Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

STARTLING NEWS! FURNISHING WILL SOON BE A GREAT LUXURY Any House Furnisher will confirm the fact that not only has everything required for Furnishing gone up very considerably, but that through the great shortage of labour caused by the War, the Any House Furnisher will confirri,,t the feavcet ry CwOeek, m"m"PANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS, great difficulty of getting supplies is increasing every week, certain goods in fact being unobtainable at any cost! Foreseeing several months ago this probability BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS, Near Empire & 97, St. Mary Street, Cardiff, Pontypridd, Swansea, etc- placed at old prices for delivery to them as required during the War, the heaviest orders by far ever given by them during their long career of sixty-five years. This well-known firm are therefore in a position to offer goods at old prices, and far and away below those of their competitors SAVE YOUR MONEY!! PURCHASE FORTHWITH FROM BEVAN & COMPANY. They continue to pay return Fares on Cash orders. Free Delivery up to 200 miles from all Branches. Illustrated Catalogues Gratis, and Post Free.

Peeps at Portheawl

Peeps at Portheawl By MARINER. -Y- We leave Porthcawl with regret," said Colonel Homfray in response to the words of appreciation of the Bantams spoken on the occasion of a presentation of a cheque for 50 guineas, subscribed by the people of Porthcawl for the regimental fund of the Battalion, which was made after Church parade on Sun- day. Last week I referred to the great re- spec+ and admiration felt for the Bantams by the townspeople, and this presentation was a practical corroboration of the views expressed in this column. The people of Porthcawl are nothing if not patriotic. ^Their subscriptions to the various patriotic funds equal the amounts, and surpass many, collected in towns of larger size and double the popula- tion. The town fund raised to augment the regimental fund of the Bantams Battalion was subscribed to by all classes willingly and readily. It was the one practical way to show the admiration the townspeople felt for the fine body of little men, but good men, who have been with us so long, and have made many friends in our midst. From the time they came to partake of our hospitality and took possession of some of our front rooms as honoured guests, they have done much to increase our liking for these true- hearted boys from the colliery districts. We have confidence in their courage, belief in their skill, and admiration for those qualities which have made the W elsh soldier rank amongst the greatest fighters the world has ever seen. The Bantams have the pluck of men head and shoulders taller, and while the Welsh Guards will have the eyes of thou- sands cf Welshmen upon them, and their do- ings will be followed by thousands of others, the Bantams will excite the interest of many thousands more. I am certain that, as their popular Colonel said, they regret to leave Porthcawl. They have been well treated; the people have gone out of their way to do them kindnesses—it has not been a question of profit-making entirely-and the men have benefited by their long stay in the finest holi- day resort in Wales. # i The men had a rare send off. The town turned out to bid them farewell; the station was thronged with excited and enthusiastic j townspeople; the chairman of the Council, | Mr. T. E. Deere. J.P., was present with his 1 colleagues to bid them an official farewell; cigarettes were handed round, and everything was done to make the last moments of the plucky little Bantams happy. They all looked it. They smiled and waived their hats to the ladies, whose hearts they have appealed to; the ladies waved back and smiled gracious smiles in return; some eyes were dim with tears, but over the tears we draw a curtain, or rather a complexion veil, and I believe there was more than one Tommy genuinely sorry to leave a faithful heart behind him. It is a sad world at the best of times, but in war time it is cruel. It is said that "faint heart never won fair lady." Well, there were not many faint hearts amongst the Ban- tams, and the khaki uniform makes a tremendous appeal to a romantic maiden. Everyone of them, I believe, was thinking of I moments happily spent, when the horrid whistle of the engine reminded them that they were on earth, and that their heroes were going. The train moved out of the sta- tion, and the wheels passed over two detona- tors, which exploded with a tremendous re- 1 port, and threatened to burst the already fast-beating hearts of the waving crowd standing near. The train went; the men ji leaning out of the windows, waving hats until they got out of sight; and the crowd returned to homes that were empty and quiet and not nearly so jolly as when the Bantams were with us. 1 If everything goes well, it is confidently believed that more troops will come to Porth- cawl. When the Registration Act comes into operation there will undoubtedly be a still greater rush of recruits, and then Porthcawl will, it is most likely, receive its quota. Al- though a Porthcawlian, I can say with truth that we deserve them and few towns have contributed 50 guineas to a regimental fund, and if only for that the Welsh Army Council, or the War Office, whichever is responsible, ought not to forget us. I understand Mr. T. James raised the matter at the Council meeting on Tuesday. That is well; it is wise 1 not to let the grass grow under our feet in -| j times like these. • • • 1 The only regrettable incident that broke the sequence of happy hours the Bantams j have spent amongst us occurred on Sunday, | when one of their number, Private W. Rose, { lost his life while bathing with four others near the Black Rocks. His compaions nar- rowly escaped the same fate. Private Jeff- reys made a heroic attempt to save him, after effecting the rescue of three others but could I not get to him before he went under. The tide was low at the time, and it is well known locally that bathing near the Black Rocks at any time is not safe. The rescuer spoke of strong currents at the spot. against which 1 deceased could not fight. This sad tragedy should lead the Council to consider the advis- 1 ability of erecting danger signs at this spot, as they have done at others. It would not be out of the way to suggest that notices pro- hibiting bathing at this spot should be erected. The Y.M.C.A. billiard tournament, ar- ranged for the benefit of the Bantams, con- cluded on Saturday night, after some excit- ing handicaps. The arrangements had been carried out by Mr. Hugh Price, and the win- ners were Private Stanley, whose best break was 35. and Private Arnott came second. A tournament for the 3rd Welsh is now proceed- > ing. and true storv I 1 Here is a rea l and true story ? from Porthcawl. Four of the 'knut' class, with coloured socks, dandy shoes. etc., were in Newton, Porthcawl, for a breath < of the briny. They aton one of the Council a. Presently a pretty young lady put a j (Continued on Bottom of Next Column.)

Peeps at Portheawl

(Continued from previous col umn. ) card in front of them, Your King and Coun- try Need You.' They moved away to another seat. Here again they were pestered with a similar card by an old gent. They again moved away where they thought they could sport their fineries in solitude, but at that se- questered spot they were again pursued by an old lady of 70, and her card. On the village green another card was put before them. They gave it up in disgust, and went into the churchyard and sat on the tombstones."

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT iCOUNCIL m

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. m LOSS OF THE BANTAMS. I APPLICATION FOR MORE. I i NO EGGS LEFT BEHIND. I A meeting of the Porthcawl U.D. Council was held at the Council Chamber on Monday, when Mr. R. E. Jones presided. There were also present: Messrs. D. Davies, T. James, D. J. Rees, and J. Grace, with the lfey clerk (Mr. Brown) and the surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn). ECHO OF THE STORM. The Clerk read a letter from the proprietor of the Queen's Hotel, New Road, stating that on the day of the storm his scullery was half filled with water. He asked that the Coun- cil's men might get the water out, seeing that he had some beer down there, and could not get it out. The Clerk said he had written to the gentle- man, stating that the Council was not re- sponsible for flood by the storm, and that the storm was an Act of God. The Clerk's action was approved. DAMAGE TO A LAVATORY. A letter was read from the Superintendent of Police at Bridgend, in reply to a communi- cation sent him by the Council with regard to the breaking of a lock at the public lava- tory. The letter stated that he had given notice to tL' police at Porthcawl to give the matter their special attention. A SERIOUS MATTER. The Surveyor read a letter from the collec- tor of Customs at Port Talbot with reference to the burying of the carcase of a horse that had been washed up. Mr. James said another carcase had been washed up at a certain point, and there was a horrible stench there. It was a very seri- ous question. The Council gave instructions for the animal to be buried. I CAMPS WANTED. Mr. James said the Camps Committee had decided to recommend that the Council should apply to the proper authorities for arrange- ments for another camp in Porthcawl. They should write to anyone who had influence on the matter. The loss of the Bantams from Portheawl was enormous just at that time, and if they could replace the Bantams by a similar battalion, it would be a great thing for the town. He moved to that effect. Mr. D. J. Rees seconded, and it was carried. WATER CONTRACTS. On the suggestion of Mr. James, the -en- gineer on the water contracts, was asked to report to the Council fortnightly upon the progress of the work. CONGRATULATIONS. The Chairman said last Sunday week he took a short trip round after the storm, as he was particularly anxious to see the effect of their new drainage system. He certainly found indications that there had been a heavy flood, but there was not a sign of the storm water remaining. He thought the Council could congratulate themselves upon their new system. (Hear, hear.) SEATS ON THE COMMON. Mr. D. Davies asked what had been done with regard to the repairing of seats on the Common at Porthcawl. Mr. D. J. Rees thought they should not spend money on that sort of thing now that everybody was trying to save money. Mr. D. Davies said if they didn't provide some means of seating accommodation for people, they would not get people to come LO Porthcawl. It was agreed that the matter should be attended to.

FOR THE BANTAMSI

FOR THE BANTAMS. PRESENTATION TO COL. HOMFRAY FOR REGIMENT FUND. After the church parade on Sunday at Porthcawl, a committee of townsmen, com- prising Mr. W. Lord (chaiirman). Major Bray (treasurer), Mr. E. A. Smith, and Mr. Edgar W. Lewis (hon. secretary), waited upon Col. Homfray, commanding ofifcer, with the object of presenting him with a cheque for 50 guineas in aid of the regimental fund, which had been subscribed by the townspeople. The deputation was introduced by Councillor T. E. Deere, J.P., Chairman of the Council. Mr. W. Lord. chairman of the Organising Committee, addressing Colonel Homfray, said it had occurred to several townsmen that something should be done to start a regimen- tal fund for the Bantams. The cheque was not as large as they would like it to be, but it was more than they anticipated. They were sorry they were going to lose the Ban- tams. Major Bray said he had great pleasure in asking the Colonel, who was his old com- manding officer, to accept the cheque towards the regimental fund. Colonel Homfray expressed thanks not only for the handsome cheque, but for all the kindnesses the people of Porthcawl had s hown the troops since they had been at Porthcawl. They left with great regret.

No title

A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned at a Westminster inquest on Friday on Albert Edward KnowLson (45), a National Reservist, who died whilst on parade at Charing Cross on Tuesday morning. Death was due to rupture of a blood vessel.

HELP FOR GODS SAKE I

HELP, FOR GOD'S SAKE!" I DROWNING MAN'S DESPAIRING CRY I AT PORTHCAWL. BRAVE ATTEMPT AT RESCUE. I CORONER'S COMMENT. FOUR OTHER MEN NARROWLY ESCAPE A sad bathing fatality occurred at Porth- cawl on Sunday morning. Private W. Rose, of No. 1 Platoon, A Company, 18th (Service) Battalion Welsh Regiment, whose home is at 49 Bryngwyn- street, Abertillery, went to bathe with four other privates near the Black Rocks at low tide. The five soon got into difficulties, and Private H. S. Jeffrey, of the B Company, immediately rushed into the water and bravely rescued three of the men, whilst another managed to come ashore without aid. Priv. Jeffrey entered the water again with the object of saving Rose, who was shouting, Help, for God's sake." Before the would-be rescuer could get to the spot, however, Rose had disappeared. The other four men were badly bruised about the body. Rose's body was recovered later. The deceased- was a married man, with three children, and was about 22 years of age. THE INQUEST. I Mr. Edward Powell (deputy coroner) held an inquiry into the affair at Porthcawl on Tuesday. Lieut. E. W. Bond, representing the Mili- tary Authorities, said he was a lieutenant of the 18th Welsh, and William Rose, the de- ceased, was a private in that regiment, and was 22 years of age. Private Hai-olcl Jeffrey (18), of Plasseg Street, Penarth, said at 12.30 on Sunday he, with three other soldiers, was bathing off the Black Rocks. He had been in about twenty minutes, and was just coming out, when a great back-wash caught him. About two minutes afterwards he heard the deceased call- ing for help. He made a good effort to get to the man, but the current took them in opposite directions. The last words he heard the deceased say were, "For God's sake, help me." He then disappeared, and witness had a struggle to get back to shore. He then found three others in difficulties, and witness assisted them back. Another soldier came to his help or he would not have got back with the second. The Foreman: What state was the tide when you went in ?—I think it was quite low. Who was in the water first ?-I was there first, and I felt the current very strong my- self. You have been bathing there before ?—Yes. Dr. Morley Thomas said he saw the body about quarter past two on Monday. The man was then dead, the time of the death being consistent with what was said by the last witness. He thought drowning was the cause of death. The Coroner said the evidence given was very plain, and it was a clear case. The poor boy got into difficulties, and was caught by the current. He wished to say that the witness Jeffrey behaved with great pluck. (Hear, hear.) A verdict of Accidental Death" was re- turned. The Foreman of the jury wished to express the deepest sympathy with the parents of the deceased in their bereavement, especially under those circumstances. Lieutenant Bond said he had been asked by Colonel Homfray to express sympathy on behalf of the Battalion with the parents and relatives and wife of the de- ceased, and he could assure them that any- thing that could have been done was done for the deceased. The deceased was a man in his (the speaker's) platoon, and he could only say that the deceased was a credit and an honour to the battalion to which he belonged. Even on Sunday, just before the fatality, as there was a man in the regi- ment with a broken collar bone, he asked for a volunteer to carry that man's pack to the station on the following day, and the deceased was the only man in the battalion who stepped forward for the task. It was understood that Lieut. Bond would make the necessary application to the Royal Humane Society with reference to getting a parchment for the man Jeffreys, as a token of his gallantry in saving the three men and try- ing to save the fourth. I THE BODY CONVEYED HOME. I The body of Private William Rose was con- veyed on Wednesday from Porthcawl to Aber- tillery for interment. A large number of sol- diers formed a procession to Porthcawl Sta- tion, under the command of Captain Hedley. The band played the "Last Post" as the train left.

THE NATIONAL REGISTER I

THE NATIONAL REGISTER. I FORMS TO BE COLLECTED IN AUGUST. I The President of the Local Government Board has asked local authorities to be ready to collect the National Register forms in the second week of August. "Meanwhile," said the Statistical Super- intendent of the Registrar-General's office on Monday, "an enormous amount of organisa- tion has to be completed. There will be two separate processes—leaving the forms and col- lecting them, and the collection cannot begin until the deliveries are complete. "It is anticipated that nearly 40 million forms will be distributed. In England and Wales there will be approximately 40,000 col- lectors. The work will be done by volunteers, organised by local authorities. Scotland will make its own arrangements. "When the completed forms have been gathered in, local authorities will tabulate and index the particulars; each area will have its own register. The only figures sent to the I Register-General will be in the form of sum- maries of the statistical returns, which we shall condense for the Government."

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances tor turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

I WOMEN IN WAITING I

I WOMEN IN WAITING. I KENFIG HILL TEACHER ASSAULTED. I -1 We must protect our teachers," said the Chairman (Alderman W. Llewellyn) at Bridg- end Police Court on Saturday, when fining Emma Loder, married woman, Park Street, Kenfig Hill, for having assaulted Benjamin Williams, school teacher, Margam House, Kenfig Hill. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, Aberavon, said complainant was an assistant schoolmaster at Kenfig Schools, and there appeared to have been some trouble between complainant and a little girl scholar, who had been rebuked. At lunch time, complainant with another teacher, was going home, when he saw defen- dant and other women, surrounded by a crowd of children waiting on the bridge at Kenfig Hill. She was swearing vengeance on him. He appreciated there would be a difficulty, and told her not to create a dis- turbance there, but to go to his house to talk the matter over. Defendant then threat- ened to "rip him," and as complainant at- tempted to leave she caught hold of him, swung him round, and slapped his face. But that was not what was complained of. He complained that he had had to suffer this in- dignity before all the children, and he asked the Bench to inflict a penalty which would act as a deterrent to the woman as well as to others. Complainant said he had taken an extra class on account of the absence of another teacher. During the morning a girl caused trouble, and he rebuked her. As he was going back to lunch with another assistant he saw defendant on the bridge with other women and about 40 children. Witness asked the woman to come to the house to discuss the matter. The first words she said were that she was going to tear him to pieces. Mr. Lewis Thomas: And having no desire to be torn to pieces, you were going to leave? —Yes, but she caught hold of me, swung me round, and slapped my face. Defendant: How could I keep my hands off him when he struck my little girL Edward Anthony, another assistant mas- ter, corroborated. Defendant admitted insulting complain- ant. The Deputy Justices' Clerk: And I suppose you are sorry ? Defendant: I think he ought to be sorry for beating the child, not me be sorry for beating him. The Chairman (to defendant): By your own admission, you assaulted the teacher. Pos- sibly you had something to annoy you, but if you had you should have made your com- plaint to the right quarter. We must pro- tect our teachers; if they are to be as- saulted in this way on the road, they would have something to put up with. You will be fined £ 1.

SERGT OLEARY YC I

SERGT. O'LEARY, Y.C. I FRANTIC CROWDS IN LONDON. I Sergeant Michael O'Leary, V.C., whose brilliant achievement of killing eight Germans and capturing two more at Cuinchy on Feb- ruary 1st has thrilled the Empire, was given a royal greeting in London on Saturday. No private soldier has ever before faced so many thousands of hero-worshippers. From the stand throughout the West End the streets were crammed to watch the shy young man's progress to Hyde Park, where the vast sea of faces seemed to frighten the fearless soldier who has braved the worst horrors of modern war. The reception was arranged by the United Irish League of Great Britain. In the morning Sergeant O'Leary visited Westminster Cathedral, being presented to Cardinal Bourne, and after being entertained to luncheon at the Hotel Cecil by Mr. T. P. O'Connor, M.P., the hero was the central figure in a great recruiting demonstration held in his honour in Hyde Park. Four pro- cessions were assembled in different parts of London, and, headed by military bands, pro- ceeded to the park. In Trafalgar-square dense crowds congregated to greet Sergeant O'Leary, and when an open carriage drawn by two horses pulled up under the shadow of Nelson's Monument, great cheering rang through the square. In Hyde Park the bands played Irish airs, the people shouted themselves hoarse, and O'Leary, pale and nervous, looked now to one side and now to the other and gravely saluted. When at length the cheering had subsided, Mr. T. P. O'Connor addressed the crowd. "I have been at many a historic and great gathering in Hyde Park," he said, "but this is the greatest I ever witnessed in my life—(cheers)—and I can tell our friend and countryman, Sergeant O'Leary, that no Em- peror, King, or gentleman has ever received a mightier or more loving welcome from Lon- don than he has to-day." Sergeant O'Leary, upon whom a number of presents had been showered, made a brief and soldier-like speech. "I have," he said, "only done my duty as a soldier and a man. I don't like being made a fuss of and handshaking. There are quite as many good fellows as me, who have fought, and are fighting. I happen to be one of the luckj ones. I am proud to fight for my King and country. All I ask you fellows fit to serve is this: Don't stand look- ing at me. That's no good; come and join me. That is the only way to put down the German hordes." (Cheers.) In the evening the V.C. was present at the Coliseum, and was greeted with the greatest enthusiasm by the audience.

No title

A supplement to the "London Gazette," issued on Thursday, contains an Order in Council, which prohibits the exportation of tinplates, including tin canisters for food packing, which are at present prohibited to ports in Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden, to all foreign ports other than those of France and Russia, except the Baltic ports, and to Spain and Portugal. A similar conditional prohibition is placed on cassava powder and tapioca, mandioca, or tapioca flour, rattans, sago, and sago meal and flour.

GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEERS J

GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEERS J TRAINING CORPS. The Earl of Plymouth and his assistants are making a determined effort to ensure the suc- cess of the Volunteer Training Corps move- ment in Glamorgan. His lordship is taking a keen interest in the formation of the county regiment, and in spite of his many engage- ments and the great amount of public work that lie is doing in this time of national stress, he has found time, or made time, to attend a number of meetings in Cardiff, and in the county for the purpose of setting up the organisation which will co-ordinate the various volunteer corps throughout the county, and, by giving them the cohesion of a ttiktary force under one command, will in- crease their efficiency and encourage them to make still further efforts to fit themselves for the time when the country may have need of their services. In this it is to be hoped that the lord-lieu- tenant and the regimental commandant, Commander Bethune, R.N., may meet with the same success as has been attained by others in many of the counties in the king- II dom where thousands of volunteers have been drilled, clothed, armed, and organised on a sound military basis. The volunteer move- ment was taken up enthusiastically through- out Glamorgan during last autumn and win- ter, when every man who possesses the true British spirit felt a desire to acquire such a measure of military training as would enable him to stand up in defence of his hearth and home if as the result of some unthinkable mis- fortune to our land and sea forces the enemy should reach our shores. There are many hundreds of thousands of men in our land who may not enlist in the Army, however much they might wish to do so, such as the butcher, the baker, the farmer, the shoe- maker, and others who are required to feed and clothe the soldiers, sailors, shipbuilders, ammunition workers, and others who are helping to win the war as much by staying in this country as by going to France, Flanders, or the Dardanelles. These men, who do not enlist in'the Army, are animated by the same spirit as their sons and brothers in the trenches, and have no intention of being driven in herds by an invader to a convenient spot and there shot down without striking a blow for themselves, their wives and daugh- ters. Therefore, they formed themselves into corps, and were instructed by those of their number who had some military experience. But as the months went by and the monotony of squad drill began to pall, as they saw no in- dication of the State accepting their offer of service and offering them some encourage- ment as the young and unencumbered men, their blood fired by the rudiments of drill and shooting they had learned, left the corps and joined the Army, and as the prospects of in- vasion by the enemy seemed more remote, some of these isolated corps lost interest and became less keen, and many discontinued the drills. Now, however, that the lord-lieutenant has formed the county regiment these corps will find a new interest in the work. The separ- ate units will be linked up into platoons, com- panies, and battalions. They will meet to- gether and have the opportunity of drilling in larger bodies. They will be taught methods of attack and defence, and will feel that they are learning something useful. They will have a uniform, which will give them a status as combatants if the time should come when they are needed. And, no doubt, when they have proved themselves efficient some useful work will be found which they can do. It is conceivable that there may come a time—and it may come sooner than many of us think-when the war might be ended up speedily if Lord Kitchener could throw an-, other million men into the balance. This could be done with ease—the necessary muni- tions will be ready-if there were sufficient volunteers ready to take the place of the men required to be taken out of the country. Therefore, every man who would rather die fighting than blindfolded against a wall, but is too old or ohvsicallv unfit for the armv. should join the Volunteer Training Corps. Any man between 40 and 60 who can play a round of golf can do an hour's drill twice or thrice a week, and any man who can play a game of billiards can learn to use a rifle. To those, however, who are so incapacitated by age or infirmity that they can do neither of these things, there is another way of show- ing their sympathy with the movement. Many of the men who give their time and strength will be unable to buy their own uni- form and equipment, and the public will be asked to subscribe to a fund in each battalion area to provide uniforms for their own bat- talion. Those, then, who cannot drill and shoot may show their patriotism by subscrib- ing to these necessary funds. And not only individuals, but municipalities and district I councils, should be invited to make grants towards the equipment funds of the Volun- teer Training Corps. This has been done in many towns and districts in England. Some I of the local councils have taken UDon them- selves to build and equip miniature rifle ranges, others have assisted with money, and all have given the use of halls, schools, and other premises for the purposes of the corps. The Lord Mayor of Cardiff has lent an office at 75 St. Mary Street, for the use of the county headquarters staff and the headquar- fcers of the 1st, or Cardiff, Battalion, and he has also issued an eloquent appeal for funds to equip that battalion.

No title

Replying in Parliamentary papers to Mr. Cave's inquiry whether, pending the consider- ation by the House of Welsh Church (Post- ponement) Bill, it is proposed that an Order in Council shall be made under the Suspensory Act, 1914, postponing the date of disestablish- ment until the end of the war, Mr. Asquitdx says: — "The Government is arranging to con- fer with the parties interested in the hope that it may be possible to make an announce- ment as to the Postponement Bill before this part of the Session terminates."

Advertising

I I Up-to-Date Appliances fofr turning out every class of work at competitive prices, atj1 tb-o <4<1,«morgan Gazette" Printing Work*, j

WOUNDED ENTERTAINEDI

WOUNDED ENTERTAINED. I GUESTS OF EARL AND COUNTESS I PLYMOUTH. Nearly 400 wounded soldiers were the guests of the Earl and Countess of Plymouth at a garden party held in the grounds of St. Fagan's Castle on Friday afternoon. Both the Earl and Countess were unfortunately prevented from attending, the Earl, who is chairman of the Executive Committee of the WTelsh Army Corps, having been called away to London. Those present included Colonel and the Hon. Mrs. Forrest, Mrs. Tyler, the Rev. and Mrs Bird (St. Fagan's), Miss Booker (Southerndown Hospital), Mrs. Hastings Watson, Major-General Lee, Colonel Mar- wood-Elton, Colonel Hepburn, Captain Hobbs, Captain Brewis, Lieut. Quinn, Mr. Glenig Grant, and Miss Richardson (assistant matron, 3rd Western General Hospital). The men were drawn principally from the Cardiff Military Hospitals-Splott Road, Howard Gardens, Albany Road, and King Edward VII. Hospital—and there were others present from Penarth, Barry, Bridgend, Caerphilly and Pontypridd, together with about 30 nurses and detachments of the Red Cross and Boy Scouts. They were brought to the Castle in motor cars. The proceedings were of an informal character. There was no speech-making, and the welcome accorded to the guests was signified by the presentation to each of a charming nose-gay. They were afterwards invited to explore the wide and beautiful stretches of garden and woodland. Some of the more energetic rambled in and out by a winding stream, while others stretched them- selves at ease on the grass, out of the heat of the sun, to listen to fine selections by a band made up of details of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalions of the Welsh Regiment. Cigar- ettes were distributed. Later they had tea in the shade of the trees, and after this an enjoyable concert was given on a platform erected for the occasion. The artistes were Misses Gwladys Naish and Louie Grainer, Messrs. W. E. Carston, Wm. Dudridge, Cyril Best, and Roland Butler.

KING AND THE NAVY I

KING AND THE NAVY. PRIDE IN HIS MEN. I The King, attended by Sir Charles Cust, one of his Naval Equerries, and Lieutenant- Colonel Clive Wigram, left London about 6 o'clock on Tuesday evening of last week for an undisclosed destination and returned to Buckingham Palace on Saturday afternoon. In the meanwhile his Majesty had been busy visiting and inspecting the vessels of the Grand Fleet, and seeing something of their preparations for any service that may be re- quired of them. His Majesty has addressed the following cordial message to Sir John Jellicoe:— I am delighted that I have been able to carry out a long-cherished desire to visit my Grand Fleet. After two most interesting days spent here I leave with feelings of pride and admiration for the splendid force which you command with the full confidence of myself and your fellow-countrymen. I have had the pleasure of seeing the greater portion of the officers and men of the Fleet. I realise the patient and determined spirit with which you have faced long months of waiting and hoping. I know how strong is the comradeship that links all ranks to- gether. Such a happy state of things con- vinces me that, whenever the day of battle comes, my Navy will add fresh triumphs to its old glorious traditions. ADMIRAL JELLICOE'S REPLY. I His Majesty has received the following reply from Admiral Jellicoe:— On behalf of the officers and men of the Grand Fleet, I beg to tender your Majesty my most profound thanks for your message. Your Majesty's intimate knowledge of the feelings which permeate the officers and men of the Royal Navy will enable you to appreciate the depth of their devotion,. loyalty, and respectful affection, which feelings your Majesty's visit has intensified. The memory of it will carry us through any further trials of patience that may be be- fore us. On my own behalf I beg to as- sure your Majesty of my conviction that the glorious traditions of the Navy are safe in the hands of those I have the honour to command.

CLOSING OF SUNDAY CLUBS I

CLOSING OF SUNDAY CLUBS. I DECREASE IN SUNDAY" DRUNKS." I Crime at Merthyr is on the decrease, and the quarterly report of Chief Constable W*l- son, presented to the Watch Committee, makes interesting reading. There is a de- crease in ordinary offences of 42, as compared with the corresponding period last year. There were 421 non-indictable offences as com- pared with 651, and of that number 103 were soldiers arrested and handed over to the mili- tary authorities. Quasi-criminal proceedings totalled 76, as compared with 198. There were 91 fewer cases of drunkenness (74 as against 165). Not one Sunday "drunk" was reported, and Saturday offences fell from 67 to 25. Mr. Wilson said that the closing of clubs on Sundays had resulted in more men i", OiTi- to work on Monday morn- ings. The licensees were carrying out their duties exceptionally well. There were no she- f beens in the borough.

I GENERAL McINTYRES VISITi

I GENERAL McINTYRE-S VISIT. -i Sir Joilf, Courtis, as commandant of the County Cofjisij presided over a meeting of the executive committee of the Cardiff' Volunteer Corps, held at the City Hall, Cardiff1, on Fri- day evening, at which arrangements were made for the visit to Catdiff on Monday of General Mclntyre, who, a general oii; the ac- tive list, has been appoint-ed generalissimo of the national body. General McLntyre's visit to South Wales is in connection with the National Corps of Motorists. In addition to the Cardiff Corps, it is proposed to form a Motor Volunteer Corps at Merthyr, to- gether with platoons at Port, Talbot,, Sridgend and Neath. [

I G h 1 Gathered Comments ON THE WAR I

I G h *1 Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. French View. "T' t I hear from a member of the French General Staff (says the London correspondent of the "Daily Despatch") that many of his colleagues are, curiously enough, in agree- ment with the Kaiser's reputed view that the war will practically end "about October." The only difference is the mode of the ending! I understand that the French generals base their opinions not only on strategical calcula- tions, but on the perfectly well-known dread of a winter campaign by the German army and people. They maintain that even if actual hostilities have not then ceased, never- theless the war will to all intents be "over." America Can't Afford It. I Mr. Herbert A. Gibbons, until recently Pro- fessor of History at Roberts College, Constan- tinbple, declares that the United States ought to go into the war, and at once. "We can't afford to let Germany win," he says. "The United States cannot remain practically dis- interested in the progress of this titanic struggle. It is not only a great European war but a world war. We have got an enemy to face, and we ought to put into the struggle every single ounce of energy and resource to beat him. If we keep going on in the pre- sent spirit of apathy, it is going to be an awful day when the awakening comes." I American Warning to Germans. I I The shooting of Mr. J. P. Morgan, the United States banker, by "a Christian gentle- man" inspired "from on high," of German origin, named Muntner, has led to an outburst in the American Press. The New York "Tri- bune" warns the German partisans that if they take their cue from "the barbarity and lawlessness of the German Government," they must expect short shift from the American public. The whirlwind of indignation which swept over the country after the des- truction of the Lusitania," says this paper, "was a zephyr compared with the storm which must overwhelm the introduction to our soil of the German methods of crime and savagery which have manifested themselves in the Mor- gan assault and the bomb operations in the Senate wing of the Capitol." Ireland and Our Enemies. The anniversary ci the battle of the Boyne was celebrated at Belfast on Monday, over 25,000 Orangemen marching in procession through the principal streets. Colonel Wal- lace, Grand Master, who presided at a subse- quent meeting, read the following message from Sir Edward Carson :At this great crisis in our country's history it is right and proper that we should take this opportunity for solemn and fervent hope and prayer for the success of the forces of the Crown against the aggression and tyranny of their enemies. We pray God to preserve our Kingdom and our Empire, and to maintain for us the liberty which has been won for us by our forefathers in building up the great struggle for freedom which is associated the world over with the name of the British Empire." Straw Stuffed Engines of Alarm. I For the last week or so there has been so great an outbreak of hysteria in certain quar-. ters that it has become absolutely necessary for those who are concerned with the national safety to trim the boat of State by pointing out how grossly overdone and how ill-founded has been so much of the recent pessimism," says the Spectator." "Though in a sense we want to see the country alarmed, or, at any rate, made fully cognisant of the terrible gravity of the situation, we recognise that panic may prove quite as great a danger as false security. What has been specially harm- ful of late has been the tendency of our pes- simists to manufacture a series of bogies with which to scare the nation. To make people face the facts, and the true facts, is one thing. To erect these straw-stuffed engines of alarm is quite another, and one which is bound to prove exceedingly hurtful." Mr. Asquith. I "It is the accident of events that has made Mr. Asquith the pilot during the most stormy period of British politics, for, certainly, a cen- tury," writes Mr A. G. Gardiner in the "At- lantic." He is himself, by temperament, the least adventurous of statesmen. His quality is intellectual rather than imaginative, and he is congenitally indisposed to pluck the peach before it is ripe. At no time in his career has he forced issues on the public, He is content to kfeve the pioneering work to those who like it, and prefers to make his ap- pearance when the air has been warmed. To some extent, no doubt, his reticence is due to a certain shyness, which often assumes a pro- tective shield of cold indifference. That, be- hind the rather frigid public exterior, he culti- vates sensibilities, is known to his friends and has more than once been revealed to the pub- lic. He is the only man I have seen break down in the House of Commons under the stress of emotion. It was on the occasion when he announced the final failure of his I efforts to bring about a settlement in the me- 1 morable coal strike of 1911." Personal Controversies. I Addressing a patriotic demonstration at the Essex County Cricket Ground, Leyton, Sir John Simon said that every patriotic man and woman must feel that at this time it was de- plorable to raise partisan issues to forward personal ambitions or to foment personal con- troversies. He did not ask that Ct'itid&m I etraint and by the avoidance of all sterile ôön I troversittg. He did not ask that criticism should be abandoned for all time. There would be pieiity of opportunity for criticism, and Ii £ <1í4 not care how it was expressed or what consequences might Ofisue from it so long as it was lvíthheld fttftil after the war. Sterile controversies about the past and un- worthy panic about the future Cultivated hys- teria in the present. All these things were so many poisonous gases emanating from those who indulged in them, aiul their Only reefult was to confuse the judgment and temper of the nation. There were three things a demo- cracy such as ours must show in order to win the war. They must cultivate the duty of unity, the duty of cheerfulness,, and of forti- tude. Oh, the Waste! Describing the fighting round La Bassee, a writer in "Blackwood's" says:—" Oh! the waste, the utter damnable waste of everything out here—men, horses, buildings, cars, every- thing. Those who talk about war being a salutary discipline are those who remain at home. In a modern war there is little room for picturesque gallantry or picture-book hero- ism. Must be Prepared. Sir William Ramsay says that we have learned in the crucible of fire that we must be prepared. War is not most to be dreaded. It is the insidious advance by fair means or foul of our enemies the Germans to obtain a monopoly of all fields of human endeavour. That nation is organised for the purpose, and this war is merely the attempt, let us hope a fruitless one, to obtain world-wide dominion. M ere Theatricalities. The War Office," says the "Nation," "has always had more recruits than it is able to deal with. The Ministry of Munitions has received more offers of industrial service than it can organise. As for amateur help, it has been poured out from men and women in an abundance with which the authorities have not been able to cope. These are the three things apparently needed to enable the Gov- ernment to get on with the war. Why then do they not get on with it, and have done with the mere theatricalities of preparation?" Nearly 70,0000 skilled munition workers have been registered. 87,860 women have offered their services to the Labour Bureaux. Assize Judge and the Coal Crisis. In his charge to the grand jury at the Gla- morgan Assizes at Swansea on Monday, Mr. Justice Lawrence, referring to the coal crisis, said:—" What is deplorable about the county, to my mind, at the present moment seems to be the unrest between capital and labour. I put it to you as gentlemen representing capi- tal that in regard to the condition of labour at the present moment there seems to be some latent cause which is not apparent to the outside observer. That men should be found lacking in that patriotism which is so neces- sary at a time of such great peril as we are in is amazing to me. We have rumours of strikes,of quarrels about wages at a time when apparently ample wages are being paid, and every dispute prevents the necessary effort for the production of munitions and the prosecu- tion of the war, so that everybody who is now in any way exciting or causing trouble is really risking lives in the various seats of war. It seems to me almost incredible that the people of Glamorgan should be participating in this unrest, if not aiding it. The country is hanging about its neck a millstone, which posterity has got to carry, and it is going to be a grievous burden, even if we go success- fully through this terrible war, as I hope and believe we shall. The men have got to bear it themselves, and it is no good running up the cost of everything to make the millstone a still greater burden." What We Owe to War. While I make no scruple of confessing my- self a passivist, and with all my loyalty to peace," (said Professr Patrick Geddes, speak- ing at King's College), "I want all the more to do justice to war. We must recognise what we owe to war. Observe its effect on the youth who fill our streets in khaki. They are better set up, manlier, than they were; they are restrained, vitalised and disciplined as peace did not vitalise or discipline. The I slackness of the youth at the street corner has gone and this dramatic change is before us all. Most dramatic of all to me in my own every- day life and experience in Edinburgh between the squalid old High-street and the Old Castle, has been the rapid change of the dete- riorating loafer into that cutting edge of des- perate battle which they call the Black Watch. This is an educational process. Only when we can organise our eduoation on lines something like those of the Army shall we have any hope of getting beyond this eternal iteration of peace and war with which history is full," continued the professor. "We have only one name which may be added to that great sequence of transforming educationists of the past 100 years, and that is the name of Baden-Powell, who, with all the limitations of a too military reversion to scouting, has in him that appeal to young life which no quan- tity of parsing and conjugating can 'ever supply, even though they are acoompanied by lessons on nature study or morals. yf Mr. Walter Long and the Reoistef. Mr. Walter Long, addressing a meeting of local municipal and other authorities at the Local Government Board Offices in connection with the National Registration Bill, said there was a great deal of confusion in the public mind in regard to the position of the Govern- ment on the question of compulsory service. The debates in Parliament on the Bill had led to the conclusion that the hands of the Gov- ernment were tied and they could not con- template the adoption of compulsion. There was no foundation for these conclusions. He said quite frankly that the Prime Minister would be the last man in this country to say anything to-day, in the face of the situation in which we found ourselves, which would pre- vent the Government adopting compulsory service to-morrow if they believed it to be right and necessary in order to bring this war to an end. Objection had been taken to the National Registration Bill by some who said it was the forerunner of some form of compul- sory service. The Bill was proposed not with regard to service, but with regard to what must precede service, that was to say, organi- sation, and the Government's hands remained absolutely free as regarded compulsory ser- vice. He could say for himself that he would not remain a member of the Government 24 hours longer if he had reason to believe that they hesitated to adopt measures which they believed in their hearts were necessary to bring this war to an end. (Loud cheers.)

No title

Subscriptions through the Swansea Chief Post Office for War Loan so far amount to over E20,000, an average of about £ 7, £ 00 a week. Mrs. Samuel Beeze, Carne Street, Pent re y llhondda, has given birth to tripl,-ts-two, girls and a boy. Mother and children are doing well. Efforts are being made to secure the King's bounty.