Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

acTvAiN* & COMPANY, Ltd., Special Purchase of a MaDufacturt.r' Rtock of 60 Superior Dining Roppr Suites As Drawing. Thoroughly Strong well finished, and well upholstered in excellent leather cloth, worth 6 guineas each. Offered at only 14 19s. 6d. per suite. Hundreds of Dining, Drawing & Bedroom,Suites from 3 guineas upwards! !\Ipar Empire & 97, St. Mary Street. WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS Be van & Company FOR In?n?ei?sc SeiectiQ., t I Newest DesiOvs, I Everytbil74. for furpisl?li?§ j Rcclf Botton? Prices!: Trai., Fares Paid I free Delivery! Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, &c.

Paeps at Porhcawl

Paeps at Por?hcawl ? By MARINER. I have tH-en able to read through the Medical Alexander's) report on the health o! the town. Of course, it is for 1914, and, f: )m all points of view, it is emin- ently satisfactory. I think if any Councilloi, or any ratepayer, had sat himself down to write out a statement giving figures as he would like them to be, he could not have done much Hotter than the doctor has been able to do for us on the facts which have come to his knowledge as medical officer dur- ing the twelve months that are past. For- tunately, we all know that medical officers' reports are not biassed. They present facte and figures as they really are. They are bound to do so. Primarily medical officers' reports are not intended for home consump- tion, but for the benefit of the Local Govern- ment Board, who thus keep in touch with each urban, rural, and borough authority in the country. And I venture to say that amongst tlio reports that have reached the Board from -ill parts of the country a better, a more satisfactory one is not to be found. It is one of the best advertisements we could have. There is really no necessity for guides, railway posters, etc., when we have reports like this. Circulate them instead of a guide, and they would bring their own re- ward. A perusal of the report will show I everybody that there is not much wrong with our town. Its health is good, ita pulse beats normal, and there is every prospect of and practically no doubt that it is going to be a long-liver. It is to be hoped that Zeppelins will not send this year's death-rafe up. < w < I The death rate for 1914 has fallen to 9.4, which is leovs than the rate for the past three years. The infantile mortality is very low compared with other districts, says the doctor. I therefore advise mothers to bring their chil- dren to Porthoawl at oncil. We can do with them all. We like to hear them squall, and Porthcawl air will make their lungs stronger to sust:t;n t!:e note. We like to see them gambol about on the sands, free from all care, thinkiyg of nothing but their sand castles and the pebbles that keep the dogs barking at t.ie water's edge. So mothers, for our sakes, bring your children, and for your own sakes do it, because it means health for them if they are delicate, and greater strength for them if they are already strong. Cases of infectious diseases in the town during the year numbered seven-not one a month, and, as the doctor says, "considering the great number of visitors to Porfchc&wl during the summer months, many coming from infected areas, and many being convalescents from infectious diseases," the number of cases noti- fied are very few. • • • There are other points in the report that I should like to ref-er to, but I am limited to space, and must therefore just briefly refer to the fact that the dairies, cow- sheds, and milkshops in the district "are periodically inspected and found clean and well kept." This may clear up some sus- picions that have been lurking in the minds of some people in the locality. It is to be heped that farmers and milk sellers will con- tinue to live up to the reputation that the medical offioer gives tfcem. They have a duty to perform to the country, as well as the Bantams and the other soldiers in our midst, and that is to see that our milk supply, like Cfeesar's wife. is above suspicion, and that it is kept up to the highest possible standard. When we read of the dangers of milk as a conveyor of t ;burculosi s we get a bit nervous. We tremble i-i our shoes every time we look at alass of iLLk, yet it is a terrible job on a hot day to resist the tempting food that the cow gives us. So farmers, in seeing that their cows and their cowsheds are maintained in a cleanly state, and purveyors, by making sure their utensils are clean, will understand that they are doing their little bit to keep up the health of the community of which they are units, and so be of service to the State, < I cannot leave the medical officer's report without quoting his remarks concerning the water supply" For a short period during the summer months the water supply of the district was intermittent, but no inconveni- ence was caused to the populace as the water was turned off between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. A new 8-inch pipe is about to be laid from Craig-y-Aber to the boundary; this will materially increase the water supply. At the present time there appears an ample supply with good pressure. The chemical and bacteriological examinations of the water have been satisfactory." That last sentence should be emphasised. It is not every district that can !).• ist • water supply that is chemically and satisfactory. And this rem: n-is t the connection has been made with >e I' v-bont Council main, and is al- ready '_iv:vhe utmost satisfaction. Every- body t w lises that this was a happy idea of IMs IXeie's, and has removed a source of great anxiety to the town. f There appears to be an impression among-s-t people who anticipate the summer season in onder to spend a holiday amongst us that the soldiers have taken up all available accom- modation. Such a rumour is not calculated to do Porthcawl any good. I was pleased to hear that Mr. T. James raised the matter at Monday's meeting. The impression is an erroneous one, for there is an abundance of room. We can take all the visitors who like to ooroe to see us—everything will be as com- fortable for them as it always was; there will be numerous attractions this summer. The soldiers themselves are worth going a long way to see. They are a smart, happy-looking lot. The majority of them have now left their billets and gone under canvas, and I am told are having a splendid time. This has meant that many of our boarding-houses are now ompty. and the landladies, who I cannot speak too highly of, are waiting with open arms to greet the summer visitor. The last- namtld cannot really imagine how glad, all Porthcawl people are to see them. Every- body regards them as old friends. People fe-t-I wb borne as soon as they step out of the tr,ail for there are so many smiling faces to grcev them. Of course, while walicn ? turough the town the visitor may run across a sour-faced individual here and there, who looks as if he had had a bad bilious attack or an attack of the bliies--bL-eii looking too long aD the sea perhaps, contemplatively—but bilious-looling people are always male's —the ladies are always smiling. They thrive on the summer air; they always look happy, but the summer visitor makes even these look happier than they usually do. And when the summer visitor comes, they catch the mood, and tkev look happy, too. 0 I trust Mr. Deere will strive to let all busi- ne,&, of public interest be discussed in public. matter which came before the Council on Monday night was one of great public import- ance. viz., the consideration of a plan for de- velopments near Seabank Hotel. Mr. R. E. Jones, as always, was ready and willing for the Council to debate the matter in the presence of the Press, and'intimated his will- ingness by retiring from the Council Chamber. The question at issue was the building line. This is an extremely important question at Porthcawl just now. The Council, by adopt- ing a sdip-shod policy can make or mar Porth- cawl it can spoil the beauty of the Esplan- ade, and it can prevent development towards the Rest by failing to give proper attention to the matter now while Porthcawl is in the stage of development. The Esplanade is a great asset to the town, and it should be made to look at its best. The Council should fix upon definite building lines in all parts of the town. Nothing is more unsightly than a lot of buildings, some projecting, some lying well back hidden between two brick walls. Near Seabank Hotel, if the Council acts wisely, great improvements can be carriecWout which will give the town a grand drive from the Esplanade Hotel to the Rest. I am sure if Mr. R. E. Jones and Mr. J. Elias, and any other landowner interested, were approached is the proper manner they would readily grant facilities for this much-desired improve- ment to be carried out. At present the spot opposite Seabank is extremely dangerous, and it is often blocked by motor cars. But if facilities—eitfeer by a dedication of the neces- aary land to the public, or the sale of it to the town—were granted, I am sure the thanks of the town would go out to both gentlemen. Once buildings are erected the chance will be gone. < < < Clause 60 in the Parliamentary Bill gives the Council wide powers. It states: "Where any street or road in the district, repairable by the inhabitants at large, is, in the opinion of the Council, narrow or inconvenient or with- out any sufficient, regular line of frontage, or where, in their opinion, it is necessary or desirable that the line of frontage should be altered, the Council may, from time to time. prescribe and define what shall thereafter be the line of frontage to be observed on either side of such street or road. The line which in any case the Council propose to prescribe and (tefine shall be distinctly marked on the plan, and be signed by the Chairman of the Council or by the clerk and be deposited with the surveyor, and such plan shall be at all rea- sonable times thereafter open to the inspec- tion of the public without charge. No new building, erection, or obstruction, being of a permanent character, shall be made nearer to the centre of the street or road than such line." In face of that clause, the Coun- cil should immediately prescribe building lines so that owners and builders will know what to do, and-in the long run it will prevent a lot of discussion and annoyance. w < I over-heard a few complaints at the fire on Saturday. Some wanted to know where the Fire Brigade was; others wanted to know where the captain had got to. If they had not been so hasty they would have remem- be red that the road is "up" in John Street, and this made the Brigade's task of getting through some- what difficult. Then if they had thought again they would have remembered that the captain is now a J.P., and has to discharge hia duties. He was on the Bench at Bridg- end, and on getting the telephone message that a fire had occurred, immediately left, and 25 minuta-, later was in Porthcawl. But those people did not think. As a matter of fact, considering all circumstances, the Brigade were quickly on the scene, and when they got there they did valuable work. w < < I am gtad to hear that the Chairman of the Council is taking steps to assist British pri- soners of war in Germany. It 's a praise- worthy object, and I am sure he will have the whole town at his back, giving him sup- port. A concert is being arranged, and the proceeds will go towards the funds for assist- ing those who have played their part in the defence of their country and, unfortunately, have fallen into the hands of the Huns.

PORTHCAWL OFFICER WOUNDED 0

PORTHCAWL OFFICER WOUNDED. ——— 0- MIRACULOUS ESCAPE OF ANOTHER. Second-Lieutenant B. G. D. Jones, one of the six officers who left about a fortnight ago to join the 1st Welsh at the front, has been killed in action. Lieutenant Jones hailed from Worthing, and made a host of friends at Cardiff. He was only 19 years of age. Both Second-Lieutenants Brown, of Penarth, and Bowen, of Porthcawl, who were wounded at the same time, are now in hospital in Lon- don, and are reported to be progressing fav- ourably. Lieutenant Brown, who is a',sun of Mr. Archibald Brown, a well-known £ rn- diff Docksman, had a miraculous escape from death, for he was buried in the earth of a blown-up trench for a couple of hours. Lieut. Bawen, a son of Mr. Geo. Bowen, who was wounded by shrapnel in the forehead, hopes to be out of hospital in a few days' fine.

No title

"I am not sure that the finest thing about our warfare is not the affection with which the officers especially those of the newer type speak of their men," says "A Way- farer" in the "Nation." "If the war has done nothing else., it has created a new bond of class-sympathy, which one hopes will en- dure well beyond it."

A strongly Worded Letter1

A strongly Worded Letter 1 REMARKABLE STATEMENT AT I POiUHCAWL COUNCIL. COUNCIL SAID TO HAVE "SOLD" THE TOWN. I POSITION OF NEW STATION. G. W. RAILWAY SAYS PETITIONERS HAVE MOVED TOO LATE. In response to a memorial sent to the G. W Railway Company by 340 residents of Porth- cawl, protesting against the situation of the new station now in course of construction, and which the Council pledged themselves to sup- port, the manager of the G.W.R. wrote to the Council on the matter. In the letter, which was read by the Clerk (Mr. E. Davies) at the Porthcawl Council meeting on Monday night, the Company Said, in reply to the letter from the Council in which they intimated that the Porthcawl Council was desirous of associ- ating themselves with the representations to a memorial recently received by the Company relative to the new station now in course of erection at Porthcawl, they could only say that having regard to the steps which the Company took to let their intentions be made known to carry with them the concurrence of the leading people of the town and district, they were not prepared to receive the memo- rial that had come to hand. They were cer- tainly surprised that the Council should iden- tify themselves with it. The site of the new station waa only decided upon after very care- ful consideration, with the sole object of se- curing that passengers travelling to and from Porthcawl and especially excursionists, should arrive at and depart from a station, erected in a reasonably convenient position. The Company could not be charged with want of consideration for the town and interests of Porthcawl. AMAZING STATEMENTS. The Clerk further read a letter, signed by Messrs. R. Sampson, 1. V. Thomas, J. M. Walters, and F. Richards. The letter stated: Four weeks ago we sent you a petition, signed by 340 residents of this town, appealing to you to prevent the erection of a station on the docks and so pre- vent thination of the town. We have not yet had even an acknowledgment from you of the petition, which, please to under- stand, was the sacred wish of a very large portion of the residents of this town. We have now reason to believe that no effort has been made by you to seriously deal with this all-important question. It is a well-known fact that certain members of the Council, together with other persons interested in, land, etc., in the vicinity of the docks, secret- ly met some officials of the Railway Company some time ago, and, without any attempt of consulting the town, persuaded the officials to erect a station at the docks irrespective of the level crossing-which must inevitably become a greater hindrance to the town than ever, and irrespective of the ruination of the town. "The Council have not done their duty by pursuing such illicit and deplorable tactics, for they should have held a public meeting and they should have consulted the town as r a whole on this vital question. "The Council had no business to confer with a few men in John Street and advise the Railway Company to erect the Station at the Docks, and those Councillors who did so will be cursed by the residents of this town for ever. It is openly averred that this piece of nefarious "work was done by the reputed "sel- fish men" that are on and off the Council and upon their doorsteps the ruination of the town will lie. The predominating question of the Council with the Railway Company certainly should have been the abolition of the level crossing, which is the fundamental drawback of the town. Had the Council had the true interests of the town in view then they would have made it their main business to advise the Railway Company to erect the Station to the north of the level crossing so that the level crossing could be abandoned. "We, the 340 residents of the town, em- phatically say that you have sold the town, yea ruined it, by secretly designing and plan- ning behind the backs of the residents." Mr. R. E. Jones said he was one of the members of the Council who never had any- thing to db with regard to the new station and its position. He remembered that a meeting was called of tradesmen there in the town and matters were discussed, but he knew nothing about it; he was not present. He wished to emphatically say that he had noth- ing to do, so far as he was concerned, with the position of the station. He remembered distinctly asking the Great Western Railway Company if they could say where the new station was to be, but they would not tell him; they requested him not to ask them. Only one thing more he had to say and that was, no matter what one did, one only got kicks. Mr. T. G. Jones thought the Council stated their views when the petition was presented. Mr. D. J. Rees said this was a pity it had been started so late. There was no doubt about it they had good grounds for com- plaints, but it was very unfortunate that they had moved at so late an hour. He moved that a copy of the letter received by the Great Western Railway be sent them; they could see then that the Council had moved. The Cler1, suggested that these people should not make such wild statements broad- cast before they knew the position. 'I' "'I I'. jyir. T. u. Jones sai-a n was a serious trnng for the Council that such things should be said. They accused the Council of serious actions. Personally, he was not one of the tradesman who interviewed the Railway Company. He would like to know who was, as it would be a smart man who could influ- ence the Railway Company. The Chairman: I don't think he is to be found round the table. Mr. R. E. Jones agreed with Mr. Rees. He had asked one of the prominent signa- tories of the memorial why in the world he had not moved until now. They knew as much .about it as anyone, but they left it till election time and then brought it up. Mr. D. J. Rees* motion that copies of the (Continued on Bottom of Next Column.)

A strongly Worded Letter1

(Continued from previous column.) letter sent to the Railway Company and the reply be sent to the signatories was not seconded, so no action 1rvm taken in the mat- ter.

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. THE BANK AND THE GAS LOAN. t EXCURSION FACILITIES. I A meeting of the Porthcawl U.D. Council was held at tie Council Chamber on Monday- Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., presided. REGISTER OF APARTMENTS. I The Clerk read a letter in which a prospec- tive visitor asked for a register of apartments and lodging houses in Porthcawl. Mr. R. E. Jones thought it would be con- I. venient to have a register of the apartments to let in the town, so tfcat when they re- ceive d an application such as this they coiild send one. They were now posting large po&- ters of a character which was calculated to draw people to Porthcawl, all about the coun- try, and he thought they would do good work. There was only one thing he didn't like about them-the word Porthcawl was not very dis- tinct. It would be an excellent thing if they could get a list of the people able to let apartments,- with how many rooms they had to let. Mr. D. Davies: Didn't I notice that the G.W.R. canvasses for suala a thing as this? The Chairman: Yes; it is all in their "Holi- day Resorts." Mr. D. Davies: I have noticed that; I think we ought to do the same here, too. Don't you think we ought to get people to pay a little for it P The Chairman: You will find that a diffi- oulty. Mr. R. E. Jones agreed with Mr. Davies. He thought they might fix a small fee. Mr. D. Davies: This is the fourth or fifth application that we have had now. Mr. D. J. Rees proposed that a small com- mittee of three should be appointed to go into the matter and find out what had been done in other seaside resorts.—Agreed. A gxeo d The committee appointed were Messrs. Dr J. Rees, T. James, and J. Grace. PENYBONT COUNCIL'S ASSISTANCE. I A letter was read from Mr. R. Harmar Cox, clerk to the Penybont R-D., Council, confirm- ing the resolution of the Council sanctioning the connection to be made to the Council's water main at South Cornelly, for the pur- pose of supplying troops at PorthcawL On the proposition of Mr. R. E. Jones, seconded by Mr. T. James, a vote of thanks was passed to the Penybont Council for. their action in the matter. I FIRST PHOTOGRAPH FOR THE ALBUM. I The Clerk stated that he had rceeiv-od a photograph of the late Mr. Walker Bevan who at one time was a surveyor to the Coun- who at <)no time wa8 a surveyor to the Coun- It was resolved that the photograph should be placed in the album kept for that pur- pose. The Chairman: That's the first one, gentle- men. t EXCURSION FACILITIES. The Clerk read a letter from the Public Health Resorts Association with reference to the question of excursion facilities. It was stated that the question was discussed by the authorities concerned including the War Office and Board of Trade authorities, and it was quite evident that there was very little possibility of getting excursion facilities for the ensuing season, unless a very strong case was made out. A question was asked whether representa- tions could not be made with regard to week- end tickets. It meant a great loss to a place that that could not be done. It was moved that the clerk should write the author- ities on the matter. Agreed I REPRESENTATION ON HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. A letter was read from the Bridgend Isola- tion Hospital Committee in which they pro- posed that the number of representatives on the committee be increased from 8 to 16. It was resolved that the committee should be asked if Porthcawl would be entitled to any additional representation on the committee. I BANK AND THE GAS LOAN. I In reply to a question, the Clerk said he had had no letter from the local bank with reference to the gas loan. Mr. T. G. Jones: Nor from their solicitors? The Chairman: Yes;. there was a letter from the solicitors, and it was read on Friday night. Mr. T. G. Jones suggested that the letter should be read at the open Council. The Clerk it was an adjourned Council on Friday. Mr. T. G. Jones took it that any letter re- ceived by the Council should be read at a proper Council meeting if it was received after the last public meeting. It was only right and proper. Friday night's meeting was a Council in committee, met for a special pur- pose, and he submitted that no oorrespon- denoe should have been taken there at all. It should have been taken by the public meeting. Mr. D. J, Ree§ said the letter was marked u Urgent/' and it was opened by resolution. The Clerk I think it should be taken in committee. It is not a matter for the public at present; we are in negotiation. It was agreed that the matter should be taken in committee. DESTROY THE FLIES. Mr. T. James asked if it was possbile to get some means of destroying flies. They heard so much about the gernis at the present time; they were told that flies contained a terrible German germ. The Chairman: You don't suggest a prize for the biggest number killed. It was agreed that the matter be included in the leaflet which the Sonreyor had in hand. The Clerk: If we could ascertain where the flies congregate, perhaps we could hold a Council meeting there; that would do it. (Laughter. ) ROAD UP. I After some discussion it was arranged that notices should be fixed at certain spots diver- ting the traffic from John Street, where the road was up.

ALARMING FIRE AT PORTHCAWL

ALARMING FIRE AT PORTH- CAWL. BANTAMS TURN OUT ) ——— I AND KEEP THE ÇRQwn BACK WITH I BAYONETS. I A fixe of an alarming, character occurred at Porthcawl on Saturday. The outbreak, it appears, commenced; im the ioiners" shop be- longing to Mr. R. Sampson, whi-ch is near to the G. W. Railway. Station. The conflagra- tioa was sudden, and the first intimation that ,anything unusual was happening was a column or flame, which shot into the air and attraicfeed the attentioa of the proprietor, who was working at the rear of his premises, and a number of people near the Railway Station. The alarm was at once given; the Bantams were called out by bugle, and in a! very few moments hundreds of people had congregated. Siglit-seers began to climb over the G.W.R. railings, and at last the crush became so great that the Bantams were ordered to fix bayonets to keep the crowd back. There were many willing helpers in the work of subduing the flames, which had now got a thorough hold of the premises, and although there was a capital supply of water it was seen that the shop was doomed. The Brigade were not long before they were on the scene, and got to wot'k quickly,- devoting their efforts to serv- ing the adjoining houses, which were threat- ened by the flames. One house had just; caught when the Brigade got to work with effect and extinguished the flames amd les- sened the danger in that direction* It was, however, thought advisable to remove the fur- niture from the threatened dwellings- The sheds were still burning, and a good volume of water was directed upon them, sending up dense clouds of smoke. Ultimately the flames were extinguished, but not before the shop and offices were gutted, and the work- men's tools inside, which, it is Hoderstood, were not insured, destroyed. The office books, however, were saved. The Brigade was under the oomUxand of Sergt. J. Farrow, the captain, Mir. T., E. Deere, J.P., being at Bridgend. Immediately he received the message, however. he left the Bench and reached Porthcawl 25 mihaites later. The cause of the fire is unknown.

MASONS INSURANCE CARDI

MASON'S INSURANCE CARD I NOT STAMPED WHILE AT PORTHCAWL t I COMMISSONERS' PROSECUTION. I At Bridgend Police Court an Saturday, Robert Rankin, traveller, CornersweH Road, Penarth, was summoned for having failed to pay contributions in respect of the week com- mencing Monday, 27th April, 1914, which he was liable to pay under Part I. erf tite Nation- al Insurance Act. Mr. J. Hadyn Jones, Cardiff, who prosecu- ted, said a mason named Best was in defend- ant's employ at the Pavilion, Porthcawl, and w hen he commenced work he handed defend- ant his insurance card which had a number of stamps upon it. When he left he was paid off and went to defendant's office. There were two books on the desk and Beet found that his insurance card had not had any more stamps put on. He had been nine weeks in the employ of defendant and nine stamps should have been affixed. The effect of de- fendant's omission was that if Best was taken ill between now and October the sickness benefit would be reduced from 10s. to 2s. for the first six weeks of illness. John Best, Houston House, New Road, Porthcawl, said he was a mason and was em- ployed by defendant between 30tH March to 30th May at the Pavilion, Porthcawl. He produced a card when he entered defendant's employ and it bore eleven stamps then. When he left his employ the card was returned to him without amy additional stamps having been fixed. Defendant, who did not appear, was fined 92.

IFOUR PORTHCAWL MEN I

I FOUR PORTHCAWL MEN I ON THE GOLIATH. 1 Porthcawl residents are anxiously, awaiting news concerning four Porthcawl men who were on the Goliath, whioh was sunk in the Dardanelles. The list of survivors has not yet been published. The local men included Mr. James Pearce, from whom a letter was received a few days ago that he hoped he would shortly have leave of absenoe. It is not known whether he was on leave when the disaster occurred. The other men are Mr. David Ockwell, Mr. Hodgson (George Street), whose father is serving with the National Re- serves and the fourth is a brother-in-law of t Mr. Lord,. St. Mary Street. Porthcawl awaits further information anxiously. I f -"—-

I VISITORS TO PORTHCAWL

I VISITORS TO PORTHCAWL. I PLENTY OF ROOM. At Porthcawl Council on Monday Mr. James said he had received a number of let- ters asking if Porthcawl was free to receive visitors just now. There waa an impression abroad that the military had taken the whole of the lodging houses in the place. It would be a great boon to the public at Porthcawl if it could be made known outside that visi- tors could come to the town and that the military were confined, comparatively speak- ing, to a limited area, and a large number of them were at present under canvas. He moved that the matter, should he mada known through the Press. Mr, D. J. Rees seconded and it was carijed.

No title

Some engineers were working at the railway crossing near Bletchley when a trainload of German prisoners, captured in the fighting at Hill 60, passed through. The German pri- soners spat at the British soldiers from the carriage windows and made insulting remarks. The engineers, however, disregarded the jieers and remained standing at attention.

HEALTHY PORTHCAWLI

HEALTHY PORTHCAWL. I MEDICAL OFFICER'S GRATIFYING I REPORT. Interesting facts and figures bearing out all the good things that have been said about Porthcawl as a health resort, are given in the Medical Officer's annual; report,, which was submitted at Pciifchcawl Council oa Monday. In the coursGr-of: the report. Dr.. Alexander states:— BIRTHS. There were 73" births.. rogistGrOOi during the year, viz.: M&les/ 37; females, 38. This gives an annual birth, rabo of 21s3 per 1,000 compared wifit a. similar raio-ia 1912; 15.7 in 19ia^ and 17..S in 1914. DEATHS, I There woyee 48 Deaths- during the year,, in- cluding residents dying, anvay aad in public in- stitutions. This, gives, an annual death rate of 11.2 per 1,000. -1 INFANTILE; MmTALITY., Ii mere were serein de¥hS umaer one eæ: ua the distnict. Rate pe? 1,.WO births register?d? I'i 93.3. 1- REMARKS. I The births were about the same as. 19$3, showing a greatly continued improved, birth rate. The corrected death rate of 9.4 is lees than the past three years. The rati o between birth and death rates is very good. The in- fantile mortality is very low compaxed with other districts.. SCARLATINA. I seven cases were notilied during the year. Some of the cases occurred among visitors, and wera seat either to the Isolation Hospital in their district or to their homes, the medi- cal officer of the district being notified. Five cases were sent to the Isolation Hospital for treatmeat. All cases sent to the Isolation Hospital; im- mediately after removal the houses were thoroughly disinfected. Those cases attended it-b home (two) were aa far as possible isolated, and the houses disinfected. Considering the great number of visitors to Porthcawl during the summer months, many coming from infected areas, and many being convalescents from infectious diseases, the number of cases notified are very few. TUBERCULOSIS. Three oases of deaths were notified during the year. All cases of tuberculosis notified were visited by me, and printed instructions given as to precautionary measures to be taken from the spreading of the disease. Also all houses where cases of Tu berculosis had re- sided, after learing, were thoroughly disin- fected under the superintendence of the sani- tary inspector. Pursuant to the Public Health (Tuberculosis) Regulations, 1912, which came into operation on the 1st Feb- ruary, 1912, six cases of tuberculosis of the lungs were notified. SCHOOLS. "1 ,11 lne sanitary conveniences ot tne public schools are from time to time inspected. The premises are always found to be clean and well cared for. There is an ample supply of water at both schools. DAIRIES, COWSHEDS AND MILK SHOPS. During the Session 1914, the District Coun- cil promoted a Bill in Parliament to make further and better provision in connection with the above. (1) Compensate any diary- man who has been requested by the Council to stop his milk supply within the district on account of the spread or suspected spread of infectious disease or the probability that the consumption of such milk may cause tuber- culosis to any person residing in the district; (2)' compensate any person who, at the request of the Council or their medical officer of health, stops his employment for the purpose of preventing the spread of infectious disease; (3) regulate the sale and manufacture of ice cream, etc. (4) require information to be fur- nished to the medioal offioor of health in oases of infectious disease. There are 23 cow- keepers and 11 purveyors of milk registered in the district. The prtiptrises are periodically inspected and found clean and well kept. SLAUGHTER HOUSES. I There are four registered private slaughter- houses in the district, which are frequently inspected and found to be in a sanitary con- dition. SEWERAGE AND DRAINAGE. t The new drainage scheme for the Western Section is now being carried out, and it is dstiticipated that this work will be completed before the summer months. WATER SUPPLY. -I I For a short period during the summer months the water supply of the district was intermittent, but no inconvenience was caused to the populace as the water was turned off between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. A new 8-inch pipe is about to be laid from Craig- y-Aberr to the boundary;, this will materially  increase the water supply. At the present time there appears 1m ample supply with good pressure. The chemical and bacteriological examinations of the water baTe I been satisfactory. t SANITARY ADMINISTRATION. J This branch of the town's administration is particularly well carried out, the facilities for early and speedy removal of the town refuse being well equipped. Every house in the district, with the exception of the few out- lying farmhouses, is scavanged not less than three times a week all the year round, the town portion of the collection being carried out and completed early in the day. Under the Porthcawl Urban District Bill, 1914, power was granted that the public should provide galvanisod iron or enamelled dustbins in lieu of ashpits, ashtubs, or other recep- tacles for refuse. I should suggest that this should be put in force before the summer months. CESSPOOLS. There are very few houses in the district that are not drained to the main sewer, and special attention is given to the cleaning of these. AH cesspool cleaning is carried out by the workmen of the Council, and the work performed by night. I am glad to state that ten of these cesspools will be done away with on the completion of the sewerage scheme rtovt in hand. GENERAL. The administrative duties of the sanitary department aro especially well pref ormed, the district being peroidically and systmc-atically inspected and immediate action taken in 1"e- spect of, amy matter arising from nuisances, breach of bye-laws or regulations. RECOMMENDATIONS. The completion of the Eastern sewerage scheme as- soon as possible. Provision for fur- tner lavatory accommodation. The making I up of back lanes under the provisions of the Private Street Works Act. Main street im- jprovement in laying down kerbing, channel- ling,, fiaofbwfays, and the proper disposal of sur- face, water. The purchase of a portable fumi- gator or disinfector for bed, bedding, etc.

SURVEYORS REPORTI

SURVEYOR'S REPORT. Ill the course of his report, the Surveyor I (Mr. A. J. Oborn) says:— MILITARY CAMPS. I During the year about 6,000 soldiers of the &-d Shro.-pshires, Royal Army Medical Corps, Glamorgan Yeomanry, 3rd Cheshire and Welsh Fusiliers Regiments were encamped in the district. The whole of the water supply was received from the Council's mains and distributed by the Council, who also had control of the scav- enging of these camps. The work was exe- cuted to the entire satisfaction of the military authorities. Since August the district of Porthcawl has been used entirely for military recruiting and training purposes, and up to the end of thie year we had up to 5,000 strong biUeted in various dwelling-houses. These troops ap- pt?red to be remarkably free from any iua%o- tious disease.

IPORTHCAWL GIRL GOES TOI IPRISON

PORTHCAWL GIRL GOES TOI PRISON. THEFT FROM OFFERTORY BOX. I Sentence of fourteen days' imprisonment or a fine of 19s. 6d. was imposed att BJsmotrfeh upon Helena and Florence Hawker,, two re- spectably-dressed young women, for stealing an offertory box, containing 3s. Qii., from Holy Trinity Church. They decided to go to prison. Helen Hawker, whose ago was. giiten at 20, was stated to be a housemaid., her home being at Porthcawl, whilst Florence Hawker is her cousin, of Church Court,. Bteer, Devaa. The former stoutly denied thd offence, but Florence pleaded guilty.

1 n ISEIZURE IIN CHURCHI

— n I SEIZURE I IN CHURCH. I I TRAGIC AFFAIR AT NEWTON. I On Sunday, Mr. David Thomas, an old re- sident of Newton, and a reguilar Churdh at- tendant, although- not feeling well, tcid his wife that he thought he would go to chrarch once more as it was a good place to go to. He got to the church and had been inside only a few minutes when he was seen to fall. Sidesmen; at ojece ran to him, and carried him outside, in. am unconscious state. Dr. James, who was quickly on the soene, pronounced life extinctu The affair caused a sensation in the chiujfch, but the curate, the Rev. D. J. Arthur, prevented a scene by proceeding with the service.

IKERFIG HILL REFRESHMENT HOUSE KEEPER

I KERFIG HILL REFRESHMENT HOUSE KEEPER AND PENNY-IN-THE-SL0T MACHINES. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Victoria Lusardi, refreshment housekeeper, Commercial Street, Kenfig Hill, and Carlo Nardoni, refreshment housekeeper, Evan St., Kenfig Hill, were summoned for having aV lowed an unlawful game to be played on their premises. Mr. D. Llewellyn asked for the adjourn- ment of the case for a week. The makers of the machine were defending the case, but he (Mr. Llewellyn) had only just received in- structions. An adjournment was granted for a week.

ILLOYDS PENNY BANK I

I LLOYDS PENNY BANK. I The promotion of habits of thrift is wise and commendable at all times, but it is especially so at the present moment, when many people are earning larger incomes, and it is encourag- ing to read the announcement of Lloyds Bank, Limited, which appears in our oolumns to- day. The directors of this Bank,, one of the largest and most powerful of the Joint Stock Banks, and which already has a large Savings Bank Department in the South-West oi Eng- landj have decided to place the services of the Banjr, with ito widespread system of branches, at the disposal of the public gener- ally for the deposit, at interest, of savingp, however small.

No title

t An American actor, just married, went on to.tlr with his wife. For several days he had been telling her about a certain hotel which served delicious honey. When they arrived he found, fo his annoyance, none oii the table. "See here," he said, "where's ma honey?" The waiter .nmeredj h?itat?d? an? finally leaned forward and said in a stage whisper, She don't work here any more."

No title

A telegram from Kansas City states that agents of the Allies propose buying cattle by live weight in America, shipping them in ves- sels recently commandeered for carrying horses and mules, and sending them to follow the armies, as the Federal Government of the United States did during the Civil War.

Advertising

LADIES BLANCHARD'S PILLS Ass unrivalled for all Irregularities, die.. by speedily afford relief and nevea fej] to woemicite all suffering, etc. They monwe& PomyrDy4 Pil Oochia, Bitter Apple. danohanfr Me the Best of aZI AQb Women. Sold fa boxes ts. ltd., by BOMW nmmwl" MA an ChemuAs, or post manm price, from LESLIE MAJRTYN, CbeB&?, 8? DoMm Efte, L.wi- j E?? ?nd valuable BooMe? go* bw ?a. <

Gathered Comments II ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments I ON THE WAR.. .¿..& The Least America Could Do. "Without despatching a squadron or, an, Army, President Wilson might at least get rid of the Am bassad or. who plays such. a das- tardly and im.olent rue, sa.ys "Le .à-Ia.t.in. Census of Eljflibles. "The machiuery of. the census should be. employed to make an accurate muster of all persons of military age, that is, of all persona over nineteen, .and under thirty-eight, who do not hokla certificate of exemption." "Spe£. tat-or. If the Kaiser, Qjed? v\ oulxl.tho. (teoitJi proloiao, the war or hasten its end? Would it quench the Geimans., lust, foi: battle oir fire it afresh pH asks Mr, F. W.. Wile in the .Evening News." Mr. Wile thinks the sudden passing of Wil- liam. II.. at, this hour would only spur his people on to. still more furious endeavours to impose their imperious domination on Europe, sunder the leadership of the present Hotspur iCrown Prinoe-long the darling of the War Rwty, aeal, tho iamruation of all its sanguin- ary hopes. "If the Kaiser had' died five years ago I am positive that the Germans, jafter giving him a spectacular funeral and hlyishing on his memory a wealth of merited tributes, would have rejoioed in thøi. heart jthat the graTe had closed upon a reign which had; c