be- grudge those who favoured the scheme, through thick andothin, having a good shout now they have, got the chance. Things have turned out well for them, and we could not expect them to be otherwise than overjoyed. Everybody has been talking about the arbi- tration during the last few months, and I am told that even the little scholars at our schools were ready to put a little bit on the result. I do not believe the gambling spirit is so prevalent, but I do know that there have been marked symptoms of gambling fever amongst our Councillors, and odds have been freely offered as to what the result would be. As I have pointed out before in my column, public opinion in the town was wobbly on the matter, and figures were named anywhere between £ 30,000 and t,50,000. The umpire's award is £ 30.396. And the gas undertaking is cheap at the price. It is no use attempt- ing to hide the fact that the opponents of the proposal in the first place are as genuinely pleased at the result as the strongest suppor- ter of the scheme. They strenuously opposed it in the first place because at that time the- rates were extremely high and showed no signs of dropping. In face .of that, they rightly considered that the position should be well considered before any leap was taken that might place the ratepayers and the tradespeople "up to their ears" in financial difficulties. The reduction in the rates came after the resolution to purchase the gas undertaking was carried. Had that happy state of affairs occurred before, I have no doubt that those who then opposed the scheme would have given it their support, for there are not many men to-day opposed to municipal control of gas undertakings. I gladly congratulate the Council on having been so fortunate in matter of the pur chase price. w w Now there should be a spirit of co-operation amongst the members of the Council to make the undertaking pay, and that bitter spirit of antagonism which has been existent for so long must be got rid of. It is doing our little town no good, but, on the contrary, is causing a great deal of harm. Undoubtedly new blood is required to get the Council out of the groove, and now the ratepayers' oppor- tunity comes to place men on the Council whose business capacity is unquestioned, and who have every right to appeal to the elec- torate for support. The Rev. A. J. Arthur and Mr. D. J. Rees have been extremely busy during the week, and have been welcomed with open arms by the great majority of voters. There is not the slightest doubt as to the popularity of these two candidates, and there is little reason to fear their return. w The three withdrawals have cleared the air a bit, and will make the fight all the keener between the Rev. A. J. Arthur, Mr. D. J. Rees, Mr. J. E. Davies, Mr. R. E. Jones, and Mr. David Jones. Mr. Francis, the old member, drops out. It was admitted at the beginning that against such strong candidates as were in the field, his chances of success were slim. Mr. Francis was enthusiastic enough and sincere enough, but these are days of advanced and progressive views, and younger men are wanted to push things for- ward as fast as they will go in our little town. The injection of new blood will put new life in our Council which ought to result in work that will leave its mark on the pages of the town's history. It is gratifying to learn that my notes re- garding the Chairmanship were received with warm approval by such a large number of ratepayers last week. As a matter of fact, I only discussed a rumour very prevalent in the town just now that there was an inten- tion on the part of old members to elect Mr. T. G. Jones as Chairman again this year. It would make his third year of office in that position, and I questioned the justice of such a proceeding in view of the fact that there are others equally entitled to honour and to this mark of appreciation by colleagues. I know the proposal is not popular in the town-not even in face of the gas award—for desire for fair-play is a strong characteristic amongst my fellow townsmen, and I am afraid if any candidates now before the elec- torate show an inclination of supporting such a proposal, their return is extremely un- likely. If Mr. T. G. Jones had not already had the honour conferred upon him, I would be one of the first to suggest his name, for there is no denying the fact that he is a good worker, but there are other men who have worked as hard and who have as great a de- sire to promote the interests of the town, and who should have an opportunity of shar- ing the honours that the town can give. I have no idea what Mr. T. G. Jones' views on the matter are, but I think if he was asked he would decline, with thanks, to sit as Chair- man again. ww* Porthcawl is to have its own Poor Law medical officer, thanks to Mr. D. J. Rees, whose proposal of two or three years ago at the Board of Guardians has now borne fruit. The original proposal was that there should be two districts for medical purposes, viz., Porthcawl, Kenfig Hill, and Pyle, one dis- trict and Tondu, Aberkenfig. and Heolycyw as a second district, but Mr. D. J. Rees suc- ceeded in inducing the Guardians to agree to cutting the area into three parts, to be known as the Porthcawl district; Kenfig Hill dis- trict, and Aberkenfig district. This bit of work by Mr. Rees will be appreciated by the needy poor in the district, who have been considerable sufferers as a result of the con- ditions which have hitherto prevailed. < w I want to have a word or two about the station question, but will have to postpone my comment till next week.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances tOT turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at I the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

PORTHCAWL RAILWAY STATION

PORTHCAWL RAILWAY STATION. To the Editor. I Sir,-l have been asked by a large number of intiuential ratepayers to write ana inank you for your promptness in publishing the im- portant appeal which appeared in last week's Gazette" regarding the very serious pro- position remove the station to the Docks, and thus perpetuate the level-crossijig which has during recent years been the bane of the town. I say, sir, that it is full time that the rate- payers changed the cast of the Council by electing men that will serve the town as a whole. May I hope that the election which takes place on Monday week will be fruitful in that direction, then we may have better representation and more justice. I enclose, sir, a copy of a petition which is being signed with great avidity by the rate- payers, which will come before the Council at an early date. Another petition is also being signed extensively which will forthwith be sent to the Railway Co.—Yours, etc., J. E. THOMAS. Porthcawl. Petition. I Gentlemen,—We, the undersigned rate-- payers and tradesmen of Porthcawl and district, humbly yet earnestly appeal to the Council to immediately do all in their power to prevent the erection of a perman- ent station on the docks site, in view of the grim and appalling fact that it would en- tail the ruination of a vast amount of valu- able properties in the district, and that the level crossing would still be as now-the bug-bear of the place. We further ear- nestly appeal to the Council to impress upon the Railway Company the reasonable- ness of erecting the new station on the al- lotments which is north of the level cross- ing, in order that the level-crossing may be abandoned.

THE AWARD 230396i

THE AWARD: 230,396. THE PORTHCAWL GAS ARBITRATION. The purchase price to be paid by the Porth- caw l Council for the works of the Porthcawl Gas Company is £ 30,396. At a meeting of the Council on Tuesday night, Mr. T. G. Jones presiding, the sealed award of the umpire, the Hon. John Donoghue Fitzgerald, K.C., was produced by Mr.' Evan Davies, clerk to the Council, who broke the seal in the presence of the mem- bers. The announcement of the figures of £ 30,396 was received with applause. The Chairman said that without any boast- ing he must say that that was the proudest moment of his life. (Hear, hear.) The Council had now achieved what the majority of the members had set out to do from the commencement. There was a time when the then chairman of the Council was quite right when he said that they could not afford to buy a wheelbarrow. (Laughter.) But they had set out to attain a certain goal, and now they had reached it, and the figure which they had mentioned at the outset, namely, £ 30,000, was practically the figure in the award. (Applause.) It was the figure at which the Council had advised the ratepayers the gasworks could be purchased. It proved that those Councillors who promoted this scheme were quite fair in the statements they made to the ratepayers. This award would mark a new era in the energies of the Porth- cawl Council. The secretary of the gas com- pany had told him that day that even with coal at 30s. a ton as compared with 12s. 6d. and 13s. 6d. twelve months ago, the works could be made to pay with a purchase price of £ 40,000. Mr. David Jones moved that a letter giving the figures of the award be sent to the Council's bankers, and this resolution was carried. Mr. David Jones When do we take over the works? The Clerk: The date for completion has been fixed for the 24th June. Mr. R. E. Jones hoped that now they had got such a favourable award the members of the Council would' let bygones be bygones and work together for the success of the undertaking. (Applause.) Mr. David Jones said the company had put forward the purchase price of t52,000 odd, but the award was only L30,000 odd. That fact in itself should give the ratepayers con- fidence in the Council. The Chairman said that at the next meet- ing they would have to consider the amount of loan that would be required for working capital, cost of Parliamentary Bill, and cost of arbitration. Mr. David Jones: I think it should he stated that we have a guarantee of £ 40,000.

IPONTYRHYL

PONTYRHYL. TEA.—On Wednesday last week a social tea and concert were held at Llest, Ponty- rhyl. Those who assisted at the tea were: Mrs. Thomas, Miss Thomas, Mrs. Braund, Mrs. Edwards, Miss Griffiths (Garth), and Mrs. Isaac, Mrs. James Thomas, Mrs. Car- penter, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. John, Mrs. Evans. Mrs. Griffiths, Messrs. W. Thomas, Braund and B. Braund. After tea an enjoy- able time was spent in a musical evening. The following took part:—Mr. Apsey, Miss Edwards (Pontycymmer). Misses Bessie, Vio- let, Olive and Lena Braund, Misses Isaac. Job, Jacob, Lizzie M. Braund, Thelma Evans, Annie Braund, Phyllis Thomas, and A. Edwards. In the children's competitions, Bessie Braund won first prize for a solo. while Lizzie M. Braund carried off econd prize. In the recitation Ethelwyn Griffiths won first prize, and Master Willie Isaac the second prize. Messrs. D. Davies and Tv O. Morgan, of Pontvcymmer, were the adhdjca- tors. Mr. Morgan also presided. During the evening instrumental solos were given by Messrs. Pascoe and Daniels and Miss Ethel- wyn Griffiths. The accompanists were Mr. Willie Thomas and Miss Ethelwyn Griffiths.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out j every class of work at competitive prices, at j the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. I

THE CHARITY ENQUIRY AT PORTHCAWL

THE CHARITY ENQUIRY AT PORTHCAWL. To the Editor. I Sir,—The enquiry re Newton Xottage Allot- ment Gardens has created much interest in the town. A very interesting point to be settled was:—"Who have the lawful right to manage the Charities?" According to the award of the Inclosure Commissioners, "the churchwardens and overseers" were to be the managers or trustees. But the Inclosure Act of 1845, under which this Award was made, stated that "the managers of the Allot- ment Gardens should be the incumbent of the parish, and four other wardens appoin- ted by the Vestry in the same manner as over- seers were appointed." The first question to be decided was, which of the two said methods was to be binding, or should the Act govern the Award or vice-versa. The Rector and his co-managers relied on the Act; whilst the Council relied on the Award. Now, sir, I claim that both parties lost all power of control over charities of the kind by virtue of the Local Government Act of 1894. Section 6 reads thus:—"Upon the Par- ish Council coming into office there shall be transferred to that Council the powers, duties and liabilities of the churchwardens and over- seers with respect to the management of I parish property, including village greens and garden allotments! Now, sir, this inter- esting bone of contention should not have arisen. The above Act clearly decides who are the lawful managers. And it is quite clear also that the Porthcawl Council have neglec- ted their duty in not managing the charities during the last twenty years! It is therefore quite evident that the Coun- cil is the lawful and proper authority to man- age the charities, and that the allotment holders have no choice in selecting or appoint- ing managers. We now hope that the Coun- cil,. having taken over their lawful responsi- bility, will study and carry out the true ob- jects of the charities as expressed in the Award. Much credit is due to the old managers for their services on behalf of the allotment holders. Yours faithfully, PROGRESS.

I OGMORE VALLEY MINES EXAMINER

OGMORE VALLEY MINES EXAMINER. To the Editor. Sir,—Re Mines Examiner for the Ogmore and Gilfach district. Many proposals have been made during the ballots for the above, but surely the most absurd was that to dis- qualify a man who wished to make it clear who he was. Mr. D. J. Thomas asked to be made known by his popular nickname, Dai Pound, and this they calmly tell us should disqualify him. Surely the authors of this unique suggestion could not have been in earnest, when they called this "canvassing." Had they a lodge mandate in support of them ? Perhaps they overlooked the fact that Thomas, or Dai Pound, topped the poll. Opinion was against them, or at the next bal- lot we should be asked to back any horse in the field, except the favourite.—I am, yours, I etc., I etc., SENSIBLE. I March 16th, 1915. SENSIBLE. I

I THE NEED TO FIGHT AND WORK I AS ONE

I THE NEED TO FIGHT AND WORK I AS ONE. Sir,—This war will cost us, is bound to cost us, heavy loss of life, immense expenditure of money, and to entail much hardship and sacrifice upon us all. Germany has made her attack and failed. The war cannot end until the Allies have made their attack and succeeded. When the time comes for the Allies to make their attack there will be be- fore us the fiercest fighting and the heaviest losses of the war. To carry out the great effort to a victorious end we shall need every officer and soldier and sailor and workman we can find. We may have to organise the nation as a family and fight and work like one man."—Blatchford, in the "Weekly Dis- +t. pux-uu. Blatchford speaks of a possible state of communism in our country before the termin- ation of the war. The war has already changed our outlook on life. What do we find to-day ? The lord and earl digging trenches with the labourer and miner at the front, sharing billets together, partaking of the same diet, and facing death together as comrades and not as rich and poor. Her- ladyship gives up her mansion to the Red Cross Society, and her car for the use of the wounded, while she herself proceeds to the Continent to carry out her duties as a nurse to our brave sons. The "Utopian Parliament" has become a fact." Parties have ceased to exist, and in their place we find State representatives who without a protest commandeer the private workshops for the use of the nation. Our greatest medical authorities have given up rich practices, and have placed their services at the disposal of the nation without a thought of the financial loss. About 200 Members of Parliament and 160 Peers are ser- ving with the Army. This change was mani- fest the other day. Sir Herbert Raphael, a millionaire, arrived at the House of Commons in the khaki of a private soldier, and found his superior a Labour Member, Mr. Albert Smith, who was in officer's uniform. The baronet's salute to the working man was a sign of the change that has come. Cam- bridge has a complete corps of M.A.'s in training. The University roll of Edinburgh reaches 1,500--800 barristers, 1,831 solicitors. 981 articled clerks, and over a 1,000 school teachers from London alone. We have those who are over military age doing service as special police, or training in our voluntary force for duties in any part of Britain should their services be required. We, as working men, should take the signs of the time to heart, and not fuss so much about wages as we should fuss about keeping prices down. It would be more honourable to the miners f they gave notice against the exorbitant prices charged to the public for coal than for an in- creased rate of wages. (I will agree that it's much easier to preach Socialism than to try and act up to its ethics). If every trade and every employer is out for making money, what will become of the poor beggar who can- not protect himself against their tyi-annv P Let the best brains of our nation try to de- Continued on bottom of next column. I

I THE NEED TO FIGHT AND WORK I AS ONE

(Continued from previous column.) vise ways and means whereby all may live in the highest possible comfort-no one on the make, but all prepared to carry the business to a successful issue, not forgetting- We may have to organise the nation as a family and fight and work like one man to come out victorious." —Yours, etc., OQWY.

WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT

WELSH DISESTABLISHMENT INTERVIEW WITH MR. J. HUGH I EDWARDS, M.P. Mr. J. Hugh Edwards, M.P. for Mid- Glamorgan, was interviewed on Friday by a reporter on the crisis in regard to Welsh Disestablishment. "What about this threatened revolt of the Welsh menders?" asked the reporter. "Well," replied Mr. Edwards, "I think the situation has been fully and accurately re- ported. As you know, we were under the im- pression that after the protracted and stub- born struggle for the Welsh Bill, extending over three lengthy sessions, at last victory had been secured for Welsh Disestablishment. 'We thought the Parliamentary Act had served its purpose and the national demands of Wales had been; made secure beyond all possible doubt. You can, therefore, judge our sur- prise when we learnt that an effort was being made by the Welsh bishops, under cover of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Duke of Devonshire, to secure strategic advances through delaying the consummation of the law and thus creating a vantage ground for t re-opening the whole controversy. Still, we were assured by the Chief Whip that no pro- posals would be entertained by the Govern- ment without the knowledge and even the con- currence of the Welsh members. THE WELSH ACT EXPOSED. I "Herein lies the first point in our indict- ment of the Government. A compromise has been effected between the Government and the Church Party without any reference of any kind to the views of the Welsh represent- atives." "How does the compromise affect the ul- timate issue?" "Well, to begin with," replied Mr. Ed- wards, "by postponing the date when Dis- establishment comes into force it exposes the Welsh Act to the peril of being 'torpedoed' by any of the political vicissitudes to which every Government is subject. If the Govern- ment had taken no action of any kind the Welsh Act would have come into operation this year. Now, by throwing it back for a further period of six months. after the war I it renders the whole position uncertain. One cannot tell what may happen after the war. There may be a change of Government, and al- though the Home Secretary emphasises the fact that before there can be any possibility of a change of Government the Act will have come into force and the dissolution of eccle- siastical corporations have taken place, one fails to see-with all due respect to the Home Se.cretary-why if there is a certainty of the security of the Act being ensured six months after the war, the Government should not secure its consummation at once. I THE POT.1 1 "Wales has won its victory, and it is most unfair after all these years of stress and strain we should be subjected to the strain of further misgivings and anxieties." I "The Archbishop of Canterbury has declared his intention of opening a campaign in the country for the repeal of the Act. In other words, the pot is still to be kept boiling for the Welsh members, for if the Archbishop carries out his intentions it will be the duty of Welsh members to start out on a crusade throughout the English constituencies." "So, really, your opposition to the action of the Government is a two-fold one?" "Quite so," said Mr. E dwards. "In the first place we complained that faith has been broken with us, inasmuch as the promise to confer with us before any proposals were en- tertained has not been carried out. But much more serious is the fact that for lack of firmness in the matter the Government has allowed itself to be stampeded into a com- promise which throws the weight of tactical advantage on the other side." "Are the Welsh members really in earnest this time?" Mr. Edwards frowned at the question. "Perhaps," he said, after a moment's re- flection, "there has been ground in the past for believing that the Welsh members ran away from their resolutions rather than jeopardise the existence of the Liberal Government, but it is a very significant fact that Sir Henry Roberts, the chairman of the Welsh Party, assured Mr. McKenna on Thurs- day that during the whole of the twenty-three years he had been in Parliament he had never known such determination and resoluteness amongst the Welsh members as on this .occa- sion. You may take it from me," concluded Mr. Edwards emphatically, "that we are not going to take it lying down this time. We owe a duty to our party, and personally, as you know, I am a strong party man, but we owe a greater duty to Wales, and the man who fails on this occasion is a recreant to the interests of the Principality. Never after this, I hope, shall the Welsh party be sneered at as a white-feather brigade, as has so often been done in the past."

No title

Colonel Ramsay Harman, late of the West Yorkshire Regiment, has died at his residence, Wootton Hill, New Milton, Hants, at the age of 77. He served with the 14th Regiment in the Crimea before Sebastopol, and in New Zea- land from 1860 till 1864. Major-General James Edward Blafckwell, late of the Royal Artillery, died at his residence at Leamington Spa, at the age of 77. He ob- tained a commission in the Royal Artillery in October, 1854, and became Lieutenant-Colonel in 1881 and Brevet Col. in 1885. He retired with the rank of Major-General in 1886. "The Britain of 1915 is giving millions of her best men at the most critical moment of an unparalleled struggle against a far more dangerous enemy than the escaped prisoner of Elba," adds the "Glasgow Herald. "And at the hour when the plains of Flanders may be deluged with blood, fate may contrive that Epsom or Ascot shall be in high carnival. Can we contemplate the possibility of such a coin- cidence without painful apprehension?"

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR j j

   ? Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. *j j Irishmen to the Fore. Mr. John Redmond, speaking at Manchester on Sunday, said Irishmen were sharing with Englishmen the common dangers on the battle- fields of the Continent, and he hoped that when the war was over this commingling of their blood would for ever obliterate the bitternesses, divisions, and hatreds of the past. He com- mented with satisfaction on the rally of Irish- men to the colours, but complained that noth- ing had been done towards the promised equip- ment of the Irish Volunteers, and that not only the Irish, but the Ulster Volunteers were .being wasted on home defence, instead of being sent to the front. Belgian Refugee Marries. A wedding took place on Friday at the Roman Catholic Church of the Holy Rood and St. Teilo, Tenby, the bridegroom being Lieut. Alphonse Messagie, of .the Belgian Horse Artil- lery, and the bride Mdlle. Jeanne Van Eck- hoven, a Belgian refugee, who has been at Tenby since October. The ceremony was per- formed by the Rev. Father Bell. The bride was given away by Mr. W. H. Thomas, ex- Mayor of Tenby. The bridegroom, who has been in the field with the Belgian Army since the first days of the war, obtained leave to come to England to be married. He rejoins the army immediately. Sea of Corpses. f- The collier Castlereagh arrived: at London- derry on Saturday after exciting experiences with a submarine. Captain McCravock stated that the first they knew of anything wrong was "when they steamed into a sea of corpses in life-belts. They were all round the ship. Suddenly a mile away I saw the dome of a submarine. Her body was awash, and she was coming rapidly towards us. I decided to run for the Scottish coast. The submarine altered her course, trying to get on my quarter. I then altered and ran for the County Antrim coast, and after an exciting chase the sub- marine dropped off." When the Men Come Back. "Let there be no mistake," says the "Daily Citizen." "This great war is not going to leave social problems in the old place. The effect of it will be searching and deep. The spirit of the people, of the great masses of the people, has been roused by this war as that spirit was never roused before. These great masses of the people have been and are reali- sing themselves as never before. When sons and brothers come back, as they will, the veterans of victory, the man who reads history in the nation's eyes will meet with a new ex- pression. Whatever these toilers of the fields and of the meaner streets become they cannot be what they were." Who? A striking poster issued by the Parliament- ary Recruiting Committee runs:— Who made these little Islands the centre of the greatest and most powerful Empire the world has ever seen?—Our Forefathers. Who ruled this Empire with such wisdom and sympathy that every part of it-of what- ever race or origin—has rallied to it in its hour of need?—Our Fathers. Who will stand up to preserve this great and glorious heritage?—We will. Who will remember us with pride and exul- tation and thankfulness if we do our duty to- day?—Our Children. "Justify the faith of your fathers and earn the gratitude of your children." John Bull's Teeth." I Speaking at Llanelly at a meeting held by the Llanelly Labour Association, Mr. John Hodge, M.P., said the .lesson the war had to teach was that the so-called brave captains of industry were keener than ever to exploit the nation's necessities. Dealing with the result of the war, Mr. Hodge said that when the war ended in a great triumph for the allied armies —because there was 'no question about it, when John Bull gets his teeth in he never lets go-- it was the Kaiser and his satellites that would have to be punished, and not the workers in Germany. The "clay" had come for Prussian militarism to bite the dust. When peace came a new method of settling disputes should be found. Then when one nation fought for world domination it would have against it all the other nations in the world. I Germany and Silver Bullets. t, I The "Times" states: The new Secretary for the Imperial Treasury (Dr. Hellferich) made a remarkable speech in the Reichstag in introducing what he described as the first war Budget in the history of the German Empire. Dr. Hellferich made an impassioned appeal for further sacrifices. He said that knowledge of other people was never England's strong point. You all know the saying that the last fight will be fought with silver bullets, and Mr. Lloyd George indicated that these silver bullets would be England's. I have studied his speech closely, and, apart from the matter-of-course conviction of England's financial superiority over the whole world, I have come upon a view of the war and of history which I think I ought to communicate to you. Mr. Lloyd George tried to explain that trade must not make demands upon the capital market, but that market must be left entirely to the Gov- ernment for war purposes. The Government needed every penny for fighting the common enemy. Their first care must be to win the war. The first few hundred millions could be found by the enemy just as well as by Eng- land, but the last hundreds of millions the enemy did not possess at all. England had by its silver bullets won the greatest of all wars, the Napoleonic war. I think that Wellington would turn in his grave if he heard that. Silver bullets were also a quite unknown sort of ammunition to the Prussian Grenadiers, who at Waterloo saved Wellington's troops at the right time, and so decided the war. More- over, our 17in. howitzers and our submarines do not shoot with silver bullets, but with good German steel. The phrase of Clausewitz that war is the. continuation of policy (with other means can be translated into, English policy and war are the continuation of business. We regard war as the most grievous, but also the most noble trial which summons and strains to the utmost all the' moral, intellectual, and ■■ H'lMoa—■■IIBII IIII —I than all the gold and silver in the world.' H material forces of the German people. This view is a better foundation for our confidence' Be Prepared for Depression. Sir Horace Plunkett, writing on the econo- mic effects of the war in the "Irish Home- stead;" says: — "The wisest and most far-see- ing amongst us can form but the vaguest notion of the economic, social and political agony which this war may be piling up for years to come. We must be prepared for a period of depression, the like of which this generation has not known. Every man of sense must know that the killing and maiming of workers by the thousand, the vast destruc- tion of material, the closing of markets and the interruption of transport will cause an unparalleled dislocation of the nation's in- dustry. Not even an early and triumphant issue to the war can save our millions of wor- kers from the consequences of the wholesale turning of the ploughshare into the sword. But it may be safely affirmed that the extent and duration of the suffering will largely de- pend upon the forethought now bestowed upon the means which must be taken to reproduce normal conditions in our industrial life. In the work of reconstruction the chief pairt will, no doubt, belong to the leaders of the indus- trial and commercial classes, who will have problems of appalling complexity to face."

i CHECKWEIGHER AND INSPECTOR

CHECKWEIGHER AND INSPECTOR I IMPORTANT LLANHARRAN APPEAL. In the Court of Appeal on Friday (before the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Justice Swinfen Eady, and Mr. Justice Bray) the appeal was heard of the Gas Coal Collieries, Ltd., Llan- haran, against a judgment of Mr. Justice Bailhache, who has made a declaration that a checkweigher is entitled to discharge the duties of an inspector appointed by the miners. Mr. Mitchell Innes, K.C., and Mr. Harold Morris instructed by Messrs. Bell, Brodrick and Co., London agents of Messrs. C. and W. Kenshole and Prosser, Aberdare) were counsel for the appellant colliery com- pany. Mr. Leslie Scott, K.C., and Mr. A. T. James (instructed by Messrs. Smith, Run- dell and Dods (London agents of Messrs. Mor- gan, Bruce and Nicholas, of Pontypridd, so- licitors to the South Wales Miners' Federa- tion), appeared for the respondent. COUNSEL'S CONTENTION. I Mr. Mitchell Innes, K.C., said the respon- Meiros Colliery, belonging to the appellant dent, William Date, was a check weigher at the company, and the facts were agreed. Prior to October 29th, 1913, Date had been a prac- tical working miner, and was a checkewigher appointed under the Coal Mines Act. On October 29th, 1913, he was appointed at a general meeting of the workmen to act as their inspector in the mine, and due notice was given to the owners. Date asked to be allowed to go down the pit to carry out his duties as inspector, but the permission was withheld on the ground that his position as checkweigher precluded him from acting as an inspector. Counsel stated that sub-sec- tion 3 of the Act of 1911 made it illegal for a checkweigher to say anything or to give any information or advice except upon a matter that came within the scope of his duties as a checkweigher. Therefore, counsel conten- ded. that the duties of the two offices could not be held consistently by the same person, and argued that Mr. Justice Bailhache was wrong in making the declaration that the same person might hold the two offices. Mr. Justice Bray asked if a man went out- side the scope of his duties could he be re- moved ? Mr. Mitchell Innes replied he could not contend that the man could be removed unless some detriment or damage caused by his conduct could be proved, but he did contend that the section showed that apart from interference with the management or detriment, if the man outstepped his statu- tory duties as a checkweigher, he was a trespasser, and could be restrained because he had committed a breach of his duty. CHECKWEIGHER OR INSPECTOR? Mr. Leslie Scott, K.C., for the respondent, said there was no suggestion of any miscon- duct or of interference on the part of Mr. Date, the whole point being one of law. The Act said the miners for their own safety and protection could appoint a man as in- spector who had been or was a practical work- ing miner, and the office did not demand a great deal of time or attention, because there was only an occasional duty to be done. Lord Justice Swinfen Eady: Would you say that a checkweigher had reasonable excuse for absence from his duties as checkweigher if he were away inspecting a mine? Mr. Leslie Scott replied yes, if he were carrying out another duty he was lawfully en- titled to perform. There was nothing in Section 13 of the Act which was a prohibition to a checkweigher from undertaking the duties of an inspector. Briefly, Mr. Scott summed up his argu- ments as follows:—Firstly, there was noth- ing to prohibit a checkweigher from holding office outside his duties; secondly, that since the passing of the Act that provided for the appointment of a deputy checkweigher the only objection raised that a checkweigher should be present performing his functions whenever the pit was working had gone I thirdly, that if the men wanted a check- weigher to represent them as inspector it was a reasonable cause for his absence if he were away on inspecting duty. It was a conveni- ent arrangement, counsel said, that a man who had the men's confidence and whom the I owners knew as a checkweigher, should hold the office of inspector. I JUDGMENT RESERVED. I The Court, after a lengthy consideration, I decided to reserve judgment.

No title

The Glamorgan Local Government Commit- tee on Friday granted the application of St. ?Aiidrew's Major Parish Council to raise a loan of X2,000 for the purpose of purchasing a new burial ground. The committee approved of the re-arrangement of several electoral areas, in- cluding increased representatives for the Glyn- corrwg Urban District and the extension of wards at Pontardawe and Margam. Increased representation on the Neath Board of Guar- dians and the Rural District Council was also granted to Resolven.

Advertising

tD :J -9"] 'IT —— IMPORTANT TO PIANO BUYERS. —— THE BEST VALUE CAN BE OBTAINED BY PLACING THE ORDER WITH Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), WHO HAVE ALWAYS IN STOCK A GREAT VARIETY OF The CELEBRATED BRINSMEAD PIANOS, AND ALSO THE NEWEST MODELS OF Challen & Son, Ibach, Collard & Collard, Broadwood Player Pianos, Simplex Player Pianos, J. & J. Hopkinsqn, J. H. Crowley, Ernst Kaps, Schiedmayer, Moore & Moore, Justin Browne, Neumeyer, and many others to select from. Largest Discounts for Cash. SOLE AGENTS FOR the Celebrated ESTEY ORGANS. Our Terms for Cash are low. ———— Our Hire System is Equitable. ———— Beautifully Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue sent on application, with full particulars of a splendid selection of SECOND-HAND PIANOS and ORGANS, returned from hire and taken in exchange-now offered at Bargain Prices. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Written Warranty with Each Instrument. Turnings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd., X, VSTyn.dllia.iGa. Street^ BRIDOEND. ALSO AT:- 8, High Street, NANTYFFYLON, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, NEWPORT, BRISTOL, ETC A LARGE VARIETY OF RELIABLE WELSH FLANNEL From 1/2 per yard. Plain & Stripe Fawn Shirting. Plain & Stripe Grey Shirting COLOURED DRESS FLANNELS. Cream Stripe Shirting and Blouse Flannels. Home Made Shirts from 5s. each I& 1 li BOYS' SHIRTS from Size I to 9. Plenty of Patterns to Choose from. HUNDREDS IN STOCK. STOCKINGS and SOCKS of all kinds from 6d. per pair PANTS and VESTS from Is. each. Fleecy and Merino. Also a variety of Cashmere Pants and Vests from 213 each. NOTE ADDRESS: el t i "Ii I ? *,? l?I, ?* .tl t W. T. JONES. Manchester House, Not 5 minutes from Station. BRIDGEND. TEN REASONS Why you should Advertise in the GLAMORGAN GAZETTE The LOCAL PAPER FOR CENTRAL GLAMORGAN. BECAUSE it is found in practically every House in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE it is the recognised medium for all local official advertisements. BECAUSE it circulates amongst people who have money to spend. BECAUSE it secures to every advertiser the greatest possible publicity. BECAUSE it is the Oldest Local Newspaper in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE its rates are low compared with the extent and character of circulation. BECAUSE it circulates in a densely populated industrial district. BECAUSE no advertising scheme is complete I without it. BECAUSE it has been used for years by all the most successful advertisers. BECAUSE it stands in the Front Rank of News- papers as a Business Bringer. Rates on application. v HEAD OFFICES— Queen Street, Bridgend. v j