Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
29 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
COMMONERS OBJECTIONSi

COMMONERS' OBJECTIONS. i SUB-COMMITTEE'S RECOMMENDATIONS. I PETITION TO BE CIRCULATED. 1 A meeting of the Joint committee represent- ing the four Parish Councils interested in Coity Wallia Commons was held at the Union Offices, Bridgend, on Tuesday. Mr. F. Pugsley (St. Bride's Minor) presided, and there were also present: Messrs. D. Lewis, T. Morgan, D. Bayliss, and R. Rees (St. Bride's Minor), T. Thomas, W. H. Pickering, and L. Lewis (Pencoed), D. Jones and Wm. David (Coity), J. Evans and G. Hawkins (Coychurch) and the clerk (Mr. Ivor M. Howells). The principal business of the meeting was to consider the recommendations made by the sub-committee appointed to frame objections to the proposed Order for regulating the Com- mons, these objections to be embodied in a pe- tition to be presented to the Board of Agri- culture. The recommendations were :— (1) Preamble. That the whole of the Order be objected to on the ground that the application for the Order did not emanate from the general body of residents of the Manor. (2) Part II., Clauses A and B. Adjust- ment of Rights. That these clauses be objected to on the ground that rights of Common have been exercised 'by all residents in the Manor, with- out restriction, from time im- memorial, and it is therefore sub- mitted that if the existing rights are not to be interfered with, as has been frequently stated by the pro- moters, these clauses are unneces- sary. (3) Part II.: Board of Conservators. That the constitution of the pro- posed Board of Conservators be ob- jected to on the ground that it is not to be elected by the inhabitants of the Manor. (4) Part IV. Sale. That objection be taken to the sale of any portion of the Common, on the ground that it would limit the user of the Common as at present enjoyed, and would confer no benefit on the general body of residents of the Manor. (5) Part IV., Clause 3: Rating. That ob- jection be taken to the levying of a rate in aid by the Penybont Rural District Council, in view of the sub- stantial amount which the Com- moners' Committee have at their disposal, and in view of the fact that one of the parishes, namely, Coity Higher, has only a very small por- tion of its boundaries within the Manor. That District Councillors William Evans, Coity, and W. A. Howell, iPencoed, be invited to join the Committee. The Chairman moved and Mr. Haw-kins seconded, the adoption of recommendation No. 1. Mr. J. Evans pemfced out thatat-the last meeting of the committee, Mr..Riandall in- formed them that the proposed Order eman- ated from the Lpet Court, and ifce silso said that a subsequent Loot Court decided to drop the thing. He (Mr. Evans) suggested, therefore, that home reference to that should be made in the olause. Mr. Bayliss: The public bodies were not consulted at all in connection with the draw- ing up of the Order. The Clerk The Parish Councils as such have not been consulted by the promoters; the Rural District Council have, and they are passing the matter on to the Parish Councils. Mr. J. Evans: The point of my observation is that this objection could be made stronger. I have no doubt personally that it is strong enough as it is, but when we get up a case it is for us to get it up as strongly as pos- sible. It was agreed to include Mr. Evans' sug- gestion in the objection. Regarding the second recommendation, the Chairman moved the adoption, and Mr. J. Evans seconded. Mr. D. Jones: We object to the Order in the first clause, and here we are objecting again. Mr. Bayliss pointed out that there appar- ently was an intention to close the mountains to Commoners at certain times of the year. After Mr. Evans had complimented the clerk on the framing of the objection, the re- commendation was agreed to, as was also the third and fourth. Some discussion ensued over the fifth re- commendation on Mr. Bayliss moving an amendlLt nt that they agree to the levying of a rate ox id. in the JE, because by that every person, lie thought, would be made a Com- moner. Mr. D. Jones seconded. Mr. J. Evans: R appears to me that we shall stultify ourselves if we agree to this rate at all. Our objection would appear to be a contradiction in terms. We are to some extent to favour an Order by agreeing to a rate, however small. Mr. Bayliss' ob- ject is an excellent one—to give us a footing, but our argument is that we .ve a footing already, The Clerk: But is that argument borne out by counsel's opinion ? Mr. J. Evans: No, but counsels are not in- fallible. I could, I daresay, go to another counsel who would give a different opinion. There are Welsh counsel we could have gone to who are acquainted with Welsh customs, and if I had had a voice in this I would have gone to someone who knows something about Wales. I submit that Mr. MacMorran knows little about Wales and its customs. I know ( f no two Commons where the Commoners' rights and privileges are the same. The Clerk: But all are guided by the same law. Mr. Evans: No. He went on to say that he had never heard, and he dared say others in the room had never heard, of Mr. Mac- Morran. Mr. Bayliss' amendment that a rate be agreed to, w,s defeated. Mr. T. Morgan: The Order is asking for a rate from people, and at the same time wants to take from them their rights. Mr. J. Evans: We cannot have the rate without the Order. That was my reason for saying that agreement to a rate is tanta- mount to an acceptance of the Order. It has been pointed out repeatedly that these objections are framed in order to strengthen our case, and to show that we are not un- reasonable. The only reason why we have had an opportunity to deal in any way with this Order is because the Penybont Rural District Council has been good enough to relegate it to the interested Parish Council, and the reason Penybont Council has had anything to do with it at all has been be- cause they have been conferred with. with regard to the rate. If we delete this ob- jection we would take away the ground upon lich Peiivbont Council takes its stand. Mr. David: Mr. Randall told us he only nted the Peny'iont Council's consent to levy a rate and they would put the Order through. Mr. J, Evam t The point all along has been that the Order seeks to exclude the bulk from the benefits of the common, while the rate would fall oft all. Mr. Morgan: The only answer we can give is that we won't have anything to do with the rate. Mr. Bayliss thought the people of his par- ish would not object to a id. rate. Mr. David: I should be willing to accept a rate if they gave the management 

INTERESTING LOCAL ARBITRATION

INTERESTING LOCAL ARBI- TRATION. A BLACKMILL FARM AND THE I FINANCE ACT. A case of local interest involving the value of undeveloped minerals for payment of duties under the Finance (1909-1910) Act 1910 has recently been the subject of an arbitration. The late Mr. William Gxiffiths, of Coed Pare, Bridgend, was the owner of Hendrefor- ganifarm, near Blackmill, the minerals under- lying which farm have not been worked. Shortly after Mr. Griffiths death in December, 1911, the surface or agricultural value of the farm for estate duty and other purposes of the .Finance Act was agreed with the Govern- ment valuers, but the divergence of opinion between the valuers and advisers of Mr. Griffiths' representatives and those of the com- missioners of inland revenue was so great that an;appeal was entered by the former against the value proposed to be placed thereon by the Government, and the matter was made the subject of a reference under the provisions of the Finance Act. It is believed that this is the first reference of the kind in regard to minerals which has been held in this neigh- bourhood. The reference was taken at Cardiff before Mr. H. W. Bruton, F.S.I., of Gloucester. Mr. D Villiers Meager (instructed by Messrs. Gwyn and Gwyn, solicitors, Cowbridge), ap- peared for the representatives of the late Mr. Griffiths, and Mr. Shaw from the legal depart- ment of the Inland Revenue appeared for the Commissioners. Expert evidence was given on behalf of the appellant?, by Mr Henry K. Jordan, F.G.S., Lieutenant H. P. Herdman, Bridgend, and Mr. J. Richard Thomas, Cardiff, and on be- half of the Commissioners by Mr. W. T. Grif- fiths (the mineral valuer for Wales), Mr. John Roberts, of Swansea, and 3fr. H. T. Wales, of Swansea. The referee has now issued his award, whereby he fixes the value of the undeveloped minerals underlying the farm at a sum less than half the value claimed by the Commis- sioners, and further direeis that the costs of the appellants shall be paid by the Commis- sioners.

I FORMER BRIDGENDER MARRIED

I FORMER BRIDGENDER MARRIED I GRIFFITHS-EVANS. At St. John's (Canton) Parish Church, Car- diff, on Wednesday, the marriage was solem- nised by the Rector (the Rev. H. J. Williams, M.A.) of the Rev. Alfred Griffiths, curate of St. Mark's, Newport (and formerly of St. John's, Canton), and Miss Gwladys Evans, younger daughter of the late Dr. John Evans and Mrs. Evans, of Cowbridge-road, Cardiff. Owing to the recent death of the bride's father, who was Vicar's Warden at the church for many years, there was an absence of joy- ous display. The bride, who wagiven away by her brother-in-law (the Rev. Isaiah Roberts, M.A., R.D., Vicar of Cowbridge), wore a semi-mourning dress of grey taffeta, with grey hat trimmed with purple pansies. and carried a bouquet of grey and mauve sweet peas. The bridegroom was attended by Mr. David Llewellyn, solicitor, Bridgend, as best man. After the ceremony, which was at- tended by a large number of well-wishers from the parish, a reception was held at Church House, Church-road, among the immediate re- latives of the couple present being the Rev. Isaiah and Mrs. Roberts, Cowbridge, and the Rev. H. Morgan and Mrs. Morgan, of Holy Trinity, Newport. Later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Griffiths left for Torquay. The Rev. Alfred Griffiths was at one time a master at Bridgend County School. He was well known in athletic circles, and played hockey for Bridgend, and was a member of Ogmore Vale Rugby Club. ] I ADAMS-WILIIAMS. I The wedding was solemnised on June 29th, at the Wesleyan Church, Lancaster Road, London, of Rev. Alfred Ernest Adams, a missioner from the West Indies, son of Mr. and M rs. G. Adams, of Ogmore Vale, to Miss Dorothy Williams, daughter of Mr. and Urs. J. P. Williams, Bayswater. The ceremony was solemnised by the Rev. S. Bingham Beattie and the Rev. W. Foster. A recep- tion which took the form of a garden party, was held at the home of the bride's parents, when about 70 guests were present.

No title

Here is the new German way (says the "World") of paying old British debts. A well- known West End tradesman had on his books a debt of £50 against a German attache for- merly at this Embassy, but subsequently trans- ferred to the capital of a South American Re- public. Last autumn he wrote to him politely requesting payment. At last came back the answer. No cheque was enclosed, but across the bill was written boldly in red ink, "Gott Strafe England."

No title

The directors of the London City and Mid- land Bank, Limited, announce an interim dividend for the past half-year, at the rate of 18 per cent. per annum, less Income Tax, pay- able on the loth inst.

Advertising

Advertise in the Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; if you wans a servant, or need employment you cannot do better. Terras on page 5.

MEMBER OF CARADOGS CHOIR1

MEMBER OF CARADOGS CHOIR 1 OtiS AT KENFIG HILL. I The funeral of Mr. Thowras Thomas, A.C., of Kenfig Hill, the late coJlector of water rents wnder the Penybont Rural District Council, who died on Saturday last, took place on Wednesday at Cornelly Cemetery. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. D. Teify Davies and the Revs. T. Howells, E. W. Pearce, T. M. Williams and T. R. Williams also took part in the service. Mrs. S. A. Lewis and Miss Rees presided at the organ. The funeral was largely attended. The Brid- I The Late Mr. Thomas Thomas. gend District of Oddfellows was represented by Mr. Thomas R. Lewis (Grand Master), Mr. J. R. Williams (deputy Grand Master), and Mr. David Williams (Provincial C.S.). Wreaths were sent by the Lodge of Odd- fellows, the Parish Council and Moriah Chapel, and Pyle C.M. Singing School. The life of Mr. Thomas Thomas was a very interesting one. He was born at Kenfig Hill on the 23rd January, 1853, educated at Bryn- du schools and worked as traffic manager at Kenfig Hill, Cymmer and Maesteg. Very early in life he studied music in John Cara- dog's choir at Aberdare. He was secretary of .the Mansel Abbey Lodge of Oddfellows for 28 years, and was a P.P.G.M. of the Bridgend district. He also represented the district at the Aberystwyth and Scarborough A.R.C. He was clerk to the Kenfig Hill Parish Coun- cil and rate collector since 1907. He was a deacon of the Moriah C.M. Chapel for forty years, and leader of the singing there. In addition he was leader of the singing festivals in the district since their commencement. The deceased gentleman was well-known and highly respected. He was a man of splendid character, straightforward and true. His demise will be a great loss to the neighbour- hood, especially in religious circles.

I FAIRFIELD LADIES CHOIRI

FAIRFIELD LADIES' CHOIR ENTERTAINS WOUNDED AT CARDIFF. The Fairfield Ladies, Choir, Maesteg, enter- tained the wounded soldiers at the Military Headquarters, Howard Gardens, Cardiff, on Wednesday in last week. The Lady Mayoress presided, and in a brief opening address, she introduced the conductor. Mr. J. Sims Davies, and the choir, explaining that they had tra- velled by motor char-a-banc from Maesteg in order to give a little pleasure to the brave men who had been fighting for their country. The choir then opened with The Soldiers' Chorus" (Faust). The spirit of that well- known chorus was wonderfully demonstrated and thoroughly appreciated by the military audience. Miss Annie Evans sweetly sang "Abide with me," and this was followed by a due, "Springtime," by Madame Davies Owen and Miss S. Rees. Mr E. T. Thomas recited, "The Charge of the Light Brigade." The elocutionist was in very fine form, and his dra- The Conductor, Mr. J. Sims Davies. I matic powers were fully appreciated by the audience. They encored him most enthusias- tically. Mr. Thomas responded with the "Sig- nal Box," a recitation again demanding great skill. Miss Gwladys Absalom delighted her hearers with "Llam y Cariadau." Though but few understood the Welsh language, her beautiful voice was thoroughly appreciated. and an encore was responded to. Mr. Leo. Llewellyn, in his usually fine style, gave a patriotic song, The Bugler." Miss Dolly Powell contributed a pianoforte solo. Mem- bers of the choir distributed cigarettes, which had been contributed by Mr. Henry Laviers' employees, and one of the wounded friends added an amusing item to the programme by giving a step dance. After this little interlude, the choir sang The Messengers" (from "St. Paul"), and were encored. Miss S. Rees sang "There's a Land," her rich contralto voice being heard to great advantage in this patriotic effort. The choir next contributed, "Love's Likeness," and responded to an encore. Other items were:— Solo, "Western Flower," Madame Davies Owen; solo, Only once more," Miss Gwladys Absalom (repeated at the request of the Mayoress); chorus, Comrades' Song of Hope." The Lady Mayoress proposed a vote of thanks to the choir, and one of the Cana- dian Officers seconded in a very able manner. He complimented the choir and conductor, and paid a high tribute to the Welsh people for kindness received since he had arrived in this country.

No title

In the last three months of 1914 319 persons were killed and 2,123 injured on the railways of the United Kingdom, as compared with 305 and 2.399 for the corresponding period of the previous year.

GARW CALYINISTIC METHODISTS I

GARW CALYINISTIC METHODISTS. I PRIZE WINNERS. I At t!e Calvinistic Methodist Sunday School Examinations for the County of Glamorgan, held in March the following were successful Class 1: Mrs. Annie Davies, Mr. Hugh Jones, and Mr. D. Rees James, all of Blaen- garw. Class 2: Mrs. Thomas John Morgan, Blaengarw (seconded prize); Miss Merfina Evans, Blaengarw; Miss Margaret Ann Thomas, Pontycymmer Misses Gertrude John and Blodwen Rowlands, Blaengarw. Class 3: Misses Anna Mary Phillips, Agnes Thomas, Myfanwy Davies, and Master Cyril Jones, all of Blaengarw; Miss Sarah Jane Morgan, Miss Iona G. Morgan, Master Gwyn Maddock, Master Daniel Davies, and Miss Olive Jane Davies, all of Pontycymmer; Master W. Llewellyn Davies, Misses Rhonwen Evans, Elizabeth Ann Davies, Mary E. Rowlands, and Ceridwen Davies, all of Blaengarw. Class 4: Miss Doris Morgan, Pontycymmer (winner of first prize and medal for the best Welsh paper) Master David Ithel Evans, Blaen- garw Master Thomas Austin Ridgeway, Pon- tycymmer Miss Elizabeth Ann Llewellyn, Blaengarw; Masters Iwan Morgan, Emlyn Evans, Mervyn Morgan, and Ebenezer Davies, Pontycymmer; Master John David Llewellyn, Miss Gwladys Rowlands, and Miss Elsie Mil- dred Harley, Blaengarw Master Gwilym Mor- gan and Master D. W. Jones, Pontycymmer; Master Iorwerth Morgan. Blaengarw; Miss Owen Thomas and Miss Katie Davies, Ponty- cymmer and Miss Eilwen Morgan, Blaen- garw Misses Eunice Isaac, Gertie Lawrence, Edna Thomas, and Gwyneth James, Pohty- cymmer. Class 5: Master Thomas Llewellyn, Blaengarw; Miss Annie Davies, Pontycym- mer; Master Ieuan Garwyn Evans, Blaen- garw; Miss Eluned Morgan, Master Leonard Thomas, and Master C. Thomas, Pontycym- mer.

PORTHCAWL CAMP NOTES I

PORTHCAWL CAMP NOTES. I (By CIVICUS.) I It is a long time since I visited the pic- turesque village of Newton, but one glorious morning this week I wended my way in that direction. I found the quietness of this pretty village disturbed by military activities. The green in front of the historic church was bear- ing a load of khaki clad soldiers undergoing physical training. As I reflected I thought of a year ago when this recreation ground presented quite a different appearance. One saw at that time games of cricket being played, but to-day our men are preparing for a greater game, a game in which the destinies of nations are at stake. Having watched- for some time with much interest the capable manner in which these men performed the various exercises, I directed my steps towards the camp itself, which lies on a plain of sand with dunes on the south side, and the church on the north. w I took a view of the whole camp. In the distance was the Y.M.C.A. marquee standing out rather prominently, and in a few minutes I was heartily welcomed by the secretary in charge. I plied him with questions and he informed me that there were quartered in this camp over 1,000 of the now famous 3rd Welsh Regiment, under the command of Major Span, many of whom have already faced the Huns, and as is now well known have shown what they are made of, much to the discomforture of the opposing sausage mer- chants. The interior of the marquee proved very interesting. At the one end was a counter taking up the whole breadth of the marquee, at which stamps, postal orders and picture postcards are sold. Envelopes and writing paper are provided free. Writing tables, blotters, pens and ink are also placed at the disposal of the soldiers, together with an offi- cial letter box, which is cleared four times a day. • • » There is an average of 400 letters and cards despatched from this box daily. At the other end of the marquee stands a large plat- form which is used for concerts and religious servioes. On Monday a grand concert was given by a Cardiff party, brought down by Mr. Glening Grant, and among the artistes were Mr. W. E. Carston, tenor; Mr. Jackson, humorous entertainer; Miss Gwladys Naish, soprano; Miss Eden Parker, contralto, and Miss V. Robinson, violinist and elocutionist. Every item was rapturously encored. At the close Miss Naish and Miss Parker sang with great effect, "God be with you till we meet again," and the men joined in the chorus with great fervour. w On Wednesday night, the 7th inst., a com- peTitive meeting was held, substantial prizes being offered for the best comic and sentimen- tal songs. There were large entries and the men followed the contest with keen interest. The adjudicator's task must have been a very difficult one, for one sang "Thora," other selections being ragtimes, patriotic songs and many home-made comics suitable to the times. Another great feature is the provision of a full-sized billiard table, which is kept quite busy throughout the day and is very highly appreciated by the men. The secretary also informs me that every Sunday evening reli- gious services are held and are well-attended. Y.M.C.A. hymnals are provided and the men are invited to select their favourite hymns. Mr. Sibbering Jones and Miss Olwen Davies, the famous Evangelist, has given stirring ad- dresses on several occasions with great effect. On Sunday next Councillor W. J. Williams, J.P., of Aberavon, will give an address. Beautiful pocket testaments have been pre- sented to the men and are very highly appre- ciated. I understand that Mr. Cerddor Davies acts as conductor, and Mrs. Morgan, "Clydfan," Newton, as accompanist, with Mr. John Morgan and Mr. D. John as sidesmen. w < There is another camp at Danygraig, where 350 men of the 3rd Welsh are stationed under the command of Major Masterman, and here the Y.M.C.A. are again represented. All the facilities afforded by the Y.M.C.A. at Newton Camp are likewise provided I here, with the addition of a dry canteen, where mineral waters, tea, coffee, cakes and cigarettes, etc., are sold. < < On Thursday night, the 8th inst., a concert was given by a special party of entertainers, among whom was Mr. Tony Lucas, Cardiff, the celebrated comedian. The men thorough- ly enjoyed the great musical treat provided and their appreciation was shown in no un- mistakable manner. As each man entered the marquee he was presented with a 3d. packet of cigarettes. The entire cost of pro- viding the party and cigarettes was generous- ly defrayed by Mr. J. P. Leat, of Southlands, Porthcawl. Mr. T. Deere, J.P., occupied the chair. The Y.M.C.A. marquees in both camps are tastefully decorated with a generous dis- play of bunting, the flags of our Allies being prominently represented. v • • I left the camp greatly impressed with the great work done for these brave fellows by the Y.M.C.A., and was much struck by the en- thusiasm shewn by Councillor D. J. Rees, who is in charge of both camps.

ABERAYON BOYS GALLANTI RESCUE

ABERAYON BOY'S GALLANT I RESCUE. DIVED IN 9FT. OF WATER FULLY I DRESSED. A gallant rescue by a twelve year old boy, named Willie Murphy, who lives at 110, Water Street, was witnessed on Thursday week on the side of the 'River Avon at a dan- gerous place, known as the Old Avon Vale Bridge. A number of youngsters were playing on the spot and some had been in th(k water. A six year old boy named Emmel Clark, who lives in Green Park, Aberavon, was sitting on the bank when it gave way and the lad was pitched into the river, which was there about nine feet deep. There were no older people about to give help in rescuing. Clark, who could not swim, at once went under. With- out a moments hesitation Murphy, who had been in the water swimming previously, but who was fully dressed when Clark fell in, dived into the river fully dressed and tried to rescue his young comrade. At first he.failed, but when Clark had sunk for the. second time Murphy managed to catch hold of his hair and somehow got him to the side. The other boys, who could not swim, dragged the two out. Clark appeared to be unconscious, but the other boys rolled him on the ground to bring him round, and their amateur attempts at artificial respiration were happily successful, for young Clark speedily began to show signs of consciousness. The troop of boys then took him home. Murphy, who affected the rescue, is a strong well-built boy for his age, and his mother told a "Glamorgan Gazette" reporter that he had never had any lessons in swimming. It was impossible to keep him out of the water she said, and when he came home shivering with his clothing soaking, after rescuing Clark, he calmly answered in reply to her query that he had only pulled young Clark out of the water.

CWMAYON TEACHER KILLEDI

CWMAYON TEACHER KILLED I TRAGIC OCCURRENCE AT MUMBLES. I The tragic death of Mr. John Evans, as- t sistant master at Cwmavon Schools, created considerable commotion at Cwm- avon. The deceased, who was thirty-nine years of age, visited Mumbles on Saturday night, when he was knocked down by an en- gine and was killed instantaneously. The inquest was held on Tuesday at Swan- sea, when Rhys Nicholas, The Terrace, Cwmavon, schoolmaster, identified the body of the de- ceased, who was an assistant master at the Council School, Cwmavon, and was thirty-nine years of age. Witness last saw deceased alive on Friday afternoon at the school, and heard he was going to Swansea to visit the Turkish Baths. He knew nothing of his movements, after he went to Swansea, and no colleagues accompanied him. He had known deceased for twenty years. Deceased sometimes took more than was good for him. Lewis J. Williams, 141, Western Street, a special constable, said he was on duty on the Mumbles Road last Saturday evening, and saw the deceased, before the accident hap- pened, coming along between the Baths and the cricket field, about 10-45. Deceased walked somewhat unsteadily towards the Slip, but was not incapable. Later on he saw the deceased sitting on the railings of a house in Priorton Terrace. After the arrival of the train from the Mumbles witness heard a scream from a woman, and noticed the train had stopped. Witness was informed by a guard that a man had been run over. The police were sent for. The guard showed him the body, which he recognised as that of the man he had previously seen. The. head and feet were severed. Witness said there was not much light near the Slip, owing to the order to have them reduced. WANDERING ABOUT. I Annie Logan, 21, Trafalgar Terrace, said that at eleven o'clock on Saturday evening she was standing on the door of her house and saw the person who was ultimately run over. She did not see the deceased go on to the rail- way, but noticed he was wandering about aim- lessly. Francis Henry Virgo, 22, Trafalgar Terrace, saw the deceased before the accident, and heard the bell on the Mumbles train ringing vigorously, besides a whistle being violently blown. Witness did not think deceased saw the train, and was satisfied the driver did his best to attract the attention of deceased. A brake was jammed on and shook the ground when it was applied. E. Dunkin, 2, Brooklands Terrace, who has been driver of the Mumbles train for fifteen years, said he did everything possible to avoid the accident. Stanley Claypit, Southend, the fireman, cos- roborated the last witness. Inspector Davies, of the Mumbles Railway, said the military authorities had ordered them to reduce the lights since the outbreak of the war. The Coroner said it seemed to him that deceased partly contributed towards the acci- dent by his condition and partly by the fact that the two L.N.W.R. trains were passing the spot at the time. He thought some- thing might be done with the military authorities to have a better light on the train. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death," and suggested that something should be done to secure better lighting. Deceased had been at Cwmavon for 18 months. For the greater part of that time he lodged at Cwmavon, but for about the last three months he had lodged in Beverley Street, Port Talbot. He was a fine discip- linarian and was educated at Aberystwyth. He had held several positions in the Neath and Garw districts. After the inquest the remains were con- veyed by motor to the deceased's home, where the funeral took place on Wednesday morn- ing.

GERMANS UNPLEASANT SURPRISE

GERMANS UNPLEASANT SURPRISE I HOW THE SCOTS RETALIATED. Private T. Russel, of the Gordon High- landers, and who has recently been wounded, writing to his brother who lives in Tan-y-groes Street, Port Talbot, says:- "I have not been seriously wounded, thank Vlod. I got it at Ypres on June 3rd, and I have to grin and bear it. I was laying in the trench all day as the Germans were shelling ,all the roads which led to the dressing station. I am now at Paisley Hospital. In West Flanders the fighting was of the most fierce nature but Ypres beat the whole lot for excitement. The Huns are a rotten lot, and all they are good for is the gas game. But when it comes to hand to hand fighting they throw their rifles at you, put up their hands and shout: "Mercy English soldier. We find respirators just the thing for the gas. One day they sent clouds of gas towards our trench, but we were ready for them. The Germans must have thought we were all "out for the count," but when they advanced our machine guns cut them down like rabbits, and we were firing like the dickens.

THE LATE MR W JENKINSI

THE LATE MR. W. JENKINS I FUNERAL AT MAESTEG. I The funeral of the late Mr. W. Jenkins, ironmonger, Maesteg, took place on Wednes- day, and this was the occasion of much public sympathy. Mr. Jenkins' unceasing Jabours had won for him the admiration of the towns- people of Maesteg, who seemed eager to pay their last tribute. After a short service at the house, conducted by the Rev. E. W. Pro- bert, the coffin, which was of solid oak with nickle silver trimmings, and was covered with wreaths, was placed in the hearse. After the singing of a hymn, the cortege slowly moved forward en route for the Maesteg Cemetery, headed by local ministers, Revs. Iorwerth Jones (Bethania), W. R. Bowen (Carmel), W. H. Thomas (Tabor), E. Davies (Congregational), D. John (Canaan), C. P. Thomas (Zion), E. W. Probert (Bethel), Rhys Davies (Griffithstown), J. Lloyd (Swansea). Members of the Maesteg Chamber of Trade followed, wearing white rosettes. Among those present were:—Messrs. W. G. Roberts, A. L. Parry, I; W. Leake, E. Morris, T. W. James, E. H. Thomas, T. E. Jones, W. T. Lewis, D. M. Price, J. Phillips, A. Nicholas. Henry Laviers, T. P. Jenkins, A. E. Lockyer, E. W. Lewis, J. D. Davies, W. Owen, A. G. Laugharne, W. Peel Davies, J. P. Gibbon, J.P., T. E. Hopkins, J.P., D. Morris, Rhys Griffiths, T. Lewis, J. R. Morgan, A. K. Davies, W. Isaac, D. H. Lloyd. J. A. Boucher, Rhys D. Morgan, T. Thomas, Titus Thomas, J. South, Beddoe Rees (Cardiff), B. Joseph, L. O. Morgan (London City and Mid- land Bank), W. Prioe Davies (Lloyds Bank). T. E. Davies (National Provincial Bank), J. Price (London and Provincial Bank), S. Rutter, George Ferrier, Richard Ferrier, George Carver, J. Gimblett, J. Griffiths, Al- I fred Griffiths (chemist), G. S. Griffiths (head- master Secondary School), W. T. Williams (Gwilym Taf), David Rees, T. Richards, W. Akehurst, Capt. J. S. Harris, Mr. J. Lakin (stationmaster), etc. Wreaths and other floral tributes were sent from:—Sorrowing Wife and children (Hill Dene); Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Morgan (London City and Midland Bank); Gwen and John (sister and brother-in-law); Gough and Sons (Birmingham); officers and members of Bethel Church; May and Peggie; "Employees to Dear Employer"; Hubert, Ruby and Vera; Maesteg Master Builders' Association; Brother Dan and Family; Army and Rees; Mrs Tucker and family Maesteg Chamber of Trade; Mrs. L. Howells and K. Havard; Mr. and Mrs. Jenkin Lewis. The chief mourners were: Mr. Ernest Jenkins, Mr. Herbert Jen- kins, Mr. T. Hector Jenkins (sons); Mr. J. J. Griffiths (son-in-law); Mr. Dan Jenkins (bro- ther). There were a number of lady rela- tives at the house. The Rev. E. W. Probert officiated at the graveside, assisted by the Rev. Rhys Davies, of Griffithstown, Aber- tillery, and the Rev. J. Lloyd, Swansea. Much sympathy is felt with the relatives in their sad bereavement.

FALLEN IN BATFLE

FALLEN IN BATFLE. MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR SOLDIERS AT OGMORE VALE. On Sunday evening a very impressive memorial service was held in Bethel Primitive Methodist Church, Ogmore Vale, in memory of soldiers who have laid down their lives upon the battlefield. The service, which was ex- ceedingly well attended, was conducted by the pastor, Rev. E. W. Hough, who delivered an appropriate and powerful sermon from words taken from St. John 14, 2, "If it were not so, I would have told you." The choir, under the leadership of Mr. W. H. Capel, sang "The Warriors' Chant," "For all Thy saints who from their labours rest," and Mrs. F. J. King beautifully rendered the solo, 'Battle Prayer.' At the close of the service the "Dead March" in Saul was played on the organ, an intense silence prevailing while the congregation stood with bowed heads; after which "The Vesper" was sung and ended a service which was both timely and helpful. It is very pleasing to note that about 24 of the members of this church have responded to the country's call for men.

ICRICKET

I CRICKET. PORT TALBOT COUNTY SCHOOL v. MAESTEG SECONDARY SCHOOL. The above match was played at Maesteg on Saturday. Port Talbot batted first, C. E. Rees and W. Stone facing the bowling of E. Thomas and G. Rees. For Port Talbot C. E. Rees gave a classy performance, he only being bowled after seven wickets had fallen. T. Thomas also batted well, but the last wickets fared badly, the score closing for the unusual total of 23. Maesteg followed, and by the aid of the short boundaries just managed to pass the Port Talbot score. For Maesteg E. Thom- as, Cox and W. Roberts batted well. For Port Talbot Ll. Gilbert took six wickets for 11 runs. The unusually low scores were due t,) the "tricky" nature of the ground. PORT TALBOT. C. E. Rees, b E. Thomas 6 W. Stone, c A. Perkins, b E. Thomas 2 H. Skyrme, run out 0 Ll. Gilbert, b E. Thomas 1 T. Thomas, run out 6 R. Powles, c E. Davies, b F. Griffiths 3 W. Williams, c E. Davies, b F Griffiths 1 M. Thomas, run out 2 G. Rees, b F. Griffiths 0 R. Mullens, b E. Thomas 0 A. Webbe, not out 1 Extra. 1 Total 23 MAESTEG. Cox, c Powles, b Gilbert 6 W. Roberts, c Thomas, b Williams 5 E. Davies, b Gilbert 0 E. Thomas, b Williams 7 G. Rees, c Stone, b Williams 1 F. Griffiths, stmpd C. E. Rees, b Wil- liams 0 A. Perkins, b Gilbert 0 J. Miller, c Powles, b Gilbert 1 W. Murdoch, b Gilbert 1 D. Griffiths, c Powles, b Gilbert 0 A. Anthony, not out 3 Extra 1 Total 25

f IDENTIFICATION MARK HIDDEN

f IDENTIFICATION MARK HIDDEN. I PYLE MAN FINED. .At Aberavon County Police Court on Mon- day, John Edward Pullen, of Pyle, was sum- moned for having ridden a motor cycle in High Street, Taibach, on June 23rd, the identification mark having been obscured. Police-constable Laracy said there was a woman and a child in the side-car and a child riding on the carrier. Her clothing obscured the identification plate. Defendant admitted the offence, but said it was quite unintentional, and the case was dismissed on payment of costs.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances foi turning out I every class of work at competitive prices, at I t u:J.1&morgan Gazette" Printing Works.

PENCOED I

PENCOED. I SUNDAY SCHOOL BI-MONTHLY MEET- ING.—The bi-monthly meeting of the repre- sentatives of the Calvinistic Methodist Sun- day Schools of the Bridgend District was held on Sunday morning at Mynyddyruthin Chapel. The meeting was presided over by Mr. David James, Bryncethin. The duties of secretary were discharged by Mr rl. Evans, Tondu. The statistics of the Sunday School, in comparison with the same period last year, showed, with one exception, an all-round de- crease. The exception was the Salem Sun- day School, Pencoed, which showed an ad- vance both in numbers and in average atten- dance. A paper was read by the chairman on the subject of The Salvation of Souls in its relationship to the Sunday School." AMBULANCE CLASS.—All the members of the Ambulance Class conducted by Dr. E. B. Macdonald Atkins at the Council School, has been successful in tl?e recent examina- tion. The class was examined by Dr. W. Edmund Thomas, Bridgend. The following are the successful candidates: Messrs. Williams, Ty Merchant; David Thomas, Oak- land Terrace; James Lewis. Caellysi; Thos. Jeffreys, Wimborne Road; William Watkins. Penjjrisk; Mrs. Catherine Richards, School House; Miss Amelia Chatterton, Railway Inn; Miss Elsie Griffiths, Britannia Hotel; Miss Sarah Duckett, Wimborne Terrace; Miss Sarah Butler, Uchel Olen, Rhiwceiliog; Miss Olive Willie, Ty Merchant; Miss Keturah Edwards. SUNDAY SCHOOL OUTING.—On Mon- day all the Sunday Schools of the village held their annual summer outing. This year it was decided, in view of the war, that it was not expedient to go, as has usually been the case, to the seaside. This decision com- mended itself probably to a majority of the people of the village. The result of Mon- day's experiment was entirely successful. The enjoyment does not seem to have been the less for the abandonment of the usual trip. The senior Sunday School of the vil- lage had tea and afterwards proceeded to a field kindly lent by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Plummer, Bryncwttyn. There the company indulged in sports and games of various kinds. The minister of the church, the Rev. R. C. Lewis, B.A., was present; also the two superintendents of the school—Messrs. Wm. Lewis and Daniel Davies. The St. David's Church Sunday School had tea at the Public Hall. After tea there was an adjournment to a field near the hall belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Walter Pvves, of the King's Head Hotel. In addition to various sports and games, there was the attraction of a gramo- phone as well. The Rev. W. H. Henwood was present, also the superintendent of the school, Mr. George Duckett.—The Penuel Welsh Baptist Sunday School were greatly daring, and they alone of all the schools ventured to have the whole treat—tea and all —in the open air. The venue was Penylan Mountain, and the whole affair was a real success. The minister of the church. Rev. D. Davies, was present, also the superinten- dent of the school, Mr. Henry Harris. The Trinity English C.M. Sunday School had tea in the schoolroom, and later on proceeded to a field, kindly placed at their disposal by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davies, Maesywern. Vari- ous amusements were indulged in, the sports being chiefly under the direction of the super- intendent of the school, Mr. W. H. Picker- ing. THe Bryn Seion Welsh Independent Sunday School had tea in Bryn Seion Chapel. The field placed at their disposal belonged to Mr. J. T. Salathiel. Those present amused themselves in various ways. Mr. Owen James, the superintendent of the school, was present.

I CAERAU

I CAERAU. ST. JOHN AMBULANCE. — A monster Jumble Sale was held under the auspices of the Maesteg Central Division on Saturday, when, through the efforts of the members, a good sum was realised. The various stalls of clothing, boots, books, etc., were presided over by Mrs. G. H. B. James, Mrs. Chaloner, Mrs. Howells, Mrs. Jenkins, Mrs. Rees, Mrs Evans, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Jones, and Miss R. Davies.

l HEOLYCYW

l HEOLYCYW. ANNIVERSARY.—The anniversary of the tUnited Methodist Sunday School took place on Sunday, when recitations, dialogues, solos and duetts were contributed by the scholars and friends of the school. There were good attendances during the day and in the even- ing. The following took part:—Miss Gladys and Eunice Chilleott, Miss Parsons, Sabina Jones, Cissy Gregory, May and Mabel Dunn, Blodwen Jenkins, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. War- ren, Master Teddy Brain, Fred Embling, Willie Jordan; Mansel and TQmmy Gregory also contributed. The meeting was presided over by Mr. Potter, of Cardiff, and the singing was ably conducted by Mr. William Gregory, now of Cardiff. Mr. Eli Gregory was at the organ. The Sunday School tea was given the scholars on the Monday following, when a good spread was placed before the children. Afterwards sports and games were indulged in.

BRIDGEND CINEMA I

BRIDGEND CINEMA. The general feeling with regard to the Brid- gend Cinema has considerably changed since the programmes have been undertaken by the new manager, and the number of people now visiting this hall is on the increase. The pic- tures this week have been excellent, the drama, "413," being a film of exciting episodes and great interest. Charlie Chaplin, in "A Night Out," is too funny for words. His simple expressions and ridiculous actions are such as to flood the house with laughter. Charlie Chaplin is appearing in another screaming farce during the latter part of the week. The picture, "Her Nameless Child," is a picture cf strong humane acts, and a story of thrilling episodes. Next week Charlie Chaplin will be again screened in another tre- mendous farce. "The World's Desire" is the star picture for the former part of the week, and this is a picture of excellent scenes. "In the hands of the Jury" is the picture for the latter part of the week, and this should be a drama of great interest. We understand that Elinor Glyn's great novel, "Three Weeks" will be screened at this hall shortly. I

IBRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE

I BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE. A programme of excellent pictures has been shown at the Picture Palace during the week, and good audiences have assembled. The dramas shown have been dramas of great fas- cination, and the comedies have been such as to create much pleasure.

No title

in the list of names of officers and men recom- mended for gallant and distiguished service in the field are the names of Captain Percy A. Clive, M.P. for South Herefordshire, 2nd Bat- talion Grenadier Guards (Reserve of Officers). This is the second honour Captain Clivo has re- ceived in the present war. In March last he was awarded the French Legion of Honour hy General Joffre for a gallant exploit in the trenches

OGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE. SUNDAY SCHOOL FESTIVAL—At St. John's Church the annual children's festival was held on Sunday last,. Holy Communion was celebrated at 8.30, and services were con- ducted throughout the day by the Rev. Alc- wyn Jones, Kenfig Hill. A flower service in the afternoon was largely attended, when the Rev. Alcwyn Jones gave an appropriate ad- dress. CONCERT PARTY AT BRIDGEND.—A A concert party from Ogmore Vale, consisting of Messrs. Gwrlym Kinsey, Tom Thomas, Geo. David, T. Dagg, and J. Williams, all well- known vocalists, accompanied by Mr. W. Ley- shon, of A berkenfig. visited the Red Cross A Hospital at Bridgend on Saturday. A variety 'W programme, which lasted about two hours, was thoroughly enjoyed by the wounded sol- diers and nutses present, and was terminated by the singing of the National Anthem. A parcel of cigarettes was sent to the hospital by the Non-Political Club, Ogmore Vale. BETHLEHEM WELSH BAPTISTS.—The quarterly meetings in connection with this Church were held on Sunday last, when there was a good attendance. Mr. William Jones acted as chairman, and Miss Gertie Jones pre- sided at the piano. Recitations were given by the following:—Harold Withers, Teddy Rees, Glyn Mansel, Phyllis Mansel, Gladys Mansel, Howell Williams. Annie Townsend, Eunice Lewis, and Messrs. Tom Edmunds and J. Pope. Misses Katie Rees, A. Burrows, and A. M. Branch gave pianoforte soos. Mr. Idwal Lewis gave a selection on the violin, and solos were also rendered by Misses Gwyn- eth Lewis, Doris Jones. Gwen Price, and Maud Jones. Mr. Emrys Jones' party also contributed selections. ST. DAVID'S CHURCH.—The annual chil- dren's festival was held Qn Sunday, June 27th. Services were as follows:—Holy Com- munion at 8.30, when the Rev. Griffith Thomas, of Carmarthen, was the celebrant; Matins at 11, when the Vicar (Rev. A. J. Ed- wards) was the preacher; children's flower ser- vice at 2.30, and Evensong at 6 p.m. The Rev. J. R. Pugh, of Nantymoel. preached stirring sermons at the afternoon and evening services, when the church was filled to over- flowing. The services throughout the day were of a high order, and reflected great credit on Mr. G. Cunningham (choirmaster) and Mr. H. Osborne (organist). The service concluded with a procession of choir and clergy and the singing of Winchester's Te Deum and the National Anthem. OBITUARY.—The death of Mrs. Jane Coombs, an old and respected inhabitant of the Valley, who came from Somerton, Somer- setshire, 27 years ago, took place at her resi- dence in Oxford Square on June 27th, after a long and painful illness. The funeral took place on July 1st, at Ogmore Vale Cemetery, and the coffin was conveyed by hearse fol- lowed by a mourning coach. A large num- ber of people were in attendance. The funeral was a Salvation Army one. Ponty- cymmer and Nantymoel Bands united played from the house to the Cemetery, and many people lined the roads. The burial service was conducted by Captain Berry, of Ponty- cymmer, assisted by Lieut. Shaw, of Nanty- moel, and was very impressive. At the graveside the band played, My Home is in 'Heaven," and "Rock of Ages." The chief mourners were :—Mr. Henry Coombs and Miss E. Coombs (widower and daughter); Mr. and Mrs. H. Coombs. Mr. and Mrs. W. Coombs, and Mr. and Mrs. E. Coombs (sons and daughters-in-law) Mr. and Mrs. Edward Blin- man (son-in-law and daughter); Mr. and Mrs- J. Edwards (nephew and niece) Mr. W. Coombs, Miss B. Coombs, Mr. E. Coombs,. Miss O. Coombs, Mr. J. Coombs, Mr. E. Coombs, Masters C. and M. Coombs, Master E. Coombs, Master F. Blinman. and Misses Ada, Lily, and Miriam Coombs and Miss- Edith Blinman (grandchildren).

I PONTYCYMMER

I PONTYCYMMER. ZION ENGLISH BAPTIST CHAPEL-The- quarterly meetings of the above Sunday School were held last Sunday. In the morn- ing the pulpit was occupied by the Rev. John' Pugh, the pastor (Rev. W. Reynolds) being, absent for the day. A successful meeting- was- held in the afternoon in spit-e of the stormy- weather, and prizes were given- to those schol- lai-s in the oral division who had passed in the last Scriptural examination. In the eve- ning the scholars again rendered recitations, etc., and prizes were distributed to success- ful scholars in the upper divisions. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Edwards on both occasions. The ladies' choir, conducted by Mrs. Reynolds, sang very nicely both after- noon and evening.

I AN ELDSIYfi AIRMAN

I AN ELDSIYfi AIRMAN, i OGMORE VALE SOLDIER'S LETTER. Corporal T. Lewis, who is better known as- the Ogmore Vale footballer, writing to his- father from "Somewhere in France," says:— Dear Dad, Brothers and Sister-I am writ- ing these few lines in the trenches. I am. fairly well, but troubled a bit with the legs. Got damp last Friday, and caught it in the' ght it in the? legs. I hope they won't get bad again. t saw a grand sight on Saturday. The Huns- were trying to bring one of our airmen down., They were playing right round him, but failed to get one in. Looking over the ground occupied by the Huns early in the war, and where they now are, one can easilv see they are slowly but surely being driven back. You at home cannot realise what a few yards of an advance means. Every inch of ground is hotly contested. I was with an officer and party of men repairing a trench just after ar- riving here. In looking over the trench, I saw a Highlander lying as though he were- asleep. I went to him, as the shells were dropping about there, with the intention of awakening him. When I got by him, what a sight. It was then I awoke to the fact that I was amid the grim realities of the war. The humorous side is here, but what about the tragedy ?

GLAMORGAN FEEBLEMINDED

GLAMORGAN FEEBLE-MINDED. Glamorganshire Joint Poor Law Establish- ment Committee met at Neath on Monday, Mr. John Prowle (Merthyr) presiding. The report of the Building Committee upon the in. spection of the plans of the Drymma Estate, where it is proposed to erect the home for feeble-minded, by Mr. Kitchen, the Local Government Board architect, was received. The plans were accepted, and the Building Committee authorised to hurry the work on as quickly as possible. Mr W. B. Trick said that Mr. Kitchen also inspected the Lonlas Estate, and approved of the proposed pur- chase. It was decided to again recommend this purchase to the Local Government Board. Printed and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany, Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offices, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- gan. rHIDAY, JULY 9th, 1915.