Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS! I Furniture for the Million! Rock Bot'om Prices. I* 81 For the Long Term of SLxty-Five Years has this weJl.n0wn firm carried on business, and during that period, have faithfully discharged all ilÔ I cbhgahons to their vast army of customers, with the result that to-cay they stand in the front rank of the Furnishirg Kingdom. I   I All goods are warranted, ai d are sold at the lowest possible prices consistent with good quality. Bevan & Company hold the largest selection in 'I I the Principality of everything required for furnishing throughout. Delivery free by road or rail up to 200 miles, and the train fares of cash S S| custome,s are paid. Terms—Cash or generous arrangements for Credit. IllustratEd Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. j Several useful Spring Vans and Carts on offer. Bargains I Must be sold to make room for Motor Vans. a PIANOFORTES and ORGANS. Splendid value and Ten Years Warranty 97, St. Mary; Street, and near Empire, Cardiff 280, Oxford Street and Arcade, Swansea Llanelly, &c.

Peeps at Porthcawl

» Peeps at Porthcawl i By MARINER. .». I feel like Topsy when she upset the ink, that "r have been and gone and done it." I oughc to feel duly chastened by Mr. Grace's dignified oratory. I have tried to.^ith some aiBoun; of success. I am told, the members of the Council came away from the Council Chamber looking as if they had thoroughly enjoyed a rhetorical treat. Knowing Mr. Grace as I do—the winner 'of seven election contests-I am sure he did not fail to rise to the occasion, and do hims-elf justice. In the Drinted report which I have received of the speech he made, it appears that he did. I I feel a little nervous, too, in face of his threats, but I have been brought up in the I school of adversity, and will allow nothing short of a threat to take my life to thoroughly frighten me. That, of course, would be something to think about. And even a tom- tit would have to put his thinking cap on if he knew that his life was in danger. I am told by those who study bird-life that the tom-tit is one of the most fascinating and one of the daintiest of British birds. If he means that I am fascinating and dainty, if he will excuse my blushes I will accept the soft im- peachment, if it will calm the troubled waters. But I am naturally modest—or I would lay claim to many achievements. The Com-tit, too. is said to possess not a little in- telligence and ventriloquial powers of no mean order. Ventriloquism does not appear to have anything to do with the matter under discussion, but I refer to it because I appear to have led Mr. Grace off the scent, for he does not seem to know who or where ")Iari- ner" is. He says he does, but that very as- sertion made it plain that he is'not sure. Of course, I can understand that the worthy Councillor—and I admire him very much- was seeking to find the lowest order of in- telligence in the universe. It is a pity he Selected the tom-tit, for there are surely other members of the feather tribe that could have been more justly named, while not a few in- sects could be resorted to in case of emer- gency. There are bigger things than a tom- tit that have less intelligence, but I am limited to space, and therefore forbare to name them. Sufficient to say that it is not always quantity that counts. He says I have not got the brains of a tom-tit. May I plead guilty, and in extenuation reply in the words of the poet: "Accuse not Nature; she hath done her best; Do thou but thine." But I am surprised that Mr. Grace should have forsaken his usual modesty and ac- claimed himself to be the saviour of Porth- cawl. Really I would not believe it if I had not seen it in print. But th-ere it is, and I accept his statement—without reserve; and I will not allow that little axiom: "Immodest words admit of no defence," to trouble my mind. It is not for me to place thorns in the path of one who lays claim to such a digni- fied position; rather would I strew his path with roses, as I have always done, until he said "Porthcawl is ruined." And then I got my back up, for I have got some little re- gard for our salubrious little health resort, and.I was writing with a full knowledge of the facts when I contended he was not correct. And they were the words I used. I did not and would not descend to the unparliamentary use of such an incorrect word as "liar." which he alleges the words used meant. A man can be incorrect without being a liar; he may make a statement "not in accordance with facts," but that does not justify any man calling him a liar. Therefore, Mr. Grace, no matter how far he allows his imagination to carry him, cannot, even with the greatest stretch, convert "not correct" into "liar." I would feel humbled if I used the word, for it is outside the bounds of newspaper etiquette. In the course of his "atck"—for attack he called it-upon my defenceless head, he al- luded to his election contests. We all agree he has represented Porthcawl for 20 years. ) think Mr. Grace told us that some time ago, and we accepted his statement. True. Mr. Deere, the now chairman of the Council. defeated him by forty votes at the last elec- tion, but neither point has anything to do with the question of the water supply to the town. [t is Mr. Grace's statement that "Porth- cawl is ruined" that I do not accept and will never accept while apartments cannot be ob- tained for love or money and furnished houses are all occupied. Mr. Grace repealed the statement at the meeting of the Council on Monday. He again asserted that Portheawl is ruined," but I notice lower down ip the report that he modified that all.? gationwhich even a tom-tit must admit is a seriously damaging one for any public -7 an to make regarding any town—and said, "Porth- cawl would have been ruined"—if the action of the Chairman and Surveyor had been per- sisted ia. That action was to give Porthcawl Rest, V-hich was crying out for water for its convalescent patients, a two hours' supply during a night or two. The latest phase in that question is that the Rest has 100 beds emptv, and has now announced that owing to the < hort?ge of water this advertisement to Pc .hcawl is to be shut up for a time, and the invalid poor are to be denied an oppor- tunity of recuperating by the sea at our fam- ous health resort. Because of this, it was asserted that "Porthcawl is ruined." With all the energy of a tom-tit" I protested, for had the statement been allowed to go out un- challenged, people outside Porthcawl might have believed that it was correct, and stayed away. And we cannot afford to let that hap- pen. It is upon the visitors to the town that the great majority of people in the town raly for a livelihood. We must therefore encour- age them here, not drive them away. Even after his eulogistic references to my unworthy; self, I must say that I'don't believe Mr. Grace really meant what he said, and I am more ready to think that what he did mean wlall what he said on Monday night—thtft "Porth- cawl would have been absolutely ruined." There is a tremendous difference. But there w can be two opinions about that, and if people disagree witn him. Mr. Grace should not get angry. There I leave the matter of the water supply and Mr. Grace's "attack" with these parting words: "When I'm not thanked at all I am thanked enough." ft • • There was some astonishment expressed as to how I obtained the information regarding the Council and the Surveyor. That is my business. I know it was annoying that the doings at a secret meeting of the Council- for all the members were pledged to secrecy- should have been made public. But why a secret meeting ? Why was the Council not ropen about it? Why -the secrecy about a matter so important ? Mr. Grace attempted to make out that I was doing the* surveyor an injury. I dismiss that allegation with- autl comment; it daes not deserve it. The surveyor has done too much good work for the town. His work speaks for itself, and I suggest it was because the Councillors under- stood the value of that wort and the favour- able light in which th- public regarded it that a secret meeting of the Council was held. It is time there was another cry for open meetings. Mr. Grace said "I don't know that a resolution was passed. I positively do not know that a resolution was passed, but I do knowhat Mr. R. E. Jones did not give a casting vote." Now it is somewhat con- fusing for a man with the experience of Mr. Grace to say that he does not know whether a resolution was passed or not. Why could he not say "a resolution was passed" or "no resolution was put." There would then be no appearance that an attempt was' being made to evade the issue. <* < The report is a full one but I fancy it could have been condensed somewhat. < w I notice that the Council has decided to expend money on the Gas Works by purchas- ing new retorts. Mr. Ferguson Bell, the gas expert, attended at the gasworks last week and is to suubmit. a report. It is to be hoped that the Council is not to be committed to any large expenditure so soon after taking over control of the works. The wonder is thao these things were not found out before the arbitration proceedings took place. We might have got the works a bit cheaper. Now it looks as if the works will cost us a pretty penny. < w w It is indeed good news that there are pros- pects that Porthcawl will have an adequate supply of water in a week or two's time. The news will be received with pleasure by everybody, for it has, I admit, been a trying time fcr all concerned, Council officials, rate- payers and visitors. The trouble will soon be over. As Mr. Dan Davies said the blunder was made in not connecting the eight-inch pipes with Craig-y-Aber. But the Council will be forgiven for its errors if it now sets to business and sees that once the water is avail- able an adequate supply is maintained. What we don't want is so many oratorical fireworks.

I PORTHCAWL REST WATER ISUPPLY

PORTHCAWL REST & WATER SUPPLY. — FACTS TO REMEMBER. I Below we publish a letter sent by the secre- tary of the Porthcawl "Rest" and addressed to each member of the Council, headed "Facts to remember," dealing with the question of the water supply :— I [Copy.] I I Croydon Villa, Porthcawl, I I- Sir,- loth August, 1915. I Sir,— REST" WATER SUPPLY. I FACTS TO REMEMBER. (1) Eight years inadequate supply. (2) Mains handed over upon promise of adequate supply (and rates paid). (3) No patient has had a fresh water bath since March last. (4) Patients (with staff) pumping, almost daily, for some months past from underground rain-water cistern. (5) No water from Council for over 11 days (to date). (6) Flushing closets and washing-up in scullery, etc., with salt water for over a week (to date). (7) Over 70 bects empty owing to shortage of water. 8) Threatened closing of "Rest"altogether on Monday next, the 16th instant, from same cause. 9) Promise of supply of water made on the 10th instant, not yet fulfilled. Do you realise your position? Yours faithfully, A. WILLIAMS, j Secretary, Porthcawl "Rest." I

TONDU AND ABEKENFIG

TONDU AND ABEKENFIG. TRINIT1 C.M. CHURCH.—At the Sunday School treat of the above church upwards of 200 children and adults sat down to tea, I which was provided in the vestry. The fol- lowing ladies had presided at the tables:— Mrs. Dd. Evans, Miss Katie Rees" Miss Elsie j Evans, Mrs. W. P. Jenkins, Mrs. T. Thomas, Miss C. Hart, Mrs.. Thos. Moles, Mrs. J. Moles. Miss E. Moles, Miss Richards, Mrs. J. Thomas, Mrs. W. J. Wheeler, Miss Anderson, Mrs. A. J. Evans, Mrs. P. Collins, Mrs. J. M. Evans, and Miss Hill. After tea a pleas- ant evening was spent in a field lent by Mr. J. Jones, where the children were given sweets and enjoyed races, etc. The older folk enjoyed a game of tug-of-war (women v. men). A presentation meeting was held in the chapel recently, when Mr. and Mrs. John Williams were the recipients of a handsome umbrella each and a purse of gold in recogni- tion of the long and valuable -services ren- dered the church. The following programme was gone through :—Solo, Miss Millie Smith recitation. Miss Gladys Grant; solo, Mr. W. P. Jenkins. The following gentlemen made eulogistic references to Mr. Williams:— Messrs. D. P. Thomas, George Evans, John Thomas, W. P. Jenkins, Ted Thoa, J. Smith, William Evans, and D. Evans. Mr. J. Williams has been treasurer of the church for 21 years. Th? Rev. J. R. Williams acted as chairman.

Mr Graces Remarkable Outburst

Mr. Grace's Remarkable Outburst. "GAZETTE" ATTACKED. I ANGRY KEPLY" TO CBITICISM. SAYS" MARINER" HAS THE BRAINS OF A TOM-TIT. A COUPLE OF THREXTS: IF CRITIC- ISM IS CONTINUED. TOWN MUST NOT BE DEFENDED. Porthcawl Council on Monday was treated to a remarkable attack on the "Gazette" by Mr. John Grace, when he angrily replied to criticisms levelled at him by ".Nlarin4er, for an assertion he made at the last meeting or the Council that "Porthcawl is ruined." In the course of his remarks he referred to Mariner" as a man with the brains of a tom-tit, he threatened "legal process," and went on to threaten that he would write to the proprietors of the "Gazette" to stop such criticism! After the ordinary business of the Council was over Mr. Grace asked the indulgence of the Council for a few moments to deal with a personal matter. He was very sorry to do so, for he did not think this was a time- an important' time for Porthcawl—for wilful, wicked statements to be made against a public man. I AMUSING THREATS. He continued: I have been attacked in the Glamorgan Gazette" for the last two weeks and I have been advised by many friends in "his town—responsible ratepayers—to bring them to book by legal process. I don't be- lieve in the law. I have been trying to serve the town for the last twenty years, and I have never objected to fair and honest criti- cism of any action of mine, but I do object to the wilful statements published under a column by "Mariner." I much regret that the proprietors of such a paper should allow such piffle against a public man to appear. I will communicate with them. What I ob- ject to is the reference to the statement that Porthcawl is ruined." I did make that statement, and I repeat it to-night. At the time I made that statement there were 30 or 40 people leaving the town in consequence of there being no water in the town. I was waited upon by some people, who told me that unless something was done in 24 hours they would have to close their establishment, I repeat it that the town would have been absolutely ruined if the action of the Chair- man and the action of the Surveyor had been persisted in. I know who the man is. He has got brains like a tom-tit. The Chairman: You had better name the man; why don't you name him instead of making attacks on somebody you say you know. Mr. Grace: I am attacking the paper. He must be well known, because he states that in consequence of his statements in the "Gazette" many people have waited upon him. I say that they have not waited upon him, because the people have been coming to my office and thanking me for having SAVED THE TOWN. I I take the credit that if my resolution had I been carried out from the time I moved it, j without any interference by the Chairman or the Surveyor, the town would have been all right. We have never had an explana- tion of-t-he loss of 30,000 gallons of water. An action was taken without coming to this table and reporting on the results of my week's trial. What happened? An alteration took place, and 30,000 gallons of water disap- peared, and the pressure was lost in the town. Although this person gets inside know- ledge of private meetings, not a word has got in the paper about that. The whole credit for saving the town rests upon me. I AM ITS SAVIOUR. If the resolution of the Chairman had been carried out we should not have hn.l a soul here. On the Saturday morning the town was without water. Our resolution had been ignored without any instructions, and because of this, to cover up the advocacy of this paper that from April last to the advent of the new members we should see. many things done, I am attacked. It is patent: it is repeated, and is doing me a considerable amount of in- jury. I am employed by one of the largest corporations in this country, and it is not a very pleasant thing for it to be marked and sent to my employers to say that I am a liar. I take. this opportunity to publicly protest against the "Gazette" publishing these two Articles. I am surprised and disgusted that the proprietors should allow the thing to be done. I should think that this "tom-tit" who has been here twenty-five minutes set himself up to tell members who have shaped t.' town for the last twenty odd years their duty. He had better not do it again. If I start fighting, I shall fight to the bitter end. HOW DID HE GET HOLD OF IT? I In this column, too, the following appears I I have had suspicions for a long time that an attempt was going to be made to get rid of the surveyor, and I was not far out. On Thursday night a resolution was moved that the surveyor be asked to reconsider his posi- tion under the Council, but fortunately the proposal was defeated, thanks to Mr. R. E. Jones, who refused to take the responsi- bility of such drastic and uncalled-for action by giving a casting vote in favour of the resolution. This is something the public knew nothing about. Whatever took place at this meeting with reference to officers was a private meet- ing. There was not a single official present. The surveyor was not present and whatever took place has never escaped my lips to. a liv- ing soul. I would not do so for the sake of the officer. This information has been given by somebody and it has been given out of this room. That is what I object to, this inside knowledge being conveyed outside. But it has not been given correctly. I don't know I that there was a resolution passed. I posi- tively do not know that a resolution was passed, but I do know that Mr. R. E. Jones j did not give a casting vote. This is a very | serious thing for Mr. Oborn and it is a very serious position for an officer. We might have been having the legal cierk over the coals. If we cannot have private meetings and be loyal to each other let the man who can't hold himself get up and tell us and I I will walk home. It is a strange thing why we can't discuss a matter without someone I should give it to the Press. NO ONE KNOWS. I lr. R. E. Jones: 1 must say that Mr. Grace is quite right about the paragraph. I did not. The question did noT take the direction thlt is indicated by the paragraph. How on earth a garbled version of it got in the papers I can't understand. We were under secrecy; we were doing it in the best interests of the town and as we thought in the best way because we did not approve* of certain things that were done and we wanted to discuss it without doing inj ury to anybody. We were all pledged to secrecy—not that it was anything. The para- graph is quite inaccurate. Mr. D. Davies: It is a great disadvantage to a public man to stand around this table if we can't deal with some questions without it getting outside. I am very sorry that it has got outside because I am certain that every- one of us pledged ourselves. The Chairman: I am clear on this journey; I have been accused before this, but I was away on my holidays on this occasion. Mr. T. James: I was here and left the mat- ter here. Rev. A. J. Arthur: Within twenty-four hours after the meeting which I attended I heard outside what had taken place. i THE CHAIRMAN REPLIES. I The Chairman: I think Mr. Grace should be more courteous while a member of this Coun- cil is away on holidays than to attack him in his absence. I think you will agree that what I have done I have done for the best. Mr. Oborn came to me as chairman of the Council to ask what he should do with regard to the Rest owing to the complaints regarding lack of water. The only way out of the difficulty was to give them a drop of water overnight. No one will agree with Mr. Grace that two hours' supply to the Rest was going to ruin the town. No one believes that what has taken place for ihe last two months has made us short of water? It was not a single week, but we have been short during the last two months. I don't believe any rate- payer in the -parish will take Mr. Grace seriously when he claims that the giving of two hours supply of water to the Rest would damage the town. I don't want to quarrel with Mr. Grace, but I do say this that it is about time that the members of this Council tried to put their heads together in the best interests .of the town. I am candidly of the opinion that Mr. Grace tried to make me a sort of catspaw to cover up something else. WARMTH. I Mr. Grace: That is very ingenious of you, Mr. Chairman to say that I attacked you. What I said was this: That you had no right and I repeat it that you have no right to go and give the surveyor instructions on Satur- day morning about the water. I have noth- ing to cover up and I won't allow you to say so. I say that the surveyor was here on Fri- day night and slipped out of the room and early on Saturday morning you gave him in- structions to alter the source of supply. You are really responsible and you must take re- sponsibility. The Chairman: I take the responsibility,. but I will not have Mr. Grace to be my judge. The public are the best judges and I for one am prepared to take their opinion against yours. Mr. Grace: I have submitted myself to the ratepayers seven times and have received their approbation on each occasion. I have beaten you too and I will beat you, again. The Chairman: We will wait and see. Mr. R. E. Jones (to the Chairman): If you admit that you made a mistake that will finish the matter. The Chairman I am not satisfied that what I did was the cause of shortage. We only gave a couple of hours', supply, and that is' what we have done here before. If any official goes to a Chairman of the Council or Chairman of the Committee on any occasion of great im- portance upon which he wants to be guided, is a committee to be called each time and that committee to consist of one man as it did last Saturday ? In reply to Mr. D. Davies, the Chairman said he was not aware until Friday night that the wate,r was coming to the town other than from Tycoch, but regarding the conversation between Mr. Oborn and himself, he considered the best thing was to give the "Rest" a couple of hours' supply. Mr. R. E. Jones: Say you are sorry that you made a mistake. The Chairman: I will not. I am satisfied to leave it with the public, who aire compe- tent to judge and have judged Mr. Grace fairly the last few days. The matter then dropped. LETTER FROM IR. LIPSCOMB. I Regarding the "Rest," Mr. Lipscomb, agent to Miss Talbot, wrote calling attention to the serious position in which the Rest had been placed owing to the totally inadequate supply of water received from the Council. He understood that. the Council was taking steps to improve the supply, and in view of the very grave injury that would be done to a great dumber of convalescents of the work- ing class in the county if the Rest had to be I closed, he would be glad to hear from the Council what steps were being taken to im- prove the supply. He realised that the Council' was in a difficulty owing to the non- completion of the contract, and that no doubt1 the whole of the district was suffering from a shortage, but that shortage should be met by a restricted supply to all consumers, rather than by cutting off the supply through the main in any particular direction. Miss Tal- bot, as the Council was aware, had met the Council most reasonably, and he was sure she would expect that such an institution as the I Rest, which was maintained by contributions/ from all over the county, for the care of the sick, should not be allowed to suffer out of 1 proportion to the rest of the community. As an institution in the nature of a hospital, it should in fact', if anything, have preference. It was agreed to write informing Mr. Lips- comb that the letter was having attention. Mr. R. E. Jones: I think we ought to con- vey to Mr. Lipscomb information about what has been done. We are doing everything in our power to meet the circumstances. We ¡ shall be all right in another couple of weeks. ROSIER PROSPECTS. I Earlier in the meeting a letter was read from Messrs. John Taylor and Sons stating that the operations in connection with the water contract had been confined to laying the 8-inch-main between Craig-y-Aber and Aberbaiden.. Nearly 400 pipes had been laid on this Section. In view of the shortage of labour and the urgency of the matter, they had sent some of Messrs. Wilkinson's men up to the pipe track. This portion of the work should be completed in another week or ten days. Mr. R. E. Jones said he and Mr. fxrace had been along the route, and, discussing the matter with the clerk of the works, they learned from him that probably this week— Thursday or so—they would have secured a connection that would give them a supply of 20,000 to 30,000 gallons mere water, nnd in another week they would probably have an- other 20,000 to 30,000 gallons. They went right up to Craig-y-Aber and found it over- flowing. The Council should make it well- known to the public that they were not short of water. The other day they had nearly one million gallons. The difficulty was this: They had tried to get water from 5-in. pipes to 8-in. pipes, which would not convey it to the town. So long as they could keep from Ift. to 2ft. at Tycochathey would be all right. There was plenty of water, but the pipes could not carry it, They were getting on splendidly now, and there would be no trouble at all. A BLUNDER. The Chairman: I think we have made it pretty well known that as far as the source is concerned there is plenty of water. Mr. R. E. Jones: There is no question that next season we shall be able to supply a town four or five times the size of Porthcawl. Mr. D. Davies: The blunder we made was not to put the 8-in. pipe from Craig-y-Aber before. ..1,

IPORTHCAWL GAS SUPPLYI

PORTHCAWL GAS SUPPLY I COUNCIL TO PURCHASE NEW RETORTS. I INSPECTION OF WORKS BY EXPERT. I At the meeting of the Porthcawl Council on Monday, Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., presiding, the Council decided to incur expenditure in con- nection with the gas works, and it was re- ported that an expert, Mr. Ferguson Bell, had visited the works and inspected it and that a report would be submitted later. Mr. R. E. Jones first raised the matter and pointed out that there had been justifiable complaints about the gas. He thought it was as well for it to be known that the trouble had been with the retorts. They had had such a pressure of work and had made more gas than ever before in the history of the gas works. There was too a difficulty with regard to labour. He thought they were now over- coming it and having a better supply than they had had for a long time. He thought everything was now going on swimmingly. The Chairman: You say the retorts axe foul and until they are mended we shall have trouble ? ( Mr. R. E. Jones: Until we get new ones we shall have trouble there is no doubt about it. Tenders for retorts were considered in com- mittee. The Gas Committee minutes contained the following: Mr. R. E. Jones reported that in consequence of the unsatisfactory position with regard to the supply of gas he had wired Mr. Ferguson Bell to come to Porthcawl and see what could be done. Mr. R. E. Jones said the minute was not quite correct, but it did not matter. He did not ask Mr. Ferguson Bell to do all that was stated in the report. He sent a telegram to him asking him if he could come and examine the retorts and report. Thii next he heard was that Mr. Bell was on his way and he was not sorry for it was time that something was done. A further meeting of the Gas Committee was held on Saturday when Mr. Bell pointed out that a good deal was necessary to be done in the near future in order to bring the works up to the standard of capacity to deal with the demands likely to be made on it in the future. With regard to other matters it was decided that he should send in a written re- port immediately. Mr. R. E. Jones: I am very glad Mr. Fer- guson Bell came down because it removes the responsibility from our shoulders and from the shoulders of the manager of the works. He recommended us to go in for two sets of re- torts at once, and I propose that we wire or write for them immediately. They are abso- lutely necessary. COKE. J It was reported by the Gas Committee that I the manager was of opinion that the selling of coke at lid. per cwt. at the yard would re- I sult in fl. loss that should not, be incurred. It was agreed to recommend an all-round price of Is. per cwt. LIGHTING OF PUBLIC LAMPS. The committee further reported that. the gas manager had been asked to arrange for the lighting of alternate lamps except at street corners, which should be left alight for the safety of the public.,Agreed.. APPOINTMENT OF GAS COLLECTOR. I On the motion of Mr. J. Grace, the appli- cations for the post of gas collector were dealt with in committee. The consideration of tenders for the erection of gas office and show room was referred to the gas committee. I RE-ASSESSMENT OF PORTHCAWL. I A letter from the Local Government Board in reply to the Council's application regarding the proposed re-assessment of the parish was I produced by the Clerk and a question arose as to whether it should be read in public. Mr. T. James said there was not a lot in the letter, but if the Council knew all the circumstances they would agree that it would be better to withhold the letter from the pub- lic at present. Mr. R. E. Jones: It is bound to be made public eventually. The Chairman: I have no objection to it going to the public but to get over the diffi- culty we could read it and ask the Press not to make a note of it until the Council decides whether it should be made public. The letter was read and stated: I am de- sired by the Local Government Board to ad- vert to your letter of the 14th inst. relative to the new valuation and valuation lists or- dered by the Union Assessment Committee of the Bridgend and Cowbridge Union in the case of the parish of Newton Nottage. In reply I am desired to state that it does not appear to the Board that they are empowered to make any order such as is desired by the Urban District Council or to give any directions in the matter. They have, however, sent a copy of the letter to the Assessment Committee. NO ELECTIONS. I A circular letter was read from the Local Government Board stating that there would be no elections this year and the term of office of existing couneillors and guardians would be extended by one year. The Clerk read a letter' from the Road Board asking the Council if they had any men or plant available for the purpose of road making for military purposes. It was decided to reply that the Council had no plant available. PIG KEEPING. I The Clerk read a letter from Mr. Comley with reference to the alleged nuisance caused by pigs kept by him concerning which notice had been served. He stated that the styes were 65 feet from the nearest dwelling-house, and during nearly twenty years the question had never been raised. It was known to the older' members of the Council that no nuis- ance had existed previously, but owing to the shortage of labour some difficulty had been experienced of late. Mr. Grace: That is a very satisfactory reply ,to the letter we sent. We asked him if he would oblige us by removing the pigs owing to the proximity of the new station to where the pigs are kept. The Chairman: I don't think that is the true position. We served a notice upon him. The Surveyor said since the notice was served the pigs had been removed, but the styes stil'l existed. In reply to Mr. D. Davies, the Surveyor said they wer$out of the limit under the bye-laws which required a distance of 60ft. to be between the styes and the nearest dwell- ing house. The Cleric: But it comes under the Public Health Act as a nuisance. Mr. T. James moved that a fortnight's grace be allowed Mr. Comley to remove the pigs. The Chairman: I think it is a nuisance that should be abated. The resolution wa.s carried. SEATS FOR. THE COMMON. I The Works Committee recommended that the tender of Mr. W. C. Sampson for six seats for the common be accepted at 9s. lid. per seat, and the cost defrayed out of the Camps Committee Fund.—Agreed. SURVEYOR'S CORRESPONDENCE. I Another recommendation of the Works Com- mittee was that all correspondence sent to the Surveyor should be submitted to the whole Council or one of the committees for instructions as to how the matter should be dealt with.—Agreed.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. Russia's Work. I Mr. Hilaire Belloc, in "Land and Water, writes:—"It is not going forward, it is not even capturing, killing or maiming your enemy, which is the test of what you have done. It is the comparison between what you have achieved and the price at which you have achieved it which is the whole basis of judg- ment. Uninstructed opinion is apt to regard a campaign as a sort of game, with forfeits attached. One side is supposed to be winning if it goes forward; the other is losing if it goes back. Were we to view the present war from this exceedingly erroneous standpoint there would be ample cause for the exagger- ated fears which our Censorship alone among the Allies allows the stupider and more mal- ignant part of our Press to propagate. The position in Russia is that no decision has yet been arrived at, and most certainly there has been no process of wearing down leaving either side" as it would be left after a disas- trous action. Each faces the other, the one still on the offensive, although with its mo- mentum strangely lessened; the other still one the defensive, though with the situation now apparently well in hand. But each may ultimately reverse his old role; each is a great army in being; and there is no seal yet set upon the eastern campaign. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the enemy has failed in his main endeavour. In other words, it is difficult to avoid the conclusion, even at so early a date as this, and with another seven or eight weeks of tolerable weather before the rains set in in Polond, that the Austro-Ger- man higher command gambled for a far swifter progress and for a much more definite result. They have expended in reaching so neutral an issue nearly half what was in the beginning their reserve of men trained and equipped (excluding what they must k&p back for drafts to the new Southern front). They have done their very utmost with shell under conditions where the big gun has had it all its own way. They have devoted almost entirely to this effort 15 out of the now numbered weeks remaining to them as the uttermost limits of their continued strength, and it is difficult to see how, to the moment of writing at'least, they can regard the thing they have purchased as worth anything like the price they have paid in men, in materials and in time. For all these three essentials are counted out to the enemy by fate very strictly. Materials least, men far more, time most of all. Lord St. Davids. Lord St. Davids addressed a meeting of the Pembroke Dockyard men outside the Main Gate during the dinner hour on Friday, and dealt with the manner in which the county war fund had been administered. He said that the dockyard collections had realised jE491, which was very handsome, and he ap- pealed to the men to again start the weekly collectiorff. He remarked that surely they who were living at home safe because of our men in France, Flanders, and the Dardanelles and on the North Sea ought to do something \and give every penny they could. They were safe, and their wives and children were safe. They did not know how long they would be safe, but they were safe now because of the efforts of our brave men. Chopin and Poland. "Before evacuating Warsaw the Russians removed from the Church of the Holy Cross the heart of Chopin. Chopin left Poland to seek his fortune in more favoured lands in 1830, and was kept in exile by circumstances till his death in Paris. His body rests at Pere-Lachaise, sprinkled with Polish earth. His heart was sent back to Warsaw to speak of his love for tortured Poland, and to inspire his countrymen to hope and resolution," says the "Glasgow Herald." "His letters to his parents were destroyed by the soldiers of General Berg in 1863 in the sacking of the house in which they were stored. Paris swarmed with Polish refugees, and Chopin found many friends among them. Liszt tells us he was a pure, generous, good, and com- passionate man, filled with a single sentiment, the love of country. But the man Chopin was very reserved, and the not inconsiderate Chopin literature does not bring us into any- thing like close touch with him. Only as a musician could he unburden his heart freely to all the world. In knowing his music we know Poland." Germany Knows. In my considered opinion, there is practi- cally nothing of value that happens in any of the countries hostile to Germany that is not accurately and speedily known. in Berlin (says "A Neutral" in "The Times.") Ger- many gets news from France in many ways. She gets news from England by the following routes :-Flushing, Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden, and the United States. Very little of it is, I believe, written. Much news is con- veyed by the small neutral ships which are essential to your sea-borne commerce. Apart from the regular spies there are those whom I would call "semi-spies"—sailors and others who come to England on the legitimate busi- ness of their trade, and whose trained eyes enable them to convey information about ship- ping movements. I was in Berlin when one of your statesmen announced that "the back of the German spy system was broken." That statement was read out to a number of Ger- mans at a dinner party with immense amuse- ment. I have little doubt that England is to- day as closely honeycombed with semi-spies as Belgium was. The 'increasing stringency of the letter-censorship has rendered written spying almost impossible. The present system I believe to be largely verbal spying. "Mrs. So-and-So," having gathered her information in England, proceeds to Geneva or Zurich for the legitimate purpose of meeting a relation., and gives the information verbally, which is taken immediately to Germany. The German People. Americans cherish no ill-will towards in- dividual Germans, and do not, ascribe to them as separate human beings those qualities of ruthlessness and unscrupulousness which have brought upon Germany, as a nation, the con- demnation and resentment of just-minded people—condemnation and resentment so ab- sorbing as to cast into the background, for the time being, those gentler thoughts which, when the terrible agony is over, will once more assert themselves," says the New York "Nation." "For the fact is that, so far from it being impossible, in this sense, to draw up an indictment against a whole people, it is precisely against a whole people that in times like these an indictment can and ought to be drawn. Indeed, when Edmund Burke made his well-remembered declaration it was not a moral indictment .but a legal indictment that he had in mind. I do not know,' he said in his great speech on Conciliation wiJh America, I donot knew the method of draw- ing up an indictment against a whole people.' but the preceding part of the speech shows precisely what he. meant. There are but three ways,' he said, 'of proceeding relative to this stubborn spirit which prevails in your colonies, and disturbs your government. These are: To change that spirit, as inconve- nient, by removing the causes. To prosecute it as criminal. Or to comply with it as neces- sary.' And it was the utter impracticability of criminal proceedings as a method of deal- ing with the AmcricaTi spirit, seeing that that spirit pervaded the whole body of the people and their assemblies, that Burke condensed into his famous epigram." I The British Line. j The answer to a question often asked in France—namely, why, in spit? of the con- I siderable development of the British Army in regard to numbers, does it not hold a longer line of front ?-is given by M. Hubert Jacques in the "Information" of Paris: — "If our troops have become the incomparable soldiers wo know them to be, it is because they have been trained by a year in the trenches, have grown 'acclimatised' to danger, have imper- ceptibly learned to despise death, and have lost all knowledge of the feeling of fear which a 'beginner' cannot escape when for the first time he faces an avalanche of shell, liquid fire or poisonous gas. It is not on the occasion of his first acquaintance with a 'Jack John- son' that even the bravest man will calmly continue to roll a cigarette, saying Hullo, that fellow needs a couple of lessons in range- finding!' Would it not, then, have been ex- tremely dangerous to entrust too long a front to a young army, of which the soldiers had only a few months previously learned to handle a rifle, and to set it to face thoroughly hardened adversaries? How great would have been the responsibility of Sir John French in holding, with these young troops a line of over 100 miles. These young soldiers, after being trained at home, required a further training at the front. They, too, have now grown, into doughty warriors." I The German Chancellor and the Kaiser. "If the German Chancellor falls we shall all know that Germany is committed to a pro- gramme and a doctrine which are incompa- tible with liberty or civilisation." The Reichstag meets this week, and perhaps that I fact may explain the report of strained rela- tions between the Kaiser and his Chancellor and of the Chancellor's impending resigna- tion," says the "Manchester Guardian." "If Herr von Bethmann-Hollweg should leave office it will be an event of importance," adds the "Manchester Guardian." "He is the nearest approach to understanding and sym- pathetic statesmanship which official Germany possesses at present, and his fall would mean the defeat of the saner and the triumph of the extremer element in German public life. The fight between these two factions is con- tinuous and bitter, although it is not allowed much ventilation in the censored Press. The opponents of the Chancellor undoubtedly in- clude the Conservative landlord party and many of the rich and ambitious manufac- turers, financiers, and business men who are the most powerful if not the most numerous section of the National Liberal Party. It cannot be doubted that the strain on German political unity grows severer every week, and that the overthrow of the Chancellor and the enthronement of the extreme Jingoes in office would revive the open. conflict between parties." Zeppelin Bombs. The air raids are leading a good many men to brush up their knowledge of dynamics. The simple suppose that a bomb dropped from a Zeppelin falls straight down to the earth. But this, of course is not true in the case of a moving Zeppelin. When the bomb is dropped there are two forces which determine where it will strike the earth—the velocity of the Zeppelin and the force of gravity. It des- cribes, therefore, a slanting passage in its descent to the earth. A Cambridge Honours man, who knows all about this sort of thing, said :—"If I see a bomb being dropped from a Zeppelin directly above my head I shall not be unduly alarmed, because I know that, if the airship is movtng very fast and high up, the bomb will-reach the earth about half a mile further on. But I shall be really anxious when I see a bomb being dropped from a Zep- pelin which is still half a mile off and coming fast in my direction, for I know it will reach the earth somewhere in my vicinity." Ip practice, of course, it will not be so simple. Very few, if any, people seem to have seen the Zeppelins which dropped the bombs. They were certainly high up. A curious eirclum- • stance about the latest raid is the number of persons who, having been in a previous raid near the coast, moved inland for greater se- cui-ity, only to find themselves in the thick of it once again. One well-known man has been a witness of three raids in three different dis- tricts..

Advertising

POUNnS SAVED BY DEALING WITH THE ACTUAL I PIANO MAKERS SELLING DIRECT to the PUBLIC III  )M )L)!) !BMa«?)M) "!M  ? T" CELEBRATED IraCITON i ADDIII Li I ?%??.!E???'????L;tS?'r

No title

Ma,de from German shrapnel a miniature violin by a wounded soldier at the Bethanl Green Military Hospital, has been presented to Godfrey, the ten-year-old violinist. Mr. Lloyd George never does things by halves. It. is stated on good authority (says "Reynolds") that finding the requirements of the munition works with regard to one com- modity which it would be unwise to mention must necessarily be very lairge, he bought up the whole of the world's production.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. I