Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MAESTEG

MAESTEG. WEDDING IN CANADA.—The wedding was solemnised at the Stratcone, Baptist Par- sonage on "Wednesday, October 6th, by the Rev. H. R. Megill, M.A., B.D., of Miss Mabel Gaul, of Neath Road, Maesteg, to Wm. G. J. Daniel, of the Post Office Staff, Edmon- ton, Canada. The young people were atten- ded by Mr. and Mrs. McGregor. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel will reside in Allendale. The bride, it will be remembered, was on the 6.6. Hesperian when it was. torpedoed, and con- tinued the voyage the following week. SOCIAL.—An interesting social and dinner in connection with the "White Pals" were held at the White Lion Hotel on Wednesday evening last. In the absence of the chairman (Councillor Gomer Davies), Mr. 1. W. Leake war, voted to the chair. After the removal of the cloth a lengthy programme consisting of the usual toasts, songs, etc., was gone through, the following taking part:—The Chairman, Messrs. W. P. Davies, A. L. Parry, F. Hodges, W. T. Williams, and Evan Wil- liams. WEDDING.—A wedding took place on Mon- day at Llansantffraid Church, the contracting parties being Miss M. A. Richards, niece of Mrs. Roberts, Maesgwynne, and Mr. Halford Tat- chell (the Bryncethin and Bridgend football player). Mr. David Richards, brother of the bride, acted as best man. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. D. R. Wild, B.A., curate of Bryncethin. A reception was afterwards held at the bride's home, and the happy couple left for Cardiff and other places for the honey- moon. LECTURE.—An interesting lecture was de- livered on Monday in connection with the Libanus C.M. Mutual Improvement Society at Libanus b*r the Rev. J. T. Parry, of Zoar. The subject was: "The Ideal Young Man." Mr. Thos. Jeremiah, chairman of the Society, presided. The lecturer was thanked in eulo- gistic terms by the Chairman, the Rev. T. H. Morgan (pastor), Mr. Thomas Evans and Mr. John Jenkins for the able manner in which he had dealt with his subject. On Wednesday the Rev. J. T. Parry gave an interesting lec- ture to the Zoar Mutual Improvement Society at Zoar Vestry. The subject was: "An hour with Tanyma,rian." Mr. William Adlams, Nantyffyllon, presided over an appreciative audience. The lecturer gave a vivid descrip- tion of the great musician and preacher's char- acteristics. Messrs. J. Johnson Thomas and G. Jenkins, on behalf of the Society, compli- mented the lecturer on his effort. Mr. Llew- ellyn Jones gave arendering of Tanymarian's favou-rite song: "Peidewch golfyn i mi ganu."

MAESTEa MANS APPEAL I

MAESTEa MAN'S APPEAL. I I AGAINST DECISION OF BRIDGEND BENCH I Mr. Harold Lloyd appeared at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday with reference to the case of Elizabeth Maloney, Bridgend Road, Aberkenfig, against Harry Evans, late of Maesteg, now cor- poral in the Motor Cyclist section of the R.E., which was decided last week, and in which an order was made on defendant to contribute 3s. 6d. per week towards complainant's child. Mr. Lloyd stated that defendant had decided to appeal, and he asked to be bound over in sure- ties. Defendant was accordingly bound over in sure- ties of £40. to appear at the Assizes.

COLLIERY NGINEME N I

COLLIERY NGINEME N. I CONDITIONS OF MEMBERS. I The South Wales Association of Colliery En- ginement and Stokers have met the coal- owners in order to further improve the con- -ditions of the members according to the pro- gramme agreed upon some time ago. The owners refused to deal with the matter gener- ally, but agreed to deal with each case upon its merits. The following official report of the proceedings was supplied by Mr. F. A. Cibson:-The committee appointed by the Coalowners' Association to deal with questions in regard to the terms of employment of en- ginemen and stokers met the representatives of the Monmouthshire and South Wales Col- liery Enginemen, Stokers, and Craftsmen's Association. Mr. T. H. Deakin presided over the owners' representatives, and Mr. W. Hopkins presided over the enginemen's repre- sentatives. The Enginemen' s Association presented a list of special cases for considera- tion by the owners, these cases referring to men who, it is contended, are paid low rates. The owners had intimated at a previous meet- ing that they were not prepared to agree to a general levelling up of wages, but that they would be willing to deal with any instances where it was alleged that individual workmen were paid rates lower than the average of the coalfield. The cases submitted were carefully considered, and a further meeting of the Joint Commitee will be held shortly.

COAL MINEFS RESENTMENTI

COAL MINEFS' RESENTMENT. I .——— IMPORTATION OF CANADIANS. f Rew iitment has been caused in the coal it-iiiin(,, districts (writes a correspondent) ty the policy which has the sanction of tho Ho ae Office, of importing coal miners from Cara.'iu to work in British pits. Mr. Baird, s»cret»r> of the Scottish Coalowners, and Al, T It,(-I,ardson, M.P. for Whitehaven, weve the representatives who have been out o Canada, for this purpose. Tae hostility of the miners is based on two grounds-—(1, That it is improper to import workmen into the pits to take the places of miners who are fighting for their country (2) that though the number of men employed in the pits has been seriously depleted by the en- listment of 260,000 miners, the present output is fully meeting the deIlJAnd for coal in the various districts. In the vitally important coalfield of South Wales stocks are beginning to accumulate, with the result that some stoppages have taken place while stocks were handled on transit by the railways. This has had its effect on prices, and the coalowners have asked for a 5 per cent. reduction in wages. The South Wales Federation has made its protest against the importation of Spanish and I|ortuguese into the Abercrave Pit, and a stoppage there is threatened.

No title

Mr. McKinnon Wood, Secretary for Scotland, presiding at a meeting in the Royal Scots Cor- poration Hall, London, for securing further re- cruits for the London Scottish Regiment, said it was notorious that the physical atmosphere of the lobbies at Westminster was very enervating and tended to produce neurosis. He believed that was also true of parts of Fleet Street. The press in Scotland was a bit calmer. He thought it had thoroughly appreciated the fact that one of the first things necessary in this conflict was national unity, and it had suc- ceeded, as some other parts of the profession had not, in rising above all controversies and intrigues of the past.

Advertising

I IMPORTANT NEWS FOR FURNITURE BUY 14RST A. E. LOCKYER, Complete House Furnisher, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. Begs to announce that he has now opened Extensive Showrooms at Market Building's, Talbot Street, Maesteg, With a New and Up-to-date Selection of FURNITURE, CARPETS, BEDSTEADS, BEDDING, Etc., Etc. Including all the Latest Designs and Styles. You are cordially invited to inspect Showrooms at your leisure. Customers can rely upon making their choice from a magnificent and comprehensive stock. Every facility is pro- vided to enable you to get just that pretty home you have in your mind. Every need is met and every taste catered for. Once you be.come a customer you will discover why LOCKYER'S" hap become a household word, and merited the confidence of the Public. Your wishes will be observed to the smallest details; you will get FURNITURE WORTH HAVING at Moderate Prices. NOTE ADDRESS OF NEW SHOWROOMS: LOCKYER'S FURNISHING EMPORIUM, Market Buildings, Talbot Street, MAESTEG. mr A VISIT OF INSPECTION WILL PAY YOU.

I MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. ———- INCREASED RENTS. MEMBERS CONDEMN UNPATRIOTIC LANDLORDS. Mr. Henry Laviers, J.P. (chairman) pre- sided over the first meeting of the Maesteg Urban District Council in the new Council Offices on Tuesday. I THE SHOPS INSPECTOR. I Mr. terrier Williams, shops inspector, wrote thanking the Council for the resolution passed at their last meeting to reinstate him in his position. It had been his intention earlier in the year to apply for an increase ni salary, but as a result of the war he had de- cided to postpone this application indefinitely, and would be prepared during the war to ac- cept a salary of JE30 instead of t35. On the proposition of Mr. J. P. Gibbon, seconded by Mr. T. Lewis, this offer was ac- cepted. ASSISTANT SANITARY INSPECTOR'S I REPLY. Mr. Rees Joseph, assistant sanitary inspec- tor, wrote stating that the accusation that he had been playing billiards when he should have been engaged on the work of the Coun- cil was absolutely untrue. On the morning he was supposed to have been playing bil- liards he was at Caerau for the purposes of making certain inspections. He did happen to pass the billiard-hall, and was asked by the son of the proprietor to come in and inspect a building for which plans had already been passed by the Council. Had he not called there, he would have been obliged to shelter elsewhere, as it was raining heavily at ihe time, and he had no overcoat with him. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: Is there any report of the inspection he says he made at this hall? The Surveyor (Mr. S. J. Harpur) was understood to say no report had been pre- sented Mr. J. P. Gibbon: Then his statement is of no value at all. Mr. A. E. Hicks: What does he mean when he says he was there to inspect certain alter- ations ? Have any plans been brought for- ward ? Mr. Gomer Davies: It was after the date of the accusation that the plans were brought before the Council, so he could not have been there for the sake of looking at the plans. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: I really don't think we need go into the contents of the letter; we have not accused him of being there. And besides, his services are to be dispensed with. The notice to terminate was given by the Re- trenchment Committee on the grounds that his engagement was unnecessary. The Chairman said Mr. Joseph had received a testimonial from the Council, and he thought the matter could remain where it was. If the Council noticed the letter, the only course to adopt would be to ask those who made the accusation to appear before the Council with their witnesses. Mr. Hicks moved that the letter lie on the table, and this course was adopted. SURVEYOR REFUSED PERMISSION TO I ENLIST. Mr. J. P. Gibbon, in moving for adoption the recommendations of the Finance Com- mittee, drew attention to the fact that the Surveyor had been offered a commission in the Royal Engineers, but the committee decided that his services could not be dispensed with. The surveyor, the sanitary inspector, and the rate collector were doing very useful work, and by retaining them the work of the Coun- cil could be carried on without very much difficulty. He hoped the other eligible men amongst the officials would enlist. A Member: Have any of the others ex- pressed a desire to join ? Mr. Gomel- Davies: Yes, some of them. Mr. J. P. Gibbon said lie did not think the clerk was indispensable if he desired to join. There was a gentleman in the town who had been clerk to the Council for many years, and who was over military age, whom they might be able to fall back upon to do the work if the clerk enlisted. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: If any official beside the three who have been mentioned desires to go, I think he should be allowed. Mr. J. P. Gibbon said he hoped the Coun- cil would be careful in the salary allowance they made to the men who enlisted, and not fall into the same error as the Bridgend Board of Guardians, who discovered that one of their men who had enlisted was receiving a great deal more than he did previously. The right thing to do was to grant the man the differ- ence between his wages and his Army pay plus the separation allowance. SCARLET FEVER INCREASING. I the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. G. E. Howells) reported that there were in the hospital 28 cases of scarlet fever, and 3 of diphtheria. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: So scarlet fever is in- creasing again in the district. PIGS FOR ECONOMY. Mr. D. Davies raised the question of effect- ing economy by the keeping of pigs, and urged that the Local Government Board be asked to sanction for the period of the war the keeping of pigs within 50 feet of a dwell- ing-heuse, instead of 70ft. as at present. He moved that the distance be reduced for the benefit of the working men. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: I object to that. Mr. D. Davies: Half a minute. I want 'he Council to understand the matter, and see that I do not deceive them in any direction. It is only right that the working men should be given the same facilities to economise here as they are elsewhere. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: I object to your speech, not to the subject of the proposal. Do I understand that the Chairman, for instance. would have to kcpp to the 70ft. limit, whilst permission is given to the working man for only 50ft. ? Apparently Mr. Davies only wants the working man to have this permis- sion. Mr. D. Davies: I know more than that; I am not dull altogether. I want every man to have the same privileges. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: You will find at the pre- sent time more pigs are kept by those who are not working men than by the working men. Mr. D. Davies: Yes, and these people have places to keep them. They may be able to afford to pay high prices for bacon, but the working classes cannot. Mr. Lewis seconded the proposition. He had always maintained that 50ft. was quite a sufficient distance from a dwelling-house. "I asked Mr. D. Davies to support me the last time I brought the matter forward, but he said 'No, I stick to 70ft.' I am glad to find he has changed his mind." Mr. A. Nicholas and Mr. D. Morris sup- ported the resolution. A Member: Elections! Mr. Rhys Griffiths pointed out that in 1914 there were 61,450 more pigs kept in England and Wales than at the present time. Mr. J. P. Gibbon said the whole question was one of health, and lives were more im- portant than pigs. He moved an amend- ment that the opinion of the medical officer be procured on the subject. The Chairman said the members knew full well the Medical Officer was against the keep- ing of pigs even 70ft. from a dwelling-house, and he was sure he would not agree to 50ft. The proposal to refer the matter to the Medical Officer was agreed to. | UNPATRIOTIC LANDLORDS. I Mr A. J. Hicks, in accordance with a notice of motion, moved a resolution condemning the action of landlords who had increased rents during the war, and recommending that the attention of the authorities be drawn to the matter. He gave the names and addresses of a number of tenants who have had their rents raised, and the name of the land- lord responsible for the increase. He had evidence to prove that in some cases the ex- cuse given was the fact that the rates had been increased, whilst in others the excuse was the increase in the cost of materials for repair. It was a disgrace that such things should be, and it was the duty of the Council to protect these people who were being imposed upon. Mr. D. Davies seconded. If the landlord was being taxed so was the working man, not in one way, but in many ways. Mr. J. P. Gibbon said he would give no support to landlords who were increasing their rents during the present crisis, but at the same time he would not like to pass a resolu- tion such as the one suggested without the fullest possible information. Mr. Gomer Davies concurred. Mr. J. P. Gibbon said when persons com- plained to him about their rents being in- creased he advised them not to pay. Mr. Hicks intimated he had no objection to the matter being deferred. The Chairman suggested the Council might pass a resolution condemning the principle of raising rents during war time, and then go thoroughlv into the facts. The Council passed the resolution suggested by the Chairman, and it was agreed that further consideration of the matter be ad- journed for a month.

FIRST EXPERIENCESI

FIRST EXPERIENCES. I MAESTEGIAN IN GALLIPOLI. I The following are extracts from a letter, received from Private Clifford E. Parry (son of Rev. J. T. Parry, Maesteg), now serving L%faesteg ) now serv i n- with the Welsh Field Ambulance in the Dar- danelles :— "We have arrived quite safely at our desti- nation all serene, after a more or less exciting voyage. We landed on Monday night and slept on the bare ground all night. We had the novelty of being aivakeried, in the morn- ing by shells whizzing overhead, rather too close to be pleasant. During the day we fooled about the landing base and kept away, as our neighbours, the Turks, seemed to think it right to welcome us with a few 6-inch shells. One has a peculiar ensation when under shell first for the first time. We could hear the boom of the guns, then we would all fling ourselves flat on the ground, soon to hear the shell whistling overhead. It didn't give us a feel- ing of fear and trembling exactly, but rather a feeling of speculation as to where the shell would drop, and what poor beggars would have the pleasure of dodging it, and after- wards collecting the bits and the bullets as souvenirs. Anyhow, as soon as darkness set in, we started off on a march to our first-line positioons, over six miles of very difficult, sandy ground. We reached here about mid- night, slept on the ground, and yesterday we built dug-outs from sand-bags. I am writing this in our dug-out. We have a pleasant posi- tion here; about a hundred yards from the sea shore, in a large plain or rather small desert of sand. We are in the sound of con- tinual gun-fire from all sides; our ships and artillery from one direction, and the Turks fire from another direction. The Turks have the full range of our lines, but they are bigger sports than the Germans, since they respect the Red Cross. It is very seldom they shell us deliberately. It is a fine sight to see our guns shelling the Turks Taube aeroplanes when the latter attempt an excursion over our ground. You would be amused by the Hin- doos (Gurkhas) who are here in great num- bers. Our 'Tommies' call them 'Johnnies.' I have met several of my old pals from Cardiff, three of them from the municipal offices there. Their ten weeks here has made them look very fit; some of the chaps are as brown as coolies. Frankly, I am not sorry I came out here, as I am now passing through experiences which I I shall probably never have again."

Advertising

OUR MAESTEG, CAERAU, and NANTYFFYLLON CORRESPON- is Mr. D. W. THOMAS, NEATH LODGE CHAMBERS, NEATH ROAD, MAESTEG, to whom all Reports and Notices of Events should be sent. Readers are invited to for- ward copies of letters received from Soldier Relatives far Reproduction in the Gazette."

I MAESTEG ENTERPRISE

I MAESTEG ENTERPRISE. I OPENING OF THE NEW MUNICIPAL OFFICES. MEMBERS DINE. Another step along the road of municipal enterprise at Maesteg was made on Tuesday, when the new offices in Talbot Street, which have been erected at a cost of £ 4,350, were opened with fitting ceremony. THE BUILDING. Those who were acquainted with the town of Maesteg in the early eighties will remem- ber the old Town Hall and Markets, situated on the site facing the Great Western Rail- way Station approach. The population of Maesteg at that time was not one third of what it is to-day. The abormal develop- ment of this mining centre in more recent years brought with it the need of better ac- commodation for the municipal business of the town than the old buildings afforded. The Council rose to the occasion, and set out, first of all, to purchase the freehold of the Town Hall site and Market grounds. The new Town Hall, having a seating accommoda- tion for 1,500 people, and the Market Hall without, at the present time, a vacant stall or shop, have been erected, and were both opened twelve months ago. the new municipal offices, the erection of which was commenced some eighteen months ago, are of excellent proportions, and blend in their architectural features with the new Town Hall and Markets immediately adjoin- ing. The offices provide ample accommoda- tion for the various departments of the Coun- cil. On the basement floor are situated the lavatories, plan rooms, and strong rooms, to- gether with a public weighing machine and Market toll collector's office. The ground floor consists of a large and handsome Coun- cil Chamber, furnished with circular seating, panelling and eight columns, the whole in solid oak. A large committee room is also provided on this floor, with the engineer and surveyor's offices, all of which have immediate access to a handsome circular entrance hall. On the first floor are situated the clerk's office, the sanitary inspector's department, the rates department, and the medical officer's room; and on this floor is also provided a large assembly hall, with seating to accommo- date one hundred people, which will, no doubt, be a great boon to the town in general. Every part of the building has been de- signed for use. There are no vacant spaces, and every room of the building has windows opening directly to the outer air. The architect for all these building under- takings of the Council—that is, the new Town Hall, Markets, Fire Station, and new Munici- pal buildings—is Mr. Samuel J. Harpur, the engineer and surveyor to the Council, assisted by his deputy, Mr. E. J. E. Moore, and staff. The contractor for the whole of these build- ings is Mr. P. Gaylard, of Bridgend. OPENING CEREMONY. I The proceedings outside the offices, brief though they were, attracted a good deal of attention. The members of the Council posed for the photographer, and this inevitable cere- mony concluded, Mr. P. Gaylard presented the Chairman (Mr. Henry Laviers, J.P.) with a key. with which he unlocked the door of the premises. The key, which is one of handsome design, bears on the obverse side the inscrip- tion: "Presented to Mr. Henry Laviers, J.P., Chairman of the Maesteg Urban Dis- trict Council, upon the occasion of his open- ing the new Council Offices, Maesteg, Nov. 9th, 1915," and upon the reverse the inscrip- tion: "Presented to Henry Laviers, Esq., J.P., by Mr. P. Gaylard, the contractor for the new Council Offices, Maesteg, 1914-1915." At the conclusion of this ceremony, the members adjourned to the Council Chamber, where several speeches were delivered. The Chairman said they were privileged to see brought to fruition a scheme which was commenced in 1908. It was thought that better and more suitable accommodation was required for the municipal business of the town, and they were now celebrating the opening of their new municipal offices, which he was sure would prove a great boon to the town. Some while ago Mr. Gomer Davies had the pleasure of opening the new Town Hall and Market Place, and he (the Chair- man) thought he could claim for the Town Hall that for comfort and accommodation, to- gether with the good acoustic properties, if not for achitectural beauty, a foremost place amongst similar buildings throughout the county. The arrangement of the Market Hall was good, and the accommodation was good, while the fine entrance made it very prominent. It was satisfactory to know that every stall there was let, and the revenue de- rived from this source formed an important item in the finances of the Council. There was also a fire station-not an imposing build- ing, it was true, but one which served its pur- pose and he hoped in time a better engine would be procured. The Brigade, under the able leadership of Mr. Hocking, had been brought to a high state of efficiency, and were equal to ail demands made upon them. IN-AN-FED, A MAYOR, I When the war concluded, and they had I time to turn their minds into peaceful chan- nels, he hoped they would turn their attention towards securing a Mayor for Maesteg, who would sit as chairman of the Council. The Chairman proceeded to give a descrip- tion of the building, remarking that it was constructed in the style of the English Ren vis- sance. They were fortunate in having com- menced the building work before the high prices owing to the war obtained, and all who had taken part in the work were to be con- gratulated. Mr. Gaylard had done excellent work, and they sympathised with him in ti e fact that labour and materials had been so difficult to obtain. They could congratulate themselves upon entering upon a new era of the history of the Council, and he hoped the possession of the new buildings would lead to better and more efficient work in the future, (Applause.) A POLICE AND COUNTY COURT. Mr. J. P. Gibbon proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, observing that he had hoped the Chairman would have mentioned the ambition they had in connection with the assembly hall. For many years the district had been clamouring for a Police Court and a County Court. Neither of these institutions was very desirable, but whilst such things had to be, a big centre like Maesteg ought to be a place where justice could be meted out to both parties. Now they had suitable accom- modation to offer, he hoped that as a Coun- cil they would not rest until they had suc- ceeded in securing these two institutions for the town. (Hear, hear.) Some years ago, when it was decided to purchase that free- hold site at a cost of something like L2,000, some seemed to think the price excessive. He d:d not say very much at the time, but now he would say he considered it one of the finest pieces of business the Council ever d;d. Other toasts were Thè" Architect, Mr. S. J. Harpur," proposed by Mr. J. Hocking, and supported by Mr. A. J. Hicks; "The Con- tractor," submitted by Mr. David Morris, and supported by Mr. J. P. Gibbon; The Town and Trade of Maesteg," proposed by Mr Thos. Lewis, and responded to by Dr. W. Kirkby and Alderman E. E. Davies; "The Press," submitted by Mr. A. Nicholas, supported by Mr. H. M. Jones, and responded to by the Gazette" representative. Mr. David Davies proposed The Visitors," and Messrs. R. Dooner, J. R. Snape, J. W. Cooper, and Emrys Davies responded.

f EXMAESTEGIAN

f EX-MAESTEGIAN. I RECOGNITION AS PASTOR OF IMPORT- ANT BAPTIST CHURCH. The Rev. John Thomas, M.A., who left Maesteg for College in 1881, graduated B.A. with triple honours, and took his M.A. first on the list at London University, afterwards occupying pastorates at various churches, has now been recognised as pastor of Sutton Bap- tist Church. i The Baptist Times and Freeman," com- menting on the event, sa s:- It is felt by all that tober 27th, 1915, when the Rev. John Thomas, M.A., was for- mally recognised as pastor of the Sutton Bap- tist Church, will be long and gratefully re- membered, not only for the significance of the occasion, but also for the noteworthy charac- ter .of the services and of the congregations that assembled. The afternoon service was conducted by Dr. Chas. Brown, who took for his text Acts xxvi., 16. Itwas a. memorable utterance on the dignity, responsibility, and potency of the Christian ministry. The schoolroom was filled with these who bridged the interval between the afternoon and evening services by joining in the social tea. Those who did so had the privilege of hearing three excellent addresses of welcome from the Rev. J. Trussler (representing the Primitive Methodists), the Rev. H. J. Morley, of Sydenham, and Mr. Arthur Black, hon. sec. of the Ragged School Union. Mr. Black, who has only recently come from Liver- pool to London, spoke of Mr. Thomas' work in the former city as a leader, not only in the pulpit, but also in social and political ques- tions where direct moral issues were involved. The evening meeting was alive in every sense—the massed audience, the platform crowded with speakers and supporters, and the choir that from aloft led the praise and effectively sang two fine anthems. Dr. Dixon made an excellent chairman. He expressed his delight that Mr. Thomas had come to the metropolis, as London needed such preachers and expositors of the Word. He told the audience how Mr. Thomas' preaching in America had delighted the great Northfield and other conferences, and warned them that they must not expect to keep him to them- selves, for the churches would be wanting his services, and first among thess would be the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Dr. Dennis, the Church secretary, read a number of quite remarkable letters. Those from Liverpol roused the audience to a lively interest, scarcely less than that excited by a letter which had come from Downing Street, the writer of which was Mr. Lloyd George. The great statesman had promised to come to the recognition, "if he could possibly find a few minutes in these terrible times." Un- fortunately, with the Premi er ill, the few minutes could not be found, but everyone was glad to hear his word of Godspeed to Mr. Thomas in his new ministry. From the Bishop of Liverpool came a letter of most friendly greeting, expressing regret at Mr. Thomas' departure from Liverpool, and testi- fying that he had been amongst the foremost in that great city in fighting the forces of sin and sorrow. From the Archdeacn of Liver- pool, whose church was near Myrtle Street, came a letter brimful of affection, apprecia- tion, and goodwill. Similar letters of 'regret and affectionate Godspeed came from the Myrtle Street Church, from the secretary of the Liverpool Free Church Federation, and from the Secretary of the Lancashire and Cheshire Baptist Association. Letters from ministers of distinction, personal friends of Mr. Thomas, included messages from the Revs. J. H. Shakespeare, Thomas Spurgeon, Dr. W. L. Watkinson, F. B. Meyer, J. W. Ewing, and—why not classed among minis- ters?—Mr. Herbert Marnham. Mr. T. H. Stockwell, aforetime editor of the old "Bap- tist," one of the new pastor's oldest friends, came to speak for himself. The Rev. A. V. Thomas, a former co-pastor of Mr. Thomas', spoke through a very grateful and gracious letter. In a few chosen words the pastor closed the list of speakers. He said that he found him- self in a most happy apostolical succession. His predecessor and dear friend, the Rev. George Turner, was with them on the plat-, form, and had already during the evening spoken most affectionate words of apprecia- tion. A letter had been read from Mr. Turner's predecessor also, making the chain complete. Quite unexpectedly one of the deacons of his (Mr. Thomas') first Church-at Salendine Nook—had arrived cn the scene; and Myrtle Street Church was represented by Sir William and Lady Slinge. All of these had given most eulogistic testimony to Mr. Thomas' previous ministries. And thus on this side also the links of the chain were com- plete. The new pastor gratefully acknow- ledged the spiritual atmosphere created by the ministry of his predecessor, and the strong evangelical foundations laid for further build- ing. The recognition service is over, but we can already record more than a promise of the "open door." Large and growing congrega- tions are eagerly coming to hear the Word, and an increasing number is. seeking the fel- lowship of the Church.

Advertising

 J Henry Lasers MAESTEG. SPECIAL BARGAINS THIS WEEK IN BLANKETS, QUILTS & RUGS. —wnwcw—nirr—w — MEN'S, YOUTH'S & BOYS' OVERCOATS. Ladies Fur, Plush and Nap Coats. Children's Pretty Costumes and Bonnets. The latest designs in Ladies and Children's Millinery arriving daily. The newest styles in Ladies Blouses. SPECIAL JAP BLOUSES 10 Mome, at 4/111 0 Don't forget to bay your WINTER STOCKINGS whilst the prices are right. 38, 39, 40, 41 & 42, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. JEm.of' 11" geOOoooeoaa;eOO I H J l^inc COJnplee Hou.. i t n < j en Ins, = ?'?f?ff? Successor to "W". Jenkins Sc Sons, 14 and 15, Commercial Street, Hf AESTEG. We are now showing many new designs in BEDROOM SUITES Solid Oak, Walnut & Mahogany. "lllL always been our Prices: IPS It has always been our 6 Guineas ob!ect to sell th ? 8 ..¡il I ¡-newest & best dSIS 8 G?neas at prices well within 10 Guineas the reach of everyone. It will be a positive pleasure to us, to show you round our show- rooms whether buying or not. Accept this as an invitation when next in the vicinity. To the Inhabitants of Maesteg and District —— 0- Mr. John Davies (Malster's Hotel), Begs to inform you that he has purchased the business of the late Mr. WILLIAM PRICE, known as RIVERSIDE MILLS. Mr. Davies intends carrying on the same business as was done by the late Mr. Price, and hopes by strict attention to all orders to merit a fair SHARE OF YOUR PATRONAGE All kinds of Building & Undertaking Materials kept in stock. MILL MORTAR SUPPLIED. Undertaking a Speciality The whole business will be under the management of Mr. J. L. CARR. as before.

No title

Private H. L. Fisher, machine-gun section of I the Welsh Horse, son of Mr. Sam Fisher, writ- ing home, says:—I am in the pink, and having a good time so far; only that the flies are very plentiful and troublesome. We arrived at —— on Saturday, October 2nd, about mid-day, im! remained there until Friday, October 8th, when we left by boat for our destination at 2 p.m. I We got near the coast about 7 p.m., and were I then transferred to a large motor tender. It blew hard, and the sea became very rough, and I shall never forget that landing. After get- ting ashore we had to march about three miles. On the way the regiment got divided, and we missed about one-half of our men. That night we slept in a communication trench, and next morning, about 8.30, we picked up the missing half of the regiment. This was Saturday, Oc- tober 9th, and we have Ixrn under fire ever I since. Three of our fellows have been wounded. I am with the machine-gun section of my com- I pany. =-

Advertising

I ADvl CE FREE.—Mrs. Stewart, Herbal Specialist, 9 Guinea Street Bristol. 6191 The Co-Operative Stores Are the Members Own Shops, Every Penny Profit over Working Expenses is Divided Quarterly About 230,000 has been paid in Dividends During the Last Fifteen Years. Every Member and his Wife is Insured under our Insurance Scheme, without Personal Charge MF Every Want for Home 0. PerBon^Supplied, H We Pay 5 per cent on Share Capital. tt n 4 »» "Loan „ „ 31" „ „ Penny Bank Deposit. We are affiliated to the Co-Operative Wholesale Society who have an annual turnover of above £50,0000 I Caerau and Maesteg Co-operative Society, GIFT PARCELS for the TROOPS. For your Friends "t the Front, nothing is more appreciated than something good to eat Ho ..e mething to vary the monotony of ordinary service rations. "DOROTHY" TUCK BOXES. All Articles Home-made (not factory) are just the thing. The contents have been carefully selected to form a home-like Gift for a Soldier or Sailor on Service, especially during the summer months. No tins to open, nothing to spoil in transit. Everything of the best -quality, securely packed and forwarded Carriage Paid to destination. No. 1 Parcel, "The Pride of Wales," contains the following good things:— 2 lb. Territorial Cake (Almond Iced). :t lb. Shortbread :1 ? !b. Real Galantine II 1 lb. Swiss Roll ?l 12 Assorted Chocolate Cakes 6 Welsh Cakes i lb. Old fashion Bull's Eyes." lpi-tee 5s. ad. complete* Including Postage to France, Belgium, Egypt, Mediterranean or British Isles Other Parcels: 3/6, 6/6, and 8/6 each. Owing to the volume of Orders we are receiving, please Order Early. ALL ORDERS SENT OUT IN ROTATION. R. WILLfflMS & SONS, (ON WAR OFFICE LIST) f IDonothy Cafe, MAESTEG. SPECIAL QUOTATIONS FOR. QUANTITIES. All Remittances acknowledged and Date of Despatch given. Please state clearly Full Address, Regimental Number, Battalion or Regiment, Rank or Ship. Sergt. McNamara, 6th Dorset.s, B.E.F., France. 25-8-15 I Dear Sir,—I received parcel in good oider. Many thanks. (Signed) P MeNaniar S. Hawkins. No. 9812, 3rd Ratt. Machine Gunner, RE.F., France. 23-S-15. To Mr. Williams Dear Sir, Just a line trusting this may find you quite veil as it loaves me at present. I must thank you co much f, -r the Box you sent me out, which I received vesterdav ("unday), which j think was a good assortment. It came as a great surprise to me to find that J had such a neat box sent, but of course, we are all happy out here when we receive anvthing frenj home, if it is only & few Iiiiep it cheers anvone up you know; especially where we arc at present, nothing but shells flying all around us. It will be a good job when this is all over, but if we cou'd only got hem on the r' it would be a had job for them, but their time as got to come one