Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
To tlie Editor

To tlie Editor. Si \—Mrf John Evans is really incorrigible. lL i. an old and wise saying that (- J here are so as those who won't "pe." and Mr. Evans is apparently determined to ad- here to that prejudice with which he has closely bandaged his mental vision. His attack upon the honour and reputation of the Commons and Footpaths Preservation Socio*r .1" him ro credit. It merely proves the length to which he is prepared to go in his desperate efforts to buoy up what can only be regarded as most unnecessary and ill- grounded opposition to a valuable scheme formulated in the best interests of the com- munity. The Society, fortunately, is not in need of Mr. Enm" blessing, but I protest most vig- orously against his statement that tins is a Society "consisting largely, if not entirely, of large owners." This is an assertion which, as the context of the letter shows, is calculated to damage the reputation of the Society. This statement is as unjust as it is un- true. and it Mr. Evans possessed the slightest knowledge of the Society's history and work he would, without being asked to do so, at once withdraw and apologise for a statement for which there is not a shred of justification. I am grateful to observe that you have in your Editorial Notes dealt with this, as well as with another reference made by Mr. Evans to the Society. In his letter which appeared in your i."sue of the 18th December last he plainly suggested that this Society was be- hind the opposition to the scheme. It is al- most unnecessary for me to say that from first to last the Society has warmly approved of the proposed regulation of the Commons, and has never in any way countenanced or encouraged opposition to the scheme. Mr. Evans had no right whatever, when he thought it suited his purpose, to use the name and influence of the Society to bolster up his case. But what is to be thought of the value of the views of a gentleman who poses as an authority and guide upon Commons and who has the temerity to confess ignorance of the existence of Mr. Alexander MacMorran, K.C.! The name of Mr. MacMorran is a household word amongst those who have any knowledge of the different phases of local government. He is one of the most distin- guished counsel of the day. Mr. Evans' ignor- ance cf this fact is only equalled by his amazing lack of knowledge of the elementary principles upon which is based the law of Common' He endeavours to discredit me because he says I am "a lord or part of a lord of the manor." This requires a word of explanation because Mr. Evans takes care in his letter not to mention the circumstances under which I am personally interested in a Com- mon. The Common referred to is Towyn Trewan Common, a vast open space in Angle- sey. Some years ago an attempt was made to enclose this Common. The Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society and its mem- bers intervened, and, as a result of expensive legal proceedings, prevented the enclosure. Subsequently, the Common was bought, under the Society's auspices, to save it from further attacks, and vested in Trustees, of whom I am one. Realising the value of regu- lation schemes from the public point of view, we at once took steps to formulate such a scheme as that which has been proposed for Coity Wallia Common. The scheme became law, and the Common is now quite safe from any further attacks. From first to last I have never derived a single penny profit from my position as a part owner of the Common, my interest being confined to a desire to save the land for the public use and enjoyment. I am nevertheless grateful to Mr. Evans for his letter. It conclusively establishes the unreasonableness of his attitude, and will be of considerable use in proving to the satisfac- tion of the Select Committee on Commons the baseless nature of the opposition to the scheme. Mr. Evans will find it an interest- ing and enlightening experience to be cross- examined upon his published statements. In the meantime, care shall be taken to forward a copy of his letter to the Board of Agricul- ture for consideration in connection with any objections to the scheme. I do not propose to ask so heavy a draft upon your space or your readers' patience as would be necessary if I were to follow Mr. Evans in detail through the labyrinth of fanciful objections which he advances. Many of these obviously carry their own refutation. There are other points, however, which ap- pear to demand an answer: (1) Mr. Evans states, "Mr. Chubb also says that only freehold and customary ten- ants are Commoners in Coity Wallia." Now, Sir, I have never said any such thing, and Mr. Evans can do no less than withdraw his statement. What I did say was that the cus- tomary freeholders and copyholders of the Manor might certainly be regarded as Com- moners, but that, in addition, I was of opinion that many other persons might ex-, pect to be able to set up a prescriptive title to a right of Common, enjoyed not as inhabi- tants but as owners or occupiers of specific tenements in respect of which rights could be shown to have been exercised for a long period of years. When I met at Bridgend the representa- tives of the parishes I carefully explained the bearing of Gateward's case. to which Mr. MarMorran refers, upon any attempt to set up a claim to a right of Common as an inhabi- tant. Such a right cannot exist at Coity Wallia, and does not exist elsewhere, save in a limited sense in certain ancient Corpora- tions. I wish most cordiaJly that such a right were capable of legal proof, for it would im- mensely simplify the task of safeguarding Commons. It is merely a wast-e of time to pretend that a claim, to what lawyers term a "profit a prendre" can be maintained by an inhabitant qua inhabitant. If Mr. Evans still persists in his own view, let him proffer a claim to a right of Common as an inhabitant in such a way that the issue can be tested on that simple point. He will speedily find how mistaken is the advice which he is giving to the inhabitants, for such a claim must inevit- ably fail. (2) Mr. Evans says: "Fortunately, many of the inhabitants here fully realise that the regulation of Commons is no new thing. They, or relatives, have had bitter experience elsewhere, and for that very reason our oppo- sition to any regulation here is uneomprftmis- ing a'nd immutable- I invite Mr. Evans to drop innuendo and to come out into the open. I challenge him to prove his assertion. Let him give for th. information of your readers the names of the Commons he refers to and the nature of his friends' complaints. Regu- lation schemes are notoriously and uni- formly successful throughout the country. Again, if Mr. Evans cannot prove his asser- tion, lie is in honour bound to withdraw it. (3) Mr. Evans writes: "There is already a T titr e is a l rea d v ??t body in existence perfectly capable of effec- tively performing all the functions which Mr. Chubb allots to the proposed Board of Con- servators." This is presumably intended to be a statement of fact which no hair-splitting or word-juggling can explain away. I deny absolutely that any such body exists. Mr. Evans should know that it does not exist. and that it can only be called into existence in the manner provided by Parliament. (4) Mr. Evans persists in pretending that the proposed regulation scheme will take away the rights of the Commoners. This is not the case. I repeat that Part 5 of the draft Order absolutely protects any rights which may be exercisable over the Commons, whatever those rights may be. The deter- mination of the rights will be in the hands of the Board i of Agriculture, a body which has always shown in such matters that it is able to temper judgment with mercy. No just claim to a reasonable right when supported by the necessary evidence .of- antiquity and enjoyment is lightly dismissed by the Board of Agriculture. If the right exists, the Order cannot prejudice it. If if does not exist in the legal sense, the Order makes generous provision for its continuance as an ancient custom or privilege, under the direc- tion of the Board. Though I cannot profess to admire his-con- troversial methods, I am willing to give Mr. Evans every credit for the best of motives in his campaign. That he is quite mistaken in his action in opposing the scheme, no one who possesses the slightest knowledge of the sub- ject will attempt to dispute, and one can only regret that his efforts are not directed to bringing about the consummation we all de- sire—the full and complete protection of the Commons. The Society again strongly urges that the regulation scheme merits, and should re- ceive, the unanimous support of all those who have at heart the permanent preservation of Coity Wallia Commons and of the rights of the people over those open spaces.-I am, your obedient servant, LAWRENCE CHUBB, Secretary. Commons and Footpaths Pre- servation Society, 25 Victoria Street, 5 I- letoria Street, Westminster, S.W.

To the Editor II

To the Editor. < I Sir-When dealing with the question of the Commons in your able editorial notes of last week you said I had forgotten past services of the "Gazette" to the public of this and other districts. Indeed I have not, sir. For quite 35 years I have been a regular reader of, and an occasional contributor to the "Gazette," which during t hat period has but very seldom uttered an uncertain sound on questions re- lating to the welfare of the public of South and Micl-Gl amorgan. I wish I could say the same with regard to our Commons, but as long as you advocate acceptance of an order which would take the Commons from all the public of these four parishes and confine them to the benefit of an exceedingly small minority of us, it is impossible to do so. I fear, sir, I differ with you, not on a question of policy as you say, and which would be a trifling matter, but on a question of principle, and that a fun- damental one to boot. The gialf between us is, therefore, unfortunately great. It is quite fair on your part to contrast my. attitude towards the Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society at present with what I said in your columns in December and January last, and it is as fair for me to explain the difference, which I can very easily do. For the past two or three years I have had more or less frequent communications in reference to our Commons with two friends, one in Eng- land and one in Wales, who are great enthu- siasts for the preservation of ALL Commons for ALL the public in their vicinities. But were members of the C. and F.P.S.. which they considered was a bulwark to the cause they have at heart. They no longer think so, and have ceased their membership. My friends were deluded and they deluded me, so contagious is delusion. Now. however, they and I see plainly, and we now know that the Society, which sails under such a beautiful name, exists to preserve Commons to frejjkold and customary-hold tenants only. Thair, is the reason for the difference in my attitude. which you very naturally and properly remark upon, and I am not ashamed to give it. It is no shame for me and my friends to be de- ceived once, but if we were deceived twice in the same way it would be a great shame to us, but I do not think we shall incur that shame. It is no new thing in the history of the wor ld that men and societies are not always what they seem; nevertheless it is my policy to con- tinue to give them credit for sincerity till I am compelled to do otherwise. I Your well-meant advice to us Commoners to drop our opposition to the proposed order is evidently based on the opinions of Mr. Chubb and counsel. You apparently think such opinions infallable, and there you and I must agree to differ. Those opinions are based on the assumption that the public of Coity Wallia are Commoners to-day by sufferance. That is not so sir, except in the sense that all land is held by national sufferance. It has never been proved that Coity Wallia is a manor, and until that is done our Commons remain Crown lands, and will never be de- clared the perquisites of a few. We have the evidence of that late, lamented, and learned antiquarian and archaeologist, Mr. G. E. Robinson, Charles Street, Cardiff, that there is not a scrap of evidence in the National Re- cord Office that Coity Wallia is. or ever was, a manor. Indeed. Mr. Robinson held that there were only two manors in all Wales. I will not name them now suffice it to say that neither Coity Wallia nor that district in Ang- lesey over which Mr Chubb tol dus he claimed a fractional lordship..vas of them. I fear, the fraction in this case is a very vulgar one. However, in view of this and much more in the same line, that could be added, the natur- al assumption ,.is, not that upon which Mr. Chubb and counsel go. but that this is not a manor. Our Commons here are simply unen- closed lands, never given to anybody, and over which all have exercised equal rights from time immemorial. "-?We. therefore, decline to come to terms with people whose object is to get the public to. forgo their rights to the Commons, which would then very soon go were so many of our Commons have already gone. I am not sure sir, whether your editorials contain a veiled hint that I am playing to the gallery in this business. I assure you I am not, and I am certain that those who know me best will testify that I am, to say the least, as often on the unpopular as I am on the popu- lar side of Questions. My sole concern here is the interest of the manv, and to frustrate j here the ignoble tactics by which so many commons elsewhere have been lost to the poor. I am not without hope that success will crown the efforts of mv friends and myself. Mean- while I warmly thank "One who is interested" and Mr. David Williams, Heolvcyw. for their helpful contributions to the fight in last week's "Gazette." and you. Sir, for the liberal space you gave to this important question. Yours, etc.. I Heo! JOHN EVANS. ITeo l vcyw.

No title

We regret to have to hold over till rwext week, owing to pressure on space, Miniature Rifle Shooting Notes and Garw Sunday School- outing and Bridgend Yeomanry Sergeant's wedding.

TRY MAGNESIA FOR YOUR STOMACH TROUBLE

TRY MAGNESIA FOR YOUR STOMACH TROUBLE. IT NEUTRALISES ACIDITY AND PREVENTS FERMENTATION. Doubtless you have already tried pepsin, bismuth, soda, charcoal, drugs, etc., and so you know that these things will not cure your trouble—in some cases they do not even give relief—but before giving up hope and deciding that you are a chronic dyspeptic just try the effect of a little magnesia—not the ordinary car- bonate, oxides, or citrates, but pure bisurated magne-da, which you can obtain locally from J. Jones, 31 Caroline Street, or any other good chemist in either powder or tablet form. Take half-a-teaspoonful of the powder or two com- pressed tablets with a little water after your next meal, and see what a difference this makes. It will instantly neutralise the harmful acid which now causes your food to ferment, giving rise to wind, heartburn, flatulence and many ether unpleasant symptoms, and you will find that, provided you take a little bisurated mag- nesia immediately afterward, you can eat almost anything and enjoy it without any dan- '? to follow. 5713 ger of pain and discomfort to follow. 5713

YALE FARMERS AND THE WAR

YALE FARMERS AND THE WAR. -—-—— AN APPEAL TO PATRIOTISM. THEIR PART. Vale farmers attended in fair numbers,, at the Bear Hotel, Cowbridge, on Tuesday, when the well known agriculturist, Mr R. Stratton, The Duffryn, Newport, at the invitation of the Cowbridge and County Farmers' Club. gave an interesting paper on "Farmers and the War." Mr. T. Thomas, Red Farm, pre- sided, and among others present were: Messrs. John Owen, H.M. Board of Agrieul- ture Commissioner for Wales; H. O. Irvine, Southerndown; Edmund D. Lewis, St. Mary Hill Court; Edward Akers, J.P.. Pentrebane; W. Hopkins, Pancross; W. B. Wavman, Tre- castle; F. H. Osmond-Smith, County land agent; David J. Jenkins, J.P., Fleming- stone Rees Thomas, Boverton Court; Alder- man Edward John. Cowbridge Messrs. W. L. Jenkins, Cowbridge; oah Morgan. Peny- bryn; Edmund Lewis, Whitchurch; Daniel Jenkins. Ruthin, and the secretary (Mr. D. C. Watts). Mr. Stratton, who throughout appealed to the patriotism of farmers in this time of great stress and trial, said it was well for farmers to take stock of their position and see whether they were doing their part ade- quately and whether there was anything more that they could do to bring this terrible war to a satisfactory termination. "How does the farmer stand to-day as compared with last year, and what is the prospect of the future ?" They had been told by prominent members of the Government and others that the first duty of everyone was to practice the utmost economy in everything. He thought it was the duty of the Government to prac- tice what it preached, and prevent the great waste that had been and was going on in the camps. I FARMERS HAD DONE WELL. -No one-would deny that on the whole the farmer had done well in consequence of the war prices of all kinds of produce had risen- in some cases over 50 per cent. On the other hand, of course, there had been some draw- backs and much inconvenience owing to the shortage of horses and high prices of feeding stuffs, but there was no doubt that on the whole farmers had benefited largely by the war. It behoved them to do all in their power to further the great national cause, and that brought him to the question: What could they do that they had not already done ? The Government had appealed to farmers to lay down larger areas for wheat, and a con- siderably larger area had been planted, and fortunately wheat was the best crop of the I season, so farmers had been repaid for their patriotism. On the whole, however, he heard that the general returns of crops of all kinds would show a considerable deficit this year. It was most unfortunate that just at a time when they wanted a fat year, they had to put up with a lean one. WHEAT PRICES. Dealing with the national aspect of the I farmers' position, he said while he wanted to see fair remunerative prices paid for produce, he did not want to seextravagant prices; they were no good to anyone. Wheat prices had fluctuated between 35s. a year ago to 65s. six weeks ago. It was now about 50s., and he hoped it would get no higher. But notwithstanding the present high prices of wheat the country had a great deal to congratulate itself upon, for whereas to-day wheat stood at 50s. and 52s. 6d. per quarter, a hundred years ago—the period of Waterloo—and also during the Crimean War it ranged from 65s. to 126s. The Govern- ment and the country looked to the farming community to get the utmost produce pos- sible out of the land, but the question was, what could they do? Wheat was sure to maintain its present high price, if not go higher, for a considerable time. They should continue to produce as much as possible in preference to any other cereal. Wheat could be grown successfully year after year on the same ground. POTATO GROWING. In many parts, and particularly in Glamorgan. potato growing could and should be more extensively pursued than at present, and if the crisis "came to the pinch" woman labour could be largely utilised if men became scarce. Hay would prove very light this year, but there should be excellent second crops, which might with advantage be converted into silage. Referring to meat and live stock, Mr. Stratton enjoined farmers not to put their stock on the market in an immature condition, for there was every indi- cation that good prices would be maintained for some time to come, and the meat-consum- ing areas were increasing. The Government had taken a wise, though drastic, step in the direction of maintaining full stocks of cattle and sheep by prohibiting the killing of young calves and in-calf cows. He advocated a further step in this direction by prohibiting also the slaughter of ewe lambs. The indi- vidual interest of the farmer in the present grave and threatening crisis must be subser- vient to the national well-being. Farmers should lay themselves out to pro- vide as much beef and mutton as possible. Although the prices of feeding tuffs were high, the farmer was getting a better return than formerly, for, supposing a beast put on 10lbs. per week and sold at lOd. a lb., 10lbs. at lOd. was 8s. 4d. To get that, cake cost- ing 3s. per week was consumed, so there was a balance to the good of 5s. 4d. Before the war beef was selling at 7d. Ten pounds at 7d. was 5s. lOd., and cake cost 2s. 3d., leav- ing a balance of 3s. 7d. There was therefore a balance of Is. 9d. per week in favour of the higher prices.. I THE LABOUR PROBLEM. There was no doubt that the labour ques- tion was sure to be a serious one until the war was over, and he hoped a more rational system of recruiting would be adopted, whereby young unmarried men would be called up in preference to married men with families. Mr. Stratton urged that greater attention should be paid to poultry-keeping by all classes of the community in the national Mr. Emlyn James, B.A., B.D. interest. Horsebreeding, too, must be a very profitable business in the future. There was no doubt that stock of all kinds was insuffi- cient. He commended to the attention of farmers the offer of the War Office to place soldiers—experienced men-at their disposal for the in-gathering of the harvest. The price paid by the Government for hay, he agreed, was a subject of much interest, but they should pay a good, fair price for it. The State had a right to demand all their goods— and their lives as well—but, he maintained, at a just and reasonable remuneration. On the other hand they should not be asked to pay an extortionate price, for it must be re- membered that it was the Army that had created the demand for hay. GOVERNMENT CRITICISED. I In the discussion which followed, Mr. Edmund D. Lewis, St. Mary Hill Court, hoped the farmers would discourage the harvesting of second crops—they should be kept for the stock. He did not believe in the farmers being expected to do all the sacrific- ing. Why should the produce of the farms be commandeered when the goods of other tradesmen were not? (Cheers.) Referring to hay-buying by the Government, for in- stance, Mr. Lewis said the Government had paralysed the hay market. They should pay for this commodity, so essential to the Army, he admitted, the same price as the ordinary buyer was prepared to pay. (Cheers.) In- stead, the Government, through the produce buyers, had taken the hay from the farms in a high-handed manner, and the hay market had, therefore, become entirely disorganised. The Government, in his opinion, was unfair, unbusinesslike, and unwise in its methods, and although hay had been bought for Army purposes for several months, it had not yet been paid for. Such methods were unfair, and a hardship upon the farmers. (Cheers.) Mr. Edward Akers, Pentrebane, said while the farmer was doing his best to assist the Government loyally, the Government should in return limit the exportation of foodstuffs. Mr. Rees Thomas, Boverton Court, did not think the Government had the interests of the farmer at heart. He was very dissatis- fied with the action of the Government through its buyers in buying hay at a certain price and then going to a neighbouring farmer and agreeing to pay 10s. per ton more for the same article. It was wrong, it was unjust, and the farmers should rise in pro- test. Mr Noah Morgan. Penybryn, also protested against the threats of the Government to commandeer the farmer's produce. There should be fairness all round. A ROTTEN SYSTEM." Mr. Daniel Jenkins, Ruthin, described the Labour Exchange system as rotten and not playing the game. Female labour had been offered to him by the Labour Exchange, and he found that the same labour was offered to a number of others farmers at the same time. Such a system, he said, was bad. Methods of compulsion had alao been adopted on be- half of the Government to induce their faipn labourers to join the colours, whereas the men of other national industries were protected. Mr. John Owen, the Commissioner for Wales for the Board of Agriculture, gave to the meeting some practical advice. He exhorted the farmers to identify themselves with the produce committees in every county, and thus secure fair and reasonable prices. The farmers themselves were indif- ferent to the offer of the War Office to pro- vide labour from amongst the soldiers to as- sist at the harvest. Co-operation amongst the farmers to acquire labour-saving machi- nery would tend materially to assist the agricultural industry. Mr. David J. Jenkins, Flemingstone Court, moved, and Mr. George Thomas seconded, a vote of thanks to Mr. R. Stratton for his ex- cellent address, which was accorded with en- thusiasm. NO FAT STOCK SHOW. I On the recommendation of the committee, it was decided that no fat stock show be held this year, and a grant of £ 10 was made to the British Farmers' Red Cross Society.

GARW PANSY DAY I

GARW "PANSY DAY." I OVER 935 REALISED. On Saturday last the St. John Ambulance nurses, assisted by friends, sold throughout the valley artificial pansies, which were made by crippled children. The proceeds were in aid of the British and Foreign Sailors' So- ciety. The ladies are to be highly congratu- lated upon the amount realised, as the pansies were in Id. and 2d. sprays. The following ladies were responsiblef or the sales: Misses Hilda Hawkins, May Mercer, and Cora Rees, Pontyrhyl; Misses Anita Jones, C. Davies, Rose Jones, and Leah Jones, Bl-iengarw, Mesdames William Evans. Ben Thomas, David Thomas, Frank Price, John Hills, Wm. Maddoek, John Thomas, Ruth Griffiths, Ben Lewis, and M. J. Stones; Misses Hilda Phil- lips. C. Howells, Gwen Hills, Edith Hum- phries. May Hill. Rose Walters. Ket. Wil- liams. Sybil Bale, Florence Bowen, Francis Evans, Ceridwen Hughes, Rose and May Bowen, Millicent Jones, Olwen Rogers, Gwladys James, Hetty, Maisy and Violet A r- derson, Ceinwen Elias, Lucy Hepworth, anu Gwladys Woodcock. Miss Ket. Williams (sec- retary) is to be highly complimented upon her work of organisation.

AN ABERKENFIG BD

AN ABERKENFIG B.D. ACCEPTS PASTORATE AT LIVERPOOL. Mr. Emlyn James, B.A., who has now taken the degree of B.D. at the Aberystwyth Calvinistic Methodist Theological College, is a native of Aberkenfig, an d the eldest son of I the late Mr. William James, of Rhyd, and Mrs. James. In early life he was a grocer's assistant, and also an athlete of no mean re- pute, having won many prizes on the cycle track. He was an ardent eisteddfodwr and a champion reciter. Offering himself to the Calvinistic Methodist Church, he passed all the examinations and entered the South Wales and Monmouthshire University College. While there he was elected president of the Students' Union, and in that capacity atten- ded the investiture of the Prince of Wales at Carnarvon. As a preacher he has great powers. Both great-grandfathers were preachers-the Rev. H. Jenkins, Paran, Blackmill, and the Rev. W. James, Neath. Mr. James has accepted a call to a pastorate at Liscard, near Liverpool.

PONTYCYMMER SERGEANT AWARDED DCM 9

PONTYCYMMER SERGEANT AWARDED D.C.M. 9 FOR BRAVERY IN THE FIELD. An Garwites will be proud to learn that Sergt. James Murphy 821, 4th Middlesex Regiment, has been awarded the Distin- guished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gal- lantry on February 26th, 1915 when he crossed an open space of 50 yar within 150 yards of the enemy, who were firing heavily, in order to re-establish order in a trench, the garrison of which had been thrown into con- fusion by the enemy's bombs. Sergt. Murphy, after re-establishing order, returned across the open space and reported to his officer. He joined the Army when a boy and served right through the South African War, and from the last engagement he was in- valided home, and finished with the colours a few years ago. Sergt. Murphy worked as a collier at the Ffaldau Colliery for eleven years, and lived at 80 Victoria Street, Pontycymmer. In August, 1914, Sergt. Murphy volunteered, and soon afterwards left for France, and was wounded in the thigh at Ypres. After being home for one month, he returned to France on the 31st May. The D.C.M. was recommended during his first experience in the firing line. His wife, Mrs. Mary Murphy, and his five little children, are de- lighted with the news, and hope he will be spared to return home safely. SERGT. MURPHY'S LETTER. I We have received the following letter from Sergt. Murphy, whose address is: No. 821 Sergt. James Vincent Murphy, B Company, 3rd Batt. Middlesex Regiment, 85th Brigade, 28th Division, British Expeditionary Force, France:— Sir,—Will you kindly allow me a small space in your valuable paper to thank the ladies of the Garw who rode in the same com- partment as my wife and myself the day I left Pontycymmer for France, May 11th, for their kindness to me, which I appreciate very much. 1 could not express my thanks in words that day, but hope to do so with your help. It is ladies like these that we out here in the trenches are proud of, and when we think of their kindness towards us, we are ready to sacrifice our lives sooner than let a dirty Tyke of a Hun put his foot on Eng- lish soil.—P.S.—I am the only one from the Garw in this battalion.

I BRIDGEND CINEMA

I BRIDGEND CINEMA. The picture programme produced at the Bridgend Cinema this week has been c, --i L, which has drawn good houses jack nigiit. During the former part of the week, the great picture, The Word's Desire," has been Des i re 'a screened. The story, though a sad one, is one of human experience. Charles Chaplin, as bright and as ridiculous as ever, caused roars of laughter. There was also a fine war picture. during the latter part of the week the film, "In the hands of the jury" is being screened. This is a picture of high dramatic value. Comedy, in which Charles Chaplin appears, is also shown. Next week two pictures of exceptional in- terest have been obtained. On Monday, Tues- day, and Wednesday the picture, "Under- neath the Paint" is to be shown. This is a realistic drama of life behind the scenes. This film is full of excitement. During the latter part of the week, Maurice Costello is to be screened in The Evil Men Do." This is a great picture of a man's duplicity, showing how a man. carried on the wings of a peculiar fate, passes through agonising circumstances, and yet, in the end, gets landed in the realm of sunshine and-happiness. Charles Chaplin, the picture-lovers comedian, is also to be screened.

I BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE

BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE. Vurmg the past week the management of thf Picture Palace has been screening some excellent dramas to good audiences. Charles Chaplin, the ever popular film comedian, has ppeared in really funny pictures. Pic- tures dealing with the present war have also been shown, and those of travel have been really interesting.

I FELL DEAD AT OGMORE I

FELL DEAD AT OGMORE. I TRAGIC OCCURRENCE IN HOTEL. I Mr. S. H. Stockwood (coroner) held an in- quest at the Ogmore Vale Police Station on Friday last on the body of Thomas Griffith Jones, aged 36, an assistant timberman, who fell dead in the Blandy Arms on Wednesday. John Tucker, a smith, of Hendre Avenue, identified the body as that of his brother-in- law, who had been living with him. The deceased had been ill#or the past three weeks or a month suffering from influenza. He,last saw him alive on Sunday night, but he heard him come into the house on Monday and Tuesday nights. He had been attended by Dr. Gifford. Oscar Thomas, of Walters Road, said on Wednesday he was in the Blandy Arms, and between 10 and 11 o'clock the deceased came in and stood there for a bit. He had two glasses of stone ginger, but lie didn't, see him eat anything. He seemed all right and cheerful and well. After he had been there about half an hour, he had a second drink, and then he-saw' him sitting by the table. He then said he was going out, but he fell on to his back without any warning—he was dead. Thomas Robertson, haulier, Wyndham St., gave corroborative evidence, but added that the deceased had stone gingers and gin. He groaned after he fell, but not after the doctor came in. Dr. John Gifford said he was called to the Blandy Arms about 12.40 on Wednesday, and saw the deceased. He had been attend- ing the deceased before. He had warned the deceased 18 months before that he might drop dead if he was not careful. He told him to take things quietly. From his home to the Blandy Arms w&s quite a mile and a half. That, and what he had to drink, was, in his opinion, the cause of death. He suf- fered from valvular cardiac of the heart. With care he might have lived for years. A verdict of "Death from valvular disease of the heart," was returned.

NANTYMOEL DEACONS DEATH I

NANTYMOEL DEACON'S DEATH. THE LATE MR. H. B. DAVIES. We regret to record the death of Mr. H. B. Davies, draper, Commercial Street, Nan- tymoel, which event took place last Sunday evening. Deceased had been ailing for some time. He made a great effort to recruit his strength, but all seemed to be of no vail. He had resided in this neighbourhood for 33 years, and was highly esteemed by all his ac- quaintances. He identified himself with the Congregational Church at Bethel, which was under the care of the late Mr. J. A. Roberts. He was ardent in his zeal for Sunday School work. and always had ft class under his charge. In course of time the Church ex- pressed its appreciation of his sterling worth by electing him to be a deacon of the church. In this capacity he was entrusted with the secretaryship of the church, and performed this work with exceptional fidelity for over 21 years. Always present in the business meeting of the Church, he did all from a sense of duty, and identified himself with everything that made for the welfare of the cause. His usefulness in the neighbourhood was evident. He was the treasurer of the Foreign and Bible Society, and he held the office of treasurer of the Nantymoel Free Church Council more than once. The sin- cere sympathy of all goes forth to the widow and the three sons in their sad bereavement.

I LLANTWIT MAJORI

LLANTWIT MAJOR FUNERAL OF MR. DAVID GOULD.— The funeral of Mr. David Gould, whose tragic death was reported last week, took place at Vaynor Parish Church on Thursday. Mr. Gould was married to an inhabitant of the Vale. The Rev. Rees David, Rector of Vay- nor, officiated. The funeral being a public one, was one ot the largest seen at Vaynor for some years. The principal mourners were :— Mrs. Gold (widow); Mr. and Mrs. John Gould (parents); Mr. John Gould (brother); Mr. and Mrs. Stead (brother-in-law and sister); the Rev. and Mrs. Wm. -Taincs 'brother-in-law and sister); Nurse Gould (61, :r); Mr. Oliver Morgan, R.A.M.C., and Mrs. Morgan, Llan- maes (brother and sister-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Harding, Pengam (brother and sister-in- law); Mrs. Mary Grant, Aber (sister); Mr. Hughes, Coity; Mr. Jenkins, Coity; Mr. Thomas, Coity; Mr. Wm. David, Bridgend; and Mr. Wm. Watkins and Mrs. Watkins, Og- more Vale. 7th WELSH FAREWELL.—On the 8th inst. the officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of the 7th Welsh (Cyclist) Battalion invited the inhabitants of the district to a farewell entertainment at The Hayes Rooms, kindly lent by Mr. Price, before their depar- ture to go under canvass. The officers and men of the D Company, like the men of A and C Companies, who were previously bil- leted in the town and villages, had become very popular. An enjoyable whist drive, followed by dancing, gave a most enjoyable evening's pleasure to both the men of the company and the visitors. Prizes were given to the winners in the whist drive by Mr. T. H. Thomas and other gentlemen. Before breaking up the meeting Captain Lancaster and Lieut. Phillips returned thanks to the people or Llantwit and district for their great kindness to the 7th Welsh during their long stay in the Vale, where everyone had contri- buted to make their soldiering a pleasure as well as a duty.

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS. (By VELOX.) J i- .i..A- ..i. i The departure of the C Squadron of the Glamorgan Yeomanry from Cowbridge on Sat- urday last will not be quickly forgotten. The occasion is not one for banter or levity. Many thoughts crowded our Tililit when we said "Good bve," and in our hearts we felt more sorrow than mirth. It was because we had learned to respect and love the "boys" to whom we were compelled to say "Good bye." We shall follow them in the fortunes of war with an earnest solicitude for their welfare. On the morning of their departure the station platform was crowded with represent- atives of all classes. The send-off was not boisterous but it was sincere. The work of entraining was done in soldierlike manner, and considering the number of horses trained, in remarkably quick time. For a time Cow- bridge will miss the tramp of the soldier, but not for long.

ICAERAU

I CAERAU. Winning Numbers of Prize Drawing for David Rees, Caeral1 :-246; 540; 1070; 704; 1438; 1510; 459; 1578; 163: 389; 1544; 1574; 688.- All jirizes to be claimed in 14 days.

I MAESTEG SOLDIER WOUNDED

I MAESTEG SOLDIER WOUNDED. Private A. J. Jackson, 1st Welsh, who re- sides at 20 Office Road, Maesteg, enlisted on the 12th of August, and on January 11th was I drafted to France. He was wounded in both legs in March and returned home. He is now progressing favourably.

PENCOED I

PENCOED. I BUTTER-MA KING EX AMINATION. —On Friday the butter-making class, conducted .at the Public Hall concluded an examination of the pupils. The class, which was organised by the Glamorgan County Council, had met at the Public Hall for three weeks. The in- structress was Miss Williams, St. Athans. The result of the examination conducted by Mrs. Williams, St. Mellons, was that each candidate passed. The prize-winners were:—1st pr'ze. Miss Elsie Wilkins, Velindre; 2nd prize, Miss Hautippe Plummer, Brvnewttyn Farm 3rd prize, divided between Miss Etta Hopkins, Llanliarran, and Miss Llewellyn, Rhewceiliog 4th prize, Miss Jones, Pantrulthin Fawr Farm. SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY.—The Sunday School anniversary of Trinity English Calvinistic Methodist Church was held on Sunday and on Monday evening. Mr. Wal- ton, B.Se., officiated at the three services on Sunday. There was general appreciation of Mr. Walton's ministry. Special hymns were rendered by the choir under the leadership of Mr. Tom Jones. At the afternoon, service solos were sung by Miss Ruck and Mr. Cole. At the evening service the soloists were Miss P, uck I and Mi.ss Olwen Pearce. The accom- pa.nists were Miss Wilmot and Miss Watkins, Llanharry. On Monday evening the choir gave a rendering of a service of song, entitled "Robert Raikes and the Sunday School." Owing to the indisposition of the conductor, Mr. Tom Jones, the Secrtary of the Sunday School, Mr. R. Roberts, had to step into the breach. Under the circumstances the work of the choir and temporary conductor was really praiseworthy. Solos were rendered by Miss Gertrude WTilliams, Miss Lena Wilkins and Mr. David Jenkins. The connective read- ings were excellently given by Miss Lily Salathi,el. Miss Wilmot acted as accompanist. The vote of thanks to those taking part was spoken to by the Rev. D. W. Howell. Mr. W. H. Pickering and Mr. D. L. Jenkins, Bridg- end. The vote of thanks to the Chairman was moved by Mr. W. H. Pickering and secon- ded by Mr. C. Hale.

GAMBLING POLICIES I

"GAMBLING POLICIES." I COUNSEL'S QUESTION IN MAESTEG I ACTION. In the Civil Court, at Glamorgan Assizes at Swansea on Wednesday, before Mr. Justice Scrutton and a common jury, the case of Hughes v. the Liverpool Victoria Legal Friendly Society, in which Mrs. Hughes, the wife of the licensee of the Railway Inn, Maes- teg, sued for the return of R52 13s. 6d. pre- miums paid on five policies on the lives of three other persons, on the ground that the payments were obtained by fraudulent repre- sentation was continued. Mr. Trevor Hunter and Mr. Ronfeldt were for the plaintiff, and Mr. Artemus Jones and Mr. Stanley Evans for the defendant company. John Lloyd, for- merly Superintendent of the Society, and Win. Evans, a present agent, were joined as de- fendants, but they entered no appearance. William Evans, the agent (continuing his evidence for the defence) produced the pre- mium collecting books, a.nd the Judge asked where the names of policy holders appeared. His Lordship examined the books, etc., and then observed that it seemed to him a most extraordinary business—he did not think it had anything to do with the legal merits of the case—but he could not tell from the pre- mium book and policy who would get the money, except apparently the person whose name was mentioned would not get it. Mr. Artemus Jones explained that the rules covered insurable interest. In cross-examination, the witness who said he was acting under the instructions of his superintendent, Mr. Lloyd, told Mr. Trevor Hunter that he did not approve of the tran- saction with the plaintiff as it was an improper one. What was iit that you discovered?—Well the hawking of policies. If Does your society pay on these gambling policies?—Not to my knowledge. Morgan Williams, the new superintendent of the society for the Maesteg district, deposed to conversations with the plaintiff when he told her that she had no insurable interest under the policies. She replied, "If Mr. Lloyd was on, everything would be all right now." The Judge put a number of questions to the Jury as to whether the insurance was effected by Mr. or Mrs. Hughes, and whether the effecting or transference of the policies was in- duced by any fraudulent representation, and, if so, what was the representation and who made it. The Jury retired and were out an hour and a half. On returning into Court they found that the transference of the policies was effected with Mrs. Hughes, and that fraudulent rep- resentation was made by Lloyd, the superin- tendent, and Evans, the agent. The Judge decided to hear arguments on the law as affected by the findings in London before the long vacation.

I CAERAU WOMAN CHARGED

CAERAU WOMAN CHARGED At Glamorgan Assizes at Swansea on Wed- nesday, Elizabeth Pitchford (40), married woman. Caerau, was indicted for having stolen £ 110 in gold from a box belonging to Elizabeth Roberts at Caerau on May 27th. Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr. Srtape) prosecuted, and Mr. Lincoln Reed (in- structedb y Alderman E. E. Davies) defended. The case for the prosecution was that while prosecutrix was away on holiday a big box at her home containing the money was broken open, and the money taken. William Roberts, haulier, son of the prose- cutrix, said he found the box broken open be- fore his mother's return, and he told the police. Cross-examined: Witness lost about a shift a week; he denied losing 115 days out of 313, and also denied being idle and drunken. He said he had been eighteen years at the same colliry. The case was adjourned till ThursdH v. I

MAESTEG

MAESTEG. LLAN PICNIC.—The annual outing in con- nection with the Llangynwyd Parish Church took place on Wednesday in the historic sur- roundings of Castle Farm. A large company of visitors assembled, and an enjoyable time was spent. The,tea tables were presided over by a number of lady workers. In addition to the usual programme of games and races, swinging and various other side shows were provided and added much to the pleasure of the outing. Credit is due to those who worked so arduously toward the success of the occa- sion. DEATH.—We regret to record the death of Mrs. Wi.i. ms, wife of Mr. Richard Wil- liams, of Gree ':eld Street, which took place at her residence after a short illness, at the early age of 38 years. The funeral, which was largely attended, took place on Saturday, the interment being at the Maesteg Ceme- tery. The deceased was a faithful member of the Salvation Army corps. The officials of the Army conducted a short service at the house and at the graveside. The deceased leaves a widower and seven children to mourn their loss, and much sympathy is felt for them in their sad bereavement.

NANTYMOEL

NANTYMOEL. WAR HELP.—On Friday evening last, Messrs. Studt and Sons generously consented to give the proceeds of their revolving motor- cars for the benefit of the Nantymoel Soldiers' and Sailors' Fund and Ladies' Sewing Class. The opportunity was well made us of, as we understand that the takings were over L10. BETHEL CHILDREN'S SERVICE.—A children's service was held at Bethel on Sun- day evening, when the following contributed to the programme:—Sophia Thomas, Beatrice Morris, Annie Mary Williams, Mona Thomas, Ruth Edwards, Gwyneth Griffiths, May Evans, Catherine Williams, Muriel James, Maggie Rose Jones, Elfyn Thomas, Dillwyn Thomas, Howard Morris, and Reynold Gar- nett; Ruth Evans, Olwen Thomas, Gwyneth Davies, Katie George, Mona Evans, Gwladys Williams, and Catherine Ann Williams. A dialogue was given by Misses Gwennie and Vyrnwy Williams; a solo and chorus was ren- dered by Gwladys Williams and party, and the children also sang choruses (under the able conductorship of Mr. Robert Williams). j Mr. H. Pugh acted as accompanist. Much praise is due to Miss Euronwy Davies for her valuable assistance in preparing the children. Miss Davies is on the point of leaving Nanty- moel, where she has been eminently useful. Rev. R. T. Gregory (pastor) presided over the meeting. HOPE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVER- SARY.—On Sunday last, on the occasion of the Sunday School anniversary, the three services were of a varied character. Recita- tions and solos were given by the scholars. All acquitted themselves well, and the crowded congregations were quite interested throughout. On the following Monday, the scholars, over 240 in number, paraded the streets, headed by the Temperance Band, and afterwards all partook of a splendid tea; and the games, etc., on the mountain in the eve- ning were quite enjoyable. The doings of both days were quite a success. The two superintendents—Mr. Frank Baker (senior school) and Mr. W. Hobbs (junior school), and the teachers are to be congratulated upon the character of the anniversary. Rev. T. H. Jenkins (pastor) presided. The pro- gramme of the day included the following items:—A Scripture reading with appropri- ate comments, by Miss Smith, B.A.; recita- tions by the following:—Nellie Pope, Katie John, Doris Hughes, Maggie Edwards, Doris Pope, Cassie Isaac, Prudence Spanswick Vir- ginia May Baker, Reggie Price, May David, Lena Nation, Willie Lloyd, Gwen Daniels, Dorothy Bryant, Aneta Davies, May Spans- wick, Maggie Lloyd, Albert Baker, Elric Jen- kins, Marjory Peake, Beatrice Isaac, Daisy Jones, Dinah Isaac, Maggie Davies, Winnie Davies, Mabel Webber, Nellie Pope, Mary E. Keast, Willie Cranston, John Rees* Spans- wick. Gwennie Jones, Mary Cranston, Willie Hole, Katie Brown, May David, Arthur Delve, Gwladys Walters, and Miss Dilys Lloyd. Solos were also rendered by the fol- lowing :-Sydney Watson, Mary Cranston, John Edwards, Virginia May Baker, Aneta Davies, Dinah Isaac, Elvira Spanswick; and an octette was given both in the afternoon, and evening. To finish up, a solo was given by the oldest member of the school, who is in the neighbourhood of SDI,

OGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE. SMOKING CONCERT.—A farewell con- cert was held at the Non-Political Club on Tuesday in honour of the large number of Ogmore boys who will be leaving for the front on Saturday next. Quite a large number of these soldiers, who are in the Welsh Fusiliers or the Welsh Reiiment, arrived home unex- pectedly on Sunday night for their last fur- lough before proceeding to the front. They returned to camp at Salisbury on Wednesday. The Club was full, and the proceedings com- menced with an address by the chairman (Mr. Lewis Lewis), and the following very interest- ing programme was gone through :—Song, Mrs. George David; solos, Mr. William Wil- liams; solo, Mr. Evans; solo, Mr. George David solo, Mr. G. H. Morgan; party selec- tion by soldiers about to leave, Messrs. Thomas, Culliford, and Capel; solo, Mr. Thomas Thomas;. solos on tin whistle, Mr. E. Fisher and Mr. Jack Bryant; comic songs, Mr. Tom Thomas; ventriloquial sketch, Mr. Jack Bryant; entertainment by soldiers, Messrs. Thomas, Culliford, Capel, Morgan, Gibbs, Lewis, Rogers and Edge. The pro- ceedings terminated with addresses by the chairman, Mr. Macnamara, and Mr. J. Howe. Mr. George David gave The Veteran," and the National Anthems in Welsh and English. During the evening parcels of tobacco, cigar- ettes, and other gifts were distributed to the soldiers, with the best wishes of all present for their safe return.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. SUCCESS. Misses Margaret Ellen Gwytlier, of 34 King Edward Street, and Florence Irene Bright, of 20 Meadow Street, Pontycymmer, have both been successful in passing Part 1 of the scholarship examination for l Bridgend County School. They are pupils at the Ffaldau Girls' School, Ponty- cymmer. TRINTY.—The Sunday School anniversary in connection with Trinity Church, Blaen- garw, was held on Sunday. At the morning service the pastor preached a powerful ser- mon on The Bible and its place in life and religion." The afternoon and evening ser- vices were devoted to singing and recitations by the Sunday School scholars. They were presided over by the pastor, Rev. D. Davies, and Mr. Thomas Thomas (superintendent). The following took part :-Recitations, Doris Milton, Olwen Davies, Gladys Priddle, Mary Thomas. Mary Tudor, Olive Meredith, Cuara Goss, Gwladys Owen, and Samuel Lewis; dia- logue. Gwladys, Connie, and Eva Pj'iddle; pianoforte solo, Charlie Teague; solos, Edna Rces; trio, Mrs. Grey, Messrs. Dan Davies and LIew. Thomas. The choir rendered very effectively the anthems, Hark how He calls," and "Wake the Song." The evening service was presided over by Mr. Thos. Thomas. The following took part:—Recita- tions, Gwellian Davies, Edith Lewis, Eirwen Lloyd, Lilian Goss, M. Lewis, Bina BakeT, Sam. Lewis, Martha Moore, Gladys Priddle, Ceinwen Jones, Cassie Richards, Maggie Reos, Ethel Price, Irene Meredith, Connie Priddle, Gwladys Owen; pianoforte solo, Catherine Teague (winner at National Eis- teddfod) solo, Dolly Rees; quartette, Mrs. Grey. Miss Gertie Davies and Messrs. Dan Davies and Llew. Thomas; duet, Misses Gwladys Lloyd and Winnie Lewis; solo, Mr. John Phillips; solo, Mrs. Grey; duet, Mrs. Grey and Mr. Dan Davies. The choir gave a telling rendering of "0 be joyful," and "Only for Jesus," under the conductorship of Mr. A. Tudor. The services throughout the day were attended by crowded congregations. Mrs. Davies presided at the organ, and Miss Catherine Teague at the piano. Printed and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- j pany, Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offices, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- gan. [ FRIDAY, JULY 16th, 1915.