Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS! -—————————————"———'t Furniture for the III Million! Willion,fII Rock Bottom Prices. I I For the Long Term of Sixty-Five Years has this well-?nownnrm carried on business, and during that period, have faithfully discharged all j j obligations to their vast army of customers, with the result that to-ca) they stand in ?he front rank of the Furmshlug Kingdom.   ??'?_?*?*"???'???'????????????????—??—???——??. Ii 7'll goods are warranted, and are sold at the lowest possible prices consistent with good quality. Bevan & Company hold the largest selection in I I, the Principality of everything required for furnishing throughout. Delivery free by road or rail up to 200 miles, and the train fares of cash C jj customers aie paid. Terms-Cash, or generous arrangements for Credit. Illustrated Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. I t Several useful Spring Vans and Carts on offer. Bargains I Must be sold to make room for Motor Vans. t ■ —■—- I PIANOFORTES and ORGANS. I Splendid value and Ten Years Warranty *■ 97. St. Mary Street, and near Empire, Cardiff 280, Oxford Street and Arcade, Swansea Llanelly, &c. r I I

c 71 I Peeps at thcawl

c —71 ? Peeps at !thcawl c, By MARINfcn. « To the parents of Lieut. Sidney Jenkins and Sergt. Evan Rogers, the sympathy of all resi- dents will be extended. They may not de- part from the well-worn phrases used in con- veying their messages, but deep down in every heart the warmest admiration is felt for the heroism of such soldiers that Porthcawl has sent from her midst—solders who responded so nobly to the call of a country in need, and were prepared to make, and made. the supreme sacrifice. They gave up everything to keep the old flag flying; to take up the weapons of war in defence of civilisation against a barbarous foe. They have given their lives in the country's service, and are mourned by all who knew them. Their names will find a place on Porthcawl's Roll of Honour, and their sacrifice should be an example to those young men who still remain with us, in- different to all the beseeching, anxious ap- peals made to their loyalty. Have those two heroes, and thousands more like them. to die that these young men still amongst us should live ?—voung men who are physically fit and able to shoulder a gun? Will nothing move t.h.-m to answer the call that appeals to their honour as well as to their patriotism? Will they still continue to look upon these glorious sacriifces for their sake as for the sake of the women and children, without a flicker of the eye-lid? If they will-then shame on them. I was expecting to hear of something having been mentioned about the water meters at Monday's meeting of Porthcawl Council, but for some reason the committee's recommenda- tion was not brought forward. It is to be hoped, however, that the matter will be hur- ried on, for the town cannot afford to lose the money that the meters would bring into the coffers of the Council. The change may mean the saving of a 4d. rate, and more than that, if we made calculations upon the esti- mated loss for 1914, and the prospective loss for 1915 on the present basis of charges. The ratepayers, when they are thoroughly alive to this question will get a move on, and it cer- tainly is time that they showed more interest in the Council's doings. The Chamber of Trade has become an almost obsolete body, for the simple reason that it did not continue jn I the spirit it commenced life. It was then alert and lynx-eyed, but its utility and effec- tiveness .have been destroyed, because it lost members of independent spirit who at one time were interested in the welfare of the town, and were not slow in criticising the Council at every opportunity. Criticism, whatever sort it is, is beneficial to a local authority, but there is a tendency on the part of public men to regard criticism as an act of hostility, and they refuse to believe that it is tendered in the best interests of a town and not out of any ill-feeling towards indi- vidual members. When that feeling ceases to exist, perhaps ratepayers will make their protests more often, and if the feeling con- tinues to thrive, then those who pay must not allow their voices to be stifled. They must shout, as a well known politician once said, "and the consequences." • m Porthcawl ratepayers are no doubt hoping that the rate for the ensuing half-year will drop considerably on the last half, but I am afraid they will be doomed to disappointment. There is not likely to be a drop of more than 2d. or 3d. at the most. We must be thank- ful, therefore, for small mercies. The Council has undoubtedly done its best. Some mem- bers desired to make a greater reduction, but their valour outran their discretion, for other members considered that it would be a foolish policy to be too enthusiastic in reducing the estimate, and then to find a heavy burden thrown upon the next estimate. In taking this view, I think the majority of the Council acted wisely. Strict economy can be prac- tised during the coming winter, and probably when the time comes for making the summer rate, it will be found possible to make a more gratifying reduction. For we must remem- ber the Chancellor of the Exchequer has not finished with us yet. At the time of writing none of the soldiers expected have arrived, but we are all living in hopes of the advance batch soon coming. It is not known here when they are to be ex- pected, but military arrangements change so often that we must not be surprised if a week or so elapses, and, in fact, we must not feel downhearted if they do not come at all. < The Rest has been recommended by the military authorities as a hospital for wounded soldiers, so we may see some more of the heroes of Britain's battles amongst us very shortly. I have no doubt that our towns- people will give them a hearty reception when they arrive, and treat them well while they are here. The fund inaugurated for the purpose of presenting a testimonial to the Rev. D. J. Arthur making excellent progress, and the gift, wli it ever it will be, will be a worthy one for a y, wthy recipient. Mr. T'chael Davies, of Bridgend, I am told has got down a notice of motion for the next Assessment Committee meeting, urging the committee to appoint an independent valuer to assess Porthcawl. Many people agree with the proposal, but many whistle and say "We are burdened enough." It will mean a pretty penny to Porthcawl if an independent valuer is appointed. And tfbo is to blame?

No title

In this nonth's "Haul" the Vicar of Kid- welly contrasts the silver-tongued Dean Howell with the great pulpiteers of his day. He was not- as scholarly as Dr. T. Charles Edwards, nor as original as Matthews of Ewenny. and lacked the passion of the Rev. John Evars (Eglwysbfch), but the dean was more polished than the others. Of present- day Welsh clergymen there are two whose elo- quence is t one whit less brilliant. The first is a Soil Walian who ministers in North iWales (( inoTi E. T. Davies), and the second is a "North Walian who ministers in South 3Vales (Canon W. Williams, Jeffreyston).

PORTHCAWL URBAN DI iTRICT I COUNCILI

PORTHCAWL URBAN DI iTRICT COUNCIL. THE REST TO BE USED FOR THE RECEPTION OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS. Mr. T. E. Deere (chairman) presided at a meeting of the Porthcawl Urban District Council on Monday evening. TARRING IN SUFFOLK PLACE. Mr. D. Davies inquired when tarring oper- ations were to be commenced in Suffolk Place I and Esplanade Avenue. He would be rather loth to ask the residents to contribute to the cost of the frontage until the work was done. The Surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn) intimated that the matter would have his attention. I THE BILLETING OF TROOPS. General McKinnon wrote stating he would not fail to bear in mind the claims of Porth- cawl when considering the question of the billeting of troops, and on the suggestion of the chairman it was unanimously agre.ed that he be thanked for his letter. I THE WATER SUPPLY TO THE REST. Mr. D. Davies inquired if it was correct that the Rest was now getting a supply of water to the top floor. The Surveyor said it had been reported to him that the Rest was now obtaining a supply of water to the top floor. On September 29th there were two feet of water, flowing in at 3 p.m., 5-30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Mr. R. E. Jones: That is more satisfactory. If there was water flowing in at 3 o'clock we are in a better position. At a later stage in the meeting the deputy clerk (Mr. G. H. Brown) read further corres- pondence on the matter from Mr. S. H. Stockwood and Mr. Arthur Williams (secre- tary to the committee of the Rest). Mr. Stockwood wrote to the effect that he was quite aware of the purport of the clause in the agreement, but he was still of the opinion that with the goodwill of the Council the supply of water to the Rest could have been much better without any material detriment to the supply to the town itself. Mr. Arthur Williams, in a letter dated Oc- "tober 4th, stated he wished to inform the members of the Council that there was not yet a sufficient supply of water in the top tanks at the Rest afor domestic purposes. They were getting about one foot per day, and still were compelled to pump and carry the water. He had no wish to re-open the question, but they ought to have been re- oeiving sufficient water in the top tanks long ago. He would like to remind the Council of their letter of August 12th, when they wrote: "We hope it will be possible to give you a supply of water the following morning. If this is insufficient to reach the top levels we hope it will reach the lower levels at least. We hope you will bear with the Council in a state of things that they hope will be merely transitory." In spite of this the Rest did not receive any water until August 21st, when, on strong representations being made to the Council, and when the water in the cistern was almost speaking for itself, the Council caused some casks of water to be sent. Could they not agree that the authorities of the Rest had been very forbearing ? Four weeks afterwards water was obtained in the under- ground cistern. They had had a visit at the Rest from representatives of the military authorities, who had recommended the use of the building as an auxiEary hospital for wounded soldiers—(hear, hear)—so within the next few weeks it would probably be in use for the whole of the winter, and perhaps the following summer as well. This would be de- cided at a meeting to be held in the course of | day or two, and he would therefore be glad if the Council would g've the Committee some assurance on the question of the water supply, and take the necessary steps to ensure a good supply. He must express resentment at the unkind references to the "underlings" at the Rest. He maintained that the authorities of the Rest had done a good deal more than oould have been expected of them, and he hoped the Council would give effect to their expressed good wishes to the Rest by ensuring an adequate supply of water in the future. Mr. D. J. Rees: Is there any possibility of giving them water for a night or two? Mr. R. E. Jones: There is plenty of water there now, -and it is reaching the top tanks. The Chairman: I think the most important part of Mr. Williams' letter is in regard to the military. I think the question is whether we 11' can nolo out hope to the Rest for the future. It was suggested that the letters should be acknowledged Mr. R. E. Jones: By Friday, I should im- agine. we shall be able to give them a supply there night and day. The Chairman: I should like to see the mat- ter left till Friday, because we shall probably be in a better position then. It was thereupon agreed that the letters be referred to the Works Committee for con- sideration at their meeting on Friday. THE DOCKS FOOTBRIDGE. The manager of the Great Western Railway Company wrote stating instructions had been given with a view to the erection of a foot- bridge at the docks being put in hand as soon as possible. A PETITION. A petition was sent to the Council, signed by 13 freeholders of houses in Queen's Avenue, asking that the road might be adopted under the Private Street Work s Improvement Act. It was agreed that the Surveyor inspect the road, and report upon the work necessary to be done. EVERYTHING GOING UP. Mr. T. James, referring to the 23rd Welsh Pioneers, remarked that they were known as the 23rd instead of the 22nd, because "every- thing is going up." ECONOMY AT THE PUMPING STATION. I Mr. D. Davies suggested that as the engi- neer had left. the Council might be able to economise to some extent by engaging a boy at the pumping station- He moved that a boy be advertised for. The deputy clerk said it was decided at the committee meeting that the vacancy should not be filled, but that Mr. John should do the pumping necessary. The Surveyor said the pumping required about six hours at the present time, which did not leave much oportunity for other work. Mr. D. Davies: If Mr. John can do the work now it shows that he had not enough to do be- fore. The Chairman: No, not necessarily. When the matter was dealt with we agreed not to fill the position. Are you satisfied now that the position is not what you anticipated, and you want the position to be filled? I Mr. D. Davies: I thought we should only be pumping about it couple of hours a day, but now we are told it takes six hours, and that alters the case entirely. The Chairman: It has been moved that the position be filled. Mr. D. Davies: A lad could do the work in my opinion. Mr: R. E. Jones: And ruin the engine that is the danger. Continuing, Mr. Jones said they wanted to economise as much as possible, and he thought that the matter might very well be left over for a week or two. Mr. D. Davies withdrew his motion. THE PINK FORMS. The Chairman mentioned that he had been appointed agent for the district in the matter of dealing with the pink forms, and asked the members of the Council to assist him in the work. The Clerk (Mr. Evan Davies): I hope they will all work as well as they did in connection with the registration. A DISGRACE TO THE COUNCIL. Mr. T. G. Jones thought instructions should be given to discontinue the tipping of refuse in the present quarry unles the fire there was put out. It was about time this nuisance was abated. It had been in existence all the sum- mer with the visitors in the town, and it was a disgrace for a public authority to be tipping refuse in the centre of the town. It must be intolerable to the people who lived near. Mr. D. Davies seconded the proposition that tipping be discontinued until the fire was put out. The Chairman: We understand it is put out for a short time, but is re-lit again. The Surveyor said he had given instructions that no fires were to be lighted at the tip, and the employees of the Council had not caused the fires. The interior of the tip was in a state of slow combustion, and lighted itself. The Chairman: Is there any way of pump- ing water into it? The Surveyor: We have tried to smother it, but the attempt has not been successful. It will be an expensive matter; it will have to be spread out and ventilated. Mr. R. E. Jdhes: The difficulty I see is where to tip. Mr. D. Davies: It is a very serious matter, and people are complaining about it. Some people in South Road say it is impossible to stay in the house. For a seaside resort it is ridiculous. The Chairman: Steps should certainly be taken to secure a more suitable tipping ground away from the centre of the town. The Surveyor said he would make another attempt to quench the fire. HOLES IN THE ROADWAY. Mr. D. Davies said the Surveyor had pro- mised to attend to the matter of the pool of water in Philadelphia Road, but apparently nothing had yet been done. The Surveyor said he had got a man to fill up the holes in various other roads, and he hoped he would arrive at Philadelphia Road soon. The Chairman: It is a bad spot, and it will be advisable to give it attention immediately. Mr. R. E. Jones: I am very pleased to see that some of these holes are being filled up, for they are positively dangerous.

A SPLENDID OFFtCERj I

"A SPLENDID OFFtCER." Writing to the mother of the late Lieuten- ant Sydney Jenkins, who resides at Bryna- mawr, Porthcawl, Lieut. W. E. Hewett says: The only information about his death ;g from a wounded sergeant, who says he saw him shot. He says he died a fine death. The sergeant was badly hit, and this is all I could get from him. I searched all night for his body, but could not find him. We are all very sorry indeed to lose him, as he was one of the best fellows we have ever had, a splendid officer, and much liked by all men and officers." Lieutenant Jenkins a month after the de- claration of war joined the Glamorgan Yeo- manry as a private, and here he advanced to the rank of squadron sergeant-major. He afterwards obtained a commission as second- lieutenant in the 3rd Welsh Regiment, and was stationed for some time at Cardiff Castle previous to going to the fighting line 'in France, where he had been for four months. Previous to joining Lieutenant Jenkins was employed at the office of Mr. C. G. Biggs, metal merchant, Swansea.

ANOTHER PORTHCAWL MAN DIES OF WOUNDS I

ANOTHER PORTHCAWL MAN DIES OF WOUNDS. Mr. and Mrs. Evan Rogers, Suffolk Place, Porthcawl, whose son was reported wounded in France and in hospital, received a letter from Colonel Robinson, commanding officer, as follows:—" Dear Mr. Rogers,—Your son was wounded by being struck by a piece of shrapnel on the 25th ult. He was very cheer- ful when brought out of the trenches, but I regret to say that he has since passed away. I was very much attached to him, he was such a good and efficient worker. I was very fond of him. He died in a good cause. I hope you can bear up under this blow." Sergt. EvaYi Rogers was 24 years old. He was a native of Aberkenfig, and before enlisting was an assistant at the establishment of Mr. D. P. Thomas, Aberkenfig.

No title

A constable was careful to avoid looseness of expression in Ystrad Police Court. Did you see him coming through the door?" was the question put to the constable in cross- examination. "No," answered the witness precisely, "he was coming through the door- way.

KNEW IT MEANT DEATH I to

KNEW IT MEANT DEATH. ——— to ——- GLORIOUS CHARGE BY AUSTRALIANS. I I Captain C. E. W. Bean, the official Press representative with the Australian Forces in the Dardanelles, describes in a lengthy dis- patch the charge of the Australian Light Horse on Saturday, August 7th—one of the most gallant deeds in the history of war. It was a deed of self-sacrificing bravery, says the writer, quite unsurpassed. The Austra- lians charged into certain death at the call of their comrades' need during a crisis in the greatest battle ever fought in Turkish soil. Two Australian Light Horse Brigades took part, and the Royal Welsh Fusiliers also figured, although it is not the business of the chronicler to record the deeds of regiments other than the Australian forces. Captain Bean states:—A little before day- break there came, ever so faint, the sound as of water bubbling and boiling. It was the first sign of the new British force landed that night four miles to the north of Suvla Bay. Now it was a matter of intense urgency if possible to hold the Turks to their position around Anzac while these other columns had time to do their appointed work while the woods and ridges were fairly empty, and before the Turks could find out what they were at, and forestall them. It was possible that they would be in such a position by daybreak as to greatly help in the attack made by 'the Light Horse. On the other hand, it was possible that they might not be in that position in which the attack by the Light Horse would have to help them to get there. And this is what actually happened. It was clear that the attack of the Light Horse against the centre could expect no help from the north. At four o'clock to the moment the bom- bardment by our guns began. Every gun on land and shore that could be brought to bear emptied itself as fast as the gun's crew old load into the maze of Turkish trenches. The dust of the bombardment rolled across the range in clouds, 4liutting out any view of the place from a distance. For half-an-hour the slope in front of our trenches was an in- ferno, and then the uproar ceased as suddenly as it had begun-eeased as if cut off by the stroke of a knife. And that same instant the Light Horse attack was launched. Colonel White stood by the parapet with his watch in his hand. "Three minutes to go," said the Colonel. Then simply "Go!" They were over the parapet like a flash, the Colonel amongst them, the officers in line with the men. I shall never forget that moment. That tremendous fusillade rose from a fierce crackle into a roar in which you could distinguish neither rifle nor machine gun, but just one continuous roar- ing tempest. One could not help an involun- tary shiver-God help anyone that was out in that tornado. One knew that nobody could live in it. Many fell back, into the trench wounded before they had cleared even the parapet. Others wounded just outside managed to crawl back and tumble in before they were hit a second and third time and killed as they certainly would be if they remained lying out there. Practically'all those that were wounded were hit in this way on our own parapet. Colonel White managed to run eight or ten yards before he was killed. The scaling ladders were lying out there about the same distance out. Exactly two minutes after the first line had cleared the parapet the second line jumped out without the slight- est hesitation and followed them. No one knows how it happened. And pro- bably no one will every know. But some either of that first line or of the second line managed to get into the extreme right-hand corner of the enemy trench. They carried with them a small flag to put up in the enemy's trench if they captured it, and the appearance of this flag was to be a signal for a party of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers to attack up the gully to the right. Two men were put in the head of one of our foremost saps with periscopes to watch for the first sign of the flag in the enemy's trench. By this time a French "75" —a gun captured by the Turks from the Servians in the Balkan war—was pouring her shell at the rate of about one in ten seconds into the neck. Machine-guns, far too many to count by their noise, were whip- ping up the dust, and it was next to impos- sible to distinguish anything in the haze. But in the extreme south-eastern corner of the Turkish trench there did appear just for two minutes the small flag which our men had taken. No one ever saw them get there. No one will ever know who they were or how they did it. Only for those few minutes the flag flut- tered up behind the parapet, and then some- one unseen tore it down. The fight in that corner of the trench whatever it was was over; and it can only have ended one way. In the meantime—ten minutes after the second line-the third line had gone over the parapet as straight and as quick as the others. The attack was then stopped, and, fortu- nately, was stopped in time to prevent a small part of this third line reaching the fire zone. There was one noint where our trenches were r- under cover of the slope, and the men had to crawl out some ten yards or go before they put up their heads into the torrent of lead. A dozen or two were stopped here before they made their rush. It was all over within a quarter of an hour. Except for the wild fire which burst out again at intervals there was not a movement in front of the trenches—only the scrub and the tumbled khaki here and there. All day long the brilliant sun of a perfect day poured down upon them from a cloudless sky. That night after dark one or two maimed figures ap- peared over our parapet and tumbled home into the trench. One of them came from be- low the parapet of the Turkish trench on the right. From that man we know all that will nmlm h1u PVPT hp k-nfHl."n nf whilf fhrtsa T,io-ht Horse men found facing them as they ran through the dust haze. The nearer trenches were crammed with troops. The bayonets of the front row of Turks could be seen just over the parapet—and behind them there ap- peared to be two rows of Turks standing waist- high above the parapet emptying their rifles ] as fast as they could fire them. This is con- firmed by the accounts of oiffcers in other parts of the line who had a view of the Turks In their trenches opposite. There is no question that the charge of the Light Horse pinned down to that position during its continuance and for hours after- wards every available Turkish soldier. Our own machine-guns were able to get in some good work among those crowded Turks, and those who know say .hat their lofs s must have been an ample set-off to our own. So much for the charge of the 3rd Light Horse Brigade against the neck. The 1st Light Horse Brigade attacked partly from Quinn's Post on the opposite side of the gully and partly from the hill in the gully between the two. As the whole of the first line was either killed or wounded within a few seconds the t:ack was stopped, and the other lines did not start. The First Regiment attacked from the hill in the gully and cleared the Turks out of some trenches. The First Regiment saw line after line melt out as-the Third Light Horse Brigade charged across the right to their left. The Welsh Fusiliers in the valley on their left advanced through the dust haze until their two first lines fell almost in a heap at the foot of the cliff, down which the Turks rolled bombs upon them, when the attack was stopped. The Turks at once—good soldiers that they are— swooped down the cliff face, until some of the Light Horse saw what they were at, and de- tached two or three snipers, who shot twenty of these Turks in good time. All the other attacks having ended, the whole of the Tur- kish machine guns that could bear upon the spot were turned upon the three trenches still held by the First Light Horse, and after two hours of furious fighting the commander of the regiment ordered a retirement. And so ended the attack of the Australian Light Horse. They achieved in the richest and fullest manner the object for which their help had become necessary at a critical period of a great movement.

WHAT KITCHENER SAID I

WHAT KITCHENER SAID. I IF THEY DON'T COME, I WILL FETCH I THEM." "I know how many men I want, and how many I want for munitions. I have their names and the numbers on their doors, and if they do not come I will fetch them."—Lord Kitchener. Lord Kitchener's speech at the conference with the Labour representatives on Tuesday last is gradually reaching the public, and the version given by Councillor Tom Fox in a speech at Monchester on Sunday night, and reported in the "Manchester Guardian," has created something of a sensation. Councillor Fox said there were many things Lord Kitchener told them which he could not repeat, but he told them some things which could be repeated. There is no room," Lord Kitchener said, "for any pessimism. Give me the men and the war munitions I want, and I will guaran- tee my personal reputation that we have-the war in the hollow of our hands." The words quoted were followed by the characteristically blunt and straightforward declaration set out above. At Old Scotland Yard on Monday afternoon there were many more recruits than have been seen of late, and an officer expressed the epinion that the queues in the hall contained a larger number of the better class of recruit than usual.

IAPPEAL TO COUNTRY PEOPLEI

I APPEAL TO COUNTRY PEOPLE. I PRODUCE FOOD FOR YOURSELVES. I Everyone who lives in the country or has a garden can produce something to eat-the more the better; vegetables, fruit, poultry, eggs, rabbits, milk, cheese. Plant at once what you can, and prepare in all possible ways for next year's cropping. Every Plant in Your Garden May Save You I Money! Produce all you can; buy as little as pos- sible! Cultivate thoroughly! Destroy insect I pests and weeds! Prepare manure! Preserve and Store Your Crops with the I Greatest Care! I The finest harvesting may be rendered use- less by bad storing. Protect from the weather! Destroy vermin! Store your own vegetables! Bottle your fruit or make jam or pulp of it! Preserve your eggs when abun- dant Cure your own bacon! Eat Little Meat. I Replace meat by milk, cheese, peas, beans and lentils, which are as rich in flesh-formers as meat and much cheaper. Use more vege- tables! Eat more fruit! Bake Your Own Bread; It Will Be Cheaper and Better! Use whole-meal flour from home-grown I wheat, barley and oats. Good wholesome I bread can be made from:— (1) Household flour, or whole-meal flour. (2) .21 household flour and £ barley meal. (3) -.1 Whole-meal flour and t fine oatmeal. (4) 4-5 whole-meal flour and 1-5 maize meal. (5) 4-5 Household flour and 1-5 boiled pota- toes. (6) Oatmeal. (7) Barley meal. Cook Vegetables by Steaming Koumg in water reduces their food value! I Cook Potatoes in their skins! Use the bay- I box cooker; it will save coal. Use Less Coal! I Burn wood, peat, etc., whenever possible! I Save Fodder! I Use Acorns, Chestnuts, and Beech-mast for stock; bracken for litter; all suitable straw for fooder; fodder crops for pigs. Keep pigs, poultry or rabbits to eat up house refuse, damaged vegetables, light corn! Waste Nothing! I Buy nothing from abroad that can be pro- duced at home!

No title

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. I

BRITISH DARINGI

BRITISH DARING. I TORPEDOING A DISABLED SUBMARINE I A thrilling story of British daring is told ir Blackwood's Magazine." It is a detailed narrative "by one who took part" in the des- perate enterprise which resulted in the des- truction of the British submarine E 15 in the Dardanelles last April. The submarine had run ashore in Kephez Bay, and. as it was re- garded as most important that she should not fall into the enemy's hands, orders were given for her destruction. Various attempts having failed, it was decided that two picket- boats from the Triumph and the Majestic, with volunteer crews, should try to torpedo I the stranded vessel. How the attempt suc- ceeded is graphically told by the officer in I charge of the Triumph's picket-boat, who modestly signs himself Arthur B.-W. It was looked upon as almost certain death to take small steamboats right under the enemy's guns and into water every inch of which was covered by powerful searchlights, but so keen were "B.-W." and a brother officer to be in the forlorn hope. that they actually threw dice to decide their rival claims. "We each won one throw amid some excitement in the mess, and then Y. threw four tens, which I easily beat with four aces." The expedition started soon after nightfall. When the Triumph's picket- boat, which was leading, was still three or four miles from her objective the beam of a searchlight fell upon her, and thenceforward she was subjected to almost constant fire from the Turkish batteries. By the time she had reached the neghbourhood of the stranded submarine eight searchlights were trained on her. It was the Majestic s boat which succeedeti in torpedoing the submarine, and this after she had been struck by a shell under the waterline and when she was going down. With projectiles flashing all around her the Triumph's boat went to the assistance of her sinking consort and succeeded in rescuing, as was thought at the time, all on board. But "as we steamed round again preparatory to heading out, we saw a man crawling out of the pther boat's stern-sheets. He had been forgotten in the hurry of the moment. It looked like suicide to go back, but of course we could not leave him there, so manoeuvred close again and shouted to him to get into the water and swim towards us, which he did, and we hauled him into the boat unconscious." Then the picket-boat was turned towards the open sea. She steamed away at half- speed, though still under heavy fire. "We did not like to go full speed, as we thought it would shake up the wounded man tou much." The poor fellow had had his legs crushed by the shell which struck his boat, and he died on the way down the Straits. When "B.-W." got back to the Triumph his captain "was very nice about it all, and also said he had not expected to see us again."

ISTARS AND TRIUMPHS I

I STARS AND TRIUMPHS. I I ASTROLOGERS ON THE SIGNS. I Air. Arthur Mee writes:—If there be any- thing in astrology the British armies should soon achieve a series of brilliant triumphs. As the editor of the "Occult Review" points out, the zodiacal sign Aries has for at least a thousand years past been recognised as the ruling sign of England, and when the benefic planet Jupiter or the malefic Saturn transits that sign they leave their mark on our his- tory. An interesting list of such coincidences —if coincidences they be-will be found in Mr. A. J. Pearce's little book, The Science of the Stars." Jupiter is now on the threshold of Aries, and already we have had gratifying proof of his good influence, or, if you like, his transit coincides with good news for our country, as it has so often done before. But next February two benefics, viz., Jupi- ter and Venus, will occupy Aries, and, as a student of astrology, I quite share the editor of the "Occult Review's" expressed belief that we are on the eve of a period of "singu- larly unbroken success," if not the termina- tion of hostilities. Moreover, as Mr. Ralph Shirley points out, certain good influences in the Kaiser's progressed horoscope are fading away and evil ones taking their place. The good influences are seen in his Russian vic- tories but all this is drawing to a close, and next year the coincidence of Saturn with the Kaiser's asoendant is eloquent of ruin: "it is impossible astrologically to draw any other deduction than that his downfall and de- thronement are very near at hand," thus ful- filling the very remarkable prophecy of dis- aster, both to him and to Germany, published by Sepharial in his "Manual of Astrology" some ten or fifteen years ago. For myself, I have never wavered in my faith that we shall win this war, as all my friends know, and my conviction is based largely on the unfortunate horoscope of the Kaiser (clever man though he be) and the still more ominous horoscope of the Crown Prince. If there were more students of astrology there would be fewer croakers and dismal Johnnies than there are to-day.

NATIONAL EXPENDITURE ON EDUCATION i

NATIONAL EXPENDITURE ON EDUCATION. A meeting of the council of the Workers' Educational Association for Wales passed a resolution expressing concern at possible re- ductions in the national expenditure on edu- cation, and calling upon the Board of Educa- tion to advise local education authorities as to the departments of their work in which economy would be least prejudicial to the wel- fare of the nation. The resignation of Mr. John Thomas, B.A., from the secretaryship was received with re- gret, and Mr. Thomas was appointed hon. secretary for the district. Arrangements were made for the carrying on of the secret.arial duties, and an acting secretary appointed.

No title

Up-to-date appliances for turning out ev 0" I class of work at competitive priem. at the "Glamorman Gazette" Printing Works.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. Ceylon's Taxes. I -1 1 Jn the Ueylon Legislature t-ne trovernoi brought forward a proposal that Ceylon should contribute a million sterling to the Mother Country towards the cost of the war, the amount to be payable by instalments end- ing in 1925. The amount is to be raised by increased taxation, including export duties 1* rupee and 50 cents (2s.) on 1001b. of tea and 7 rupees and 50 cents (9s. 8d.) on 1001b. c. rub- ber. Offered the Throne. I 1 1"1 How ditierently attairs mignt De snapuag in the Balkans had Admiral Prince Louis of Bat- tenberg accepied the throne of Bulgaria, of which he was given the refusal before it was offered to King Ferdinand. It was on the deck of a British battleship in the Mediterran- ean that Prince Louis received the deputation which offered him a crown. "Gentlemen," he said; "You see that bit of bunting flying there ?" pointing to the White Ensign; "Well, I would rather serve under that than wear any crown vou or anyone e l se can offer wear any crown you or anyone else can offer me. When the Germans Learn the Truth. The Dean of Durham (Dr. Hensley tienson), preaching at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, E.C., on Sunday night, said that when the war ended there would be the difficult question of arranging peace terms, and there would be a great need for Christian forbearance. They must try and think justly and considerately of the German people, with whom they must live as neighbours when the war was over. When the German nation learned how foully they had been wronged by their own rulers there would be a desire to return to the friendship of the civilised world. A Boxer Sport." ,'1 "1 J 11 -=.l.=- -.L. Among tne speaKers at tne recruiting meet- ings in Melbourne recently was Jack Burns, a well-known and popular boxer, who said, I had two brothers killed in Gallipoli, and that decided the question of going for me. Come on, lads, be sports. I considered myself one of the best sports in Sydney once; look at my hands; they are knocked up with fighting. I met some of the best of my weight in the ring. I am going to handle a rifle now and do my duty. Come on, boys. Are you afraid of failing to pass the doctor ? I used to be like that. My mother is a widow, with two young daughters, and when she heard that I had de- cided to go to the front, after hearing of my brothers' deaths, she cried. But I kissed her and she made the sacrifice." A Splendid Death. I- A soldier who, had he lived, would have been recommended for the Victoria Cross, has died at the front in the person of Private T. Goodhind, of the Somerset Light Infantry. His mother, who lives at Cathay, Bristol, has received from her son's commanding officer a letter stating Had he lived I would have recommended him for the Victoria Cross, for a more gallant action than that which caused his death cannot be Conceived. His company had been brought up in support of an attack- ing brigade which had then been driven back. The enemy's guns were pounding our lines heavily. Between the opposing li les a blinded and otherwise wounded man was cry- ing for help. Without a moment's hesitation your son left his cover, climbed over the para- pet, and reached the wounded man. Whilst carrying the man back, after having bandaged his wounds, your son was hit and killed by a shell. You have our sincerest sympathy, but must ever feel proud that your son died the most splendid of deaths in that he gave up his life to save another." Liberty! Sir Arthur A. Haworth, speaking on "Liberty versus Government, or Liberty and Government," at the annual assembly of the Congregational Union, which opened at Leeds on Monday, said they had been for the past fortnight living in a state of excitement. caused by the consideration of the question of State compulsion of military service. Con- scription had for long been viewed with the greatest suspicion and abhorrence by the ma- jority of the people of this country, and rightly so. (Cheers.) To compel a man to fight, and possibly lay down his life for his country, was the greatet infringement of liberty, and ought to be strenuously resisted as such. "Only on one consideration," con- tinued Sir Arthur, "can we acquiesce in com- pulsory military service." Only after a clearly proved official statement that the vol- untary system had been inadequate to the present needs could their ideas of liberty no longer be maintained without being harmful to others, and must be temporarily surren- dered in this case also to the common good. (Cheers.) Such a statement had not been made—(hear, hear)—and he trusted would never be possible. (Hear, hear.) We Have Got To Win. Inspecting the newly raised Islington Bat- talion of the Middlesex Regiment, Major- General Sir Francis Lloyd, commanding the London district, said "Do not let us for one second think this war can be lightly won. We have made an effort, but a far greater will be required of us. We have got to win. Many thousand men have given up their lives on the plains of France and Flamders within the last few days. Are we going to allow those who have so gallantly stormed the Ger- l man lines to remain unsupported? I think not. If we have lost many thousands of men these thousand.-?, I know, will be replaced, not only from the selfish motive of the certainty that if we do not put forward our best efforts we cannot win, but from the higher patriot- ism, which means that this great race must go onward and upward. For that reason. and also for the lower one, I know that our efforts will be made up to the last necessity. You know that to-day is a bright day for the British and French arms, and the Russi.ans have reached the turning point. Our arms and those of the French have had a great, a very great, success, but do not think for one moment that we can lightly sit down and say that it is the ultimate victory. It is noth- ing of the sort. It is simply an effort which must be sustained and supported. High Explosive Shells. It will be a source of much satisfaction to the nation and the Army to learn that the production of high-explosive shells from the munition factories has recently shown a very marked improvement (writes the Political Correspondent of the "Daily Mail"). The difficulties of labour resulting in a restriction of output, of which there was for some time much reason to complain, have within th/last fortnight largely disappeared, owing to the patriotic action of the workers. Schoolmaster V.C. Lieutenant William Thomas Forshaw, the Manchester schoolmaster V.C., is on his way to England in a hospital ship. This most welcome news to his parents at Barrow was contained in a telegram received from the Records' Office at Preston. The gallant sol- dier has enthusiastic receptions awaiting him at Manchester, Ashton, and Lancaster, as well as Barrow, where he was born and re- ceived his early education. The lieutenant's arrival is expected towards the end of next week. General's Prayer. In a letter of thanks to the secretary of the committee of Elswick and Scotswood workmen, formed for the purpose of sending comforts to troops, Sir Ian Hamilton says:— I am extremely touched by the extraordin- ary generosity and kindness of the Elswick and Scotswood workmen. I will take great care to let our soldiers know to whom they are indebted for this most handsome contribution. Pray heaven the parcels will escape the thieves and scoundrels who waylaid some of the gifts and will arrive in good condition." Giving the Germans Socks." Writing to his parents at East Wharf, Car- diff, Private A. J. Kempon, says:—"You must not worry if I don't write for a few days, as we are giving the Germans socks' here now, and are advancing, so have not much time to write. We were on the march all last night, and you will hear some good news in the papers, perhaps, before this letter arrives. And after halting this morning early we have to set out again after dinner to keep up the chase, so I am only just writing this note in a hurry, as we go again in a few hours. Saved By a Testament. Lance-Corporal J. Wainwright, of the 2nd Welsh., is visiting his home at Milford Haven on a few days' leave from France. He has been at the front since November, and has been twice wounded, but he now relates a re- markable experience. A German bullet struck him just over the heart, but fortun- ately in his left breast pocket was a Testa- ment given him in Cardiff, and a French con- versation book. The force of the bullet was stayed, but it reached right through the books and grazed his flock, for the last few pages of the French book are covered with blood. Soldier-Preacher. The worshippers at Mount Pleasant Bap- tist Chapel, Pembroke, had a novel experi- ence on Sunday evening. The pastor (Rev. Benjamin Thomas) was too unwell to take the sermon as usual. He, however, has his son, Private Richard Thomas, at home with him recovering from a wound in the leg, received in France. Private Thomas at the outbreak of the war was in Canada, and he joined the Canadians, and saw a lot of service in France with them before receiving the wound that disabled him. Private Thomas now took his father's place in the pulpit, and delivered an impressive discourse, taking as his text the words, Yea, though I walk through the Valley of the Shadow of Death," and refer- i ring to the way in which many of his comrades had met their death on the battlefield. Settled for the Winter. Whit do you think of our regiment now?" asks Private A. E. King, formerly of the Glamorgan Constabulary, stationed at Treorky, in a letter to a friend at Cardiff Docks. "Our charge was made in the dark," he continues, "and Loos and Hill 70 were our objectives. The Germans wanted, mercy when we reached them—and. if course, we gave it them. Their dug-outs are Ifke underground kitchens one had a b'g min or in it, and was fitted out. with "gs on w:, h German helmets were hung. In the next trench we took we found two German women. I do believe the Germans thought they were there for the winter, and had everything complete, even boxes of cigars and wine. Fur- ther up the trench our boys found a mail-bag unopened from Germany. I got wounded in charging the third trench. The eantain sent me back to the ruined village to be dressed, and T had to crawl- back and lie down when they sent up their star shells. When it went dusk again I had to make another dart for- ward."

No title

The total receipts of Newport Corporation tramways for the week ended October 2nd, amounted to £ 830 13s. 71d., as against j6782 Is. lOd. for a corresponding period last year, and the number of passengers carried was 189,896, as against 176.940. An alarming incident occurred on the farm of Mr. W. B. Errington, Stockbridge Hall, near Penrith. Two of Mr. Errington's sons, Messrs. Fred and William Errington, went into the bull "copy" to cut grass. A valuable three-year-old shorthorn attacked at once. When the bull attacked Fred warded it off with a prod from a fork. This infuriated the animal, which at once charged William, who defended himself with a scythe. Receiving a sweping blow, the bull staggered back so badly injured that it had to be killed.

Advertising

r -=?;i l  -m," pt??riF T* tt?t?t -??.?.? „ ,,? ? p? Facsimile of One-Ouace Packet. Archer's Golden Returns The Pcrfcctio*- of Pipe Tobacco. C'JUL .\n .lT. »