Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS! s Furniture for the ir! Million,,f — ? — Rock Bottom Prices. t t For the Long Term of Sixty-Five ?ears has this well-I?nown firm carried on business, and during that period, have faithfully discharged all I < obligations to their vast army of customers, with the result that to-cay th?y stand in the front rank of the Furnishing Kingdom. ? All goods are warranted, a?d are sold at the lowest possible prices consistent with good quality. Bevan & Company hold ?he largest selection in ? the Pfincipality of everything requited for furnishing throughout. Delivery free by road or rail up to 203 miles, and the train fares of cash cu&tomers are paid. Terms-Cash, or generous anangements for Credit. Illustrated Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. jj 

It I Peeps at Portheawl

It I *Peeps at Portheawl w ByMAR!NER. I !I Xo more information can be obtained con- cerning the rumours that 5,000 troops are coming to Porthcawl. Nothing is known locally. It has also been said that the men are to be removed frcm. Xewton to another camping ground elsewhere in Wales. The nrst would be extremely good news if true, &nd we can only wait for developments. The military authorities usually are as close as oy- sters until the time comes to move, and then we know all about it. But if the sta-temcTit is true, we should like to know, because it means so much to us. and the people of the town would like to make preparations. It is Tiot likely that the men, if they aj-e coming. will arrive for a week or two; it is probable that they would come for the autumn and winter months. If that is so, then we may 6-11 feel pleased with ourselves because we can- not complain that we have had a bad summer seaso.n. The town has been full, and the boarding-house keepers have nothing to com- plain about. I have heard it pretty freely said in the town that there is not a lot of money in circulation, and the reason given is that there are comparatively few men holiday- making this year, and the ladies are more c,ireful with their money. I had almost al- J 'wed myself to believe that the opposite was the <"aae, and that it wasthe men who did the saving for the ladies to spend. However. perhaps I am wrong. If I am then the ladies are to be praised for so zealously following the ad'vice now coming from all sides to prac- tice thrift. We ought to be happy in the thought that the tadies are amongst us to impart life and colour to a town which in itself is charming. We must not advise the ladies to desert the latest teachings of economy. But we know they must eat, and must have necessaries. They will spend money on what they really need, and if local shopkeepers do not aell out their stocks as quickly as they used to do, they must not shout about it; they too must learn to under- stand that the war is teaching us many things and the greatest of all fhe lessons, I think, is economy. We needed the lesson. Our last winter season was quite a prosper- ous one; in fact, we had never experienced such times; and if .5,000 more troops come to seek shelter in our habitations after the sum- mer visitors have said their "Good-bye." we must indeed sing praises for the good fortune that awaits us. But I am speculating on rumours. Nothing is certain. We are liv- ing in hopes that the men will come if they do, they will be given a good welcome. If is likely that the rates for billeting will be re- duced. I notice that the War Omce proposes to pay 2s. 3d. this year, and this will be a substantial drop on last year, but even that sum means a weekly payment of 1.5s .6d.) so if those who billeted troops last year take them again in the same numbers, they ought, even on the decreased amount ,to be able to secure S pront. I am told the Council is going to make every effort to get men here, and pro- poses to petition the military authorities'. May they succeed is the fervent wish of all of Tts. We will be pleased to accept all the help the military authorities can give us. Only let it be Mon. < The unfortunate spell of damp weather and drizzly rain this week is likely to spoil what has been, having regard to all the circum- stances, an excellent season. The number of people in the town at the time of writing is satisfactory, but the question is whether the weather will cause any of them to depart or prevent others from coming. The last few weeks have been glorious, and have done much to attract people to the seaside. Many have postponed their holidays till this month be- cause of the bright prospects, and it is a mat- ter for the clerk of the weather whether we are to be favoured or not. We usually look forward to our holiday season extending up to the end of September, if not into the month of October, but of course the weather plays an important part in all seaside calculations. I have noticed this week, lolling lazily in deck chairs, blowing ctouds of smoke into the air, and engaging in mild flirtations with young members of the opposite sex, a number of Porthcawl youths of military age, physic- ally fit, and. at any rate as far as people who know them are aware, with nothing to keep them back from doing their duty to their country. They have had the call; they have not replied. They still lag behind. But they feel their position, of that I am sure by their endeavours to appear at ease and uncon- cerned. The hoard with the names of local men who are serving painted thereon, is about to be erected. Their names will be missing, and those who know them intimately will point to the board and talk amongst them- selves as to who has failed, who shirked, when the county called. Those men will find it difHcuIt to pass that board without some feeing of shame. Probably they will pass by ('l the other side, or take a back turning t; get to the Esplanade. Well. we will wait to see what Lord Kitchener has to say. The call will be a sterner one next time, whether it is conscription or something else. < w Another treat for 250 wounded soldiers at present at Newton was arranged for yester- day, but as my notes go to Press early I am unable to deal with the function this week. The arrangements were in the hands of Mr. D. J. Rees. D. J. Rees. I may h"ve something interesting to say shortly about the Council and the gas under- taking. There is good material available, Jbut tsome enquiry is necessary. A pithy little paragraph could be written concerning r. Bottomley's vistt to Porth- cawl, but -rhipg it can be allowed to wait until the t:1e comes when all things will be revealed. œh'e Tat 3 Coroner Cuthbctrtson was a well- tnown nure at Porthcawl with his never- continued on Bottom of Next Column.)

It I Peeps at Portheawl

(Continued from previous column). forgotten button-hole. He could a-lways be pMked out of a crowd by reason of his own style in dress. He quickly got through busi- ness there was no waiting. But something of a record was created by his deputy at the inquest held here last Thursday. The inquest was timed for eight o'clock in the morning. The deputy coroner did not arrive till 8-15, the jury were sworn, evidence taken, jury's fees paid and everything completed in time for the coroner to catch the 8.27 a.m. train.

YOUTHFUL NOTTAGE POACHERS

YOUTHFUL NOTTAGE POACHERS. BOUND OVER. 1 At Bridgend Police Court on Monday (before Alderman John Thomas and Mr. D. H. Lloyd), David John Jones, of 1 Florence Street, Nottage, and William and Thomas Gillett, of 5 Florence Street, Nottage, were summoned for having, on August 29th, trespassed in pursuit of rabbits en land at Nottage in the occupation of Alice Thomas. Jones did not appear, and the other two lads denied the charge. Johu Hopper, under-gamekpeper, stated thit the defendants, with two greyhounds, were working along the hedge in one of the nelds. When they saw him they ran away. Witness caught the defendant William Gillett, who gave a false address at Porthcawl. He then chased and caught Jones, to whom the dogs belonged, and this defendant also gave a false address. On the following Tuesday witness, in company with a constable, visited the defendants at their homes, when they admitted the charge. Answering the Bench, witness said the lads had not caught anything. Defendants pleaded not guilty, and denied having admitted the charge when visited by the constable. They Wf're not near the hedge, but were on a footpath which runs through the neld. Hopper, however, stated that they were about 300 yards from the path. Defendants were bound over to be of good behaviour for six months, and ordered to pay 2s. 6d. each. The Magistrates stated that Jones must appear at the Court next Monday.

I PORIHCWL INQUESTS I

I PORIHC&WL INQUESTS. I I MAN FOUND IN DY)NG CONDITION. I An inquest was held at Porthcawl on Thursday, by Mr. Edward PoweU (deputy coroner) on Timothy Doneghan, of Caerau Road, Maesteg, who was a patient of the Porthcawl Rest, and was found on Monday night on Lock's Common in a dying condrtdon by Sergeant Codings, of the 7th WeJsh. Dr. Alexander stated that the man suffered from heart disea-se, and a verdict of ."Death from heart disease" was returned. DIED AT BREAKFAST. I Mr. Edward PowpII, deputy c

IMAGISTRATE AS COMPLAINANTI

I MAGISTRATE AS COMPLAINANT. I TONDU LABOURER FINED. I Alderman John Thomas, of Tondu, was the complainant in a case at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, when it appeared that the defend- ant had taken umbrage at the fact that the Alderman had been one of the Justices respon- sible for giving him two months' imprisonment on a former occasion. The defendant was Ivor Lloyd, collier. Station Road, Tondu, and he was summoned for having used abusive language. Alderman John Thomas said he was outside the Llynvi Arms. Tondu. on the 19th August, engaged in conversation with a friend. Defen- dant came out of the house and shouted, "I want to speak to you." Witness told him that he could do so. The man then came on, used filthy language, and pushed witness, who ad- vised him to be careful or he would have him arrested. He threatened to strike witness, say- ing that he had given him two months in gaol. Witness did not know the man, who ultimately went away, using filthy language. The Chairman said defendant had a bad record, and would be 6ned 25s., or 21 days' in default of payment.

DA IN CANADA

D.A. IN CANADA. CONVICTION THAT THE WAR WILL BE A LONG ONE. The Times" Toronto correspondent writing on August 26th, says:—It is now the general conviction in Canada that the war will be of long duration, but there is little depression ind no pessimism. Industrial conditions have im- proved, chiefly through the distribution of war contracts and an abundant harvest. It is esti. mated that war contracts for Great Britain and the Allied Governments total .650,000,000, and probably many more orders will follow. At 6rst there was slowness in delivery—some con- tracts were allotted to factories with inadequate equipment, and perhaps chiefly with the design to relieve industrial depression and unemploy- ment—but deliveries have improved, and )f there is now any delay it is in assembling. Mr. D. A. Thomas, representing the War Omce, ex- presses satisfaction with what has been achieved and believes that additional orders could be safely placed in the Dominion. If the exchange situation is unfavourable it must be remembered that it is as favourable in Canada as in the United States. Between Mr. Thomas and Canadian manufacturers satisfactory rela- tions were quickly established; any impression that may have existed on the one side that there was discrimination against the Dominion in favour of the neighbouring country has been dispelled, and on his side Mr. Thomas has been impressed with the patriotic spirit alike of manufacturers and workmen and the general disposition to be content with very moderate pronts.

SOUTH GLAMORGAN AND WAR LOAN

SOUTH GLAMORGAN AND WAR LOAN. PERSONAL AND HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY. t A conference under tba. auspices of the South Glamorgan Parliamentary War Emergency Committee was held on Thursday at the Cory Hall, Cardiff, in order to encourage investment in the War Loan and to advocate personal and household economy. Mr. 0. H. Jones, J.P., presided, and he was supported by Mr. W. Brace, M.P. (the Under- secretary for Home Affairs), Mr. R. Rhys (of the Central Office), Mr. Sam Thomas (Penarth), General Tyier, Mr. J. C. Meggitt, Colonel Henry Lewis, Rev. David Davies, and Colonel W. Forrest, together with representatives of local authorities, clergy, and ministers of all denomi- nations, political associations, employers, labour organisations. t Friendly Societies, and women's organisations. The Chairman read a letter from the Earl of Plymouth regretting his absence and stating that "many of us have for a loug time past rea- lised the necessity of economy in all our per- sonal aSairs, but concerted and organised effort is always of more value than the single action of individuals, and I heartily support the Par- liamentary War Emergency Committee in their endeavour to arouse the universal practice of self-denial and economy in the interests of the State." Mr. Samuel Thomas proposed H That the war emergency campaign for South Glamorgan be proceeded with immediately; that all public bodies of the division be invited to assist in the campaign by the holding of public meetings and the distribution of literature; and that where necessary the local committees be formed." This was seconded by Councillor Beck, of Barry, and supported by Mr. David Rhys, who said that it was now a national duty to save, and should nrst commence with the Government and then with the local authorities. The total income of the nation was 2,300 millions they spent 2,000 millions *and saved 300 millions a year; now there was a new expenditure of 1,000 millions a year on top of it, and they must re- duce their personal and public expenditures in order to save. Every penny saved would reduce the length of the war, and it was their duty to the lads in the trencher that they should do all in their power to bring it to a speedy end. Let every man and every woman understand that by saving they would usher in a brighter day f< freedom and liberty, t Mr. W. Brace, M.P.. a:So supported, and said men and munitions were coming in well, bit they were the bankers of the Allies, and they must mobilise their credit. He hoped that when Parliament met they would be able to tell the people that they were strong enough finan- eially, as well as from the standpoint of muni- tions, to beat their foes. Mr. Brace urged local authorities to popularise the War Loan. There was a time in front of them when people would be glad of their savings. They were now living on a wave of great national prosperity despite the war; wages were high in every trade, and there was a living surplus, despite the high cost of living. It would be a pity that that surplus should be allowed to trickle to waste when the time was bound to come when money would be of enormous value. If, by any stroke of fate, Britain and her Allies failed to secure success they would have to pay an enormous indemnity, which would be counted by thousands of mil- lions. This war must be carried on. not to a compromise peace, but to a settlement which would teach the arrogant German people and all nations that there was such a thing as right in this world. Mr. J. R. Llewellyn, Barry, hoped that when the House of Commons met one of the nrst questions in connection with the new Session would be a voluntary declaration by the mem- bers that they would surrender their salaries and invest them in the War Loan. The Rev. David Davies, Penarth, suggested that committees should be appointed in every district to guide the people how to save with the least hindrance and inj ury to trade. The Chairman pointed out that the idea was that the local authorities should act as com- mittees. The resolution was carried unanimously, and it was agreed that local committees be formed in every district.

IHALFTRUTHSI

I HALF-TRUTHS. I MR. BLANDY JENKtNS BLAMES THE I GOVERNMENT. Mr. BIandy Jenkins, chairman of the Glam- organ County Council, was one of the princi- pal speakers at a war-savings conference hd at Cardiff on Monday. Having explained that the conference had been convened at the request of the Welsh Parliamentary Committee, he said that, per- sonally, he did not think the Government should ask public men to preach economy be- cause the Government had not practised economy themselves. "Mr. Asquith and the Government who started the war," said Mr. Blandy Jenkins, "certainly ought to have known that they wanted men and munitions, and should have made preparations accordingly. Where the Government is to blame is that they do not tell us the whole truth-only half the truth, and the consequence is that the public do not believe there is any real danger. If there could be close inquiry we should nnd that there Is very real danger. It will mean noth- ing but destruction for this country if the Germans are victorious." i Mr. 0. H. Jones said that one of the chief objects of the movement was to induce people to invest money in the War Loan and thus help the Government. It was also their duty to try and bring home to everyone the serious- ness of the situation, although it was difficult to understand why anyone should doubt this after reading Mr. Lloyd George's speech at Bristol, and a preface to a book of his speeches Issued that morning. After some discussion it was decided to ask the Parliamentary agents in each division to convene local conferences and to make ar- rangements for conducting the campaign under the auspices of the Welsh National Committee.

1 k Gathered Comments ON THE WAR I

k Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. Looking Things in the Face. Speaking at Dartmouth on Monday, Mr. F. D. Acland said the people of England had to look things in the face and square up to a rather situation than they had hoped for. He referred to the splendid spirit of the Allied na- tions, and said the British people were rising more and more to the height of a great occasion. He would not go into the question for or against compulsory service, but the Government knew the exact position, and the nation ought to be able to trust the people who knew what the post- tion was. Battle Change! to Murder. The Archdeacon of London preached on Sun- day afternoon at St. Paulas Cathedral, and said « I need not go further back than last Wednes- day to tell you that battle has changed into murder. Speaking with all the icstraint that 's due from every preacher, as well as the pness, and with the knowledge and consent of the cen- sor, I tell you that to one hospital alone were taken the dead bodies of little children of 15, 10, seven and five, and one little baby, so that the nursery became a slaughterhouse of the Im- perial murderer who allowed it, if he did not order it. All we can say it, in the words of the Psalmist—the most awful punishment ever given to a nian-c I will set before thee the things that thou hast done/ Rev. R. J. Campbell and the Sh'rker. Speaking at the City Temple, London, on his recent experiences at the front, the Rev. R. J. Campbell said he had to admit regarding the question of national service that most of the men did feel it as somewhat unfair that the skulker and coward should be able to shelter behind the deeds of the Volunteer men out there. He thought that some method should be devised of compelling shirkers to do their duty, but the prevailing impression was that it was deplorable to make the question of national '-er- vice one for angry newspaper discussion, and the matter ought to be left to the Government with full discretion to do whatever in their judgment was necessary for the country. So far as the Army was concerned, all the pessi- mism was in England. There was none at the front. As to statements that no man who had once been in the trenches ever wanted to go back, that might be so in some cases, but not in all. Reorisats. Dealing with the air raid on London dis- trict, a correspondent of the "Daily Dis- patch" says:— "The Hun is venting his spite on defenceless women and children. It is our business, however, to stop this murder of our kith and kin, and this can be done. That it can be done was well shown by the Karlsruhe reprisals undertaken by our French Allies in May, which stopped any more attempts by the German aerial pirates for a period of about three months. It is Imperative that retaliations of this kind should be exacted by the French, or preferably by our Flying Corps. They squealed at Karlsruhe. They should again at Frankfort, or Cologne, after which an Invitation could be forwarded them to refrain in future from the practice, since it can be made to cut both ways. The Hun would be the very last man to take no notice of reprisals on his own people. They would see to It that he did." j Speaker and M.P.'t Satariet. The declaration of the Speaker of the House of Commons (Mr. J. W. Lowther) against the payment of Members of Parliament during the time war is in progress, whilst it has met with hearty endorsement in many quarters, has also provoked vehement criticism, which has some- times descended to the personal. Mr. Lowther has now replied to his critics in the following letter :—"I did not suggest that members who required it should be deprived of their modest .k400 a year. What I did suggest was that a great number of very wealthy members should not, during the war, receive their .=8400 a year. I know of at least two cases of wealthy men who have not even been in the House during the last two years who have each drawn their full salary. Since the war began there are about 200 members who have drawn their full salaries for a year, but have not put in more than one or two attendances. My salary is paid to me for the heavy responsibilities, grave duties, and long hours of my ofEce. A member can attend as much or as little as he pleases, and for the last year there have not been more than about 80 to 100 members in average attendance. I think, therefore, that I am fully justified in suggest- ing that to a great many members their salary was a luxury, that they were not earning it, and that during the war it should be suspended, and I hope you will agree with that view." An Army of Gents. I Writing to a Birmingham clergyman, a major acting as provost-marshal to one of the divisions at the front gives our soldiers in France a splendid character:— "The sordid is lost in comparison with the enormous balance of all that is good in even the roughest nature I by Comparison. Here I have never had a case of an assault on a woman; drunknness is far below the average town. War in all its tra- gedy is with us, but it brings out all that is I beautiful, which under normal conditions would never have appeared. All these men from the jewellers quarter, suffering all the inheret discomforts of war without complaint, making good soldiers, doing their bit, dying daily, and, above all, cheery; kind to the French peasants with whom they live, and who have lost all. I was in the trenches at 4 a.m. on a perfect Sunday morning; lovely and cool, with birds singing. At 7 a.m. a German mine was exploded, and for an hour fighting lasted—so incongruous, death and Hfe so mixed up; then quiet again, everybody to his own job; to sleep, to eat, all except that row of still beings under the blankets, who will be buried at night, when you may dare to put your head up. This goes on day after day, and the spirit of the troops im- proves instead of deterioratf-s. Isn't this worth something? That the novice called from the workshop, lathe, counter, shows clearly the inborn spirit of a freedom which is the heritage of centuries. No, I see noth- ing but good." A Sptrit That Can't Be Defeated. Speaking as chairman at a lecture at the Congregational Church, Llandrindod Wells, Mr. T. P. O'Connor, M.P., said he had never wavered in his opinion that they would con- quer the enemy in the end. Fine stalwart young fellows were rushing to the flag of their own free will in the spirit of self-sacrince, and that was a spirit which could never be de- feated. Although he was in a place of wor- ship belonging to a different communion than his own, he felt no restraint. If the war had done nothing else, it had at least united men of all creeds. Narrow sectarianism was one of the greatest enemies Christianity had, and if there ever was a time when it should dis- appear from their midst, it was now, when there was this great conflict between Chris- tian ideals on the one side and brutal material .paganism on the other. Help, Not Hinder. I Speaking at the opening of an extension at the Harris Academy, Dundee, en Tuesday, Lord Haldane said war was with us .si.mply a question of courage and of making up of any defects there might be in our science a.nd organisation. They had only to look at the resources of the Allies and compare them with the resources of the Central Powers. We had to take ihese resources of population, wealth and learning which we possessed and put them into shape. Lord Haldane asked for greater consideration for the authorities. Admirals. Generals, and the Government, he said, were the people in whose hands the conduct of the wa.r rested, and their business was to help them in every way in their power. So long as they did their duty it was a crime to try to embarrass them by starting new hares, and by proposing plans which could only embarrass their deliberations. I A Fatse Perspective. Commenting on the thrilling accounts fur- nished by Mr. Ashmead Bartlett of the light- ing in Galhpoli, a London correspondent writes:—Things have happened since which have gone to show that though the objective of the moment was not reached, the magnin- cent eSort was by no means futile In its in- nuence upon the course of the war, Unfor- tunately the vivid narration of the details of the fight-by contrast with the comparatively bare omcial news which has nlled up the inter- val—tends inevitably to give it a false pers- pective and make it appear as a thing of yes- terday. The result was a greater degree of depression than developments since that date have warranted. It was not for- gotten that since then material further pro- gress has been made, and that the disappoint- ment of the moment did not imply any vital check in the forward movement. In the form in which news nowadays passes the censorship for publication-a trickle of information as to current happenings with belated spurts of ancient history-it is necessary before all things to keep a tight hold upon the chrono- iogicai sequence of events. tn the Sacred Name of Liberty. I At a- women's meeting for National Ser- vice, held under the presidency of the Bishop of Birmingham in South London, the Bishop of Birmingham said in reference to the argu- ment that Lord Kitchener would tell them as soon as he wanted them, that the very great- eat help they could afford that magnificent man was to have an educated public opinion at his back. The greatest 'fear in Germany was that we should adopt National Service. No sudden battle was going to win. Ger- many had to be worn down. Sir L. Chiozza Money said the position was grave, and we dared not do less than the utmost. He be- lieved the voluntary system had crippled our efforts in the war, and that it was continuing to cripple them. He pleaded for compulsion in the sacred name of liberty. The Govern- ment Committee had been appointed because people were demanding National Service, but we ought not to have waited 13 months for it, and he was convinced the present Parliament was out of touch with the nation.

I 8MLL HOLDINGS

I 8M&LL HOLDINGS. THE GLAMORGAN SCHEMES. In consequence of a letter from the Board of Agriculture relating to the holdings of Cog Farm, Sully, and the observations of several members of the Glamorgan Small Holdings Commit'tee regarding the state of cultivation on the holdings generally., the committee re- solved some time ago that an inspection should be made of all the land under their care, and the report came before a- meeting of the com- mittee. A neld-to-neld inspection was made to as- certain whether the land was being properly cultivated and whether the stocking was satis- factory. Six days were spent on the inspec- tion, to which all members of the committee were invited, and, in a summary of theifr find- ings, the committee state that they inspected 21 schemes, covering 2,724 acres. Nineteen were in a satisfactory state; Barry and a por- tion of SuMy were not. With the exception of the Sully holdings, the committee found no evidence of land having deteriorated since it had been let as small holdings; but in several instances there was a distinct improvement. The land generally was well stocked—es- pecially at St.-y-nyll and Yyguborwen. A few tenants complained of high rent, but all paid promptly, only one small bad debt of £8 10s. having accrued, representing one- eighth per cent. These facts, in the opinion of the committee, disproved the assertions that the holdings created have been a failure, and that they are being badly cultivated. The report concluded with a paragraph stating that the charge of ineniciency was unfounded, and that it was to be regretted that "sweeping charges" should have been made from insumcient information against the tenants and the management of the holdings.

No title

Mr. Robert Jones, an ex-president of the North Wales Miners* Association, and one of the most prominent Labour leaders in the North Wales coalfields, has. at the request of the mili- tary authorities, organised from the colliery workers of Wrexham, a tunnelling platoon for active service. Mr. Jones has been appointed sergeant.

Advertising

REMRBhE WEliS R fLHNNEIlS As UsuAL I have the LARGEST STOCK and GREATEST VARIETY of RELIABLE WELSH FLANNELS in the District. Nearly 20,000 yards in stock, from t/2 per yard. Plain & Striped Grey Shirtings Ptain & Striped Fawn Shirtings Green and Navy Shirtings Black & Blue Plaid Shirtings Cream Striped Shirtings White and Black Drawers Flannel White & Black Twill Flannel Navy, Red, Blue, Black, Grey Striped and other coloured Blouse Flannel. Black & White, and two Blues Apron Flannel, from 23 to 46 inches wide. Narrow Width Shirtings for Boys' Wear. Over 2 000 yds. White Flannel from 27 to 36 inches wide. I  N I v yt ? ?

r TOO MANY CHAPELS

!!r TOO MANY CHAPELS. a I IMPORTANT FREE CHURCH CONGRESS. I We are in a position to state (says the "Daily Chronicle") that within the next few days an important conference will be held in London to consider questions that may have a far-reaching effect on the destinies of the Free Church denominations of England and Wales, Sir Joseph Compton-Rickett, M.P., President of the National Council of Evangel- ical Free Churches, will preside over the con- ference. We understand, however, that important questions of policy will engage the attention of the delegates. The discovery has been made that in a large number of villages and smaller towns, as well as in congested urban districts, the accommodation of the Free Churches was altogether in excess of the demand. It was felt that a great and unnecesary expenditure of energy and money had been going on, and that in these two directions a desirable saving might be effected if proper steps could be taken for the reduction of the number of chapels of different denominations, so as to allow concentration upon the remainder. Great problems of Free Church polity, how- ever, underlie these questions, and it is Impos- sible to anticipate the result of the confer- ence. In the most innuential circles the view is held that the time is not yet ripe for Free Church union on a comprehensive scale.

Advertising

? TH6 CELEBRATEO S WADDIN, OT0 N ]p bw (;Ontain all inodern I mprovements atid are ?! BEST IVPLUE isWORLD. y call and inSpect-'tbe instruments. < 9 cattiloguespost free. ? All WADDING ON &ITSON59 .1 (EST ABLISHBn 1888) ? STATION MAD (OppMtte ttt Comtj Sebeoh) PORT TALB01 POUNDS SAVED BY DEALING WITH THE ACTUAL I PIINO MAKERS SELLING DIRECT to the PUBLIC Be Patriotic I Keep your Money on the move by spending wisely with our Adyertisets.,