Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
vMINERS TO BE THANKED FORI AVER riNG A NATIONALI CALAMITYI

— -v- MINERS TO BE THANKED FOR AVER riNG A NATIONAL CALAMITY. OWNERS ADAMANT TO WORK- I MEN'S PROPOSALS. MR. VERNON HARTSHORN'S I GREAT APPEAL. I GOVERNMENT PROPOSALS I ACCEPTED. The Scrawl Wales coal crisis has passed. After an all-day sitting, the delegates at the I mi tiers'/ come rer.ee at Cardd \Vedr.esCl.lY. by 123 votes against 112. decided to accept the Government's proposals, and the men will continue to work on day-to-day contracts for a fortnight. From the first the coalowners had opposed the men's demands, and had at- tempted to cast the burden of responsibility on the Government by expressing their will- ingness to accept any new working condition the Government might impose on the indus- try. Proposals were then made by the Gov- ernment for submission to the miners' dele- gates. These were accepted, and, thanks to the miners, and the miners alone, the nation has been saved from an industrial upheaval which would have shaken the Empire. The length of the agreement will be fixed in course of further negotiations, but it is agreed that there shall be a payment of a standard wage of 5s. per day to surfacemen, six turns for five for night workmen throughout the coalfield, equal payment to night ajid day hauliers, and a new standard of 50 per cent. above the old. Dtfring the proceedings Mr. Vernon Harts- ho 1 u made a stirring patriotic appeal to the de!?gates assembled, and urged that in the interests of the nation at large and their comrades at the front a settlement should be arrived at. OFFICIAL REPORT. Mr. Thomas Richards, M.P., supplied the following official report:- The Government proposals were the sub- ject of I discussion by the Conference from 7 t3 9.40 p.m., and ultimately the following resolution was carried by a narrow major- ity That the Council recommend the Conference to treat the general proposals of the Government as forming a basis for ne- gotiation for a settlement, and that work be continued under a day to day contract until the completed agreement has been submitted to and ratified by a further Con- ference, such agreement to be submitted to the further Conference on or before July 14tb, 1915. Wednesday's conference had been arranged as the result of negotiations between the miners' leaders and Mr. Runciman in London on the previous day. There were nearly 200 delegates present, and the fact that the Con- ciliation Board agreement terminated on Wednesday night, and with it all contracts between owners and workmen, added to the gravity of the situation, for there was a pre- valent feeling among delegates that day-to- day contracts should not be encouraged. FALIED TO AGREE. The members of the Executive Council tra- velled from London on Tuesday night, having failed to agree with Mr. Runciman. The President of the Board of Trade, however, had promised to send a communication to the men's representatives on Wednesday morn- ing. When Mr. Jarre-i Wins tone, the president of tne Federation, took the chair at the con- ference this communication had not been re- ceived, and the conference was adjourned till 3.30 in the-afternoon. Messrs. Thomas Richards. M.P., and Alfred Onbns, secretary and treasurer of the South Wales Miners' Federation, travelled from London on Wednesday and joined the Execu- tive Council at Cardiff. After they had been in consultation for some time a telegram was received from London stating that arrange- ments had been made for Messrs. A. Hender- son, M.P. (President of the Board of Educa- tion), Mr. W. Brace, M.P. (Under-Secretary to the Home Office), and Mr. G. H. Roberts, M. P. (Lord Commissioner of the Treasury), and Mr. Isaac Mitchell, industrial commis- sioner to the Board of Trade, to travel by special train to Cardiff to lay before the dele- gates the proposals of the Government for re- moving the deadlock. The Government deputation arrived at Car- diff at 3.45, and proceeded direct to the offices of the South Wales Miners' Federation, where they met the Executive Council in consul- tation. GOVERNMENT'S PROPOSALS. I The Government proposals, which were ini- tialled by Mr. Walter Runciman, President of the Board of Trade, were as follows:- 1-. —Surfacemen—Increased standard rate of surfacemen below 3s. 4d. to 3s. -t.d. jand altering the standard rates t by adding 50 per cent. to such rates. 2. -Night men-Six turns fof five through- out the coalfield. 3.—Hauliers employed on the afternoon and night shifts shall be paid the same rate of wages as those employed on day shift. 4.—The standards 1877 to 1879 to be raised to new 1915 standard, namely, 100 plus 36 per cent. on 1877 and 100 plus 50 p- r cent. on 1879. No maxi- mum limit and no minimum. The following were the categorical demands of the miners for inclusion in a new agree- ment Advances in wages to surfacemen; pay- ment of six shifts for five worked by under- ground day-rate miners employed on the afternoon and night shifts. Equal pay- ment to night and day hauliers. The raising of the minimum wage rate to the equivalent of 65 per cent. on the present standard—the new standard sought being 50 per cent. above the old one, and the minimum being 10 per cent. above that new standard. The abolition of the principle of a maximum wage rate. Alteration of the basis on which the equivalent average selling price to the minimum wage was fixed; a selling price of 15', 6d. per ton to be in future regarded as the! equivalent. NEARLY THREE HOURS NEGOTIATING. The Government envoys were closeted with the Federation leaders for nearly three hours before any agreement was arrived at, and eventually it was understood that the Executive Council should recommend to the delegates' conference the proposals as set forth above. Intense excitement prevailed when the delegates met again at the Cory Hall at 7 o'clock, when the agreement arrived at between the Council and the Government euti.v--ares was fE-ad out to them by Mr. Thomas Richards, M.P., who said that the I Executive Council strongly recommended I its adoption. MR. HARTSHORN S GREAT APPEAL. Mr. Vernon Hartshorn, Maesteg, pre- pesed the adoption of the Council's l'e- commendation, and pointed out that the men had already gained many of the points they sought. In the interests of the nation at large and of their comrades at the front it seemed to him imperative that a settle- ment should be arrived at. There was a general consensus of opinion that a stoppage 01 work at the present juncture would be fraught with very serious consequences and the country looked to the miners to see to it that they should not put anything in the way of assuring a full supply of coal for our Navy and those of the Allies. THE NAVY AND SOUTH WALES. One of the delegates from the body of the I hâ. seconded, and Mr. George Barker very heartily supported the motion. Mr. Barker pointed cut that they had not secured all they had demanded, but a strenuous effort had been ?enuous effort had been maue by the men's representatives to obtain a new standard and a new minimum. Of course, they blamed the coalowners of South Wales for their refusal to negotiate, but it was up to the miners to show the country that they were anxious to do their very best to support the Government in this time of war. They felt that it would be a wrong policy to do anything just now to hamper the Government, for the Navy was dependent en- tirely upon the South Wales coalfield for the supply of coal. ANIMATED DISCUSSION. In the course of the discussion which fol- lowed. several of the delegates expressed their strong disapproval of the terms recommended, and pointed out no provision had yet been made for determining the length of the agree- ment which would be entered into. It was important, they stated., that the miners should have an agreement which would carry them over a certain period, and it was sug- gested that it should urun for at least twelve months after the cessation of hostilities. It was argued that if the agreement terminates with The war, or three or six months after- wards, the workmen would be placed at a dis- advantage owing to the falling market in securing suitable terms in the succeeding agreements. It was also inted out that the men's pro- posal with regard to the payment of six turns for five seemed to have been ignored. Dele- gates said the conference had decided that "all workmen employed in the afternoon and night shifts would be paid upon the new standard at the rate of a turn and a fifth for each shift worked." Now the proposals laid before the conference by the Executive Council made it imperative that five turns should be worked before the sixth was paid for. This placed the workmen at a disadvan- tage unless they were able to work the whole five shifts. There was further discussion on the general terms, but eventually when the matter was put to the meeting there voted:— For accepting the proposal 123 For refusing 112 Majority for 11 The decision was received with loud cheers by the large gathering which had assembled outside.

MR HARTSHORN WANTS LOYALTY

MR. HARTSHORN WANTS LOYALTY. I IMPORTANT SPEECH TO MINERS AT NANTYFFYLLON. Mr. Vernon Hartshorn addressed a mass meeting of the men at Nantyffyllon on Thurs- ?? of the men at ?N m e- e -r, i day afternoon. He said he was not surprised at the workmen being idle that day, because it was in accordance with what they had ex- pected during the last three months unless a new agreement was entered into. It was also an indication of the intention of the men to have their claims met. The terms which had been considered by the conference on Wed- nesday were only a basis for' further discus- sion. One of the workmen's demands was that during the continuance of the new agreement they should have not less than 10 per cent. on the new standard, which would give every workman in the coalfield 5 per cent. increase on his present earnings apart from the war bonus, which would become the lowest rate that the workmen would receive in the future. That had not been agreed to at all, but it was one of the demands which Wednesday's conference had insisted upon being conceded. The Executive were unanimous in suggesting that, at most, another 14 days should be granted to them to further discuss matters with the representatives of the Government. The Executive would make it perfectly clear to the Government that, unless the demands i of the workmen were conceded, nothing that the Government or the Executive could do would prevent the Welsh coalfield coming to a standstill at the end of 14 days. The work- men might imagine that it was better to re- main idle until an agreement had been fixed up, but that was not the opinion of the Exe- cmi,'e. If the proposals which had been s-Lil)- mitted to Wednesday's conference were to be regarded as final proposals, he did not think there was a man among the leaders who would advise the men to accept them. But the Exe- cutive thought there should be further time to discuss outstanding points. In his experience, never had the South Wales miners had a more united or loyal body of leaders than those who had taken part in the negotiations. The leaders had made up their minds that, whatever happened, the workmen should not be able on this occasion to say that their leaders had let them down. If the men of South Wales decided to stop out now they would discredit their leaders and weaken their inauenoe. It would never do to have parts of the coalfield working and other parts idle, as was the case that day. They must remain a united body. He hoped the men would show further confidence in their leaders for another 14 days and return to work that afternoon. The meeting unanimously passed a resolu- tion to resume work at the pits that after- noon. A further resolution was unanimously passed expressing confidence in the leaders for the next 14 days. COLLIERIES IDLE. I At the Glengarw and Ffaldau Collieries yes- terday there was no work. 2,000 men being idle. At the mass meeing held at mid-day, at which Mr. A. Day presided, it was decided to resume work to-day (Friday). The Men at the Ocean and International Collieries continued work as usual. At Maesteg all the collieries were idle.

BILLY BEYNONS NEXT FIGHT I

BILLY BEYNON'S NEXT FIGHT. I Billy Beynon, the well-known iaibata boxer, is announced I to box Digger Stanley at Tonypandy shortly. He has already gone into training.

LOCAL WAR NEWS I

LOCAL WAR NEWS. I (Contributions to this Column are invited.) I ————- PENCOED. I: is gratifying to be able to chronicle dis- tinctions won at the front by representatives of two Pencoed familie." Neither of the two is a Pencoedian by b.?h. but one is intimately connected with one of the old families of the district. The recipient of one of the distinc- tions is Colonel Arthur A. Howell, of the 3rd London Regiment (Territorials). Colonel Howell, in addition to being mentioned in dis- patches. has had the high honour of being made a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George. The 3rd London Regiment was one of the regiments which dis- tinguished itself at Neuve Chapelle. Colonel Howell is a son of the late Dean Howell, of Sc. David's, and a nephew of Mr. W. Howell, J.P., Lletai, Pencoed. The other distinction, that of D. C.M., has won by Sergt. Wild, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. "We reported in the "Gazette" some weeks ago that Sergt. Wild had been mentioned in dispatches. Since then he has had bestowed upon him the Distinguished Ser- vice Medal. Sergt. Wild came home wounded, and after his discharge from hospi- tal stayed for some weeks at the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Atkins. the latter being an aunt of the gallant soldier. The number of men from Pencoed Village gone to the front is being continually added to. One. Corporal Edmund Jones, is in France with his regiment, the 6th Somerset Light Infantry. Corporal Jones had had long experience of soldiering before the war, having served in the Volunteers. Another young soldier, Gunner Alec Young, has gone to the Dardanelles. His brother, Private Sydney loung, has seen hard fighting with his regiment, the 2nd Welsh. Gunner J. Jef- freys, of Penprisk, is another artilleryman who is on his way to Egypt-if he has not al- ready reached there. Other "soldier boys" have left for the Dar- danelles. Four who enlisted months ago and have served in the South Wales Borderers, are now on the water. They are Lanoe-Cor- poral Arthur Greville and Privates W. Wat- kins, Albert Mallett, and Philip Lear. News of the sailing of the three former has been received in the village, and, as the latter was in the same regiment and company, it may be assumed that he is with his companions.

I I BRIDGEND TROOPER

I BRIDGEND TROOPER m IN FRANCE. Trooper W. M. Rees, a native of Bridgend, 40 years of age and married, writes"No yord. could do justice to the gallantry of the 15th (The King's) Hussars for their services on May 21tk. These were the concluding word. ad- dressed to the regiment by the Brigadier in con- veying the thanks of the commander of the cavalry corps: I have come," said the Brigadier, "from General Byng to thank the 15th Hussars for their magnificent performance yesterday. General Byng knows of and realises all you did. Every officer and man from top to bot- tom couldn't have done more, and I am told to thank you on behalf of the whole Army and the country. By your magnificent work you not only saved the situation as far aa that part- of the line was concerned, but by hold- ing on you saved thousands of lives, which must have been lost but for your work, and reduced casualties to hundreds that would have been thousands. I cannot put into words half I would like to say and the praise due to you. All I can say is that you be- haved as 15th Hussars always do, and that is the highest praise I can give."

I MAESTEG TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCIL I

I MAESTEG TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCIL. WOMEN WORKERS AND LOW WAGES. II The fortnightly meeting of the above Coun- cil was held at the Co-operative Lecture Hall on Thursday evening when a good represen- tation from the Trade Unions affiliated was present. The following resolution was passed: That this meeting of the Maesteg Trades and Labour Council declares its strongest opposition to compulsory military service, believing conscription in any form to be a violation of the principles of civic freedom, hitherto prized as one of the chief heritages of British liberty, and that its adoption would constitute a grave menace to the pro- gress of the nation. It further believes that recourse to a compulsory system is uncalled for in view of the enormous roll of enlist- ments since the war began. It therefore urges Parliament to offer its utmost resist- ance to any proposal to impose upon the British people a yoke which is one of the chief causes of Prussian militarism. The questions of non-Unionism amongst local shop workers, the employment of woman labour in shops at a wage far below the equiv- alent paid to men whose places they are taking, the living in system, and other mat- ters detrimental to the progress of the ordi- nary shop assistant was discussed after an ad- dress by the local Secretary of the Shop As- sistants Union, and it was decided that the said Union should arrange a series of organ- ising meetings under the auspices of this Council at an early date. I

NATIONAL REGISTRATION

NATIONAL REGISTRATION. TEXT OF SILL. The text of the National Registration Bill was issued on Wednesday. The only persons exempted from its pro- visions are members of the naval and Regular or Territorial Forces; prisoners in a prison, certified lunatics or defective inmates of any institution suffering from physical or mental infirmities, or interned prisoners of war. Any person or persons discharged from such insti- tution, however, must, before release, furnish the authorities of the institution with the in- formation required by the Bill. Persons filling up the form have to give their name, residence, whether single, married or widowed, the number of dependents, pro- fession or occupation, name and business, nationality if not British. A person who after registering changes his residence permanently, must inform the local authority of his new district within 28 days. A person arriving in the United Kingdom r--iist. if not previously registered, give notice of his arrival. £ 5 penalties are imposed :—1.—When a per- son refuses to fill up a form. 2.—Neglects to attend at any place or time at which his at- tendance may be required under the Act. 3.—Makes a false return. 4.-Refuses to answer or gives a false answer to any question necessary for obtaining information required under the Act. 5.-Neglects to perform any other duty imposed on him by the Act.

No title

At a meeting of the London Flour Millers' Association on Tuesday, the price of town households was reduced Is., to 44s.; top to 44s. top grades 3s. to 4s. more.

J VALE NOTES VALE NOTESl

J VALE NOTES. VALE NOTES.?l (By PELA-GIUS.) The gift of eggs to wounded soldiers ,advo- cated by "Velox," is being taken up by one at least of our local poultry keepers. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, Penybryn Farm, are send- ing every week an egg basket containing 4 dozen eggs, to Albany Road School Hospital. < We often hear it said that "curses, like chickens, come home to roost," but let us re- member another truth, "Deeds of kindness, like bread cast upon the waters,' return to us after many days." o 8 1 The shoals of letters of thanks received from our soldiers in France by Mrs. E. T. Lloyd for smoking requisites that this lady has sent regularly to the men of the Welsh Regi- ment, breathe the spirit of gratitude, and are couched in such thankful terms as to prove the truth of the latter adage.' < <* One writer states that the parcel that fell to his luckly lot was doubly welcome, for at this time last summer he was harvesting with Mr. Rees, Plymouth House, to whom he wishes to be remembered. o The roll of honour that is being prepared of old Council School boys will contain names of men serving in every British force in this world-wide war, for with our Fleet in the North Sea and Dardanelles, with the Expedi- tionary Forces in France and the Mediterran- ean, and the Garrisons in Egypt and other places, old boys are to-day doing their bit for King and country. < We are glad to compliment the District Council for their promptitude in removing the loose stones on the road to the beach, which is much improved' by this small expen- diture.

IPARISH COUNCILS

I PARISH COUNCILS. LLANTWIT MAJOR. The monthly meeting of the Llantwit Major Parish Council was held on Tuesday evening, Mr. E. John presiding. Also pre- sent were: Messrs. I. B. Nicholl, E. T. Lloyd, J. C. Thomas, D. Thomas, and L. Rees. WANT OF COURTESY. The Clerk reported that no reply had been received from Captain Lancaster, in charge of the 7th Welsh Cyclist Battalion at Llantwit Major, to the letter written him asking him to impress upon the company the need for more careful riding of their cycles, particu- larly in Colhugh Street. Messrs. Lloyd and* Nicholl expressed their surprise at what they thought was a lack of common courtesy. Other members concurred. I ANNUAL CUSTOM. It was resolved that the annual custom of cutting the sides of the hedges that abut on the footpaths on the cliffs be followed, and the Clerk was empowered to employ the man who usually does the work.

I COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT

I COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT. I Tuesday.—Before: Alderman W. A. James (Mayor), Messrs. Acland Allen and J. C. Thomas. NO LIGHTS. I J. R. Thomas, Lisworney, for having driven I a vehicle at 10.45 p.m. without having lights attached was fined 10s. I CRUELTY TO A HORSE. George Ambury, Llanharry, for having worked a horse in an unfit state, was fined 20s.-An officer of the R.S.P .C.A. described the case as a bad one, and said the horse ought to have had rest and treatment, but the defendant contended that the horse was worked for exercise. I DAMAGE TO CROPS. For having caused damage to standing crops on the farm of Mr. L. Da vies, Llan- harran, five collier youths had to pay 10s. each.

BWTA CONFERENCE AT ABERAYON

B.W.T.A. CONFERENCE AT ABERAYON. I FLOURISHING LOCAL BRANCH. While the Aberavon and Port Talbot Branch of the British Women's Temperance Association has only been in existence a little over a year, the district was favoured with being the chosen rendezvous for the annual meetings of the Glamorgan County Union on Thursday. The local branch has been doing some good work since its inception in our midst, and while there is ample room for more members, its numerical strength is satisfac- tory for such a young branch. The routine business was transacted in the morning and in the early part of the after- noon, when conferences were held in Wern Chapel, Aberavon. Only delegates were ad- mitted to these conferences and departmental reports were presented of the various dis- tricts, Mrs. Isles (Penarth) and President of the Glamorgan County Union presiding. Delegates were entertained to luncheon and tea in the Wern Chapel by members of the local branch, votes of thanks being accorded to the local branch for their hospitality. At six o'clock an open-air meeting was held at Vivian Square, Mrs. Morgan Thomas (Car- diff) presiding. Sister Barker (Swansea) was the principal speaker. In the evening a pub- lic meeting was held. in Wern Chapel, the President of the local branch, Mrs. Rev. D. James, presiding. In her opening remarks she called attention to the question of the earlier closing of public houses principally, basing her assertion on the remark made to her of a man who had been in the habit of spending his evenings in the pubic house that he hoped the time would not arrive when pub- lie houses would be kept open longer. In her opinion there were many men and women who thought the same. Mrs. Watkin Williams (President of the Swansea District Union) addressed the chil- dren and Sister Barker directed her remarks principally to the women, pointing out the advantages and desirability of refraining from indulging in alcohol. At the close of the meeting a number of young girls signed the pledge. At the evening meeting solos were rendered by Miss Louise Phillips and recitations by Mrs B. Rees, their contributions being very ac- ceptable. Mrs. Rev. Pugh Bevan, organist for the local branch, presided at the organ. A vote of thanks to all who had taken part in the evenings meeting was proposed by Mrs. Inspector Best and seconded by Mrs. Isaac (Port Talbot).

No title

Mr. D. A. Thomas and party sailed from England last week-end for America, where the well-known Welsh coalowner will be in charge of a special mission on behalf of the Ministry of Munitions. I

IS THIS A RECORD I

IS THIS A RECORD? I Many records are to be found in the pages of the daily papers at the present time, and the Carmarthen Training College boasts of one. Three brothers, who were members of the same training college, have responded to the call of their country in the hour of its need. Mr. Christopher J. Evans was in residence at Carmarthen College from 1896 to 1898. In his second year he occupied the position of chapel monitor and sub-editor of the College magazine. He joined the College Company of the 1st V.B. Welsh Regiment whilst a stu- dent, and has kept a close connection with military matters since that date. After leaving college, he joined the B Battalion of the 3rd V.B. Welsh Regiment, which, on re- construction became the 2nd Welsh Regi- ment. For some years he was in charge of the signalling section of the battalion. On the termination of the old Volunteer system in 1908 Mr. C. J. Evans was discharged with the rank of sergeant. Subsequently he en- listed in the Glamorgan (Fortress) Royal En- gineers, was promoted Corporal in May, 1909, and sergeant in July, 1909. Sergt. Evans is now acting as pay sergeant to the 3rd Glam. (E.L.) Company, Royal Engineers. Mr. Llewellyn Evans (1906-1908) joined the sanitary section of the R.A.M.C. He is well known as a teacher of Art and Welsh at the Pent-re Secondary School. Mr. Fred Evans (1907-1908) was, during his college days, the editor of the College Magazine, and the secretary of the Sports Club. He now holds the rank of sergeant in the sanitary section of the R.A.M.C. Sergt. Evans has done excellent service in the Army in lecturing to the men at various centres on various topics concerned with hygiene and sanitation. It may also be added that Sergt. C. J. Evans holds a responsible position under the Cardiff Education Authority. He is the author of several well-known books on County Topography (Glamorgan, Brecon, Carmar- then, etc.). Sergt. Fred Evans is the author of a suc- cessful text book on Local History. It is in- teresting to recall that he delivered a series of lectures at the College last Session on the Teaching of Local History in Elementary Schools, and also on- The Teacher and the Child," the lectures being illustrated by lan- tern slides of his own make. The above Carmarthen Training College students, are the sons of Mr. T. C. Evans, Cadrawd" (Ty Cynwyd), Llangynwyd.

IMAESTEG TEACHERS PROTESTI

I MAESTEG TEACHERS PROTEST I I AGAINST COERCION. A meeting of the Maesteg branch of the N.U.T. was held at the Plasnewydd Girls' School on Friday evening, Miss M. J .Ray- Morgan presiding. The following resolution was passed unani- mously :— That this meeting strongly objects to the action of the Maesteg School Managers in re- fusing to appoint local men who have com- pleted their professional training, to schools in the district where there are vacancies, on the ground that they are of military age. That this meeting is further of opinion that this form of coercion should not be toler- ated until conscription becomes universal." It was pointed out that there were many vacancies in the schools where male teachers should be employed; but which had been filled by female teachers. This action of the Man- agers was considered most unfair. Young men leaving college, who had gone to a con- siderable expense m order to get themselves trained, were, when seeking posts, thrown mercilessly on one side, when posts could easily be found for them all. Some were suf- fering from short sight, and one was the only son of a widow. Was it fair, it was asked, to force them to seek employment elsewhere, when work was plentiful at home?

I POLICE PRESENTATION

I POLICE PRESENTATION I AT PORT TALBOT. A large number of officials and workmen of the Port Talbot Steelworks assembled in the Grand Hotel on Saturday evening to make a presentation to Police-Sergeant H. W. Pin- cott, who has been appointed a police officer on the Margam Estate. Mr. Charles B. John (manager of the Smelt- ing department) presided, and he was suppor- ted by the works chief officials. The presen- tation was made by Mr. Charles Routledge (Plate Mills manager), who alluded to Ser- geant Pincott's six years connection with the Steelworks and the high esteem in which he was held by all employed at the works. The sentiments he expressed were re-echoed by Messrs. R. Lavery and J. Potts. Sergeant Pincott was then presented with a handsome gold chain and a suitably in- scribed medallion, together with a ladies hand- bag and a purse for Mrs. Pincott. The recipient briefly responded. A number of musical items interspersed the speeches, those contributing being Messrs P. Hopkins (comic), R. Williams, H. Thomp- son, J. McDonald, A. Reid and H. Brown (comedian). Mr. Stephens accompanied effi- ciently.

IPORTHCAWLI

I PORTHCAWL. I THE PROPERTY MARKET. Messrs. Michael Davies and Co., F.A.I., offered for sale at the Esplanade Hotel, Porthcawl, the freehold shop and two dwelling houses, known as "Bay View" (house and shop) and "Green Croft House," situated in John Street, Porthcawl, let at R55 andi'fSO per annum respectively, tenant paying rates and taxes. Both properties were knocked down to Mr. T. Langdon for £ 1,775. No. 5 Well- street, Porthcawl, was, after brisk bidding, purchased by Mr. T. Langdon for £ 680. Messrs. Dapho L. Powell and Co., Bridgend, acted as solicitors for the vendors.

IBREAD CHEAPER I

I BREAD CHEAPER. I I LOCAL BAKERS' DECISION. I At a special meeting of the Neath, Port Talbot-Aberavon and District Master Bakers' Association, on Saturday night, held at Ellis Cafe, it was decided to reduce the price of bread to 8d. per 41b. loaf as from last Monday. Mr. W. J. Stockman, President of the As- sociation, presided, and those present from Aberavon and Port Talbot were:—Messrs. T. S. Goslin, 1. Ellis, S. A. Nutley, D. Llewellyn, E. G. Dane and A. G. Morgan, Secretary.

GLAMORGAN YOLUNTEERSI

GLAMORGAN YOLUNTEERS. SCHEME ADOPTED AT LLANTRISANT. A meeting was theld in the Church Hall, Llantrisant, to discuss the possibility of form- ing a division of the Glamorgan Volunteer Training Corps in this district. Mr. Godfrey Clark presided, and Major Davis, of Criegau, explained the conditions and aims of the corps. He said Mr. James Williams and the inspector of police had consented to act as instructors. Mr. George Davis proposed that the scheme be adopted, and the meeting passed the resolu- tion unanimously.

GARW SOLDIER AWARDED DCM

GARW SOLDIER AWARDED D.C.M. A PLUCKY ACT. Corporal James Hutchison, of the Royal Engineers, has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous bravery at Givenchy, in saving from a trench mine two officers and a ser- geaii-c. Corporal Hutchison hails from Clycesdale Place, Overtown, Scotland. He worked at the Glengarw Colliery, Blaengarw, when he joined the Army. On Wednesday of last week Corporal Hutchison visited his uncle,. Mr. T. Shannon, of Mount Pleasant. Ponty- cymmer, and was proud to state that he tra- velled across on the same boat as Michael O'Leary, V.C.

I WELCOME THE BRAYE

WELCOME THE BRAYE. PUBLIC MEETING AT PONTY- CYMMER. At the Ffaldau Institute, Pontycymmer. on Monday last a public meeting was held to form a reception committee to meet wounded soldiers returning home from the front. The following were appointed :—Chairman, Rev. W. Saunders, C.C.; treasurer, Council- lor Llew. Jones, J.P.; joint secretaries, Sergt Evans and Mr. D. J. Rees. Committee: Messrs. A. Day, W. Pennant, Morgan Weeks, Job Fox, Daniel Edwards, Trevor Hughes, Charles Gunter, T. Williams, F. Price, David John, Ebenezer James, F. W. White, Rev. David Hughes, Mr. J. J. Mor- gan, B.A., Misses F. M. Thomas and S. J. Howells.

NANTYMOEL SOLDIERS RECEPTIONI

NANTYMOEL SOLDIER'S RECEPTION BY ENTHUSIASTIC RESIDENTS. On Tuesday the inhabitants of Nantymoel turned out in large numbers to welcome home a returned wounded soldier in the person of Private James Merriman, of 3 Dinam Street, Nantymoel. He belongs to the 1st Batt. of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, attached to the 173rd company of Royal Engineers. He went out to France on November 1st, of last year, and came through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed, and whilst engaged in sinking a pit with the Royal Engineers on the 25th of May, he was caught by shrapnel, and narrowly escaped with his life, receiving an ugly wound above the right eye. He was removed to hospital, and later brought over to Albany Road Hospital, Cardiff. About three weeks ago he was sent to a Red Cross Hospital at Sketty. He is rapidly re- covering and hopes to reach the depot of his regiment at Wrexham to-day (Friday). The welcome given him was enthusiastic. The Temperance Band was in attendance, and a procession was formed, and having paraded Nantymoel and Blaenogwy, a halt was called before the Workmen's Hall, and a few speeches of welcome were made by Messrs. Rhys Williams, Tom Keirp, and T. J. Job. Private Merriman was assured of the sin- cere appreciation of the people of Nantymoel of his*bravery and pluck on the field of battle and his wounds were a lasting witness to his true patriotism. The speeches naturally and wisely betook a recruiting colour. An appeal was made to the scores of single young men in the crowd to come out to defend the honour, of their country, and an appeal was made to all to be on the look out for ways and means to help their country in this time of distress. Private Merriman did not make a speech, but he expressed his sincere thanks for the royal welcome they had given him, and in pri- vate he said that his comrades in the firing line were keeping up their spirit in a remark- able manner.

I WITH THE WELSH

I WITH THE WELSH. I PONTYCYMMER SOLDIER RETURNS HOME. Private 22866 Edward Evans, 1st Welsh Regiment, returned from the front to his home at 29 Meadow Street, Pontycymmer, on Sunday morning last. He was wounded in the head and had the third finger of his left hand blown off by shrapnel whilst in the trenches. Private Evans joined'the Army in 1902, and served three years in India and South Africa. After nine years on the re- serve, his time expired on the 22nd July, 1914. He volunteered for service in his old regiment on December 29th, and left for France on January 16th, going straight to the trenches. It was a pitiable sight, he re- marked to see the poor refugees leaving Ypres. The only other warning that they were nearing the firing line was the falling of I Jack Johnsons." He highly complimented the ofifcers of the 1st Welsh, and claimed they ranked with ttffe| best in the British Army. He described the German numbers as grow- ing like mushrooms. In the only bayonet charge he was in, the Germans, with the ex- ception of the Prussian Guards, actually turned their backs in fear of cold steel. The Prussian Guards were real dare-devils! Private Evans said that the finest time of his life was spent at Bury Hospital, where the wounded soldiers were receiving all the attention possible.

BLAENGARW

BLAENGARW. C.E.M.S.—The annual business meeting held in connection with St. James' branch of the Church of England Men's Society took place at the Parish Hall on Tuesday night, Rev. J. Davies, B.A., presiding. After the balance sheet was read by Mr. D. J. Vaughan (sub. sec), and passed, the following officers were appointed for the ensuing year:—Presi- dent, Rev. J. Davies (re-elected); vice-presi- dent, Mr. G. H. Simon; treasurer, Mr. J. W. English (re-elected); secretary, Mr. J. J. Wil- liams (re-elected); assistant secretary, Mr. D. J. Vaughan). The following were also appointed to act on the committee, together with the offioers:Aessrs. A. Griffiths, H. B. Jones, and Robert Pritchard.

iBLACKMILL

BLACKMILL. PRESENTATION.—A delightful evening was spent at Blackmill Infants' School on Monday, when Miss Evans, school mistress, was presented with a handbag and gold brooch as a parting gift, from the scholars. The presentation was made by the Rev. W. P. Griffiths, who presided. Songs and recita- tions were given by the children in Welsh and English. A song was also given by Master 1. Evans, and recitations by Masters B. Storer and Willie Goldsworthy. Miss Evans leaves to take up an appointment in North Wales.

ABERAVON RECRUITING OFFICES TO BE MOVED

ABERAVON RECRUITING OFFICES TO BE MOVED. In consequence of the unsuitability of the premises at present occupied by the recruiting authorities in Aberavon it has been decided to obtain more central premises, and a shop has been taken in Station Road. Port Talbot. The offiees will be removed directly official sanction is received.

PONTYRHYL I

PONTYRHYL. I PUPIL TEACHERS.-At the recent county examination for the admission of pupil teachers the following were successful from the Garw Higher Elementary School:—Misses Annie J. Davies, Blaengarw (first on list); Blodwen Owen, Pontycymmer (third on list); Mary A. Samuel, Pontycymmer; Verona James, Bryn- menin; Rose M. Hopkins, Aberkenfig, and Bron- wen Francis, Blaengarw. INFANTS' WELCOME.—At Carmel Chapel, Pontyrhyl, a meeting was held under the aus- pices of the Ogmore and Garw U.D. Council to appoint a committee of ladies for the Pontyrhyl Ward to act in connection with the Mothers' Welcomes. Mr. T. C. Jones, J.P., presided. Mrs. Leverton (of the Association of Infants' Consultations and Schools for Mothers) spoke upon the aim of the Association. The follow- ing ladies were appointed to represent the vari- ous districts Pantygog, Mrs. (Rev.) Reynolds, Mesdames E. Pugh, T. Williams, and M. J. Stone; Pontyrhyl, Mesdames T. C. Jones, D. J. Edwards, T. Squire, W. Thomas, and Mrs (Rev.) Jones; Llangeinor, Mesdames R. Thomas, C. A. Long, and F. W. Lougher; president, Mr. T. C. Jones, and secretary, Mrs. Cyrlais Williams. Mrs. Reynolds moved, and Rev. W. J. Williams seconded a vote of thanks to the speaker and chairman. DEATH.—Much sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Evans, Caerau Road, CaeTau, in their sad bereavement caused by the sudden and unexpected death of their six years old daughter Eva. The funeral took place at the Maesteg Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon last week. The mem- bers of the Nantyffyllon and Caerau Chamber of Trade attended as a mark of respect for their colleague. Messrs. L. D. Lewin, D. L. Rees, J. L. Thomas, and Dan E. Jones were selected to act as bearers. The chief mour- ners were:—Mr. Matthew Evans (father), M, H. Evans, C. Evans, and G. Evans (brothers), Mr. H. Lloyd (grandfather), Mr. W. Lloyd and Mr. T. Lloyd (uncles). A number of floral tributes were sent by: Mr. and Mrs. Evans and family; Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, grand-parents; Mrs. Mary Evans, grandmother; Mrs. Smith, Malvern, aunt; Mrs. Probert, Hay, aunt; Mr. John Evans, Hereford, uncle; Mr. and Mrs. Dan E. Jones, Caerau; Staff and Scholars of Caerau In- fants' School; Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Davies and family, Caerau; Friends, Treherbert; Mr. and Mrs. Griffiths, Oddfellows Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. Edwards, Farmers' Arms, Cymmer; Hope Sunday School, Caerau; Mr. and Mrs. Uphill, Caerau; Messrs. M. H. Evans, T. J. Evans, C. R. Evans, G. Evans, Miss Forty, Miss Newbury, and Mrs. Hatton. The in- ternment was at the Maesteg Cemetery, the officiating ministers being the Rev. D. R. Thomas and the Rev. E. M. Thomas, Caerau.

I NANTYMOELI

I NANTYMOEL I ZOAR CHAPEL.—Last Sunday and Mon- day the annual preaching services of this church were held. The chapel being small, the services on Sunday afternoon and even- ing were held at the Workmen's Hall. The attendances were good. The special preacher was Rev. Tegfan Davies, Glyn-Neath. ANNUAL MEETINGS.—On Sunday last the Welsh Church of St. Peter's held their annual preaching services. The special preacher was Rev. P. Francis, Treorkv. The large congregations listened attentively to the thoughtful discourses delivered. The services were continued on Tuesday, being St. Peter's Day, when the sermons of Rev. E. Carston, Ystradyfodwg, were much appreci- ated. OPEN-AIR CAMPAIGN. The usual weekly meeting was held close to the Work- men's Hall. The previous prayer meeting had been held at Soar Welsh Congregational Chapel. The minister in charge of the meet- ing was Rev. D. Glanmor Jenkins, and he delivered a telling evangelical address, and the following friends spoke:—Mr. Sidney Watson, Mr. Floyd, Mr. Cook, and Mr. Fol- land. The meeting throughout was quite im- pressive. AMBULANCE CLASS.—The names of the students of this class who succeeded in win- ning certificates were published in our col- umns recently. On Wednesday evening, at the Council School, a meeting was held to dis- tribute the certificates. Mr. David Davies presided, and spoke encouraging words. Then the ceremony of distribution was per- formed by the Revs. J. R. Pugh, B.A. (vicar) and M. J. Mills, who delivered appro- priate addresses. Mr. J. R. Evans (school- master), the organising secretary, replied to a vote of thanks. An enthusiastic vote of thanks was passed to Dr. D. J. Thomas, the popular lecturer of the class.

ITONDU AND ABERKENFIG I

I TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. I Fit Id,STATION. Mr. Edgar Abel, G.W.R. controller, Tondu, was presented on June 25th, at Tondu Station, with a gold albert, and a silver-fitted oak tray for Mrs. Abel, on the occasion of his marriage, which took place recently. Mr. Bowen (superin- tendent) made the presentation, and in con- veying the gifts to Mr. Abel, dwelt at length on the goodwill which was generally felt to- wards the recipient. Mr. T. H. John, chief controller, and others, also joined in the ex- pression of good wishes. The gifts were re- presentative of all grades of railwaymen. ANNIVERSARY.—The anniversary ser- vices in connection with the Tondu Wesley Sunday School was held on Sunday. The preacher was Mr. J. Massey, of Cardiff, who delivered inspiring sermons at the morning and evening services. In the afternoon a ser- vice of praise was rendered by the choir and children, the soloists being: Mrs. Whitting- ham, Mrs. Newman, Mr. Baldwin, and Mr. Phillips. The infant's hymn "Vera" was com- posed by the conductor, Mr. S. Paget, A.T.S.C., and was greatly appreciated. Reci- tations were given by the infants and conduc- ted by Miss B. Major, their teacher. The fol- lowing children took part: Ethel Edwards, Irene Lloyd, Violet Prescott, Florrie Elliott, Doris Taylor, Alice Phelps, Nellie Elliott, Mary Anson, Lizzie Ballinger, Hilda Jacka, Violet Jacka, Doris Pope, Violet Pittard, Ketta Pittard, Fred Whitlock, Willie Ayres, Howard Saunders, Leonard Evans, Leslie Pit- tard, Stanley Jewell, Rudolph Winn, Stanley Evans, Leonard Crocombe. Archie Major, Frank Ballinger, Willie Pittard and Sydney Bayford. The recitations and singing were enjoyed, especially the anthem, "Peace be Still" (Thomas Faser) under the able con- ductorship of Mr. S. Paget, A.T.S.C. The organist was Mr. F. S. Slack. The collections for the day were devoted to the Sunday School Funds, which were in excess of recent years. On Wednesday the annual treat was held, when assistance was given by the following ladies to make the day successful: Mrs. Bundy, Mrs. Medlin, Mrs. E. Winn, Mrs. E. Rees, Mrs. G. Coles, Miss Wood, Mrs. F. Rose, Mrs. Saunders, Mrs. J. Major, Miss Tapp, Mrs. E. Bevan, Mrs. Powell, Mrs. Thos. Rees. Mrs. Ballinger and Mrs. Evans. The Rev. C. C. Pori and Mr. R. F. Pegler undertook the charge of sports and games, which were held in the school, and these were greatly enjoyed by the children.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. At the Zion English Baptist Chapel on Sunday and Monday the annual meetings were held, when the Rev. B. T. Roberts, of Cowbridge, deli- vered eloquent sermons to large congrega- tions. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES-On Sunday and Monday, at the Bethel Calvinistic Metho- dist Chapel, Pontycymmer, the annual meet- ings were held, when inspiring sermons were delivered before large congregations, by Revs S. T. Jones, Colwyn Bay (late of Rhyl), and Philip Jones, Llandilo, Carmarthenshire. BENEFIT CONCERT. At the Hippo- drome, Pontycymmer, on Friday a benefit concert was held on behalf of Mi*. Victor An- derson for his generosity in giving the free use of the premises for local charitable pur- poses. Rev. D. D. Evans presided. Dur- ing the evening the usual performance was given, including the following:—Solos by Misses Katie Davies, Cwmavon; G. Webster, Aberkenfig, and N. Powell, Pontyrhyl; Messrs. D. Lloyd Thomas and Bert Apsey, Pontycymmer; comedy duet by Hetty and Amy Anderson. The Garw Male Voice Party (under the conductorship of Mr. John Butler, L.T.S.T.) rendered, in fine style, "Jolly Roger," and "Homeward Bound." Miss Sarah Butler, L.R.A.M., accompanied. At the close of the concert Mr. Anderson thanked all for their kindness. The concert was organised by the party and local lodges. TABERNACLE.—Tabernacle held its quar- terly meting on Sunday evening. The in- troductory part was conducted by the differ- ent classes of children. Miss Keturah Wil- liams conducted the juvenile choir, the adults joining effectively with them. An address was delivered on The Sunday School," by Mr. Urias Phillips, B.A., Memorial College, Brecon. About 50 certificates were distri- buted to the children who had passed in re- cent examinations. The programme—ar- ranged by the superintendents, Messrs. D. C. Jones and J. M. Owen-was finely executed by Olwen Richards, Bcatie Jenkins, William Owen, Gladys Thomas, Olwen Smith, Edith Owen, Cecil and Ceridwen Evans, Annie May John Florence Edwards, Winnie Evans, Catherine Eynon, Rhoney Noyle, David Lloyd Thomas. The Sunday School secretary and treasurer are Messrs. Ieuan Thos. Hughes and Samuel Harries respectively. Miss But- ler presided at the organ. Rev. David Hughes (minister) presided. OBITUARY.—The funeral of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Johns, of Bridge House, Pontycym- mer, took place at the Pontycymmer Ceme- tery on Tuesday. Deceased was born at Saundersfoot, Pembrokeshire, 76 years ago. and came to the valley 30 years ago. Mrs. Johns was a member of the English Congre- gational Chapel. At the house the Rev. D. D. Evans officiated, and at the graveside the Revs. J. Davies, B.A., Blaengarw, and J. Rowe Thomas, L.D., Pontyeymmer. The chief mourners were:—Mrs. Rees, Begelly, Pem. (sister-in-law) Mr. and Mrs. Steer, Car- diff( nephew and niece); Mr. T. Steer, Car- diff nephew); Mr. Lewis, Cardiff (nephew); and Miss Hannah Thomas, Pontycymmer. Among others present were:—Revs. W. Saun- ders, C.C. J. T. Rltys, Swansea; David Hughes, and W. Reynolds; Messrs. Thomas Griffiths, Burry Port; W. Evans. agent, Braichycymmer Colliery James Fox, cashier John Griffiths, T. Williams, Dr. Parry, J.P., Messrs. A. Day, F. Day, W. Thomas, Richard Thomas, W. Lewis, Thos. Morris, W. Abel, J. Maddocks, and G. Jones. Wreaths were sent by Mrs. Emmerson, London; Mr. and Mrs. Steer, Cardiff, and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, Cardiff FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mr. George Henry Feiven, of Oxford Street, Pon- tycymmer, who died after a short illness on Tuesday, at the age of 58, took place at St. John's Churchyard, Aberkenfig, on Saturday afternoon. Deceased was highly respected, being a shoemaker in Pontycymmer for over 30 years. Rev. H. Campbell Davies, B.A. (Vicar) officiated, and the Revs. D. D. Evans, David Hughes, and J. F. Jones also atten- ded. The mourners were:—Mrs. Elizabeth Feiven (widow); Mr. Wm. Feiven (son); Mr. and Mrs. Charles Feiven and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Feiven (sons and daughters-in- law) Mr. and Mrs. Evan Davies (son-in-law and daughter); Driver Bert Feiven, R.F.A., Portmadoc, and Mr. George Feiven (sons); Mr. and Mrs. Walter and Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Evans, (sons-in-law and daughters); Mr. and Mrs S. Feiven (son and daughter-in-law) Mr. J. Poole, Bridgend (brother-in-law); Misses Mary and Alice Davies; Misses Bea- trice, Annie, and Mr. Edgar Feiven (grand- children) Mr. and Mrs. Cabbel, Ogmore Vale (cousins); Mrs. Cox, Ogmore Vale (cousin); Mr. James Pugsley and daughter (brother-in-law and niece); Mrs. D. Lewis (niece), Mr- Edmund Pearce, senr., and Mr. Edmund Pearce, junr. (brother-in-law and nephew); Mr. and Mrs. W. Pearce (nephew and niece); Mrs. Rose Davies, Mrs. M. Wil- cox, Rryneoch, and Mrs. Hurley, Aberkenfig (nieces). Wreaths were sent by Widow and children; William Paddock, and Beatrice Feiven.

OGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE: PREACHING SERVICES. The half- yearly meetings in connection with Philadel- phia Welsh Baptist Church were held on Sat- urday and Sunday. The attendance at the services was good, and some excellent ser- mons were delivered by the Rev. B. V. Davies, Abergwynfi. Mr. T. O. Brookes was in charge of the singing, and Miss S. A. Brookes presided at the organ. SUNDAY SCHOOL TREAT.—The annual treat in connection with Bethlehem Welsh Baptist Sunday School was held on Wednes- day of last week, in the vestry. It had been intended to hold the treat on the mountain- side, but unfortunately wet weather set in and the arrangements had to be altered. An excellent spread of good things was provided, and this was thoroughly enjoyed by the large number which sat down. The following ladies presided at the tables:—Mrs. (Rev.) L. G. Lewis, Mrs. (Dr.) Stock, Misses Maggie and Sarah Jones, Mrs. Owen, and Mrs. H. J. Lewis, Mrs. 1. Rees, Miss Jones, Mrs. Parker, and Miss Osborne. Mrs. Edward Davies, Miss D. Treharne, and Mr. D. Lewis acted as cutters. At the meeting held in the evening Mr. W. Jones presided. Solos were given by Miss Gwen Price and Mr. Idris Williams, and the children's choir rendered selections under the leadership of Mr. E. Jones. Cake and milk were supplied to those present, and also a packet of sweets. A series of competi- tions were held, and altogether a pleasant evening was spent. The duties of secretary were ably performed by Mrs. B. A. Davies.

Advertising

Up-to-date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive pricea, at the Glamorgan Gazette Printing Works. Printed and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany, Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offices. Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- gan. FRIDAY, JULY 2nd, 1915.