Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

STARTLING NEWS! FURNISHING WILL SOON BE A GREAT LUXURY Any House Furnisher will confirm the fat that not only has everything required for Furnishing gone up very considerably, but that through the great shortage of labour caused by the War, the great riifti iiltv of detting mpplIes is increasing eveiv week, certain goods in fact being unobtainable at any cost! Foreseeing several months ago this probability BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd, WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS, Hear Empire & 97, St. Mary Street, Cardiff, Pontypridd, Swansea, etc. I at niri nrirps for delivery to them as required during the War, the heaviest orders by far ever given by them during their long career of sixty-five years. This wen-known ?rm are therefore in a ) d at aid position to oUer goods at old prices, and far and away below :hose of their competitors i I  SAVE YOUR MONEY!! PURCHASE FORTHWITH FROM BEVAN & COMPANY. They continue to pay return Fares on Cash orders, Free Delivery up to 200 miles from all Branches. Illustrated Catalogues Gratis, and Post Free.

Peeps at Porthcawl I

Peeps at Porthcawl *I By MARINER. jr AV, Ar T- Ar f T T Local top?M for discussion, either in Press, in the Council Chamber—where our wori?"ii3?. Councillor s usually find a lot to talk about- or for ordinary conversation, are becoming fower. Time was when the Council had about a dozen schemes, large and small. on the board, which provided material for criticism by ratepayers, and provided food for the pen. We had to have something to talk about or something to write about, and we had to take sides, and. of course, we were always on the right side. That is whatwe all thought. Now that there is practically nothing but the war to ta!k about, there is a little uneasiness among some local critics. They feel like fish out of water. There is nothing to criticise. Nobody to find fault with. The Government has said that loans, except for urgent sani- tary works, will not be granted. The result is, works of improvement, but not in the na- ture of sanitary work, have to be left in abey- ance, and people can't criticise the Council far slackness or lack of enterprise, because the Council can't help itself. All it can do is to concern itself with performing the ordin- ary i-atitit), work of a local authority. There must be no expenditure, except that which is al!=>ohitely imperative in order to secure that the town's sanitary administration ghall be efficiently maintained. The Council finds it- self deprived of many fruitful topics of dis- cussion. too. Zeppelins and submarines do not now provide themes for discussion or matter for sarcastic comment; the lamps on the front are not now required to be lit, so there is no need now for arguing whether the side of the lamps facing the sea shall be painted black or white-washed. The Porthcawl Intelligence Department has not been heard of for some months, and, from what I can gather, this useful Department has died a natural death, and thus deprived worthy townsmen of a source for jokes. In fact, since the war started topics, as I have said, have disap- peared one by one, and all because the Gov- ernment has said "economy must be prac- tised." w Porthcawl Council was always an economi- cal Council. In fact-and I don't want it to I be thought I am "pulling its leg"—there is not a Council in the country to touch it for economy. But I must warn the Council that while exercising rigid economy in directions requiring it. there must be no childish pan- dering to foolish notions. There can be economy of the dangerous kind, as there can be econ-omy of the patriotic kind. There must be no cutting down expenses so that the sanitary administration of the town will be affected, especially in these times. In all other directions practice thrift. The Coun- cil can cut off all its deputation and delegates' expenses. There need be no journeys to London, or anywhere else. m 9 Again a proposal was made at Monday's meeting that more seats should be erected on the Common. Well, these are much needed, I admit; but although only small articles, they are >o me what expensive, and, having re- gard to the necessity of curtailing expenses. I cannot ->ee why money should be spent on new seats on the common. People in these times will not suffer any untoward hardship if they sit on the grass. They can enjoy the scenery just as much, or, if they don't like earth's green carpet, then they can git on the rocks, as they would have to do if they pro- longed their walk to the limits of the town along the sea front. In these times, they should endure a little hardship purely out of a sense of patriotism. Even a wooden seat, costing a pound or two, means a loss of that amount to the country. So we must do without seats until the war is over. Let us rough it for awhile; not a few will regard it 80:; more romantic to be without them. 0o There was, I understand, something of a joke perpetrated at the gasworks this week. The hour was about midnight, when threg worthy townsmen marched to the works to throw the first shovelful of coal on to the Council's furnace. It wÆs presumed then th.vt the undertaking was the Council's. The next day another worthy townsman put in an appearance with some ladies to perform a srmilar ceremony. It was a sort of informal opening of the gasworks. Now there is a discussion as to who threw on the first shovel- ful of Council coal on to the first Council's fira in the newly-acquired Council's gasworks. T*et them decide between them, because I am not going to act as arbitrator. t t There are two matters the ratepayers are waiting to hear about—the revised scale of water charges, and the proposed building on the Esplanade. It is time we heard some- thing about both. I < < There have been a number of Porthcawl men who have been wounded at the front amongst us during the last few days. Pri- vate Jack Fox. who was formerly in the em- p.loy of the Gas Company, is home on fur- lough. He has been wounded. He tells a good story concerning an incident in the trenches. There was a peculiar smell hover- ing round one of the trenches, which could no be located. The sanitary officer made an inspection, but was at a loss to account for the odour, which threatened to cause lll- ne-s. At last he ordered kits to be emptied, and in one of the Gurkha's kits was found the held of a German soldier, which, he said, he wi-s going to keep as a souvenir. a v Private J. Brown, of Porthcawl. who. it wbe remembered, enlisted some time ago, i, now in hospital in France. Official noti- fication has been given to his wife and family. H? has ten children. This ought to shame the score3 of swanky. flanneled young fellows. I won't call them men. who are now parad- ing our Esplanade giving the "glad eye" to those girls who are unpatriotic enough to take notice of them. They would make fine so'diers, if it is not cowardice that still keeps thsm out of khaki. w w A Porthcawl travelled up to Wellington Barracks this week. hoping to see some of the (Continued on bottom of next column).

Peeps at Porthcawl I

(Continued from Previous Column.) Porthcawl lads who have joined the Welsh Guards. He found he had to go on to the depot, where he met ex-P.C. H. James, of Bridgend, who was a member of the Ponty- pridd police before joining the Army.

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL I

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL. I SEATS ON THE COMMON. I A meeting of the Porthcawl U.D. Council was j held at the Council Offices on Monday evening, when the Vice-chairman (Mr. R. E. Jones) pre- sided. There were also present ;-Rev-. D. J. Arthur, Messrs. D. J. Rees, D. Davies, T. James, T. G. Jones, and J. Grace, with the clerk (Mr. E. Davies), the lay clerk (Mr. Brown), and the surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn). I SWEET STALL. I The Clerk read a letter from a resident ask- ing for a piece of ground on the Sandy Bay, opposite the swinging boats, for the erection of a stall for the sale of mineral water, sweets, etc. Mr. D. Davies thought they should let him have the piece of land. There was a committee to deal with such matters, but that committee had not met, and the sooner they derived a benefit at that place the better. The matter was referred to the Property Committee. MONEY DUE. A letter was read from Messrs. Vick-ary Bros. with regard to the retention money on Pavilion Place through .the Private Streets Works Act having been put into operation. They asked that the money should be paid to them, as the work had been completed. Mr. D. Davies said this letter had been dis- cussed by the Works Committee, and he thought they did not understand it then. This was for work which was done, and they should act according to the terms of the con- tract. The Chairman: What is the amount of the money ? The Surveyor: £ 222 17s. 6d., and the last instalment was for L200. Mr. Grace: When is the retention money due? The Surveyor: It has become due. The total amount of the work was £ 443. Mr. D. J. Rees did not think they should keep the contractor waiting about for a long time; it was not fair. The Surveyor reported later that a bal- ance of C20 16s. 6d. was due to Messrs. Vic- kary. Mr. D. J. Rees said he understood that the Surveyor had certified that the work had been completed satisfactorily up to date, and he moved that they money be paid. Mr. D. Davies asked if that was the final certificate. The Surveyor: No, not until the whole of the work is completed. Mr. D. Davies seoonde d the motion.— Agreed. A WOODEN STRUCTURE. I Mr. Grace asked what steps had been taken with reference to the wooden structure in Suffolk Place. About two months ago a resolution was passed giving the owner a month to remove the structure. He was given twelve months previously. He would like to know what action had been taken to carry out the resolution. The Surveyor said he hadi not served any notice upon the owner. The Clerk said he would go int-o the matter and report. LOOSE STONES. I On the motion of Mr. James seconded by the Rev. D. J. Arthur, it was decided to write the resident engineer with regard to the. loose stones in St. Mary's Street. NOTICE TO FRONTAGERS. I Mr. D. J. Rees asked if the 14 days' no- tice given to the frontagers in St. Mary's Street under the Private Street Works Act had expired and when? The Clerk said he would go into that mat- ter. SEATS ON THE COMMON. I Mr. D. Davies said the committee that was appointed to visit the common with regard to the seats found that people were walking on the common and had no seats to rest upon. He hoped the Council would get them re- paired. In fact, some had been taken away altogether. There were six broken and four taken away altogether. Mr. James moved that the surveyor apply for tenders to have new seats erected. The Chairman thought they should under- stand this was not the time to spend too much money. Could they spare any seats from any other place? Mr. D. J. Rees: It is war time. and we should be very careful. Mr. D. Davies seconded Mr. James' mo- J tion. It was not a big item. Mr. Grace asked if it was a small matter; they were always employing a carpenter, and couldn't he attend to the matter without the Council getting tenders? The Surveyor: We have not got a carpen- ter. The resolution was agreed to.

No title

At a recruiting meeting at Rushden Sir Ryland Adkins, M.P., read the following message from Mr. Tennant. M.P.:—" This crisis demands that we should have no diminu- tion in the satisfactory numbers who are daily recruiting to the colours. In this deadly struggle every man is needed." Details concerning Liverpool's War Loan investments show that the amount received over the counters at the Liverpool Genera l Post Office has averaged £2,000 and £ 3,00') daily since the loan was floated. The bulk of this payment has been made up of the shil- lings and small gold of the middle and work- ing classes. The executive committee of the Women's Labour League has passed a resolution ex- pressing the conviction that under no circum- stan-ces has a State the right to den.and com- pulsory military service from its male citi- zens. It declares that it is contrary to right and justice to force a man to enlist against the dictates of his conscience.

GAS WOhKb TAKEN OYERI

GAS WOhKb TAKEN OYER I CHEQUE HANDED OVER TO GAS CO.'s SOLICITOR. TOTAL OF L29,336 19s. 8d. At Porthcawl Urban District Council on Monday, the Clerk (Mr. Evan Davies) ex- plained that on Thursday last, the Chairman (Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P.), Mr. Jones, and him- self attended upon the solicitors to the Gas Company and the directors, and, after a pro- tracted interview, lasting from 12.30 until 4.30, they completed the purchase of the gas undertaking at the sum of E29,436 18s. 3d. The main award was £ 30,396; extra in- surance, t6 3s. 4d. cost of obtaining the Gas Purchases Act, £2,394 los. 4d. bringing the amount up to £ 32,696 18s. 8d. The Coun- cil had deducted a certain amount for the debentures, and a small amount of t430 for three items in the amount for. which they did not agree to pay, as they did not consider they formed part of the cost of obtaining the Gas Act. These three items they agreed should be referred to the umpire who made the award. The amount of E29,336 19s. 8d. was paid by them to the Gas Company, and they were handed a receipt, and the Council had taken over the works. Of course, there was the valuation to be added to that of the cost of the arbitration, but with these ex- ceptions, the total payment had been made to the Gas Company. The deeds relating to the property of the Gas Company were handed over and deposited at the bank, with whom they had the mortgage. Mr. Spencer was present, acting both on behalf of the Council and on behalf of the bank. It was pointed out that Mr. Spencer visited Porthcawl prior to the proceedings with a view to looking after the interest of the Council and the winding up of the affair. Mr. R. E. Jones said he agreed that Mr. Spencer did valuable work for them, and he was sure he had been quite a host, watching the interests of the Council as keenly as though he were fighting the affair himself. So had the clerk. They did not give a loop- hole for anyone to make a mistake, and he thought they were to be congratulated upon having got the interest on the loan at 4! per cent. during the time when the country was appealing for capital at 41 per cent. He thought Porthcawl was to be congratulated. The Clerk was asked if he had covered the work for extra risks ? The Clerk said he had, but that was a matter for discussion in committee. The appreciation of the Council of the ser- vices rendered to them by the bank was re- corded in the minutes, and it was stated they had honourably stuck to the agreement made previous to the war. Mr. D. J. Rees moved that a mark of ap- preciation was due to the committee who waited upon the bank and stuck to the guns and carried out the work in such a tactful manner. He wished their appreciation to be recorded in the minute book. Mr. R. E. Jones seconded, and it was car- ried. Mr. Grace thought they would spend all their time passing votes of thanks to people for doing their duty. They.had better have a special meeting for the purpose.

REDUCING THE STAFF

REDUCING THE STAFF. PORTHCAWL COUNCIL'S MOVE TOWARDS ECONOMY. In the course of his reading of the minutes of the Finance Committee at Porthcawl Council on Monday, the Clerk (Mr E. Davies) read, under the heading of "Financal Admin- istration," that Mr. R. E. Jones drew at- tention to the wages bill, and said, in the interests of a more economical financial ad- minstration, a small committee should be formed to go into the matter and see if it was possible to economise in that direction. A committee was appointed, consisting of Mr D. Davies. Mr T. James, and Mr R. E. Jones. Mr. R. E. Jones said one item required to be altered. He did not think they would have the best results from a small commit- tee. They really ought to have a committee of the whole Council. He did not wish to say more than he said at the last two meet- ings, but he thought it was time, under the circumstances, when they should try to see whether they could effect an economy. It was time that they as an authority ,-and every other authority, should do without luxury, and if there was a possibility of re- ducing the expenditure, it was up to them to do it. He thought it should be shouldered by every gentleman round the table, and he moved that the committee consist of the whole Council. Mr. D. Davies seconded, and said it was too much responsibility for three members. The resolution was carried. The Surveyor reported that the services of one of the sewer-men could be dispensed with, and he accordingly asked for the instructions' of the Council.—Agreed. Mr. R. E. Jones: Bravo! I am glad to hear the surveyor say that.

ALARMING ACCIDENT AT CORNELLYI 0

ALARMING ACCIDENT AT CORNELLY I 0 PARTY THROWN FROM TRAP. I Mx Evan Thomas, of Victoria Road, Aber- avon, accompanied by his wife and children. his father-in-law, and Mr. Charles Peterson, of St. John's Square, Cardiff, was driving in a governess car down a steep hill at Cornelly when both shafts of the car broke. Fright- ened by the broken shafts the horse broke the traces and ran away. The body of the car desoended the hill at a high speed, and all the occupants were thrown out. Mr. Peterson sustained concussion of the brain. He was at- tended by Dr. Cooper, and was removed to the house of a friend at Porthcawl. The other occupants escaped with a slight shaking and minor injuries.

Advertising

LADIES, READ THIS. ADVICE FREE foi Stamp. Mrs. E. Stewart's Famous Female Remedy never Fails.—AddrMB i 0. Guinea Street. Bristol. UN

RAMBLES IN PENNSYLVANIA I IN 1914

RAMBLES IN PENNSYLVANIA I IN 1914. AND WELSHMEN I MET. I NATIVES OF NOTTAGE AND LLAN-I GEINOR. (By the Rev. J. T. GRIFFITH). I [Rev. J. T. Griffith, Kenfig Hill, who in I April contributed interesting articles to the "Gazette" on the early history of Pisgah Church, Pyle, describes below some of his rambles through Pennsylvania, and tells of local Welshmen he met in the course of his travels. The article will be read with interest because of its references to one time residents of this district and its interesting insights into the religious life of Welsh-Americans]. Reading is a beautiful city of nearly 100,000 inhabitants, situated in the Schuylkill valley. Having been pastor of the Berean Baptist Church there years ago, I was anxious to see my old friends. I went there on Saturday, May 16th, and received a hearty welcome at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jenkin Hill, of North Fifth Street. Having served the Berean Baptist Church of this city as pastor from 1891 to 1893, it was a great pleasure for me to have the opportunity to preach in the Berean Church on Sunday, May 17th, through the courtesy of their honoured pastor, the Rev. Joseph Pierce. I feel very grateful to him for this. In this brief time I missed many of the old friends and pillars of the church, such as William Savacool, John H. Rankin, William Schweimler, S. Monasmith, E. B. High, Elwood ivickinson and others, but was glad to meet many old friends active in those days. "I took advantage during my visit to Read- ing to go to Sinking Spring, which place oc- cupies a very important position in reference to the Baptists of Reading and to the Baptists of Wales. Mr. Hill accompanied me. I had often read of this spot and was delighted to see it. Here on August 19th, 1738, the Tul- pehocken Baptist Church was organised with 25 members. The constituent members in 1738 were: Rev. Thomas Jones and wife, Martha, James Rees and wife, Ann, George Rees and wife, Elizabeth, James Edwards and wife, Margaret, Thomas Nicholas and wife, David Evans and wife, Sarah, Evan Lloyd and wife, James Davis and wife, Mary, James John and wife, Eleanor, Rees Thomas and wife, Henry, Harry, David, Lewis and Thomas Lloyd. A NATIVE OF NOTTAGE. "Rev. Dr. Maxwell, who was pastor of the fir.st Baptist Church of Reading in 1908 states that this doubtless was a Welsh Baptist Church at that time. During the first two years they worshipped in a small log cabin erected on the property of Hugh Jones in 1740. For the convenience of its members living at distances a £ >art they built two new meeting houses, one at Sinking Spring and the other to the eastward, less than a mile from the Schuylkill River, across from the city of Reading. This church continued for about sixty years, and its influence is still living in the Baptists of Reading and surrounding places. Rev. Thomas Jones was its first pas- tor, and one of its constituent members. He was a native of Nottage, Wales, and was born in 1701. He died in 1788. In 1737 he em i- grated with his family to Pennsylvania and settled at Great Valley, and in 1738 founded the Tulpehocken Church at Sinking Spring. He died at Great Valley in 1788, and his wife, Martha, died in 1799. Both are buried at the Great Valley Baptist Church. I WAS AMERICAN PATRIOT. "There were two children born at Llan- geinor, Wales, who are worthy of special note. The first was Thomas Jones, born in 1733. He was one of the eight delegates from Berks county to the provincial convention which met ia Philadelphia, July 15th, 1776. He was a major in the Revolutionary War, and com- missioner of Berks county from 1779 to 1786. He died March, 1800, and was buried at Sink- ing Spring. He was the last of the male members of the Tulpehocken Baptist Church. The old house he erected in 1775 in Heidelberg township is still standing. The second son was born in Wales in 1735. He became the renowned Rev. Dr. Samuel Jones, one of the pillars of the Philadelphia Baptist Association for more than fifty years. He received his education at the College of Philadelphia and graduated in 1762. In 1763 he became the pastor of the Lower Dublin Baptist Church, and he held that office until his death, Feb. 7th. 1814. His name occurs continually in the minutes of the Philadelphia Baptist As- sociation for half a century as moderator, preacher, committee-man, or writer of the circular letter. After the death of his father h3 wrote a very tender letter dated March 31st, 1788, to the late Joshua Thomas, of Wales, author of the history of the Welsh Baptists, giving an account of the experiences of his father in his last hours and also of his funeral. Among other things he said his faith was strong, his hope firm, his vision of the glory of God bright, and some of his last words were 'Jov! Joy! Joy!' SACRED, HISTORIC GROUND. I Mr. Hill and I felt that we were on sacred, historic ground when we were in the graveyard of the Sinking Spring Church. We had a very pleasant visit here with a great, great, great granddaughter of Rev. Thomas Jones, who lives at Sinking Spring—Mrs. Ellen A. HoSman, the widow of the late Dr. C. N. Hoffman. There is a building on part of the land on which the old meeting house stood, known as the eight-cor- nered building. It was first used as a Baptist meeting house, later as a school house, but for many years it has been used as a dwelling, with the understanding that the tenants take proper care of the property. CALLS ON WELSH DESCENDANTS. r H After the organisation of the First Baptist Church of Reading on December 20th, 1828, the descendants of Rev. Thomas Jones some of whom were still in the neighbourhood, united with the above church. In 1834 Thomas Jones, of the fourth generation, was one of the deacons of the First Baptist Church of Reading, and there are descendants there now. On Monday evening, May 18th, 1914, Mr. and Mrs. Jenkin Hill, Charles Shaaber, and the writer enjoyed a pleasant visit with these descendants, viz., Mary and Elizabeth Jones on South Fourth Street, in that city. On Tuesday evening, May 18th, Mr. Hill and I spent a very happy and profitable evening with Richmond L. Jones at his beautiful mansion on North Fifth Street. The colonel very kindly presented me with two fine volumes, containing the life and public ser- vices of Hon. J. Glancy Jones, by Charles Henry Jones, of Philadelphia, which I value very much, and for which I feel very grateful. He traces his ancestors to David Jones, who at the age of 12 years emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1721 from North Wales, and settled in what is now known as Delaware county, and who at the age of 26 married a daughter of William Davies, who was one of the largest landowners of the Welsh tract, and who gave the ground on which the historic St. David's Church was built in 1713. Thus we see that Richmond L. Jones, an- cestors came from North Wales, and the ances- tors of sisters Mary and Elizabeth Jones came from South Wales, and both parties can well be proud of them. 1- TANSDALE. I This is a beautiful town on the North Pennsyl- vania Railroad, 27 miles north of Philadelphia. It is surrounded by many places of Welsh his- toric interest that date back to the beginning of the 18th century. It was my privelege to be the first pastor of the Baptist Church at this place from April, 1888, to the spring of 1891. It was a great pleasure to me to preach to my old church on Sunday, May 24th, 1914. Though many of the dear old friends who were here during my pastorate had gone to their reward, yet some still remained. I was very glad to meet their descendants. This is an exclusively English-American Church. Its present pastor is the Rev. M. E. Hare. On Monday, May 25th, I was present with them when they were cutting d

LORD KITCHENER AND SINGLEI MEN

LORD KITCHENER AND SINGLE I MEN. WHY ARE THEY NOT IN THE FIELD? 1 The following letter has been sent by Lord Kitchener to Captain W. H. Atherley Jones, re- cruiting officer at Newport:— War Office, London, S.W. June 26th, 1915. Sir,—I wish to express to you personally, and to those who have helped you in your re- cruiting work, my best thanks for the energy that has been displayed by you all in the matter of recruiting. I would ask you to take an early opportun- ity of urging all able-bodied men in your neighbourhood to come forward and enlist, so that they may be trained as soldiers to take part in the war, and help to keep our forces in the field at the maximum strength. I shall be glad to hear of any reasons that may be given you by young suitable men for not availing themselves of this opportunity to see service in the field, where they are so much wanted.

GERMANYS LOSSES

GERMANY'S LOSSES. MR. HILAIRE BELLOC'S CALCULATIONS. Mr. Hillaire Belloc returns to the question of the enemy's losses in men in the current number of "Land and Water," and makes out a very convincing case for his figures. The calculation of enemy losses is not, as he says, an exact science, but is something in which too quite exact limits are possible-a maximum and a minimum. After discussing several of the factors in the problem, Mr. Bel- loc sums up as follows:- Germany has not armed less than six million men since the beginning of the war; she has not armed more than 7t millions. The maxi- mum that Austria-Hungary can add to Ger- many in man power is 80 per cent. She has certainly not added less than 60 per cent. The Allies hold about a million .and a quarter prisoners, at the very least, but not more than a million and a half at the most. The figures of wounded and missing to dead are, even in the severest trench fighting, not lower than four to one. Of wounded admitted to hospital and of some sick a bout half are dis- charged to fight again some day or other, but of wounded only you cannot count on more than a fifth getting back on the average of all services within, say, two months. Now put all this together and what do you find The average number of men -in the British Expeditionary Force is not a twelfth of the numbers Germany has passed through in this war. We had less than a hundred thousand men in the field when Germany had more than thirty times as much. We have perhaps now in the field a sixth of what Germany has al- together put forward. The average is cer- tainly, I repeat, far less than a twelfth. The German forces have been compelled, or have chosen to undertake, the most violent and pro- longed offensive actions. They have fought in the most expensive tactical fashion. Our casualties give 50,000 dead. Who can doubt that the total German dead must be over 600,000? It is absolutely certain an under-estimate, less than the lowest possible minimum. Austria-Hungary cannot conceiv- ably have less than sixty per cent, of that total. It is certain that she has added more than sixty per cent. In other words, it is absolutely certain that your minimum of enemy dead must—absolu- tely without escape from the simplest laws of arithmetic-be over a million. You have cer- tainly well over a million prisoners. Is it con- ceivable that disablement from wounds and prolonged sickness should be less than double the number of dead? It is inconceivable. Well, then, the figure of four millions, so far from being an extravagant figure, is an extremely modest one. And when I said that the total number of enemy permanently out of action was "nearer four than three millions I was putting the figures far below even the strictest minimum. It seems to be certain that they must be over four.

No title

Notices have been served at Swansea on German women to show cause why they should not be deportfd. There are not many men in the borough.

Advertising

LADIES BLANC HARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34, Dalston Lane, London. Sample aid valuable booklet post free Id.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. Clever Snipers. I Lieutenant-Colonel Leslie Wilson/ D.S.O., M.P., writing from Gallipoli, says the Turks are brave and clever snipers. They frequently place small trees on their backs and crawl up to the trenches. I watched a bush which ap- peared to be shaking a lot, although there was no wind. Then I and another man got on it with rifles. It moved quickly enough. Some Turks paint themselves and rifles green, and are practically invisible. "Freeing the Serj." I Criticising Mr. Stockbridge's statements, the "New Republic" says:—"The freedom of the seas is a fine phrase which stands for a most desirable political and economic object, but it can scarcely become a reality until nations cease to go to war for the settlement of their disputes. The talk about the neces- sity of 'freeing the seas' is nonsense over which England will not waste her time," says the "Pall Mall." As all the world knows, the seas, in peace, are free to every flag that flies. The further idea that a withdrawal of Germany from Belgium and the invaded part of France should be followed by some sort of British surrender of her maritime rights is I remote from moral necessity." Ramsay. Mr. Ramsay Macdonald, speaking at a con- ference of the Birmingham branch of the Union of Democratic Control on Saturday, said the war would be ended by the pacifist determina- tion of the people of Europe, and not by the operations of the Army. A question was to be asked in the House of Commons on Monday why a leader of the Labour party had not been sup- pressed because he ventured to criticise the war. The most significant part of that was that the question came from a Liberal member. Criti- cism had been passed on some of them who had not deserted their principle for their country. Instead of being reasoned with they were simply misrepresented or maligned with the object of hounding them out of public life. So far as he was concerned, he was going through with it. No Hint of Revenge. Rev. S. C. Carpenter, in a sermon, says:— "Some time ago Mr. Arthur Benson described an interview which he had had with an Italian newly come from Germany. He said to me that nothing had ever astoished him more than to come from Germany, seething with suspicion and hatred, and then to find the at- mosphere of England so free from animosity. He said to me, "I ask myself sometimes if the Englishman is capable of hatred at all. I find," he said, "plenty of indignation against German brutalities; but it is not vindictive and it is not personal. I should have expec- ted," he went on, "to find people saying, 'So this is what the Germans do—well, we will show them presently what we can do! But I find no hint of revenge!" Cause of the War. The Lord Bishop of Llandaff held a confirma- tion service at St. Mary's Welsh Church, Dow- lais. Eigthy-three candidates were confirmed. His Lordship said that one glaring sin was the selfishness which exploited the present war for personal profit and gain upon the poverty of the people, as well as the unpatriotic behaviour which at a time like the present could talk and think of strikes upon such smali issues as more money, non-Unionism, etc.—small issues com- pared with the men who were giving their lives, not for mere pay, but for love of home and country. It was failure to grasp the real in- ward meaning of things, as well as the para- mount importance of righteousness, which was the cause of this protracted war, and which would again land us in something infinitely worse later on. The Workers' Wages. "The majority of the working classes are at present in possession of larger funds than usual," says the "Nation." "Wage-rates have risen, employment is full, more members of a family are working, considerable sums are got for allowances and billeting. Over large tracts of the country, these advances of in- come have far more than compensated for the rise of prices, large and continuous as that has been. Much of this increased weekly income is spent in buying furniture and better cloth- ing, and in comforts and recreations which in ordinary times would be quite desirable forms of expenditure. But in the present emer- gency, it is more important that these higher incomes should be saved, and that the produc- tion of the articles the money goes to buy should not take place." The Submarine. The dramatic and revolutionary possibilities of the submarine are pointed out by F. P. Stockbridge in the "New Republic." "As between nations it is the mightiest engine of democracy the world has seen. And as with the other forces of democracy, the world must guard against its abuse," he says. "The de- mocratisation of the high seas is the one world-important result of the war as yet clearly apparent, inevitable and definitely de- monstrated. The submarine torpedo boat has accomplished the most revolutionary readjust- ment of the balance of power among maritime nations since the dispersal and destruction of the Spanish Armada in 1588 made England instead of Spain mistress of the seas. An American Observer. "A serviceable submarine torpedo boat can be built for three hundred thousand dollars or even less. Many of the efficient units in our own submarine flotilla have cost less than that. Our best submarines now in commis- sion, those of the "K" type, cost about half a million dollars each. The single large sea- going submersible torpedo boat authorised for our Navy will cost, completely equipped, barely a million and a quarter. Admiral Sir Percy Scott, the first English naval man to see and clearly recognise the meaning to England of the development of this new weapon, was laughed at when, six months before the -out- break of the European war, he publicly ad- vised the Admiralty to cease spending billions on battleships and instead to create a tremen- dous fleet of submarines, fast scouting cruisers and aeroplanes. Germany long before had seen the possibilities of the new arm. For the first time in history Great Britain was not the first to recognise and adapt to its own pur- poses a revolutionary military development," says this American observer." To Lay Waste. Addressing a public gathering in Bishop Auckland Market Place on Sunday evening, the Bishop of Durham said that he had it upon ex- cellent authority that the German Emperor's desire was to lay waste Tyneside from New- castle to the sea. "If I can do that," the Ger- man Emperor had said, "I shall not have fought in vain." Nobleman's Park and An Obligation. "No nobleman's park has been ploughed up since the war began, in order to diminish our dependence on imported wheat," says the "New Statesman; "yet it is a universal obligation under which we have come-an obligation which will presently have to be embodied in law if we do not voluntarily respond with sufficient alac- rity." Our Turn Will Come. Speaking at West Hartlepool on Friday night, Mr. Walter Runciman said that in Flanders we had made provision for defence. However great the attack, our numbers there were adequate for any task, and our turn would come. He expected the Government would take drastic methods if need be against exploiting supplies of food and coal. We were learning now how to deal with the submarine menace. The British Navy would be able to fulfil that task. It was truer now than when the statement was made in April that we had enough explosives for our own use. We were also overcoming our shortage of munitions. Two Moralities. "The dispute between the United States and Germany," says the New York "Nation," "involves not merely two Governments, but two moralities. A moral judgment is now being passed over Europe," writes Sven Hedin, "a moral judgment which cries: Woe to the people which has not in time put its house in order, or which relies on paper treaties and declaration when force sits in the judgment, and when none but the strong and wakeful inspire respect in all directions. Is it not true that the American moral judg- ment revolts against that?" asks the "Nation." "If our system of public morality were not in direct conflict with this one as- serted of Germany, should we not think it time for us to curse God and die?" I The New Ideal. I admit German culture has some merit," said Lord Robert Cecil at the Victoria and Al- bert Museum. "It certainly has the merit of producing a fighting machine of considerable efficiency, and if the object of culture is to create works of destruction, then German cul- ture must be given a high place in the culture of the world. We may set up in reply to Ger- man obedience, British liberty and French en- lightenment, but perhaps the final answer is de- stined to be given by the idealism of South-eas- tern Europe. When the time comes this war will be recognised as the starting point of a new influence in Europe, new at any rate for some fivfc centuries. It may be that we shall set up against the achievement of German materialism the poetry of the idealism of the Serbian race. It will furnish to the whole world, and to Europe in particular, the splendid ideal, a new conception of culture, and one which will go far to mitigate the terrible spiritual failure which has followed the German conception of that ideal. War Babies. In the House of Lords on Thursday, the Archbishop of Canterbury asked whether the Local Government Board could furnish any statistics relating to the alleged probability of an increase of illegitimate births in this country owing to war conditions. He said when the attention of himself and the other bishops was drawn to this matter they enter- tained a good deal of doubt whether the re- ports as to there being an exceptional number of cases had any substantial basis, and they were unable to find sufficient ground for giv- ing credence to the allegations that were made. A small committee of ladies had looked into the matter, and the result of their inves- tigations had been published. He wanted to know if the Local Government Board could give any information in addition to the re- assuring reports that had been received through voluntary inquiries. He was particu- larly anxious that it should not be supposed that he was satisfied that all was perfectly right, or that they believed there was no ground for any apprehension whatever, but that the reports were immensely exaggerated was absolutely certain. The statistics given of anticipated increases, when tested, had broken down entirely.—Lord Hytton said the Local Government Board had no statistics in their possession at the moment that would justify them in saying one way or the other whether the proportion of illegitimate births would be affected by war conditions. They had instituted inquiries in various directions, and the results so far entirely corroborated the view expressed by the archbishop that the reports that a large increase in the number of illegitimate births might be anticipated were grossly exaggerated. Strike!" (By William Boosey, in the "Daily Telegraph." Peasant and peer and merchant king, Clerk from the counter hurrying, Gather around at the rallying cry, England must live, so men must die!" Strike! without counting the loss or gain, Strike! for the highest your souls contain! Strike and strike hard at your country's call, You in the workshops, strike hardest of all! Peasant and peer on a field blood red, Mass upon mass of the mangled dead, Merchant and clerk 'neath the pitying skies, Merciful sleep, with the half-closed eyes! Lives shall be given, not bought and sold, Tell of the tale on a page of gold, Strike!" is the summons to one and all! "Strike!" and you answer your country's call. Workers and toilers! again and again Strike that your brother's blood flows not in vain, Strike for your children, your sweethearts and wives! Strike for the saving of millions of lives! Miners whose labours give life to us all Down thro' the depths of the earth comes the call, Lift up your picks with a lusty good swing, Strike for your country, your homes, and your King!

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances tor turning out eves, class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works,