Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

u BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS' Furniture for the Million! Rock Bottom PflCeS. I a I. ,,F. Dr the Long ?rm" of Sixty-Five?ear? ???????????????? business, and during that period, have faithfully discharged all a I r.. obhgatlOns to their va?t arr ? ? customers, with the result thai to-cay thfy stand m the front rank of the Furnishing Kingdom. !s 1\ All goods are warranted, an d ar< ??? ? ? lowest possible prices consistent: with good quality. Bevan & Company hold the largest selection in § N the Principality of everything ?q?????????g??Q?g?m Delivery free by road or rail up to 200 miles, and the train fares of cash ? N customers a ie- paid. Terms-Cash, or generous arrangements for Credit. Illustrated Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. M 81 Several usef-di .spring Vans and Carts on offer. Bargains! Must be sold to make room for Motor Vans. ? ? PIANOFORTES and ORGANS. Splendid value and Ten Years Warranty -nr 97, St. Mary Street, and nee. t Empire, Cardiff 280, Oxford Street and Arcade, Swansea L!ane!!y, &c. I ce

t Peeps at Porthcawl

t Peeps at Porthcawl: In By MARINER. m I The town has resumed its usual winter ap- pearance; few visitors are left, the Esplanade is practically deserted, and seme say that the towB is quieter than ever it was. Well, we have got used to busy scenes, and the return to normal conditions is no doubt strange. Re- cruits for the Pioneer Battalion are, however, beginning to come in, and in the next few weeks the numbers will probably increase con- siderably. That is our hope. at any rate. We have fa-red wonderfully well up to date though, for the seaside resorts on the East Coast, I notice, have made an appeal to the Government for a grant to carry them over the stress that has come upon them. Hap- pily, this side of the country has been free from the Zeppelin menace and outrages, and while sympathising with those who have lost heavily as a result of the raids on the East Coast and have suffered seriously by the de- cline of business, we must not lose sight of the fact that Porthcawl has gained by these visi- tations. People have come to stay amongst us from seaside resorts on the East Coast, and will, without doubt, give Porthcawl an ad- vertisement where it is most likely to do good. Now we have to face the winter, and the best Jivice I can give to all is to husband their re- jurces so that they may be able to meet any burdens that may be thrust upon us all. We cannot hope for such a prosperous time as we had last winter. w t Those who made the journey to Pyle on Monday to show their appreciation of the Rev. D. J. Arthur, who was inducted as Vicar of Pyle, must have been gratined at see- ing such a large number of people from all parts of South Wales. It was a splendid in- dication of his popularity, and Archdeacon Buckley was not long in mentioning the fact. The new Vicar will not be leaving Porthcawl for a few weeks yet, so it will give ample time for the testimonial fund to be Mti&faetQrity wound up. At present, the Rev. G. j:[. Har- risen is acting as ass{stant curate, and in November or December Porthcawl Church- people hope to welcome the new curate, the Rev. D. G. Samuels, curate of Perth, who will come into our midst with excellent creden- tials t do not wish to dwell unnecessarily upon Church matters this week, but I must mention that a handsome cover for the new font at All Saints' Church has been given by Mr. T. J. Stephens, of CardiS, and from the balance of the money subscribed by the children of the parish for the font, a very fine altar chest has beea purchased. The overseers of Porthcaw! had a meeting this week, and no doubt much consideration was given to the proposed re-assessment of the town. Many property-owners view the proposal with dismay; others welcome it, while the poorer classes will no doubt feel it would be an act of justice that those in a posi- tion to pay should be made to pay a fair pro- portion according to the value of their pro- perty.

LOCKS COMMON PORTHCAWL

LOCK'S COMMON, PORTHCAWL. To the Editor. Sir,—Referring to my remarks im your issue of last week re the secret bargaining of the Porthcawl Council in reference to Lock's Com- mon/it appears that the Council is deter- mined to proceed with their unjust compact. Why will not the Council make public the contents of the proposed agree- ment? Surely, the parties interested in Lock's Common should know what is intended to be done with their property. The Com- moners have not been consulted, nor have the joint Lords of the Herbert, Pembroke, and ItOugher Manors, who are tenants in common of the Newton Nottage Commons. It seems to me that any agreement between the Porth- cawl Council and one only of the Lords can- Tiot possibly be other than unjust and worth- less. The Porthcawl public and the Commoners are to be pitied. How very different are candidates to Councillors. Some of the present Councillors' motto was to proclaim at election times, We will deal squarely with the public on all matters." Ala&! those broken promises. The public have very little faith in the Council, and want none of their unjust and secret bargainings. We would prefer the Common as it at pre- sent exists, but, if there must be a change, why not be open and straightforward in the business? Parliament has provided the na- tion with a means whereby Councils can get the management of Common lands. The Commons Act of 1889 is the one and only authority to grant such powers to Councils. The Act clearly enacts that the Lords of the t Manor and alao the Commoners must give their consent before any Council can legally proceed with any scheme for the purpose of Commons regulation. By such a scheme the Lords ar the Commoners are fully protected. If our Council wish to get lawful control of the Con.mon, why not prepare a scheme under the abov'_ Act? The Commoners probably would nob object to this, for they know that if any scheme be adopted under the Commons Act that the Common will for evermore be Mfe from encroachment. In the meantime the Council should dismiss any idea of further secret agreements.— Yours, etc., PATRIOT.

PORTHCAVL I

PORTHCAVL. BAPTI r ZENANA MISSIONS. The quarterly district meeting of the Baptist Woman's Missionary (Zenana) Union was held at Gilgat ChapeL Porthcawl, on Wednesday afternoon last week, under the presidency of Mrs. Thomas Davies. Hope, Bridgend, when Mrs. R. PowcII, Briton Ferry, gave an able address on Women's Work and Influence."

Advertising

Adve-d:88 in the G!tBoorg

PYLE AGRICULTURAL SHOW I

PYLE AGRICULTURAL SHOW I I STRONG ENTRIES tN MOST CLASSES. < On Wednesday week a successful shr "w was held under the auspices of Pyle ane, District held un d er the auspic Ploughing and Agricultural A-iatim, the proceeds being in aid of the "j was a strong entry in most of the elates, and a large attendance. The pre-sidemi was Mr. G. Lipscomb, the chaiman of committee Mr. C. C. John. and the secretary Mr. A. M. Ma

THE RESTI

THE REST. I TO BE LENT TO ST. JOHN AMBULANCE I ASSOCIATION. At a meeting held at the Rest, Porthcawl, on Thursday afternoon of last week, Colonel Turbervill presiding, it was unanimou&ly agreed to accede to the request made by the St. John Ambulance ABsocia.tion for the use of the building for the reception of wounded soldiers during the winter months. It was also agreed that the Soutbea-ndown Rest be handed to the same authority, both institu- tions to be used for wounded soldiers until April loth. Requests were also made by the Red Cros-s Society for the use of the Rest as an auxiliary home far wounded soldiers at Southerndown, and by Colonel PhiHip8 on behalf of the head- quarters staff of the garrison at Cardiff for the use of the building as a milita

Advertising

Advertise in the Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to aeU. buy or exch≱ if you waut 

KFSFIG HILL SCHOOLMASTER

KF,SFIG HILL SCHOOLMASTER CHARGED WtTH ASSAULTING ONE OF HIS puptt-e. CASE DISMISSED. At Bridgend Police Court on Monday, be- fore Messrs. J. M. RandaII and D. H. Lloyd, Edward Anthony, assistant teacher at Kenng Hill Council School, was summoned for having assaulted Stanley James Morgan, one of the boys attending the school, on September 27th. Mr. David Llewellyn represented the de- fendant, who pleaded not guilty. Complainant said he was sitting in his class on. the day in question and called out "hello" to another boy. Mr. Anthony asked who had spoken, and complainant stepped out in front of the class. Mr. Anthony then gave him a slap on the hand with the cane. Witness went back to his seat crying, and defendant then came and hit him about the head with his haind, and tried to force him on to a desk- with his knee. He was very much hurt, and had not been to school since. Answering Mr. Llewellyn witness denied that he went back to his seat laughing and giggling after he had been canned. It was true he had not been to school yet, but he had not been running errands every day\. It was not true that after the caning he was running about the playground with the other boys. Mrs. Morgan said she found five mar'ks on the boy's body, and in paa-ts he was quite black where he had been beaten. Mr. Llewellyn submitted that as a certin- cated assistant teacher defendant had the right to administer corporal punishment in moderation, but it would be denied that the punishment was nearly as severe as was alleged by the complainant. In the interests of discipline it was necessary to punish the boy, but the punishment was by no means ex- cessive. He would call three of complainant's fellow schoolboys, two of whom had told him (MT. Llewellyn) thaf the punishment was by no means excessive, whilst one went §0 frnF as to M.y Morgan did not get all he deserved. These boys WOUM also state complainant had been out and about every day since he was caned. Defendant stated that after the nrst stroke of the cane complainant started muttering and laughing as he went back to his seat, and as this punishment appeared to be ineffective witness called him out again and gave him one or two strokes across the shoulders and but- tocks with the cane. At lunch time witness saw Mrs. Morgan, who told him he had no right to beat the boy under any circum- stances. The boy rolled up his sleeve and there was & small mark on the ne&hy part of the shoulder. Complainant had not been to school since, but witness had seen him running about, and on one occasion had seen him riding a bicycle, which he could not have done bad he been injured as seriously as he alleged. The magistrates intimated that they had heard sumcient, and dismissed the case.

REPRISALS

REPRISALS. GAS USED BY BRtTtSH FOR FIRST TIME. The "Weekly Dispatch" on Sunday pub- lished the following: — "For the nrst time," states a wounded officer who is back in London ait-er taking part in'the big thrust near Loos, "the British used poison gas in the famous attack of last Satur- day fortnight. "It was a long and much-needed reprisal, and will be as welcome news at home as it was at the front. In our section of the ad- vance the experiment was a great success, and was the factor instrumental in saving the lives of many of our own men. "We got the Huns absolutely by surprise with a dose of their own mixture—and they didn't like it a bit. "The wind had been blowing dead against us for some time. Suddenly, and at the most critical moment, it veered round; and then we gave it them. "Along a fairly extensive front the cocks off the cylinders were suddenly opeined and there hised forth from the tops of our own trenches the strong heavy jets of a heavy, yellowish- green vapour. "As the streams of gas belched forth they spread slowly and widened out, a.nd eventually aggregating into one dense cloud, rolled steadily acres the no-man's Jand towards the terrined Teutons. When our section of the British front realised that the experiment was successful t'bere arose, as from one great throat, a huge roar of delight, which for a few momenta drowned even the din of battle. "It was indeed, a great moment. We all saw as if instantaneously our poisoned com- rades at last avenged "When the bombardment of high explosives h&d finished, and the gas had done its work and partially melted away with the favour- able breeze, our incompatrable infantrymen made their historic rush to the nrst and second lines of German trenches. We simply walked into them without practically any loss of life. "It waa then we saw the deadly effect of our gas. The Germans had suffered as we too had suffered in the pagt. "Many of them did not have time to get to th

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out every ciass of work at competitive pncee, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Wcrha.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments $ ON THE WAR. I j None Without Sin. Speaking at St. Margaret's, Westminster, on Sunday morning, the Dean of Worcester said that while it was true that the responsibility for the outbreak of war rested with the states- men of Germany and Austria, no nation, not even our own, was without sin in regard to this great catastrophe. Each nation put forward its own interests as far as it dared, and w1 only held in check by fear of war. In our owL industrial life capital and labour each sought its own interests, and each was held in check- capital by fear of strikes, and labour by fear of suffering. I Not a Man Hesitated. The Rev. C. L. Perry, formerly of the "For- ward Movement at Newport, and now Free Church chaplain at the front, writing of the British advance, says:—When the order to charge an impregnable position was given not I a man hesitated. They were quickly over the parapet. One officer had a football with the names of his platoon written on it. Getting on the top of the parapet he kicked off, crying out, Follow up, lads," and was almost immedi- ately shot down. The lads followed up, nevertheless. The fire from entrenched machine guns was terrible, and our men went down like corn before the scythe. For 48 hours all who could render Srst-aid to the wounded had their hands full. The sight beg- gars description. I shall never forget it. An officer with three wounds knelt up to bind up a man next him, and was shot dead in the act. Two wounded men stayed out 50 hours by the side of their sergeant becauee they would not leave him to die alone. After his death they crawled in. Another sergeant went out time after time during a murderous fire and alone brought in sixteen. These incidents, which could be given by the score, make the English "Tommy" the most humane as well as the most courageous soldier in the world, .6irth and Death Rates. In\anaddress on eugenics and the war at the London Poytechnic, Dr. Saleeby said 80,000 soldiers and sailors had been lost in the course of the war, or one third more than the total exacted by tuberculosis—the gravest of aJl. diseases. That was sufficient answer to Bernhardi and all his abominable sort, who asserted-with their legs on the mantelpiece —(laughter—that war purined the race. Wè had in this country a great excess of women; and the excess was being accentuated by the' war, and yet some people proposed that after the war the soldiers should be sect to the Colonies, as there would be net enough em- ployment here. And in the Colonies there was a. dearth of women. They could do noth- ing narrower than send a-way millions from this country, where there was already such an enormous relative excess of females. Ob- viously the course to pursue was to try to get the whole of the Imperial population distribu- ted with a numerical equality of the sexes. The alternative would be to natter the Turks and adopt polygamy. He did not want to draw conclusions from the rising German birth-rate, but, bearing that in mind, and al- so that the population of France waa practi- cally stationary, the thrust of the Germans towards the French Colonies was intelligible from that point of view. But Germany was running her race now; we had lost 80,000, but she had probably lost not less than six times that number, and we knew that she was using consumptives, asthmatics, a.nd men with false hands, and was running through her healthy manhood. Dr. Saleeby also dealt with the question of the falling birth-r&te, and pointed out that the lower death-'Tat mainly meant keeping old people alive longer. To tha.t there was a limit, for the older the population the lower the birth-rate tended to fall. Shoutd Be Sent to Coventry. I Lord Rosbery paid an unexpected visit to Leith and addressed a large meeting in connec- tion with the 7th Royal Scots. He said he was no believer in recruiting speeches. He thought all that could be done by speeches had been done already, and that if men would not come in some more serious and drastic plan w<'uld have to be adopted. The only recruit- iug speeches for which he had any respect were those delivered by men who had the Victoria Cross on their breasts. Two groups of nations were lighting for their existence, and they must nght as long as they had a man or a dol- lar to nght with. The last man and last dollar would win. It was not a question of victory on a stricken neld, it was not a question of ampler dominions—we had more than we wanted; it was a question of the existence of these islands and this Empire. If every man who could come did not come the war would drag on for years sucking the very marrow out of the bones of the nation. Everything was possible in this war-these islands invaded, taxed, dominated by the Prussians, a mere burnt-cut country. The probability then was that every self-respecting man would be seek- ing a refuge in some of the outer dominions beyond the seas. That was what was before them if they would not put out the full strength of the country. That was the possi- bility that ought to haunt every man who could nght. That we should win he did not doubt, but we should have to put all our.elbow grease into the war if we were going to win promptly. On every man competent to enlist or do munition work who refused one of these options there lay a responsibility which would be cold in his bones until he died. The need was infinitely greater now than at the begin- ning of the war. The torch of war was lit in the Balkans, and when lit there heavy direful explosions were certain to follow. To the young man who did not enlist it was a respon- sibility between his conscience and his God. If the gentle methods of appeal and harangue did not succeed there was something sterner coming, and should the war turn to the advan- tage of Germany the young man who did not enlist would be stinking about the streets like a leper. He should expect to be treated as a leper by his comrades, and should deservedly be sent to Coventry. German Socialists. Mr. C. B. Stanton, miners' agent, Aberdare, presiding at a recruiting meeting at Aberdare on Saturday evening, said that while he de- tested war as much as anybody, he realised it to be their duty to stand by their country in its nght for freedom. The liberty of this country was unknown in Germany, and those who said they would be as well off under Ger- man rule were not speaking the truth. Al- though there were four millions and a quarter Socialists in Germany, that country in the, matter of democratic liberty was a hundred years behind our own country. (Applause.) tf the Peopte Knew the Pacts. Writing for the Cf Sunday Times-" an article on the Balkan drama. Sir Edwin Pears, author of "Forty Years in Constantinople," says:— Let it be said in conclusion that if the Ger- mans, with the consent of King Ferdinand, en- deavoured to drive through Bulgaria and join up with the Turks at Adrianople I feel sure that they will be strongly opposed by a portion of the Bulgarian people that such a junc- ture is very far indeed from being so easy as acme people in London have chosen to regard it. I express the strongest conviction that if the people of the country knew the facts there would be a revolt against the King. It will be impossible to keep them in ignorance of the massacres in Armenia or to prevent them re- calling that 40 years ago Bulgaria saw similar horrors, from which they were delivered by Russia. taking Others' PtacM. Lieut. Morgan Thomas, of Cardiff, at an open-air meeting at Blackwood, said one com- plaint had been made to him. He did not think it right that men of military age should come into Blackwood and take the place of those who had gone to the front. (Loud ap- plause.) It ought to be stopped, and he would report the matter to the military authorities. Why should men come there and take the place of those who had gone to nght for our country? If men went to the front from the pits and pothers were taken in their places those substi- tutes should be over military age. He could promise that a letter would be sent by the mili- tary authorities to managers of collieries say- ing that if men joined the Army their places must Bot be fUlfJd by men of military age. (Applause, and i- Voice; "It ought to havo been done a long t!m<* ilio.") The Temperance Cause. The annuél meetings of South Wales and MomouthAilt Temperance Association were t;ommea<

Advertising

"1 ? The Welshman's F?voorite.  ? MAB?N Sauce ? ?'?' /4? ?&o

I ILORD SELBORNE AND THE CENSOR

I  I LORD SELBORNE AND THE CENSOR. Lord Selborne addressed a public meeting of agriculturists at York on the question of in- creasing the production of food in the country. He said the successes of the Germans against the Russians in the East were much more im- portant successes than any successes which we and the French had gained against the Ger- mans in the West. The Germans' latest plan was to strike a mortal blow at the British Em- pire in the East, and it was curious to reflect that it was exactly the same plan that Napo- leon 1. conceived at the eud of the eighteenth century. That effort would be pursued with all the ruthless efficiency of the German Em- pire. We were confronted with a <;risi3 in the fate of England, but were not dismayed. (Cheers.) To meet th-at crisis would require ft. supreme effort on the part of all the people of the British Empire. (Cheers.) The censor (he continued) was an extremely necessary and important person, but the whole object and the only legitimate object of the censorship was to prevent news getting to the enemy which might be of use to him. When a pas- sage was excised from the report of a news- paper correspondent which described how tena- ciously and bravely the Germans had fought it was, in his opinion, nothing but an example of mischievous stupidity. (Hear, hear.) The greatest mistake that those responsible for the reports published could make was to keep bad news from the English people. There never should be any slurring over disagreeable news or exaggeration of the importance of good news. The one and the other should be stated exactly in their naked simplicity. The Presi- dent of the Board of Agriculture also pointed out the difference in the financial systems on which this war was being waged by this coun- try and by Germany. The German system was very hard on the working classes of that coun- try and extremely convenient for the Govern- ment. What we had done was exactly oppo- site. We had taken every precaution that we could that the chief burden in this terrible war should not fall upon the weakest and the peor- est shoulders. Lord Selborne, continuing, said he had just heard by telephone that Lord Kit- chener had met him in a fresh matter. The Secretary for War had promised to release those of their ploughmen who were available, but were in the Army, so that they might come back for the month and help the farmers in their ploughing. (Cheers.)

Advertising

'"HYARCHER&C? S commuRNE t ?"?? ??'?''?"?°?????H ?? Fec-sLnite oj One-Ouaw Paaet. Afcher's GoMen Returns The Perfcettor of Ptpc Tott&cco. CC'IJt. S\rf' ¡ "f f'p,lf.T. Up-to-date &ppIiMioea for turmng out every claaB of work at competitive prices, at the GiMMMtM Gazette" PnBtmg WerkB.

I bOUfii WALES RAILWAYMAN

I bOUfii WALES RAILWAYMAN. I .NEGOTtATtONS FOR INCREASE OF WAGES. A mass meeting of South Wales ra.Uwa.ymen was held at the Cory Hall, OardiS, for the purpose of reoeivmg a report as to the jiego- tiation.a which have been taking place between the Railway Manager's Committee and the Executive Council of the ¡,ati0I1al Union of Railwayman, on the question of increase cf wages. )ir. G. B. Smith presided. Speeches were delivered by Mr. T. Louth (assistant secretary of the N.U.R.) and Mr. E. Charles, a member of the Executive Committee. There was con- siderable discussion, and there was a. strong expre&jon of opinion that the Executive Council should insist on the mean's demands b,r,z roncede-d. Bn>.ntuaIJy it was decided to .adjourn the meeting for a week.

OFFpALS AND INMATES

OFF!p!ALS AND INMATES. M). Ralph Williams complained at the Monmouth Board c.f Guardians on Friday that 1121-(]. per Ib. butter was supplied to inmates, while the omeials used butter at Is. 6d. per lb. It was decided to supply both inmAtef and omcia.Is with the better quality. A com- nroj) ration from the Monmouthshire County Council stated that the Board could take it that the next precept would be for 2d. in the jE IP" than was decided upon last May.TheTf\ would be no alteration in the educatiom ratg for the ensuing half-year.