Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
25 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

HOTEL YORK BKIlDGEMlD. New Spacious Garage fitted throughout with ELECTRIC LIGHT, CEMENTED FLOOR, SURFACE DRAINAGE. ==EASY ACCE 's. CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING 20 OR 30 CARS STORAGE FOR MOTOR CARS AND CYCLES. MODERATE CHARGES. ■w WW-WW '\1" THE YORK CAR WILL STILL RUN AT 5d. PER MILE THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER SEASON. PETROL, CARBIDE, OILS and GREASE kept in Stock. TELEPHONE No. 123. ———— l

GLAMORGAN CATTLE

GLAMORGAN CATTLE. To t he 'Fd itor Sir,-l was very pleased to read Mr. E. F. Lynch Blosse's letter in your last issue, and am glad to confirm it. One of our present leading county gentlemen told me that some years ago, when he spent some time in the Badmington district, the late Duke had some Glamorgan cattle among his herd in the park then. On referring to Youatt, a standard work on Cattle, published in 1837, he states:—" Of the old breed of Gloucesters it is now difficult to speak, for they are nearly extinct. They were evidently of Welsh origin, mingled with the Hereford and sometimes with the cattle further inland. They -were the Glamorgan chiefly, but upon a larger scale and of a dif- ferent colour. The Glamorgan are black, or inclining to brown. The horns were of middle length, white, tipped with black; the bones small. and the carcase light, scarcely averaging more than twelve score per quar- ter. The bag was thin, yet large, and the milk abundant and long continued. The characteristic mark was said to be a streak of white generally along the back and always at the root of the tail." With the above description by such an authority, it is no wonder that the breed was so much sought after as to be acquired for the Royal dairies at Windsor, etc.—Yours, etc., EDWIN PRICE. I Bridgend. August 23rd, 1915.

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS FAMILIES ASSOCIATION

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' FAMILIES' ASSOCIATION. To the Editor. Sir,—I think it may interest many kind subscribers to this Association in the Bridgend District if I give a summary of the work done in the district during the past year of this lamentable war. During the year ending 14th August, 1915, the Society has expended in grants and ad- vances in this district no less than £ 1,135 0 4 During the same period the amount subscribed in the dis- trict was 821 0 5 Leaving a difference of E313 19 11 This difference has been provided out of moneys received from the Prince of Wales Fund through the Divisional Association of which Mrs. D. C. Edmondes is the excellent honorary secretary, and much of the moneys paid have been in the shape of advances on account of Army allowances which advances have in most cases been repaid to the Divi- sional Association. The number of cases assisted in the Bridg- end district, including Coity and Merthyr- mawr, is about 400, aife does not include any ef the transactions in Maesteg, Ogmore and Garw, Pencoed, Porthcawl, etc.. which are within the division of Newcastle. At pre- sent over 100 cases are being visited weekly in Bridgend alone, mostly by ladies of the committee who have been doing their work quietly for the past twelve months. A complaint is some times made that Brid- gend is backward in matters of this sort, but the amount collected, as shown above, is. in the opinion of my committee, highly credit- able to the town and district.—Yours obedi- ently. S. H. STOCKWOOD, Chairman of Bridgend Committee. Bridgend, August 26th, 1915.

BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACEI

BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE. Another excellent programme of the very best pictures has been and is being submitted to the patrons of the Palace this week, to full houses. During the first part of the week an excellent film entitled "Lead us not into Temptation" was shown to appreciative audiences; also a Chaplin comedy. For the latter half there is being shown an interesting film entitled "The Other Woman." Next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday there will be a fine exclusive 3,500 feet long screen called "Society and its Sins." There will also be an animal drama in three parts, named "In the Days of the Thundering Herd." For Thursday, Friday and Saturday there will be an exceptionally interesting four part exclu- sive entitled "The Battle of the Sexes," as well as a Chaplin comedy. Picture goers in Bridgend and district are now well aware that they can always see something to in- terest and please them at the Palace—in fact, this popular little picture house stands very high in the estimation of its patrons, and one often hears remarks expressing entire satisfaction.

BETTWS I

BETTWS. I DEATH The death 4f Mr. William Burgess, aged 55, of 4 Glanant Row, Shwt, took place on Friday morning, after a long and trying illness. Deceased was well re- spected in the district. He was an old Marine pensioner. He leaves a widow, four sons (of whom one is serving with the colours .at the Dardanelles), two daughters, and an aged father and mother to mourn their loss. The funeral took place on Tuesday, the inter- ment being at Bettws Churchyard. Deceased was a member of the Coytrahen branch of the Bristol and West of England Friendly So- ciety. members of which showed their last re- spects by attending the funeral wearing rosettes. Numerous wreaths were sent by relatives and friends. j

IPERSONALj

PERSONAL. Mr. W. J. Cranson has been promoted to be Lieutenant in the Scotch Fusiliers, for dis- tinguished service in France. Mr. Cranston at one time worked in the Ocean Colliery, Nantymoel, and was very popular among his companions as an expert footballr, etc. He went out with the Scotch Greys, but was transferred to the Scotch Fusiliers. He is on a visit iust now to this country to be equipped in the capacity of officer. He will be return- ing at onee to do duty on the battlefield. • • • Mr. A. S. Williams, chief-constable of West Sussex, who formerly was attached to the Royal Artillery, has resigned his officé of ehief-constable in order that he may re-join the active forces. The West Sussex Police Force is well represented in the Army, over 50 per cent. of the men having enlisted. Mr. Williams is a son of Mrs. Williams, Miskin Manor, and brother of Captain Rhys Williams, of the Welsh Guards. Before tak- ing up his appointment at West Sussex Mr. Williams was chief-constable of Breconshire. • • • Dr. Ivor H. Davies, J.P., Danygraig, Llan- trisant, on Wednesday last week received in- formation that his second son, Second-Lieut. Edward Smith Thomas Davies, of the gun section 5th Welsh (Territorials), was wounded on August 13th. The doctor has received a further intimation to the effect that his. son is going on satisfactorily at Malta. Lieut. Davies is a grandson of the late Dr. H. N. Davies, of Porth. He is a solicitor, and was articled to Messrs. Stockwood and Williams, of Bridgend, with which firm he is still con- nected. « The marriage took place at Newport on Tuesday of Miss Violet Brace, only daughter of Mr. W. Brace,, M.P., Under-Secretary of State for Home Affairs, and Mr. George Simpson, mining engineer under the Ebbw Vale Company at Abercarn. The wedding was very quiet, owing to the war, and only immediate relatives were present. There was no reception. The bride wore a travelling dress of grey Irish poplin with hat to match, and was given away by her uncle, Sapper J. Russell, of the Royal Engineers. There were no bridesmaids. Dr. Jones Evans acted as best man. The newly-wedded couple left later for New Quay, where a portion of the honey-. moon is being spent. The bride has attained a reputation on the London and provincial variety stage as a contralto. On + • » ti'ie, pulpit at R ain- On Sunday evening last the pulpit at Ram- oth Baptist Church was occupied by the Rev. W. M. Yorwerth, Newcastle-on-Tyne, son of Mr. W. Yorwerth, Cowbridge. As a preacher Mr. Yorwerth has won for himself a place in the front rank and is thoroughly up to date and has a wonderful power which grips the attention of his congregation. Much has ap- peared in the Press as to the attitude of the Churches in this present crisis. In his elo- quent sermon Mr. Yorwerth fearlessly faced the position, but perhaps he was heard at his best when he boldly told his congregation what the attitude of the churches should be in the future. Those who knew Mr. Yor- werth in his boyhood days in Cowbridge heartily congratulate him as he continues to [ rise higher as a preacher and orator. <+ • Gunner Charles Miller, of Swansea, who was on the Monitor Mersey which helped to destroy the cruiser Konigsberg, is a brother- in-law of Inspector Rees Davies, Bridgend. • • • Mr. Daniel Edward Rees, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rees, Gadlys. Llangynwyd, joined the Public Schools Battalion as a private at the end of last year. He sat for and passed the Sandhurst examination, and has been gaz- etted Second Lieutenant in the 3rd Welsh, now stationed at Cardiff Castle. He is 20 years of age. w w The eldest son of the Rev. D. S. Jones, of Christ ChurchS Bridgend, was the preacher at the English Congregational Church, Bridg- end, on Sunday, and made a good impression. _t.l£'" I'"

UNJER THE HEDGE I

UNJ)ER THE HEDGE. I OGMORE VALE LABOURER NEAR THE CHICKEN COTE. At Bridgend Police Court yesterday (Thurs- day), John Carter, collier, of Ogmore Vale, was charged with having been on enclosed premises for an unlawful purpose. Robert Storer, Blackmill, said he had a fowls cote in his garden, and on the 24th August he had twenty black Minorcas. Later that night he was called out by Police-on- stable Mendus, who asked him if he had any fowls missing. None had gone but the cote had been broken. Police-constable Mendus said he heard a noise at the fowls cote and thinking the owner was locking up he called him, but had no reply. He went to the cote and searched around and ultimately found prisoner under a hedge near the cote. Witness pulled him out, but on the road the man dragged himself away and ran up the road. Witness caught him and took him back to the cote and found that an attempt had been ma,de to get into the cote. Witness called the owner, but he found that no fowls had been taken. Defendant said he had been drinking. Fined £1.

LADIES READ THISI

LADIES. READ THIS. ADVICE FREE fat Stamp. Mrs. E. Stewart's Famous Female Remedy never Fails.—Address: 9. Guinea Street, Bristol. 4229 I I

00 ECHO OF A POLITICAL CONTEST

-< "00" ECHO OF A POLITICAL CONTEST. VALE FARMER AND HIS LANDLORD. I (CONTINUED). This week we give another interesting in- terview with Mr. John Lewis, of Ewenny Road, Bridgend, late of Brigam, a well- known man in the Vale. Mr. Lewis also valued the estate of the Rev. Morgan Stratford in Northamptonshire and on the Cotswold Hills and near Chelten- ham. Mr. Stratford's tenants on his estate known as Lubenham, near Market Har- borough, had complained that they could not pay their rents owing to agricultural depres- sion, and half of them gave notice. Mr. Stratford asked a local valuer to make a field valuation but the local valuer said 'he was not accustomed to doing that work, and the agent of the estate said that he did not know of any- one who could do it. Mr. Stratford therefore called in Mr. Lewis who had given him a field valuation of the estate of St. Atlian. Mr. Lewis first of all valued the farms of those tenants that had given notice. The owner of the estate thought that the other half of the tenants, who had not given notice, would re- main. but eventually they gave notice too, and Mr. Lewis had to make a second journey to the place, and another valuation. One of the fields, which had an area of eight acres, had been taken for a lengthy term of years by the McTurk Brothers, now owners of the largest sheep runs in Breconshire. These gentlemen were paying L4 an acre for that field. It was land which was supposed to fat- ten one bullock and one sheep per acre. But no one at that time wanted it because the price of cattle had been reduced to half what it had been. Mr. Lewis valued this eighty; acre field, and advised the owner that it could never be let again in the old way, and that it must be divided into four portions by an ox- fence. This was done at a cost of C300, and the owner then managed to let each portion, but the rental had to be reduced from C4 per acre to -02 10s. per acre because of the great reduction in the value of stock. Connected with this property was a mansion with about thirty acres of land attached, the whole let- ting at £ 300 a year. The field valuation made by Mr. Lewis resulted in a much-needed reduction of rents for the tenants. For sixty years all the valuations of the Wimborne Estate were made by Mr. Le,vis-lucluding the valuation for an exchange of land be- tween Lord Wimborne and the Rev. Charles Knight, of Tythegston. One very important valuation carried out by Mr. Lewis was that of the Home Farm, Gower. belonging to Miss Talbot, of Margam. This was a farm of about 600 to 700 acres, farmed by a bailiff in the em- ploy of Miss Talbot. The farm was not, ap- parently, making as good a return as might have been expected, and 'Miss Talbot decided to have a valuation made. Mr. Knox, of I Margam. the then agent of the Estate, who is still remembered as a popular figure in Glamorgan, and a perfect gentleman, instruc- ted Mr. Lewis to make a field valuation of the farm, and a valuation of the stock, crops, implements of husbandry, and tenant right. Mr. Lewis valued the farm at j6480 a year, "provided the game and rabbits were kept down." In submitting his valuation Mr. Lewis sent a letter to Mr. Knox stating that he had no doubt that Mr. Knox would be surprised to find what a low value he had placed on the sheep, of which there were 400 or 500 on the farm but this low value was caused by the rabbits and game literally eat- ing up the farm. Mr. Lewis then received a letter from Miss Talbot, who stated that she had received his communication to Mr. Knox and she was very much surprised to read his statement regarding the sheep and rabbits; she asked him to inform her whether his statements were made on personal observa- tion or on hearsay, as she had given strict orders that the game should be' kept down. Mr. Lewis replied that as the weather was very hot when he was carrying out the valuation the time was the commencement of June he did a great deal of work between the hours of 5 and 9 in the evening when the rabbits were feeding, and his personal observation proved to him that rabbits were literally swarming on the farm. Miss Talbot then wrote him thanking him for his information and adding that she had given instructions that trappers should at once be sent to the farm to destroy the rabbits. These trappers, it appears, killed many thousands of rabbits on that farm in the course of a few months. Rabbits are a pest to a farm, as they do not only eat up the herbage, but their droppings are offensive to the sheep and prevent them from grazing. MR. LEWIS AND HIS LANDLORD. Mr. Lewis's excellent farming of Brigam, together with his strong character, won for him the esteem and conifdence of his land- lord. During his tenancy of the farm he laid down the land in the best permanent grass. When the tenancy was relinquished by him, three expert valuers were appointed to value the farm, namely, the late Mr. 'lorn Price, of Coychurch, Mr. Proctor. Leicestershire, and Mr. Miller, Brecon, and these experts said that they had never seen a farm with a greater proportion laid down in better per- manent grass or in such a clean state of cultivation. As an example of the conifd- ence which his landlord, the late Lord Wim- borne reposed in him, it may be mentioned that his Lordship never let a new farm except on Mr. Lewis s recommendation. Mr..Lewis has all his life been a staunch Liberal and Nonconformist, and this being so it was .a considerable surprise to him when the magis- trates met at Cowbridge and asked him to stand for the County Council, because practically 0ll the magistrates were Tories and Church- men. Mr. Lewis never wavered in his politi- cal principles, though the late Lord Wim- borne, his landlord, was a Tory, and not only a Tory but Parliamentary candidate for the old constituency of Glamorgan when he was Sir Ivor Guest, and at a time when Mr. Lewis was his tenant at Brigam. This candidature placed Mr. Lewis in a position in which a less staunch man might have been tempted to compromise his principles. While Sir Ivor Guest was engaged in this candidature one of his agents drove in a trap one Sunday all the way from Merthyr to Brigam Farm to tell Mr. John Lewis that Sir Ivor very much re- gretted to hear that he was using i all his in- fluence against him, and the agent asked Mr. Lewis if he would be good enough to meet Sir Ivor at Llantrisant the following day to talk matters over. Mr. Lewis said to the agent: "Oh, Sir Ivor is far too good a landlord for me to use my influence against him, as I would have done otherwise, but I cannot meet him at Llantrisant for I cannot support him. Though I am not using my influence against him I cannot support him and sacrifice my principles." When it became known that Mr. Lewis was not supporting his landlord all the other tenants warned him that he would suffer for it and that his rent would be in- creased, but, as a matter of fact, shortly 'I aftcnv:lrs his rent was reduced owing to the agricultural depression. The other tenants (Continued on bottom of next column).

00 ECHO OF A POLITICAL CONTEST

(Continued from previous column). then told him that they undersood his rent had been reduced more than theirs, and Mr. Lewis retorted: "Yes, Lord Wimborne knows that you are a gang of deceivers." During that old contest the late Rev. Charles Knight, who was a supporter of Sir Ivor Guest, came to Mr. Lewis and said: "I am surprised that you have turned from your landlord and that you are not giving him your support in this election." "I lam prepared, replied Mr. Lewis, "to do anything for my landlord ex- cept sacrifice my principles." A SAD BEREAVEMENT. Mr. Lewis's married life was tragically brief. In the year 1871 he married Miss Magdalen Smith, of Greenway Farm, Brecon. a farmer's daughter, who was residing with her two bachelor brothers. Greenway Farm was one of the largest sheep walks in Brecon- shire. On it there were from 3,000 to 4,000 sheep. and Mr. Lewis met his wife on his business visits to the Brecon markets, and through his meetings with her brothers. In 1872 Mrs. Lewis unfortunately died, shortly after she had given birth to twin daughters. One of the daughters is now wife of Coun- cillor W. L. Jenkins, of Cowbridge, and the other daughter lives with her father at Bridgend and acts as his housekeeper. (TO BE CONTINUED.)

I COL J 1 D NICHOLLS IAPPOINTMENT

I COL. J. 1. D. NICHOLL'S I APPOINTMENT. I RECRUITtNG OFFICER FOR BRIDGEND DISTRICT. I A meeting of Bridgend and Cowbridge Board of Guardians was held at the Union Offices, Bridgend. on Saturday, Colonel J. I. D. Nicholl presiding. CHAIRMAN'S NEW APPOINTMENT. The Chairman said he was afraid that he would not be able to attend the meetings of the Board so regularly in the future as he had done in the past as he had been ap- pointed Recruiting Officer for the Bridgend district. He did not know yet whether he would be in the town the whole of the time, but it was quite possible that he would be able to attend quite often. He had spoken to the authorities on the matter, and they did not think there would be any objection to his attending the meetings, and therefore he would try to attend as often as possible. (Hear, hear.) EXCESSIVE EXPENDITURE ON FUNERALS. The Chairman further said there were one or two things upoy which he wished to report. There was the question of the funeral expenses of paupers; or, not necessarily paupers, but persons who, after a death, applied to the Board for relief. They had had a case before them that day where a coffin alone had cost £ 6. He did not think the fault lay with the people themselves—the fault was with the undertakers, who induced the persons—especi- ally if they knew the deceased was insured- to spend money. Undertakers went to see a widow when she was very much upset, and induced her to spend extravagant sums of money on the burial of the husband. He thought something should be done to stop that absurd expenditure on funerals at the in- stigation of the undertakers. (Hear. hear.) WATER COMPANY'S CHARGES. The Clerk reported as to the scale of charges to that institution by the Bridgend Gas and Water Company, and said he had looked the matter up. and he thought it was quite clear that the Company had over- charged the Board in respect to water supplied to the Cottage Homes. The Finance Com- mittee, he said, now recommended that the necessary alteration be made, and the account passed for payment. Mr. Rees John moved that the recommen- dation be adopted. This was seconded, and carried. COTTAGE HOMES CHILDREN'S THANKS Mr. W. A. Howell, chairman of the Cot- tage Homes Committee, said the children at present at the Homes wished to express their thanks to the Board for the prizes and for the good time given them on their re-union day. There was a large number of Guar- dians present, and a large number of child- ren, and altogether they had a good time. Quite a merry company sat down to tea in the presence of about a million wasps-which were uninvited. (Laughter.) CUBE SUGAR SUPPLIES. I A letter was read from the Local Govern- ment Board with reference to the consump- tion of cube sugar. The letter stated that the amount of cube sugar now available was extremely limited owing to the cutting off of the supplies from the Continent. The Board asked the Guardians to at once take into con- sideration the advisability of discontinuing the use of cube sugar and to use in its place gran- ulated sugar. The matter was referred to Committee. I I LADY INSPECTOR'S REPORT. I An extract from the report made by Miss E. M. Jones, a lady Inspector of the Institu- tion under the Local Government Board was read at this meeting. The report stated that after visiting the Union there did not appear to be sufficient individual attention given to the aged patients who with assistance could rise and sit in an easy chair for two hours or so daily. It was suggested tfiat the claims of the patients in that respect should be con- sidered.

BRIDGEND JP SERIOUSLY INJUREDI

BRIDGEND J.P. SERIOUSLY INJURED BY MOTOR CAR. A serious accident befel Mr. W. J. Lewis, a Bridgend J.P., at Southerndown on Wed- nesday. He went to the Post Office there at about 5 o'clock, and outside was talking to a friend when a motor car backed out of a private road leading to the Post Office. Mr. Lewis was struck in the back. It is feared that his right arm is broken, and that he has sustained other injuries' to his collar-bone and ribs. He was staying with his son-in-law, Mr. R. E. Morgan, of Cardiff, at the Cottage, South- erndown. He passed a fairly good night, and up to the time of writing is as well as can be expected. Mr. Lewis is 84 years of age.

FELL OFF LOAD OF HAY I

FELL OFF LOAD OF HAY. I BRIDGEND LABOURER'S DEATH. We learn that Mr. Fred Fitzsimmons, a labourer, of Bridgend, in the employ of Messrs J. and F. Loosmore, fell off the top of a load of hay whilst loading a trolley at the G.W.R. Station on Wednesday afternoon. The in- jury lie received necessitated his immediate removal to the Cottage Hospital, where he died at 6 o'clock on Thursday morning.

No title

As a result of the egg collection taken at the Gibeon English Congregational Church, Taibach, recently, the members and congre- gation of that church dispatched this week a box containing 453 eggs, to Messrs. Harrods, of London, who will distribute them among the many wounded soldiers.

I OUR SOLDIERS COLUMN I I

OUR SOLDIERS' COLUMN. I [This columns is placed at the disposal of local soldiers serving abroad. in order to make known their wants to generous readers of the Gazette." There are times when our soldiers feel the monotony of trench life, when a bit of music would liven things up. Then there are means of recrea-¡' tion which would help them to wile away a few hours when not engaged upon the more active and serious operations of war. These can be supplied in the way of playing cards, quoits, etc. For appeals of this kind, and for letters of general interest, this column is open. By this means friends, too, may be  ] kept in constant touch with friends.] 

LLANTWIT MAJOR OFFICER

LLANTWIT MAJOR OFFICER WITH THE MEDiTERRANEAN EXPEDI- TIONARY FORCE. In a letter to our Llantwit Major corres- pondent, Lieut. Daniel Hopkins, 6th Bat- talion East Yorks Pioneers, says of his jour- ney out:—We kept well out in the Atlantic and I did not sight land until we came to the North of the Mediterranean, and then only for a short time. We had a poor sight of Gibralta. The first stop was Malta. We were allowed on shore for a day, and I was fortunate enough to be shown over a French Dreadnought which had sunk an Austrian cruiser in a few minutes. I went to see the noted Hypogeum Temple. This it a wonderful temple. dating back 3,000 years B.C. All the work was done by means of flint instruments. The whole thing was intenselv interesting. The Holy of Holies was placed far back with an altar for human sacrifices. The place was full of human skele- tons—thousands of them. We went to the Cathedral of the Knights of Malta—a perfect gem of art. It contained a chapel for the Knights of various countries, America ex- cepted. We next stopped at Alexandria—a horrid place. Our course was then north, and we passed on to this island. The heat is intense and rather difficult to bear, but I understand this is the hottest month, so there is hope for us. The nights are awfully cold. Our battalion is doing engineering work, making jetties and quays for the troops and wounded. We may be here some time before we go up into the Peninsula; but, on the other hand, we may be away to-night. Our men are working exceptionally well. having been com- plimented several times by the General. We sleep out in the open with a blanket stretched out on pegs to cover us. At first I found it rather hard; but now it's quite all right. The food we have is bully beef, biscuits, sar- dines, herrings, and marmalade. It's not exactly what one would order in a first-class Llantwit cafe; still, they are topping after some strenuous labour. The men are very 'ell fed and in first-class spirits. We bathe twice daily. The sea is about 200 yards from our encampment. This island is barren and hilly, but the harbour is magnificent with the hospital ships in the background, just for a reminder. I thank you for the "Gazette" it is the greatest kindness you can show me— the forwarding to me of the "Glamorgan Gazette."

No title

Capt. Harry F. Lambert. Major J. L. Lambert. I Capt. J. L. Lambert has been promoted to the rank of Major and O.C. the Reserve Park I A.S.C., now stationed at Denbigh. His brother,Capt. Harry F. Lambert, is in command of the 333rd Divisional Train, A.S.C.. at Winchester. Miss Hetta Lambert is also doing military duty as a Red Cross nurse at the 2nd Western General Hospital, Manchester. Thus Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Lambert have all the members of their family serving their King and country. Major Lambert is well known in Bridgend and district. For some time he was a mem- ber of Porthcawl Council and is a large land- owner at that place.

PONTYCLUN

PONTYCLUN. RED CROSS AUXILIARY HOSPITAL.— The following appointments have been made on the staff of the above hospital consequent on Dr. and Mrs. Logic's departure from the district:—Commandant, Mrs. O'Rorke, Taly- garn; medical officer, Dr. S. A. Tucker (medi- cal officer of Llanharan Men's and Women's Red Cross Detachment); qualified nurse in charge, Miss M. Withers quartermaster, Mrs I Watkins. The Pontyclun and Llanharan male and female detachments provide the nurses and orderlies. There are at present 15 wounded soldiers in the hospital.

No title

Farmers at Driffield Live Stock Market on Wednesday stated that the price of beef ex- ceeded anything previously reached in their experience. Fourteen shillings per stone was realised. Fresh bullocks averaged £ 30 each, and this year's lambs 53s. to 74s. per head.

iYALE FARMERS AND HAY PRICES

iYALE FARMERS AND HAY PRICES, PROPOSALS WHICH THE GOVERN- I MENT PUT FORWARD. r EMBARGO OBJECTED TO. I Captain Myer, district purchasing officer for South Wales, attended a meeting of the Cowbridge and County Farmers' Club at Cowbridge on Tuesday, when the question of Government hay buying was discussed. Mr. T. Thonias, Red Farm, Penllyne, pre- sided, and there was a large attendance of farmers and hay dealers. The Chairman said there had been a lot of argument in the Vale of Glamorgan on the subject of hay buying by the Govern- ment, and he thought it might be well if Captain Myer would explain some of the problems. Captain Myer said he thought the better plan would have been to first of all hear what the problems were, as he was under the impression that everybody nowadays thoroughly understood the method of pur- chase by the Government. The attitude of the Government was that, regardless of every other circumstance, the horses at the front must have prime hay, and he did not think anyone would raise objection to that, because it was obvious that unless the horses were well fed they could not take the guns into action. The Government were desirous of interfering as little as pos- sible, having regard always to the fore- named important attitude, with the ordinary trading communities. There were two thods, of course, of obtaining what they wanted. One was by means of purchase, and he hoped farmers in the Vale of Glamorgan would be as desirous of offering their prime hay as farmers were in other parts of the country. No one was infallible, and what- ever mistakes had been made in the past should not interfere with what was being done from now on. As to price, the Government had had the aid of farmers' county commit- tees, which had been held throughout Eng- land, Scotland, and Wales, and, fortunately. they had arrived at an almost unanimous figure, so that they would not find in the future great differences in price between one county and another. The figure he was not at liberty to state, although they would all shortly learn it in dealings in the district. It was not an extortionate, but a fair, reasonable and legitimate price, which should produce the best hay and allow the farmer to get a fair return, and it had been accepted by the Government. WANTED TO DEAL WITH FARMERS DIRECT. Farmers desired, above all, to deal direct with the consumer, and there did not now ap- pear to be any necessity for the middleman. Personally, he had not the slightest word to say against hay dealers of the district, but, as a general rule, the Government were anxious to deal with farmers direct, and the producer had now his opportunity. The Government were prepared to buy the whole rick, allowing so much for best and so much for seconds, if the farmer desired it, but it would be a good thing to avoid dealing too much in seconds, as they did not want to reduce the quantity for civil purposes. What they asked the civilian to do was what they were doing them- selves—they were not using best hay in this country for Army purposes, because every ounce was needed for the horses abroad. Re- ferring to some delays which had arisen in payment, Captain Mver said this had been caused by a re-shuffling of areas, with a cor- respohding alteration of accounts, and some delays could not be avoided in the building up of such a huge concern as the Army was to- day. Payments would be made promptly in future. In concluding, Captain Myer men- tioned that farmers were being assisted by the Government in some districts by having the use of transports when not required for military purposes. The Government quite recognised that agriculture was necessary in the interests of the nation as well as muni- tions. He asked them to try and pull to- gether and make things go a little more smoothly. Mr. Edmund D. Lewis, St. Mary Hill Court: Are you likely to require all hay ? Captain Myer: As far as my instructions go. I think we shall want all prime seed hay. It is possible that we shall not require all the prime meadow hay. The Chairman asked Captain Myers if he would be prepared to answer questions put by hay dealers. Captain Myers said he had had a meeting called for hay dealers, and if they desired it he should be glad to arrange for a further meeting, but as the two interests clashed, he did not think it would be wise to allow hay dealers to take part. He was under the impression that this was a meeting of farmers. Alderman Edward John, of Cowbridge, said many of the hay merchants had dealt with farmers for a long time, and in some cases were right-hand men to them. Mr. -Noah -Nlol-,raii, Penybryn. said that farmers could make more of the whole mow than the Government were prepared to pay for the pick. He also complained of delay in payment. Otherwise, he admitted, his objections had been dissolved by the speech of Captain Myer. A RESOLUTION. Mr. Edmund D. Lewis moved: "That this meeting is strongly of opinion that the em- bargo placed upon hay merchants from pur- chasing hay in this and the adjoining counties should be immediately removed, as it operates unfairly to dealer and farmer alike, and seri- ously interferes with the supply of hay to the South Wales collieries, which arc so essential to our naval supremacy." The system under which the Government came into the market and placed itself in the position of being the only buyer, paralysed the hay industry. They were all anxious that the Government should have the best hay. but it should be bought under fairer conditions, and not to the exclusion, of other fair competitors. Mr. Daniel Jenkins, Ruthin, seconded. He did not see why the Government should "crop" the farmer, while paying full market value, for other produce. He, per- sonally, could do better with the dealers, than with the Government. If the Govern- ment bought anything else under value he would like to know of it. Mr. J. W. Hall, hay dealer, Cowbridge, was allowed to address the meeting. He questioned whether it was necessary to denude this county and the adjoining counties of hay. He understood there was a very large reserve of hay in France and there was a great deal in England, Scotland, and Ireland. Altogether, the Government held something like 200,000 tons in reserve. When they asked where the collieries were to get their hay from, they were met by the vague answer that there was plenty for the collier- ies. but if the Government took all the seed hay the farmer would require all the soft hay for his own use. Captain Myer said at a meeting at Monmouth that there had been a big leakage in the Government contracts in the past. He would like to know who was responsible for the leakage. On behalf of the hay merchants he repudiated that they had anything to do with it. Other hay dealers also addressed the meet- ing. one cf them alleging that Captain Myer had promised to call a second meeting of hay dealers, and had not done so. Captain Myer said he promised to call an- other meeting or give them notice of the suggestion he made to London, and he did so. The Speaker: I have a good memory. Captain Myer: I have the notes, which is better. GOVERNMENT WANTS HARD HAY. I In further remarks, Captain Myer said he called the meeting of hay dealers in their own interests, so that they might know the position. There seemed to be an intense auxietv on the part of dealers regarding colliery hay. Nobody had the interests of the collieries at heart more than the Government, which would see that they got hay. Regarding Mr. Hall's statement, what he said at Monmouth was that formerly the Government bought, very large quanties of hay from large contractors who sometimes never saw the hay. It passed through three or four hands, sometimes between the farmer and the Government, hence the leakage. Mr. Hall: Where 'was the leakage? Captain Myer: I used the word "leakage" in the sense that that hay passed through too many hands. If Mr. Hall had a name to mention he would be pleased to hear it. Mr. Hall: You mentioned the word "leakage." Captain Myer said regarding the collieries he had seen Mr. Dalziel, secretary to the South Wales Coal owners' Association, and he was in communication with him on the ques- tion of the supply of hay. Some of the farmers seemed to think they could not sell to the dealers, but this was not so. All soft -hay and the seconds was open for civil purchase. There was plenty of prime hay in the country as well as the prime hard hay which the Government wanted. If the colliery owners got together they would find that the sort of hay the Government wanted would not seriously affect them. The Chairman asked for a definition of hard hay. Captain Myer: All seed hay is hard hay. Clear clover we do not want. In the second crop there is generally too much clover. If the farmers sold the .particular class of hay the Government wanted it would be com- mandeered straight away from the buyers. The resolution was then put to the meeting and carried without dissent. Mr. H. M. Davies. representing Messrs. D. Da vis and Sons, colliery proprietors, Ferndale. said that for some weeks past they had been compelled time and again to pur- chase hay outside their contracts, because' their contractors—four in all-said they were unable to get supplies from the farmers, and they were really on the horns of a dilemma. That week they had purchased six trucks out- side contract, and within an hour of coming there he was rung up from Blaina with a mes- sage that unless they could get hay two of their pits would be idle to-morrow. All that was needed was a little co-operation, and he hoped that as a result of the meeting some- thing would be done to keep the collieries go- ing. Mr. Edmund D. Lewis suggested that the Government should leave Glamorgan to supply the collieries. Captain Myers said that if the farmers would be good enough to assist by offering hay they v.-oiiicl" deal with it as soon as possible, and if it was not taken the farmer would be at liberty to dispose of it. A vote of thanks was passed to Captain Myer, on the proposition of Mr. J. W. Hall, for attending the meeting.

No title

Lieut. E. H. Davies, 9th Lancashire Fusi- liers. son of Mr. and Mrs. John Davies, Tondu Farm. Tondu, was wo rinded on August 7tli while taking part in new landings at the Dardanelles. He writes: "All I shall say is that we took part in a new landing on the night of August 8th, and were quite success- ful. The 9th Lancashire Fusiliers encoun- tered strong opposition, and fought hard all night. At dawn the Turks retired. But our Company had suffered very heavily. Of the five officers, Major Tristram was killed; Captain Elwell had three fingers blown off; Lieut. Cannon was shot in both legs; I in the hand: and Second-Lieut. A. Hook was left in command." (Second-Lieut. Hook was killed next day). Lieut. Davies was a former scholar of Bridgend County School, and previous to the outbreak of war was a student at Aberyst- wyth University.

I HEOLYCYW

HEOLYCYW. SUNDAY SCHOOL TREAT.—The custom of taking the Sunday School scholars of St. Paul's Church to the seaside was broken this year and so the treat was held at heme on Wednesday. August 18th. A large number came together and enjoyed a pleasant after- noon. A happy feature in this season's fes- tivity was the appearance of Mr H. V. Thorn- ley, who took part in the sports. Again Miss Walker provided beautiful flowers and took a lively interest in the proceedings. It is to be feared that this will be one of the last social functions that they will participate in at Heolycyw, as they intend leaving tbq neigh- bourhood shortly. A little after 3 p.m. the tables were spread and most charmingly ar- rayed with beautiful flowers, provided by Mrs. Dickson. and tea was partaken of. Much credit is due to the ladies managing committee, for everything was done with a regularity of clockwork. Thanks are due to the indefatigable lady members of the com- mittee. Mrs. Morgans. Mrs. Clatworthy and Mrs. Easterbrook and to those who looked to the needs of all, viz.. Mrs. Dickscn, Misses Lanham, Mrs. Rume. Ijs<;es "DJ1do. Morgan, Eowen, Elsie and Violet Bateman, ) Mrs. Chant, Mrs. Wilhams and Mr. and Mrs. i Dando. The sports for the children were held I in a field kindly lent by Mr. James, of Bryn- with, and in which Mr. H. V. Thornley, Mr. Griffiths (Corneldu), Mr. Dawkins, Mr. Gee.

THE PttOXE

THE 'Pt-tOXE ————— ————— An officer with the Mediterranean Expedi- Aii officer with the -Aled!tei-rai,ean Ex p er,I- tionary Force, writing to a I- -n?? at Llantwit Major, describes a visit iiii, hr paid to the Hypogueum Temple, Malta, en route to the Dardanelles. This is a wonderful temple," he writes, "dating back 3,000 B.C. All the work was done by means of flint instruments. The whole thing was intensely interesting. The Holy of Holies was placed far back, with an altar for human sacrifices. The place was full of human skeletons—thousands of them." WWW According to His Honour Judge Bryn Roberts at Bridgend County Court on Thurs- day. the legal short-cut is the Icr.gEst way round. WWW At Bridgend County Court a solicitor re- marked that it was not the custom for people to run after the rate collector. It was not necessary for him to tell us; it is the usual practice to dodge them. WWW This week the Bridgend Gas Company have been altering the slot meters p: paratory to giving a decreased supply of gas icr the usual sum of money. The reason is Aie increased cost of coal. w w We notice this week that Cardiff coal has been reduced by 5s. per ton for sale to the public. < A. letter addressed from Bridgend to Wick, 6 miles awåy, has reached its destination after a. round of the British Isles. The address was fully and accurately given, but "insufficient address" has been written on the envelope, which is also crossed by seven different signa- tures. The letter has been to Brcughton and Worcestershire and to Wick in Scotland. Pos- sibly the local postal officials have joined the Army, and others who know net the little paradise of Wick in the Vale have taken their places. w w A number of Unions in Wales consider that the Workhouses expenses can be cut down without any hardship to the inmates. For instance, owing to the decrease in tke number of tramps, it has been considered advanta- geous to reduce the staff. The meat bill has been reduced, and other economics have been practised. There is much money spent un- necessarily in connection with large instiu- tions of the kind. We wonder if there can be any reduction at Bridgend. a 6 The L.G. Board wants all local authorities to reduce the expenditure so that lower rates can be levied. Taxation will be extremely heavy shortly, and the L.G. Board thus pre- r pare the way for the people to bear it. Much now depends upon the local authorities. 6 a 6 A little Bridgend boy has developed a fond- ness for practical joking, much to the dis- comfort of his adult relatives. But the day after he had mixed Epsom salts with the sugar he had time to reflect on his misdeeds. Mr. Abbott, chairman of the Bridgend U.D. Council, has been the recipient of anony- mous letters this week, criticising him for net taking steps to secure recruits for the Army. One letter starts, I am wondering what you think of yourself." Considering that Mr. Abbott has a son serving in the Army it is a little unkind, but when the letter is sent un- stamped it adds insult to injury. It is said that postcards bearing the follow- ing words have been sent to a number of old maids in the district :Lat.est war news. Kitchener gets half a million men in a month." The picture is of a lady who, on reading says: "Lor and here I've tried for 20 years and can't get one." • • • Those, elderly youths who are to be seen about the streets every night of the week im- portuning girls not much over school age, would find a place ready for them in the Army, where they would be turned into men. o 0 0 When is Quarella Road going to be patched? Within three months the Church Road footpath has been tar macadamed twice. It looks like preferential treatment.

ABERAYONS FLAG DAY

ABERAYON'S FLAG DAY. MAGNIFICENT TOTAL OF L362 REALISED FOR FRANCE. In comparison with other towns throughout the country, Aberavon, Port Talbot Dis- trict have come out exceptionally well over their recent French Flag Day by realising the magnificent sum of £ 362. The actual sale of flags realised £ 162. but thanks to the admir- able efforts of County Councillor Percy Jacob private donations by the leading industrial firms of the district brought the amount up to i £ 362. The private donations were as fol- lows :— Glanavcn Garw Colliery Company, £ 40; Oakwood Colliery Company, £ 20; Cribb Fawr Colliery Company, £ 20; CynoIl Colliery Com- pany, £ 20; Imperial Navigation Colliery Company. £ 20; Messrs. Baldwins, Ltd.. £20; Mr. S. H. Byass (Mansel Tin Plate Works), £ 20; Port Talbot Graving Dock Company, £ 20; Messrs. Vivian and Sons, LIO 10s. Port Talbot Steel Works Company, L5 5s.; Port Talbot Crown Preserved Coal Company, dM 5s. Splendid work in connection with this fund was performed by the committee, consisting of Councillor Percy Jacob (chairman), Messrs. David Jenkins, George O'Sullivan, Ernest Tennant. Councillor Hopkin Jones, and Mr. E. Marchant Jenkins (hon. secretary). A large and enthusiastic army of lady flag sel- lers also contributed materially to the success of the patriotic movement.

AN ALIENS STATEMENT

AN ALIEN'S STATEMENT. DESCRIBES HIMSELF AS A CHIUAN. At the Aberavon Police Court yesterday (Thursday), Gwilleon E. D. Steinbacker, des- cribed as an alien enemy, was charged with having failed to register himself, and also with having given a false statement. P.C. 503 said about 1 p.m. on Tuesday he arrested the defendant at Water-street, Aber- avon, and conveyed him to the Police Station. When charged with having failed to register himself he replied. I registered myself at the lodging-house." On the second charge, Ellenor G. C. David- son. daughter of Mr. Davidson, of Victoria- road. Aberavon. said the defendant called at the house about 2 o'clock on the 3rd August. She told him to go to the Police Station and register himself. She produced the register kept at the house under the Aliens Registra- tion Act. He then gave a different nrme. The Chairman: What nationality are you? Defendant: A Chilian, born in South America. The Chairman When did you arrive here? Defendant: I left the other country in Feb- ruary. and arrived here a few weeks ago. Defendant was remanded for one week,,