Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
w SIMR C T STUDD M A I

w ■ — S. MR. C. T. STUDD, M A. I CRiCKETER-MISSIONARY PAYS A VISIT TO BRIDGEND. Mr. C. T. Studd, M.A., the famous cricketer-missionary, who for some time past has been holding a series of meetings through- out North Wales, visited Bridgend last week- end, preaching at the Congregational Chapel in the morning, and at Hope Baptist Chapel in the evening. In the afternoon he addressed a -well-attended meeting in the Town Hall, the chair being taken by Mr. T. Jenkins Da vies. Thirty years ago Mr. Studd was regarded as one of the finest cricketers in the country, and both at Eton, where he was captain of the College XI., and at Cambridge, where he won his Blue, he distinguished himself in this direction. At Cambridge, also, he took his degree as Master of Arts. On leaving Cambridge he decided to go in ^missionary work. and for 20 years he lab- oured in China, subsequently becoming associ- ated with Mr. Sydney Buxton in the Heart of Africa Mission, where great difficulties were experienced in ministering to the spiritual needs of savages who had not even a written language of their own. In this dark spot he had many exciting experiences. Mr. Studd has also made an essay into the realms of literature with his "Quaint Rhymes by a Quondam Cricketer," a little book which, whilst it cannot be commended for its rhythmic merit, is characteristic of the blunt, straightforwardness of the man. The afternoon meeting was very well at- tended, and the large audience listened with the greatest interest to Mr. Studd's narra- tive. It is only ten years since the first man went into the district from which C. T. Studd has lately returned. That man was an Army officer who advanced with thirty sol- diers to mete out punishment to the lawless tribes. The chiefs sent out messengers warn- ning him that if he advanced, terrible things would happen to him and his little party. Undaunted, Captain Thornton pressed on, and Mr. Studd can show a photograph of a cross in a lonely land which marks the spot where the daring man was killed, cooked, and eaten. Only two native soldiers escaped to tell the story of those dark deeds. Little wonder that, after two years in such a region, Mr. Studd has stories of remarkable journeys and of providential deliverances—and records of alluring missionary opportunities as well. When Messrs. Studd and Buxton went to the heart of Africa seven years ago, they ap- proached the promised land from Mombasa on the east coast of Africa; while on his return journey he came down the Congo to the West. He has thus journeyed to or from his mission- ary centre, Niangara, by three entirely differ- ent routes—north, east, and west. The fact that Mr. Studd is alive after all his priva- tions and dangers is in itself a miracle. "I was looked upon as an absolute 'luney' when I went out to Africa," said Mr. Studd. You'll never come back again,' prophe- sied my friends, and it looked as though they were likely to be right. By all human reckoning I ought to be dead, but God has carried us round and brought me home." Once the lightning struck the house in which the pioneers were resting, and in a quarter of an hour the house was wholly des- troyed. Yet they escaped, and were able. too, to rescue their few valuables. One morning, we had just finished break- fast when the 'boys', came, saying, There is a snake in your bed!' I went and found underneath my blanket a thin green snake, which the natives say is death if it bites you. We killed the snake, and I sent the skin home to my wife; it will make a small bracelet, and will help her faith in any dark, foreboding hour. The 'boys' seemed greatly impressed as we told them that those who love and trust God have nothing to fear from either veno- mous reptile, savage beasts, or treacherous foes. because God is a Shield about them." The people amongst whom Mr. Studd is casting his lot, are only now emerging from the darkness of cannibalism. Many of them have teeth filed to a point-a sign that they are man-eaters. A woman and two men found a man drowned; they took him to the shore, cut him up. and brought him to the market for sale as "antelope." It would never have been discovered except that a sol- dier detected a piece of human skin on his purchase. It is only a few years since Donga, an im- portant and turbulent chief, was imprisoned for intercepting Government messengers, de- stroying mails, and cutting off the messen- gers' hands. Mr. Studd also tells of another big chief, called Sasa," who defied the Belgians. They collected 1,000 soldiers, and went to subdue him. Some years ago the Chinese soldiers used to turn somersaults in front of the enemy to damp the latter's ardour for battle. Sasa. in order to try his luck and manifest his greatness and bravery, thought to strike terror into the hearts of his Belgian foes by killing fifty of his wives. Yet these people received the missionaries with kindness and enthusiasm. Dense crowds followed them—especially when they have been travelling on their bicycle. All were very friendly at such times, and were amazed at the cycling. During the week-end Mr. Studd was the guest of Col. J. 1. D. Nicholl, one of his con- temporaries at Eton.

PERSONALI

PERSONAL. I Mrs. Mary Jones, of Clay Pits Pottery, Bridgend, who died on August 22nd, left es- tate valued at £ 553 gross, with net personalty 9490. Mr. W. Lewis, of the King's Head Hotel, Ogmore Vale, who died on the 10th July last, aged 62 years, left estate of the gross value of £ 6,2^4, of which £6,083 is net personalty. Probat- of his will, dated 25th June, 1915, has t granted to his brother, Mr. John Jenkin Lewis, of Nantydyriw Farm, Ogmore Vale, .armer, and Mr. David Llewellyn, of Gorwyl. Ogmore Vale. The testator left his premisl) Leicester House, Penprisk, Pencoed, to his nephew, William Jenkin Lewis, E2,000 upon trust for his niece, Gwladys Lewis, jESOO upon trust for his niece, Blodwen Lewis, the proceeds of sale of his furniture, etc., to hie said two nieces, and the residue of his estate to his brother, John Jenkin Lewis. e 0 0 Mr. George Stanley Williams, only son of Mr. David William- Caroline Street, Bridg- end, Provincial Corresponding Secretary of the Brid rend District of Oddfellows, has been appointed to a commission in the 16th (Cardiff City) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment. He was educated at Queen's College, Taunton, and distinguished himself in his examination. At the outbreak of the war, Second-Lieut. Williams gave up his position on the office staff of Glamorgan Insurance Committee, and enli d in the 1st Glamorgan Imperial Yeoman: He is a well-known Cardiff Rugby !otball three-quarter. His only sis- ter, y:.ss Marjorie Williams, is serving as a Red Cross nurse in France. J

I HELP FOR RETURNED SOLDIERS I

HELP FOR RETURNED SOLDIERS. I I To the Editor. I Sir,—I have noticed in your paper accounts of the return of soldiers from the front, and it may happen that some of them find them- selves in financial difficulties or in need of assistance to get pay, pension, insurance money, etc. I am anxious to make it known that THE INCORPORATED SOLDIERS' AND SAIL- ORS' HELP SOCIETY deals with such cases locally, and that notification should be given either to the local representative of the Sol- diers' and Sailors' Families Association or myself, if in the Newcastle district which com- prises The Bridgend Urban area. The Penybont Rural District Council area, The Porthcawl Urban area. The Maesteg Urban area and The Ogmore and Garw Urban area. If not in the Newcastle district, I shall be happy to forward the case to the proper quar- ter. I am, Sir, Yours etc., LEWIS D. NICHOLL. (District Head.) Newcastle Division (West,) Glamorgan. Laleston, Bridgend. October 11th, 1915.

GUARDIANS EXTRAVAGANCE I

GUARDIANS' EXTRAVAGANCE. I To the Editor. I Sir,—Mr. Edmund D. Lewis, rising in all the dignity of an offended citizen, and stand- ing boldly forth as the self-constituted cham- pion of a down-trodden electorate, provides an edifying spectacle such wealth of invective and such scathing denunciation are enough to apall the stoutest heart, and if one hears in the near future of wholesale resignations on the part of those who mismanage our affairs, one will know where to apportion the credit. Mr. Lewis, like the majority of us, would probably like to live without rates altogether, but unfortunately such a state of affairs is not possible outside Utopia, and "it's a long, long way to—" that happy land. But even "the stupid force of a brainless bumbledom" has sufficient brain to recognise the necessity of these inflictions. And why the covert sneer at the labouring class ? I presume they pay rates-when they can like Mr. Lewis, and surely therefore they have a right to a voice in the manage- ment of affairs, and a right to elect whom they will to represent them. The whole point appears to me, Sir, to be that Mr. Lewis does not like to find himself in a minority, and as he is not in accord with the manner in which things are being administered he rushes into print with allegations about the "invertebrate iftertness of the ratepaying one," and the "thoughtless and indifferent electorate," in- stead of being broad-minded enough to give everyone credit for the honesty of his convic- tions. Municipal work, or, for the matter of that, any public work, is a sufficiently thankless task without having gentlemen of Mr. Lewis7 calibre to fling reckless charges through the columns of a newspaper. Yours faithfully, "DISGUSTED.

COITY WAJLLIA COMMONS

COITY WAJLLIA COMMONS. To the Editor. teir,—l and hundreds of my fellow Com- moners in Coity Wallia are anxious to know what has become of the petition against the proposed regulation which aimed at surrepti- tiously taking the little left the poor to hand it to the few who are already anything but poor. In Pencoed, Coity and St. Brides Minor we are told that almost all residents qaulified to sign the petition did so, while here, in Coychurch Higher, all except the dis- trict councillor, four parish councillors and a few others did so. When signing the petition in July we were told that a joint meeting of the four parish councils concerned was to be convened early in August to arrange to for- ward the document, accompanied by a con- sidered oovering letter, to the Board of Agri- culture, which was to be asked to receive a deputation consisting of the M.P.'s for South and Mid-Glamorgan, and possibly one or two others. Has that meeting been convened, and if not, why not ? We all know that the matter of preserving our Commons for their rightful owners may appear trivial in such dreadful times as we are now pass- ing through. and that the Board, which, without doubt, has plenty of other things to occupy its attention just now, should not be worried at present. We must, how- ever, defend our rights and the rights of scores of our fellow Commoners who are doing their bit for their country in its hour of need, while others do nothing but dodge about for exorbitant war profits; yes, we must defend we must defend those rights though the heavens fall, and I venture to appeal to the good friends of the Commoners we have in the four parish coun- cils to see the business of preserving our com- mon rights intact effectively completed with- out further delay. Procrastination on our part is the enemy's opportunity. The Commons already lost were lost while their true owners slept, and some of them were grabbed in times of crisis like the present. It was easier to effect the grabbing then. Vigilance is our watchword as Commoners. Praying without watching is useless. Yours etc., DAVID WILL LA MS. Lewis Town, Heolcyw. DA VTD WTLLTA_vs. I

ABERKENFIG MAtE CHOIRI

ABERKENFIG MAtE CHOIR. The first annual concert of the Aberkenfig and District Choral Society was held last Wednesday at the Wesley Church Tondu, under the presidency of Mr. D. C. Whitting- ham. The choir, which has only recently been organised, undertook the oratorio, "The Hymn of Praise" (Mendelssohn), and great credit is due to the talented conductor, Mr. J. Simon Davies, Bridgend, for the-way the choir did the heavy work of the choruses. ably assisted by Madame Bronwen Jones-Williams, Juaesteg, soprano; Miss Ceridwen Williams, Aberkenfig; Mr. Bedford Morgan, Bridgend, tenor; Mr. W. Richmond. Tondu, baritone. The first part consisted of miscellaneous items, including: a glee by the choir; soprano solo, Madame Bronwen Jones-Williams; tenor solo, Mr. Bedford Morgan; baritone solo, Mr. Richmond duet, Madame Jones-Williams and Mr. Bedford Morgan; solo, Madame Jones- Williams. The audience showed their appre- ciation by demanding encores from each artiste. The second part of the programme was taken up by the rendering of the "Hymn of Praise," in which the choir performed effec- tively.

No title

Lieutenant-colonel Ivor Bowen, K.C., officer commanding the 18th Reserve Battalion (2nd London Welsh) Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been appointed Judge Advocate-General for the Western Command military area, which incorporates the whole of Wales. Colonel Bowen is well-known throughout South Wales, having at one time belonged to the old Cardiff Volunteers (Royal Garrison Artillery). He is the Recorder for Swansea, and is an old Bridg- end boy.

PENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT COUNCILI

PENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT' COUNCIL. I SERIOUS INCREASE IN INFANT I MORTALITY RATE. Mr. G. Jeanes presided at a meeting of the  Penybont Rural District Council on Saturday. STRENGTHENING THE GOLD RESERVE. A circular letter was received from the Treasury calling attention to the importance of substituting notes for gold in order to strengthen the gold reserve of the country. i The public response to this appeal had, on the whole, been excellent, and the Treasury acknowledged the patriotic spirit in which, often at a serious inconvenience to themselves, employers had adopted their arrangements to meet the wishes of the Government. Mr. Jenkin -Jones thought something smaller than the 10s. note would be very use- ful. Mr. W. A. Howells emphasised the import- ance of a 7s. 6d. or a os. note for the purpose of paying out large sums of wages. The Chairman: It is gold that is the trouble; there seems to be plenty of silver about. I COLONEL TURBERVILL RESIGNS. I Colonel J. P. TurberviU wrote stating that   as there would be no election of district coun- I ciHors next year he wished to resign his seat I for Ewenny, as he had been absent six months. i On the proposition of Mr. Rees John, j seconded by Mr. J. T. Salathiel, it was agreed that the resignation be accepted with regret. I DARKNESS AT PYLE. I Pyle Parish Council stated kad agreed to abandon street lighting during the coming winter "owing to the high price for la bour and other things." SERIOUS INFANTILE MORTALITY. Dr. Wyndham Randall reported that the births during the March quarter were 156, equivalent to an annual birth-rate of 27.88 per thousand for the quarter, 1.67 below the average amnual;rate, and 6.65 below the cor- responding quarter's rate for the preceding 10 years. There were 65 deaths, equivalent to an annual death-rate of 11.6, 1.08 below the average annual rate, and 1.61 below the average for the corresponding quarter's rate of the last ten years. The deaths from zymotic diseases were 2, equivalent to a rate of .36 per thousand, .74 below the average annual rate, and .86 below the average cor- responding quarter's rate for the preceding 10 years. The deaths of infants under one year were 18. equivalent to an annual rate of 115.38 per thousand births, 20.45 above the average annual rate, and 26.84 above the average corresponding quarter's rate for the preceding 10 years. Mr. W. A. Howells: It is a serious matter the infantile mortality going up like that.

INDUCTION OF NEW VICARI

INDUCTION' OF NEW VICAR AT PYLE. The induction of the Rev. D. J. Arthur as Vicar of the parish of Pyle took place at Pyle Parish Church on Monday, by Arch- deacon Buckley. The church was crowded with friends of the new Vicar, who had come from as far as Carmarthen, Hirwain, and Car- diff, and a large number made the journey from Porthcawl. Among the clergy present were:—Revs. Z, P. Williamson, Rural Dean and Vicar of Margam; Joseph Morgan, Vicar of Aberaman; D. J. Jones, Vicar of St. Theo- dore's, Port Talbot; J. R. T. Williams, Vicar of Hirwain; T. Holmes Morgan, Rector of Newton Nottage D. Phillips, Vicar of New- castle; G. H. Harrison, Porthcawl; H. R. Protheroe, assistant curate of Tondu; M. Evanson, Vicar of Merthvrmawr J. W. James, Maesteg; E. A. R. Nicholl, Port Tal- bot; W. L. Harris, Port Talbot; W. H. Williams. Port Talbot. The Rector of. Newton Nottage (the Rev. T. Holmes Morgan) and the Rural Dean took part in the preliminaries. In his address, Archdeacon Buckley ex- plained the meaning of the induction cere- mony, which, he said, was the handing over of the temporalities to the care of the new Vicar. Institution, which was another cere- mony, had already taken place at the Palace Chapel, Llandaff. He dwelt upon the import- ance of the occasion to the person chosen for the office. and to the parishioners. He feel- ingly alluded to the good feeling which had al- ways existed between the late Vicar (the Rev. Bangor Davies) and the parishioners, and went on to say that he had heard very good things of the new Vicar, who was coming from Newton Nottage with the highest testi- monials. It was no doubt a great encourage- ment to him to see so many people present from long distances, and the Archdeacon con- cluded by asking the parishioners to rally round the new Vicar by giving him their united support, so that the good work could be carried on. The congregation afterwards left the church and the Archdeacon authorised the new Vicar to take the church. The opening of the church doors and the tolling of the bell by the new Vicar completed the ceremony. Tea was afterwards provided in the Parish Hall by the churchwardens and parishioners. At the conclusion of the service at All Saints' Church, Porthcawl, on Sunday even- ing the Rev. D. J. Arthur asked to be allowed to make a few personal remarks, but not a farewell sermon, as he hoped to see them all again as occasion arose. He thanked the congregation and parishioners for their many kindnesses to him during the time he had been with them as curate. It had been his privilege to work with them during what he called the crisis in the history of the church in that part of the parish. He was with them at the last service in the old iron build- ing, and at the first service in the new church, and also took part in the first service at which a surpliced choir was seen in the church. Then came the erection of the handsome new font. He asked the parishioners to give the same support to his successor as they had given to him.

I LlSWORNEY SEPTUAGENARIANS DEATH

I LlSWORNEY SEPTUAGENARIAN'S DEATH. On Tuesday an inquest was held at the Police Station. Cowbridge, concerning the death of Ivor Arnott, of Liswrney, who died somewhat suddenly after retiring to bed on Saturday night. Dr. Moynan gave it as his opinion that death was the result of heart disease, and a verdict was returned accordingly. Mr. Arnott was in his 70th year. He had not engaged in active work for some years. He was highly respected in Cowbridge, where for many years he acted as carting agent for the T.V.R.

No title

Mr. Lewis T. Jones (Eos Sychphant) has been unanimously appointed deputy precen- tor for Tabor C.M. Church, Maesteg. Mr. Jones has always taken a keen interest in singing, and is an ardent eisteddfodwr, having led many choirs to victory. In Mr. Jones, Mr. John Thomas (the well known Tabor precentor) has a willing and capable assistant.

BLAENGARW WOMANS ERRORI

BLAENGARW WOMAN'S ERROR I FALSE CLAIM TO SEPARATION I ALLOWANCE. I Mary John, Brynbeuw TerrAce, Blaengarw, was summoned at Bridgend Police Court cn Saturday for having made a false statement in a certain document, and that she did attempt to obtain for herself a sum of money from the Monmouthshire Territorial Force Association, for separation allbwance in excess of the amount payable. Mr. Lucas E. Rumsey (Messrs. Colborne aril Co., Newport), who appeared to prosecute for the Monmouthshire Territorial Association, by I instruction of the War Office, said defendant was the mother of Private E. John, of the 1st Monmouthshire Regiment. The soldier made I his usual declaration on joining the Army. Liiter defendant made a declaration that her son's allowance to her was 15s. per week prior to his enlistment. The man's average earn- ings were 26s. On the 13th August last the pensions officer saw defendant, and had a lengthy interview with her. Defendant then admitted that her son had been away from home for nine months, and had only visited her on five occasions. She told him that she could not say what money he brought home on those occasions, but he regularly sent home postal orders. Ultimately she said that was untrue, and she had made the statement so that she could get the separation allowance.. It was not as if defendant was dependent upon this son, for she had two sons at home work- ing, and her husband, who was in South Africa, regularly sent her tl-per week. The War Office asked for a severe penalty in order to put a stop to this sort of thing, which was prevalent throughout the country. It was serious, because the amount paid in separation allowance was six and three-quarter million pounds. William John Coventry gave evidence as to an interview he had with defendant. Mr. W. M. Thomas (for defendant): Did she tell you that her son had been home wounded from the front a little while previously?—She may have done. j Arthur Morris, Blaengarw, hon. secretary of the S. and S.F. Association, said defendant: came to him for a form to fill up. Mr. W. M. Thomas: Did you show her how to fill it?—I might have- done. Was it not the son who gave the figures?- Y. After you filled it up, the defendant signed it?-Yes. For defendant, Mr. Thomas said the case was brought under the Army Pay and Pensions II Act, 1884, and that Act related only to soldiers' I pay and pensions. This money was not a pay or pension in any way. If defendant had filled up a form with the object of securing the soldier's pay or pension, then the case would come within the purview of the Act; but she filled up a form for separation allowanc which was quite different. The Bench decided against Mr. Thomas, who then said defendant's son joined the Army, was wounded, and returned in February of this year. He returned home again at the end of June. He had spoken to his mother about obtaining a separation allowance, as he had always supported her. Acting upon his advice, defendant went to see Mr. Morris, who gave her a form. She and her son went back to Morris, and the son gave the figures to Mr. Morris, declaring his own earnings and the separation allowance to which his mother was entitled. When Morris filled up the paper it was handed to defendant to sign. Surely the Bench would not convict the woman unless they were sure she intended to benefit. She had been two months without pay, and did not apply till her son came home wounded and urged her to do so. She had resided in the district for many years, and by thrift had bought the house in which she and her family lived. Defendant said she never intended to get any money that was not due to her. The Chairman said the Justices were sorry to convict a woman of defendant's good charac- ter, but there was no doubt that she did make a false statement. The Bench had taken into consideration her previous good character, and only inflicted a small penalty of R2.

THE LATE MAJOR J C GOATHI THE LATE MAJOR J C COATH 11

THE LATE MAJOR J. C. GOATH I THE LATE MAJOR J. C. COATH. 11 PULPIT REFERENCES. I At All Saints' Church, Porthcawl, and at St. Illtyd's, Newcastle, Bridgend, on Sunday references were made to the death of the late Major J.C. Coath. Preaching at All Saints', Porthcawl, the Rev. T. Holmes Morgan (Rector Newton Not- tage) took as his text, "There shall be no more pain." He,said last week they laid to rest in the Parish Churchyard at Newton one who had been connected with the parish for close on 40 years. He was a keen Volunteer, one who took a warm interest in Church work, and one who was universally respected. He had worshipped in that beautiful church, and previous to its erection attended at the old iron church. He was a worshipper, too, in the National Schools, where the Church ser- vices were once held. He (the Rector) had known him personally for about 20 years. At i the time he was one of the most active men at Bridgend in connection with the Volunteer movement. At that time he (the Rector) was appointed as chaplain to the regiment with which Major Coath was connected, and being I a young man then, he knew little about mili- tary matters, and little about the duties of J chaplain. But he wished to publicly express from that pulpit how grateful he was to Major Coath for the very many kindnesses he showed him at that time. During the last few years, I when he was extremely anxious about a fund ) to, build the splendid church in which they I were now worshipping, he went to Major Coath, who again showed him great kindness by giving a handsome donation towards the building fund, thus once more showing his interest in the Church work at Porthcawl. II He hoped the widow and members of the family would have strength to bear up under their great trouble. VICAR OF NEWCASTLE'S TRIBUTE. "reaching at Newcastle Church on Sunday morning, the Vicar (Rev. David Phillips) re- ferred in sympathetic terms to the death of Major Coath. Major Coath, he said, had been a faithful worshipper at Newcastle Church for over 30 years, and took a great interest in its welfare, as he did in the pro- gress of the town generally. His death would naturally leave a blank in the community, and all their sympathy would be extended to the widow and members of the family. -1 PUBLIC SYMPATHY. I a message or condolence has been sent by Porthcawl Council to the widow and family. At a meeting of the Swansea Corporation a vote of sympathy with the Town Clerk (Mr. Howell Lang-Coath, elder son of the deceased) was passed on the death of Major Coath. The members of the Porthoawl District Committee of the South Glamorgan Unionist Association have forwarded to the widow and family a similar message of sympathy in their I bereavement. i

MAESTEG OFFICIALS TO GO 1

MAESTEG OFFICIALS TO GO 1 THE COUNCIL'S ECONOMY. I At Maesteg Urban District Council on Tues- day (Mr. H. Laviers) presiding) the Retrench- ment Committee presented a report recom- mending in pursuance of economy that the Council should dispense with the services of the ar-sistant S anitary Inspector and the Shops Inspector. Mir. J. P. Gibbon, as chairman of the com- mittee, proposed that the recommendation be adopted. Now that there was so little build- ing going on at Maesteg, he said, they could very well dispense with the services of the Sanitary Inspector, especially as there was a young man in the Surveyor's office as assist- ant to the Surveyor, who was qualified to assist the Sanitary Inspector with a good deal of his work. This young man could devote a considerable part of his time to those duties. In proposing that the services of the Shops Inspector should be dispensed with he had nothing whatever to say against the manner in which he had carried out his work; he thought he had done his work well, but he thought it was the wish of the Local Govern- ment Board that local authorities should eco- nomise for the period of the war. Other Councils, such as the Ogmore and Garw Coun- cil, were doing without Shops Inspectors, ai,,1 he thought in view of the special circum- stances Maesteg could do likewise. He wished to repudiate the charge that Maesteg Council was not trying to economise. The rate was down 4d., and it was a consideration. He wished to say that he thought criticism in the Press with regard to the Council was oc- casionally unfair. He did not think it was right to make the suggestion that the Council was trying to establish a new industry. It was the duty of the workmen to devote their time to the work for which the Council paid them. The Council employed them as whole- time men, and if they carried on other work when they ought to be doing Council duties, they were not acting honestly, and the Coun- cil had a perfect right to check them. Mr. T. E. Hopkins seconded the resolution that the resolution be adopted, and quite agreed with what Mr. Gibbon had said. At present the building trade was not carrying on as it was before the war and the services of the assistant Sanitary Inspector were not, in his opinion, required. He paid a compli- ment to the Shops Inspector, but he did not think his services should be continued in face of the warning from the Local Govern- ment Board. Other members agreed with the resolution, which was carried by a majority. Mr.. A. J. Hicks, in accordance with notice I of motion, proposed that the resolution of the Council, dispensing with the services of six workmen be rescinded. The resolution was passed at a previous meeting on the recom- mendation of the Retrenchment Committee. He thought there was a good deal of work which the Council had to carry out, for which these men would be useful, and he thought it false economy to discharge men now and in a couple of years have to engage them again at higher wages to do the work which they might very well do now. He was also of the r opinion that the ages of the men were on the elderly side, and it was a hardship on them to be discharged. Mr. Phillip Jones seconded. Mr. Gibbon opposed the motion, and con- sidered the services of the men at this time were not needed. There was plenty of work for men of that class in Maesteg, so there would be no hardships. Mr. Gomer Davies said he was given to understand that the age of the oldest man was not more than 52. The resolution was defeated by 7 votes to 5.

IYSTRADOWENI

YSTRADOWEN. I HARVEST FESTIV AL.-The harvest thanksgiving services were held on Thursday at Ystradowen Church. There was Holy Communion at 8.30 a.m., and Evensong and sermon at 7.15 p.m., when the Rev. T. P. Price, B.A., Rector-of Coity, preached to a large congregation. The services were con- tinued on Sunday, when the Vicar (Rev. J. Phillips Jones) officiated. The church was prettily decorated by the following ladies:— Mrs. Phillips Jones, The Vicarage; Mrs. Griffiths, Tudor Arms; Mrs. Thomas, Pencyrn Farm, and the Misses Morris and French. The offertories and collections were in aid of the funds of King Edward VI.s Hospital, Cardiff

TRAGIC DEATH OF TAIBACH CHILD

TRAGIC DEATH OF TAIBACH CHILD A shocking accident occurred at Taibach on Tuesday, resulting in the death of a young child. It appears, that Horace Chilcott, son of Mir. Robert Chilcott, of 31, Upper West End,' Taibach, was left downstairs playing with a toy lamp. By some means or another he caught himself on fire and was badly burned. He was taken to the Cottage Hos- pital, where he died the next day. The inquest was held at the Taibach Police Station on Thursday morning before Mr. Powell (deputy coroner). The child's mother said the deceased was five years of age in March. About 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning he was playing beside the 'table with toy engines and a little toy lamp attached to a magic lantern. There was a little oil in it, but she did not know that at the time. It must have been put there by his brother. She never saw any matches there. Whilst she was upstairs she heard the boy shouting. She went downstairs and saw the boy in lfames; the lamp was not alight. He could have got to the fire by reaching over the fire guard or by put- ting his fingers through the guard. The mat- ches were on the mantleshelf, and he might have got on to a chair. He was a very big boy for his age. Dr. Phillips, M.D., said he saw the child at 11-30 on the day in question. His condi- tion was bad; he had 7 burns from the left thigh back and front, down the leg and up to the shoulder. It went over to the other side as well. He was removed to the Cottage Hos- pital, but died the following day. The burns were extensive, but death was due to shook, resulting from the burns. He was wearing a flannel shirt. The boy wa-s a very big boy he was a clever boy also. He could easily have reached over the fire guard. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE I

BRIDGEND PICTURE PALACE. ThIS place of entertainment is still "going strong," and maintaining its reputation for high-class productions, a reputation which should be enhanced, by the way, as the result of next week's programme, which is of a high order of merit. The star picture for the first half of the week will be "Reformation," featuring Valdemar Psilander, described as an absorbing dramatic creation, whilst "The Strength of Men" will also doubtless prove a great attraction. On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Alphonse Daudet's famous novel, "Sapho," the world's greatest love story, will be filmed, and should ensure packed houses. It may be mentioned, en passant, that "Florence Nightingale" is coming.

Advertising

Important Purchase OF Ladies' & Children's Stockings and Woven Underwear, At PRICES considerably below present day prices, < Be sure and secure some ycu will be delighted with the value. J. SIMS DAVIES THE LADY'S R.EALM, T1 H jri tE? LAD i o K 17, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG

I TONDU A ND AB E P KENFIG I

TONDU A ND AB E P KENFIG. I THE HARVEST.—Harvest thianksgiving services were held at St. John's Church on Thursday last week, beginning with a cele- bration of Holy Communion at 10 a.m. At the evening service the Ver. J. R. Buckley, B.D., Archdeacon of Llandaff, was the special preacher, assisted by the Rev. H. R. Prothero, Tondu. A large congregation was present. The church was beautifully decor- ated by the lady members of the church, who spared neither effort or time in carrying out their voluntary work. The anthem rendered by the choir, Lift up your heads," was ex- cellently sung. The festival was continued on Sunday with Holy Communion at 8.30 a.m. (choral celebration). At the morning service the anthem, 0 Lord, how manifold are Thy works," was sung by the choir. The service held for the children in the afternoon was a service of praise, and in the evening there was Evensong and sermon. The Rev. J. S. Davies, B.A., Reetor of Llanthetty, Talybont-on-Usk, preached two powerful ser- mons on Sunday to crowded congregations. In the evening manf had to be turned away. The church was packed from the door to the vestry. The choir, under the conductorship of the Rev. H. R. Prothero, Tondu, rendered the musical part of each service with great devotion, and sang the anthems well.

I LLANTWIT MAJOR I

I LLANTWIT MAJOR I W.E.A. CLASSES.—The County Education Committee having withdrawn the grant to these classes throughout the county, in accord with the policy of economy during the dura- tion of the war, students of the local class have determined to carry on the work by voluntary methods, and in this respect have been promised help from many professors and teachers of the Cardiff University, and others of the teaching staff of the Cardiff and Barry Schools. The winter session was opened on Monday evening at the sc hools, when an able address was given by the Vicar (Rev. R. David) on the rise of civilisation in Egypt, Syria, and Arabia. There was a good atten- dance. Several of the members spoke, and some questions were asked. The rev. gentle- man, in reply, thanked the class for the man- ner in which the paper had been received, but said he expected that the members would have remarked on the probable danger to us of the fact that we were an insular people, and would become too effete and lose our strength by reason of trusting too much to our favourable geographical and climatic con- ditions. The president (Mr .E. T. Lloyd), in proposing a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. David, said he hoped that other leaders of thought in the town would follow their Vicar's example and give the class the benefit of their talents and advice.

IPONTYCLUNI

I PONTYCLUN. VOLUNTARY AID. Mrs. Wyndham Clark, lady "chairman," Llantrisant branch, British Red Cross Society, entertained mem- bers of the Pontychm. Llanharan. and Hant- wit Vardre Women's Voluntary Aid Detach- ments, who are assisting at the Pontyclun Red Cross Hospital, at Talygarn on Saturday last. The detachments were in charge of Mrs. Isabel O'Rorke, Mrs. S. A. Tucker, and Mrs. Bruce, commandants of the Pontyclun, Llanharan, and Llantwit detachments respec- tively. Major Ewen McClean and Mr. God- frey Clark complimented the members of the detachments on their smart appearance and their devotion to duty at the above hospital. After tea the party were conducted round the I beautiful house and grounds of Talygarn.

COWBRIDGEI

COWBRIDGE. I ABURTHIN C.M. CHURCH.—The annual tea in connection with the Sunday School of the above church took place on Tuesday. After paying a hearty tribute to the excellent tea, a most enjoyable evening was spent, the scholars of the school being the sole enter- tainers. The following took part:—Maggie Thomas, Gwenith Davies, Albert and Evelyn Webb, Jenkin Hughes, Idris Hopkins, Ernest Leyshon, Alban Leyshon, Annie Mary Evans, Louisa Sharp, Nellie David, Misses G. Ley- shon, E. Hughes, Kate Hopkins, Eve Morris, and Master Tom Thomas. The evening came to a close with a vote of thanks to Rev. E. Davies (pastor), who presided, and to Misses E. Evans and E. Hughes, and all other mem- bers and friends who gave their hearty co- operatioli

IBLAENGARW ENGINEMEN

BLAENGARW ENGINEMEN. At the Dunraven Hotel, Blaengarw, on Tuesday night a well attended meeting of the Garw branch of the Enginemen's, Stokers', and Craftsmen's Association was held. Mr. Edward Nicholas (Ffaldau branch) presided. Mr. William Hopkins, general secretary for South Wales, addressed the meeting. The following resolution was unanimously car- ried That we stand loyal to the decision of the Executive Council and general secretary."

Advertising

?r The Cook's BeA Friend."  [ BORWMK?S ) BAKING POWDER. M

BLAENGARW I

BLAENGARW I MOUNT ZIOX BAPTIST CHURCH.—The harvest festival services in connection with the above church were held on Sunday. The lady members had worked hard to tastefully decorate the church with a large supply of fruit, vegetables and flowers. Appropriate sermons were preached by the pastor (Rev. J. Francis Jones) to crowded congregations. In the evening service Madame Ellis rendered two solos, "I will extol Thee," and "The Golden Pathway" and Mr. Joseph James sang "How willing my Paternal love" (Samson). Special hymns were' also sung, the conductor being Mr. John Sugg, and the organist, Mr. J. H. Sparkes.—On Monday evening the church members and many friends* met in the schoolroom for a social eve- ning. After a splendid tea, the fruits and vegetables were sold, under the direction of Mr. William Webber. A good sum was rea- lised, and handed over to the church funds. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mr. Howell Evans, of 28 Railway Terrace, Blaen- garw, who met his death at the Glenavon Colliery by a fall of roof, took place at Llan- santffraid Cemetery, Tondu, on Wednesday of last week. Rev. David Davies (Trinity, Blaengarw) officiated. The mourners were: Mrs. Elizabeth Evans (widow); Mr. Thomas Teague (father-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. John Evans (father and step-mother); Miss Annie Evans, Pontllanfraith (sister); Mr. and Mrs. T. Attcarn, Dowlais (brother-in-law and sis- ter) Mrs. S. George, Ferndale (aunt); Mr. L. Teague (brother-in-law) Messrs. T. P. Teague, L. Teague, E. Teague (brothers-in- law) Miss B. eague (sister-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. A. Sanderson, Pontllanfraith (uncle and aunt); Mrs. White, Mrs. Davies (cousins); Mrs. Jenkins, Tredegar (aunt); Mrs. Hale and daughter (aunt and cousin) and Mr. W. Hale, 1ardy. Floral tributes were sent by the widow and family, Nanthir Lodge Com- mittee. father and sisters, Mrs. Eli Oakley, Mr. and Mrs. T. Kinsey (Pontycymmer), Mr. and Mrs. Thorne, Bettws; Mr. J. Thomas, Mr and Mrs. J. Bowen, Tommy Bowen, and friends.

iOGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE. QUARTERLY SERVICES.—The Sunday School quarterly services in connection with the English Congregational Church were held on Sunday, and three excellent meetings were held, the scholars taking part with recitations and songs. The morning service was pre- sided over by Mr. John Evans, the following taking part:—Richard Ham, Dorothy Web- ster, Harold Evans, Edith Cornelius, Gwen- nie Webster, Nancy David, Reggie Ham, Dorothy Webster and friends, Cyril Dobbins, Thomas J. Jones, Harold Webster and Selwyn Dobbins, Gladys Evans, Phyllis Williams, Elwyn James and friends, and Nancy David and friends. Mr. Abel Jones gave an ad- dress, and the children rendered a chant. Mr. Wm. Abel presided at the afternoon meeting, when the following took part:— Ethel Ham, Elwyn James, Selwyn Dobbins, Clarice David, Iris Perry, Mary Evans, Nellie Williams, Marjorie Glover, Anne Evans, Mabel Webster, and Dilys Lewis. At the evening service, Mr. W. Richards presided. The service was opened by Glyn Evans, and the following also took part:—Phyllis Elward, Elwyn James. Glyn Evans, Dilys Lewis, Flor- rie Clements, Clarice David, H. John Jones, Nellie Jones and friends, Mrs. Ellis, Gwilym Evans, Eva Webster, Mrs. Dob- bins.

BRYNCETHIN I

BRYNCETHIN I HARVEST FESTIVAL.—St. Theodore's Church held its thanksgiving searioes on Sun- day and Monday. The Rev. D. J. Thomas, Vicar, of Tonyrefail, was the special preacher on Sunday, and on Monday night the sertnon was delivered by the Rev. D. J Jones, M.A., Vicar of Port Talbot. Both gentlemen preached eloquent and instructive sermons to large congregations. The singing through- out was beautiful, and the rendering of the anthem, "Food and Gladness." reflected great credit upon the conductor, Mr. A. G. Hibbs. The church was prettily decorated, and the following deserve every praise for the decora- tions:—Mr. and Mrs. C. H. O'Regan, Wood- lands Miss Richards, Maesygwynne; Misses M. Hibbs, Richards. Barnett, and Morgan. Mr. F. Takel, Miss Takel, Mr. and Mrs. A. Richards, Mrs. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Gifford, Miss Dawkins, and the curate (Rev. D. R. Wild, B.A.). After the service on Monday, all the gifts were sold, and a sum of 26s. was realised.

IBRYNMENINI

BRYNMENIN. FAREWELL.—Mr. J. H. Lewis. B.A. (Aberystwyth and Cardiff), who has for some time been assistant master at Brynmenin Council School, has obtained an appointment I in a Secondary School under the Rhondda Education Authority.

No title

The total amount of the collections in Bridgend for Dr. Barnardo's Homes was E9 17s. 6d.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances tor turning out every oLase of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

FONTY CYMMEK

FONTY CYMMEK. ZION .-On Sunday evening a memorial ser- vice to Harold Thomas, of H.M.S. Essex, was held. An appropriate sermon was preached by Rev. W. Reyonlds. Very pathetic tunes were chosen by the precentor, Mr J. Edwards, and the playing of the "Dead March" in Saul by Rev. W. Reynolds. Very pathetic tunes upon a large and attentive congregation. CYMRODORION .-At the Ffaldau Insti- tute on Thursday, under the auspices of the Cymrodorion Society ("Glenydd y Garw"), Miss Jennie Williams, of London, sang and lectured on Old Welsh Folk Songs." Rev. W. Saunders, C.C., presided. At the close, Messrs. Morgan Hughes and David Thomas respectively moved and seconded a vote of thanks to the chairman and Miss Williams. PRESENTATION.—At the Ffaldau Insti- tute a presentation meeting was held, wken the Pontycymmer branch of the Enginemen's Stokers' and Craftsmen's Association pre- sented a masslVe marble clock anjS a pair of bronzes to Mr. Robert Lewis, of 22 Ivor St., Pontycymmer. An engraving on a brass plat4: on the clock read as follows:—" Pre- set ted, to Mr. Robert Lewis by the Officers and Members of Pontycymmer Branch of the S Wales Enginemen's, Strokers' and Crafts- men's Association, in recognition of faithful services rendered as branch treasurer for a period of eleven years." The clock was pre- se-:1.{ on behalf of the members by Mr. John Evans, and the bronzes by Mr. John Hill. Mr. Lewis, who had worked on the Ffaldau Ci lKerv as blacksmith for a period of 14 years, responded. Eulogistic speeches were made by Mr. Ed. Nicholas, Mr. A. Elliott, Mr. C. Viekery, Mr. Thos. Bevan, Mr. Wm. Wat- kins, Mr. D. T. Edwards, Mr. S. J. Jarvis, Mr. H. Rule, and the chairman (Mr. J. Hill). MEMORIAL SERVICE.—A memorial ser- vice was held at St. Theodore's Church on Sunday evening, in memory of the late Corpl. Arthur Greville, who recently died from wounds received in the Dardanelles, and who was a faithful and devout communicant at St. Theodore's Church prior to enlistment. The special music rendered by the choir (of which the decea-sed soldier was formerly a member) included "Now the laburer's task is o'er," and "On the Resurrection Morning." A powerful sermon was preached by the Vicar, w ho, in the course of his remarks, appealed to the young men of St. Theodore's congre- gation to follow the good example set them by the deceased soldier, who died for us at home, and who, despite all obstacles, availed himself at every opportunity of the highest moans of grace, namely, the partaking of the blessed sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. "England expects every man to do his duty" was the message to every young man to-day, and Corporal Greville had met with the most glorious of all deaths—in doing his duty to his King and country. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mrs. Gwenllian Edwards, wife of Mr. Richard Ed- wards, grocer, Oxford Street, Pontycymmer, who died on Wednesday, October 6th, took place at the Pontycymmer Cemetery on Mon- day last. Deceased was highly respected, having resided in the valley for over 35 ytars. Revs. Campbell Davies, B.A., and D. D. Evans officiated. The mourners were: Mr. Richard Edwards (widower), Messrs. Edward- and Jessie Edwards (sons); Mr. and Mrs. M. Tilley and Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffiths (sons- in-law and daughters); Mrs. M. Howells and Mr. Edward Howells, Treorkv (sister and nephew); Mrs. E. Evans and Misses Gwendo- line and Jennie Evans, Builth Wells (daugh- ter ard grand-children) and Mrs. G. Saund?rs, Mr. and Mrs. B. Gri&ths, Mr. Ja.s. Griffiths, Mr. and Mrs. Jess Grinlths, Mr. ?iid Mrs. Isaac Davies, Mr. and Mrs. John Evans, Mr. and Mrs. M. Jenkins, Mr. and Mrs. J. Weeks (grand-children); Privates Alfred and Tissil and Messrs. Richard and Edgar Tilley (grand-children); Mrs. Phoebe and Mr. John Jones, Tredegar (niece and nephew); Mr. and Mrs. D. Howells, Tredegar (nephew and niece ) Mrs. M. Griffiths and Mrs. E. Colstan Tredegar (nieces); Mr. R. Howells. Trealaw (son-in-law) Misses Annie, Alice, and Private Miles and Mr Jesse Edwards (grandchildren); Mr. Ben and Miss L. Griffiths (grand-child- ren); Messrs. Baden, Ted and Tom Griffiths (grand-chddren); Misses May and Morris Griffiths, Phillys Saunders, Messrs. Ben Griffiths, D. J. Rees, Idris and Jesse Jenkins (grea t -.gra nd-children).

NANTYMOEL

NANTYMOEL ANNIVERSARY SERVICES.—The annual preaching services of the English Calvinistic Methodist Church of Bethany, Blaenogwy, were held on Saturday evening and Sunday. The Rev. Arnold Evans, B.A., Newport, was the special preacher for the oocasion. His thoughtful discourses were attentively lis- tened to. The pastor (Rev. D. G. Jenkins) rendered a solo in the Saturday night ser- vice. There was a good attendance at ea-h service. Printed and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany, Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gaeette," offices. Queen Strwt. Bridgend, Glamo- g8a. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th, 1915.