Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CHAIRMANS PROTEST I

CHAIRMAN'S PROTEST. I SCENE BETWEEN MILITARY REPRE- SENTATIVE AND CHAIRMAN. The Maesteg Tribunal sat on Friday to oan- .r,der applications for exemptions. Mr. J. P. Gibbon, J.P., presided. Before prorex-ding with the business, the members had a consultation after which Mr. T. E. Hopkins, J.P., the Military Represen- tative and the Press were admitted. The Chairman announced that on behalf of the tribunal he had two statements to make, one for the Military Representative and one specially for the Press." They had decided to ask the Military Representative to retire while they discussed their decisions, and they had decided to W'k the Press to make a special note of the fact that the members of the tri- bunal re&ented very much the canvassing that was done by applicants, and that very strong action would be taken if it was known that any member had been canvassed. Mr. Hays, the owner of the Llwydarth Foundry appeared on behalf of one of his em- ployees, a moulder, who was unattested, and asked for in exemption. Permission was granted for the applicant to appeal under the Military Service Act. Mr. Hopkins said that he must protest against this man being allowed to appeal now, as he had lost his opportunity by not at- -ftsting and by not putting in his notice of ap- peal before the 2nd of March. The Chairman: You have no tight to put questions or express an opinion in this case at present, Mr. Hopkins. The question as t- whether a man shall be given the right to ap- peal is a matter for the tribunal only. If the man is allowed to appeal, you will have your opportunity when the appeal comes before us. When the tribunal were about to confer on a subsequent appeal Mr. T. E. Hopkins (the military representative) left the court with the public and the appellant in a with the decision of the members. On his re- turn, Mr. Hopkins said that he would like to be informed on what authority he was asked to retire when the members were c^r f urring. The Chairman cited the in-truct ans which had been issued by the Director-General of Recruiting giving discretionary power to tri- bunals, and added that it was under tba.t para- graph that the tribunal had decided to exclude the military representative. In another case the Chairman asked the \iilitaj-v representative whether be had any questions to put to the appellant. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: 1 think it is folly on my part to try to represent the military hem under the circumstances or to try to put any questions. The Chairman: Please reserve your re- marks until the appellant's case is finished. Mr. Hopkins: You object to my sitting here altogether, that's about it. The Chairman: No, I don't. Mr. Hopkins: Your attitude here this morning shows it clearly. Mr. Hopkins retired with the appellant amd the public while this case was being conferred upon. MILITARY REPRESENTATIVE'S PROTEST. On returning he said, I may as well leave the room, because I do not think .it will be mmoeassry for me to sit here. You reserve to yourself the right to a&k questions here, and you ask me to retire, And now you are] dealing with the cases without any military representative. The Chairman: That is not my ruling, and we are not here to quarrel. I have given you the decision of the tribunal. You have a per- fect right to ask questions, and you refused my invitation to do so. The decision of the tribunal is to ask you to retire with the pub- lic. Mr. Hopkins: When I began to ask que&- tions you rebuked me, though all I did was to point out that the man was atteoted, and that he had not appealed under the Military Service Act before March 2nd, and after that you asked me to retire in other cases. The Chairman: What I told you was that we were considering whether we would give that man the right to appeal or not; you had no standing in the case, but that your time would come when we dealt with the appeal. Mr. Hopkins: You commenced to deal with a case under the Military Service Act until I told the clerk that you had no right to do so because he was an attested man, and you object in every case. You raiaa.an objec- tion against my asking quest iocs, and rebuke me. The Chairman: You are incorrect in your statements. I am sorry that you were so d s- C(Xirteous that you did not call my attent' en to the Military Service Act case when it was opened. Mr. Hopkins: The clerk stepped forward to ask me, and I did so at once. The Chairman: There is no intention of preventing the military representative tmVirig the questions he is entitled to ask. NO REFLECTION. I Mr. Hopkins: You think there is no neces- sity. The Chairman: Nothing of the sort. Mr. Hopkins: You make me retire like a criminal. The Chairman: No, no; read the rules. Mr. Hopkins: That is merely part of them. You simply rebuke me. You don't give me your reasons, but ask me, to retire. The Chairman: I didn't know you had not got a copy of the rules. Mr. Hopkins: Your attitude has been the same before. The Chairman: I am entixely. voicing the decision of the members. Mr. H. Laviers: I am entirely opposed to the views of Mr. Hopkins with regard to the chairman's attitude. I do not see any reason why Mr. Hopkins should leave us altogether, because he is neoessiary here. To be asked to retire while we are conferring is no reflection on him. Mr. Hopkins: If I am treated by the chair- man as I ought to be treated I am perf otiy willing to stay and represent the military. Mr. Laviers: What the Chairman objected to was your discussing a matter which was for the tribunal only. Mr. Honkins: The question I raised was that it was a breach of the law. Mr. Laviers: You forgot for the moment that you were not a member of the tribunal. Mr. Gomer Davies: Sit down, Mr Hopkins. I am sure the chairman will give you every eourtesy in asking questions. The Chairman: I am willing to give Mr. Hopkins every courtesy within my instruc- tions, but if he enters into matters not within his purview it is my duty to call attention to it TREATED SHAMEFULLY." I Mr. Hopkins, who had remained standing and had gathered up his papers to leave, now resumed his seat, stating that he noticed that several members were beckoning him to stay, but he added that he thought he had been traated shamefully. The Chairman: You have been treated as you ought to be treated. Mr. W. R. Bates, marine store dealer, who was represented by Mr. J. R. Snape, solicitor, applied for exemption on the ground of seri- ous hardship. Mr. T. E. Hopkins, the military representa- tive, remarked that he was an attested man. The application was refused. Mr. Emrys Davies, grocer, of Caerau, ap- plied for exemption on the grounds of serious hardship and business obligations. Temporary exemption for six months. William Guilford, Caerymu Farm, applied for an exemption on the ground that he was working on a farm of 46 acres, and that no- one else was employed. His employer, Mr. William Powell (who also appeared) was a re- cruiting sergeant at Port Talbot.. Granted six months. Sydney Loveluck Hopkins, of Garnlwyd, butcher and slaughterman, applied for exemp- tion. The Advisory Committee recommended temporary exemption for six months, and it was agreed to acoept this recommendation. Rev. W. Morgan appeared on behalf of his son, Percy D. Morgan, aged 23, chemist's assistant, of Commercial Street. Being in a certified trade, total exemption was granted. Gwilym Bowen, aged 22, of 9 Turberville Street, applied for total exemption on the ground that he was deaf in one ear, and was one of a family of eight children. He was now working underground, but when he at- tested he was a bricklayer. Application refused. Trevor James Phillips, aged 19, colliery lampman, applied for exemption on the ground that he was the only support of his widowed mother and widowed sister. A letter was also put in by his mother. Granted two months. John James Scourfield, aged 19 years, of 6 Alfred Street, employed as a coke oven feeder at Messrs. North's Colliery, applied. for ex- emptioa.—Granted. FARMERS. Mr. Morgan Res, of Tymaen Farm, ap- plied for an exemption on behalf of his son, Jenkin Morgan Rees, who was the only person on the farm able to do ploughing and shep- herd's duty. They had 190 acres of land, 8 acres being ploughed and the remainder meadow and mountain land. They supplied the town with 25 gallons of milk every day. Granted six months. Mr. Rowland Thomas, of Blaen Cwmdu Farm, applied for exemption on the ground that he was working the farm on his own, being unable to get labour. He reared cattle for home consumption. Granted six months. John Davies, Cwrtymwnws Farm, applied on the same grounds.—Granted six months. Idwal Thomas Morris, a law student, ap- plied for a postponement until June in order to sit for his examination.—Granted. Mr. W. McPherson, mechanical engineer, applied as an employer on behalf of Augustus Laking, who was also present, for exemp- tion on the grounds that he was a fitter and turner. The work he was doing was directly connected with the collieries. In reply to a question by the Chairman, Mr. McPherson stated that applicant was in the last year of his apprenticeship, and it would be a serious matter for them to lose him.—Granted conditional exemption. David Jones, hay merchant, Caerau, single, aged 33, applied for absolute exemp- tion on the ground that he was the I sole support of a widowed mother. He was the only chaffcutter from Bridgend to Aber- gwynfi that supplied chaff to tradespeople. Mr. Gomer Davies disputed the last state- ment. Granted three months. A CAERAU ELECTRICIAN. I Mr. E. Bevan Thomas applied as employer I on behalf of Evan Thomas Jones, of Alma Road, an electribian in his employ, on the grounds that he was, indispensable, being the sole supervisor of a large electric plant, which cost them 91,000. Many of the Caerau busi- new premises were supplied, as well as other institutions. It would be a hardship to them and an inconvenience to many others if they had to close down.—Applicant was granted conditional exemption. Mr. Jenkin Morris, 33, single, applied for exemption. He was a bread baker with a business of his own. He baker 14 sacks of I flour a week. Granted three months. CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. I Gwilym Joseph Thomas, aged 23, of 3 Bryn Terrace, Caerau, applied for exemption ,on the ground that he was a theological student and a conscientious objector. The Chairman: You are not entitled to ex- emption. Applicant: I think I am. The Chairman: Are you a minister, a clergyman, or a priest ? Applicant: No; but I think I am entitled under a special regulation from the War Office. The Chairman: You are under a misappre- hension. Aon'leant: I know of students from Car- marthen who have been exempted by the mili- tary representative on these grounds. The Chairman: We have our instructions, and they contain no such provision. Have you any other statement to make? Applicant: I conscientiously object to mili- tary service, as being against the principles of religion and the teaching of Christ. The Chairman: Why don't von-fulfil your obligation to religion, and defend your country, the same as I heard of an old Methodist preacher, who met with an agges- sor on the highway. Having struck the old preacher on one cheek, he struck him also on the other. "There now," said the preacher, "I have been faithful to my religious obliga- tions, and taking off his coat he gave the aggressor a "whacking." That's what you should do with the Germans. J Applicant was* recommended for non-com- batant service. Mr. Edwin M. Davies, aged 18, of Maest-eg House, applied for exemption on conscientious grounds. Letters in support of the claim were put in from Rev. J. T. Parry, Zoar; Mr. A. H. Thomas, Neath Road, and Rev. H. E. Rogers, Bridgend. Applicant was recommended for non-com- batant service. Harold Picerton, a conscientious objector, of Turbervill Street, Maesteg, in his applica- tion for exemption, stated that if he met the Kaiser in Maesteg to-morrow and pushed a sword through, him, it. would not touoh his soul. Recommended for non-combatant ser- vice. Thomas Henry Laugharne, of Charles Row, another conscientious objector, was also re- commended for non-combatant service. OTHER APPLICATIONS. Other applications were dealt with as J follow:— Herbert J. Lewis (manager of Lipton's): Granted four months. Evan W. Lewis, Talbot Street: Four months. E. J. Morgan, jeweller, Caerau Road: Three months. John Lewis, 54 Caerau Road: Three months. Fred Stra- h-,idge, slaughterman (whose ap- plication was supported by his employer, Mr. T. E. Jones, butcher): Granted conditional ex- emption. John William Rees, grocer's assistant, 2 St. Michael's Road: Three months. James Henry Davies, 2 Alma Road: Appli- cation refused. J. Alban Lee, 66 Station Street: Applica- tion refused.

Advertising

I" J.- _08" IMPORTANT NEWS FOR FPBWITPBE BUYER147 A £ Y LOCKYER, Complete House Furnisher, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. Begs to announce that he has now opened Extensive Showrooms at Market Building's, Talbot Street, Maesteg, With a New and Up-to-date Selection of •, FURNITURE, CARPETS, BEDSTEADS, BEDDING, Etc., Etc. Inclading all the Latest Designs and Stylee. Yoa are cordially invited to inspect Showrooms at your ieMUre. Cusbomm can rely upon making their choice from a magnincent and comprehensive stock. Every facility ie pro- rided to enable you to get just that pretty home you have in you mind. Every need is met and every taste catered for. Once you ??oome a customer you ..m discover why LOCXY' hM beecme a hoomhold word, and merited t?e codèeRee of the Public. Your wishes will be obøened to the smallest details; you will get FURNITURE WORTH HAVING at Moderate Price@. NOTE ADDRESS OF NEW SHOWROOMS: LOCKYER'S FURNISHING EMPORIUM, Market Buildings, Talbot Street, MAESTEG, Yon are cordially to Prices. FURNISHING EMPORIUM, Market Buildings, Talbot Street, MAESTEG. pr A. VISIT OF INSPECTION WILL PAY YOU.

SATURDAYS SITTING I

SATURDAY'S SITTING. I Mr. J. P. Gibbon presided on Saturday. Mr. Joshua Davies, manager of the Maes- teg Deep Colliery and Coke Ovens, appealed on behalf of nine workmen for total exemp- tion on the ground that they were indispen- sable for the carrying on of the work at the coke oveits.-Granted. Mr. Wm. Morgan, manager of the Celtic Colliery, appeared on behalf of seven men as being indispensable on the sur- face of the colliery. In reply to the Chairman, the Manager stated it was impossible to get men to re- place them. Granted. William John Williams, Maesteg Road, washery attendant, applied for exemption.— Refused. Latimer James Williams, Maesteg Road, and David Evans, Mill Street, were deemed to be engaged in certified occupations. W. M. Williams, Bridgend Road, colliery clerk, and W. Jenkin Jones, of 30 Turber- vill Street, colliery clerk, were granted total exemptions. J. S. Morgan, colliery pay clerk, was given two months. Mr. T. E. Hopkins gave notice to appeal against the decisions to grant exemptions. An application was made by Mr. E. W. Davies, G.W.R. carrier, on behalf of his haulier, W. Henry Hicks.—A certificate of ex- emption was granted. The Advisory Committee recommended total exemption in the case of William J. Dupplaw, who said his father and two bro- thers were serving with the colours.—Six months granted. COMPOSITOR EXEMPTED. I That is was impossible to get men to re- place B. Llewellyn Davies, a compositor, and Walter J. Gibbs was the reason given by their employer, Mr. J. James, Castle Street, when applying for exemption. Applicant admitted it was possible to carry, on the work with one of them. Davies was granted total exemption, and Gibbs was given one month. Mr. J. A. Boucher, manager of the Llynvi Valley Gas Co., applied on behalf of a. stoker. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: Surely you can get an older man to do stoking. Mr. Boucher: If this man is taken away the works must be shut down. The man was granted exemption, as it was held be was in a certified occupation. DOCTOR'S DISPENSER. I I I The Advisory Committee advised total ex- emption in the case of Mr. J. D. Morgan, dis- penser and book-keeper in the employ of Dr. Sinclair, for whom Dr. Sinclair appeared. The Chairman asked if this man could not be replaced by a woman. Dr. Sinclair said he had been with him for four years. It would take a long %ime to get a woman experienced. He was a quali- fied man for dispensing under the National Insurance Act. The recommendation of the Advisory Com- mittee wafe adopted. Giraldus Rees applied for an extension till July to complete his first year's training at College.—Granted. John John and Thomas William John, of the Plasnewydd Restaurant, insurance agents, applied for exemption. They pos- sessed white certificates. Granted two months' postponement. The application of Arthur E. Davies, of St. Michael's Road, a colliery surfaceman, for ex- emption from military service on the ground of being the main support of his home was refused.

TUESDAYI

TUESDAY. I Fewer Girls in Business in Maesteg Than in I Other Towns. { The sitting of the Maesteg Tribunal was re- sumed on Tuesday. James Treharne, Penylan Farm, applied for total exemption on the ground that he was the only male person on the farm. His father was not well, neither was he much in- terested in farm work.Graiited three months. Mr. Brinley R. Morgan, Office Road, ap- plied for exemption. Three brothers were in the forces, one having recently been dis- charged. Inasmuch as the applicant was a collier, the Chairman (Mr. J. P. Gibbon) suggested that applicants who were colliers before the regis- tration should not be dealt with, pending the decision of the Home Office in connection with collieries.—This was agreed to. Mr. Evan Jones, builder and contractor, Caerau, applied for total exemption. He had several uncompleted contracts. The Advisory Committee recommended that the application be refused.—Granted two months. Mr. Lewis John Griffiths, Castle Street, who did not appear personally owing to ill- ness, in his application stated that he was in sole charge of the business. He had' two brothers serving in the army.—Postponed for a month. NANTYFFYLLON CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR. Mr. John Day, boot and shoe dealer, Nan- tyffyllon, applied for exemption as a conscien- tious objector. He was opposed to the tak- ing of human life or to agree to any form of military service whether combatant 'or non- combatant. The Chairman: Have you anything to add to your written application? Applicant No. The Chairman: You are not prepared to defend your country? Applicant: I have no country. The Chairman: And yet you enjoy the benefits of the country. Applicant: All the benefits I enjoy are ob- tained by my own efforts. Applicant was recommended for non-com- batant service. One of the public remarked that this was another prejudged decision. The Chairman: Next case, please. Mr. Roger Thomas, butcher, Caerau, ap- plied for exemption. He was a single man. but had his father and mother dependent on him. His father was 72, and his mother 68. —One month. BOUGHT HIS DISCHARGE. Mr. William Charles Davies, Picton Street, Nantyffyllon, applied for exemption on the grounds that only in February, 1914, he pur- chased his discharge. He was for over two years in the Duke of Cornwall's Light In- fantry. The Advisory Committee recommended that the discharge be produced, and the applica- tion refused. The Tribunal refused the application, but the Chairman, in informing the applicant of the decision, said the Tribunal would re- commend that the money paid for the dis- charge be refunded. Mrs. Thomas, wife of Mr. Tremrudd Thomas, grocer's assistant, of 51 St. Michael's Road, appeared on behalf of her husband, who was ill in bed, and applied for total exemption on the ground that he was medically unfit. Temporary exemption for two months. HALF A MAN EQUAL TO THREE WOMEN Mr. Ben Jones, grocer, Caerau Road, ap- pealed for total exemption on behalf of two of his assistants—Mr. Henry Jones and Mr. Thes. R. Edwards—on the ground that they were indispensable to the business. The former. was the manager and buyer, and the latter was first salesman. The Advisory Committee recommended refusal of both ap- plications. The Chairman: Have you advertised for men to take the places of these men? Applicant: Yes, and I am unable to get them. The Chairman: Why don't you get young lady assistants?' There is less work done by young ladies in Maesteg than in any of the larger towns. Applicant: I have already engaged three young ladies. The Military Representative (Mr. T. E. Hopkins, J.P.): You have studied your own interests well. You have three young ladies, two male assistants, and yourself in the busi- ness, but at the present time we have to study the interests of the country. Neither of your assistants have appealed for them- selves, which proves to me they are willing to go, only that you are studying your own interest to keep them. Applicant: That is only one aspect of the case. We have the community to provide for, and it is in the national interest that they should be served. Mr. Hopkins: Why don't you engage more young ladies, and let these young men go ? Applicant: As far as young ladies are con- cerned, I would sooner have half a man than three young ladies. Jones was granted three months, aDd Ed- wards one month. Mr. W. H. Richards, Royil Stores, Castle, Street, appeared on behalf of Mr. Edward I King, a haulier in his employ. He em- ployed young ladies in retail work, but as three parts of his trade was wholesale, it was essential that he should have men for the heavy work. At present he had two; one of them was only with him temporarily. If he was called up, he would be left with only this man, and if the application was refused it would be a serious hardship.-Three months. Mr. Thomas Thomas, a baker, applied on behalf of his son, Richard Thomas.—Two months. Mr. Ivor H. Owen, Ewenny Road, bread baker, employed by Mr. D. Thomas, was the I only support of a widowed mother.—Three months. Mr. Cross, manager of the Maesteg and Caerau Co-operative Society, applied for total exemption on behalf of Mr. John Lewis Davies, Smith Street, Maesteg, provision foreman, he being indispensable to the busi- ness. The Chairman: Have any of your assistants gone to the colliery lately? Mr. Cross: Yes, one. The Chairman: Can't you replace this man by a woman? Mr. Cross: The question of women in the grocery is useless. They can talk over the counter, and that sort of thing, all right.— One month. I OTHER CASES. Mr. William James Davies, High Street, Nantyffyllon, who said he had been a miner for two months, applied for exemption on domestic ground,Six months. Mr. Thomas Frances Evans, Brynmawr Plaoe, coalyard haulier, with mother and sister dependent, was granted two months. Mr. Evan Morgan Davies, Llwydarth Farm, was granted four months. I Mr. Thomas John Petty, Commercial St.— Application refused. Mr. David Arthur Davies, Queen Street, master butcher. Three brothers on active service; the only son left to support father.— Four months. Mr. Alfred D. Perkins, pupil teacher, ap- plied for temporary exemption to pass his examination.—Granted till July 31st. Messrs. Evan Evans and Thomas Evans, of Gellilenor Farm, applied for exemption.—Six months and four months respectively. Mr. Theophilua Williams, boot repairer, Castle Street.—Six months. Mr. Thomas Daniel Williams, Hermon Road, boot repairer.—Application refused. Mr. John Maddocks, Blaenllynfi Farm, ap- plied on behalf of Mr. Christopher Evans, a shepherd in his employ. He had 700 acres of land, and 600 sheep to look after.—Six months. Mr. John Thomas Jones, Alma House, builder and undertaker.—Four months. Mr. Albert Lewis Roberts, Queen Street, a student .Six months. Mr. William James Howells, assistant weigher at the Patch Machine.—One month. Mr William Sutton, painter, Cwmdu Street. and Mr. Benjamin Jones, carpenter, Treharne Road, Caerau.—Refused.

Advertising

Noted for Reliable Welsh Flannels. Shirtings from 1/2 per yard Home made Shirts, all siz s in stock from small- fflr,ify, est boys' to'largest men's. Anytyle or size a garment made to order at shortest notice. Stockings and Socks of every size and descrip- f tion, from finest Cashmere to thickest Woollen. t Thousands of pairs to choose from. \J All Reliable Goods at right prices. Note Address— W. T. JONES, ? Mtt5? t'v r J} jjj, Manchester House, Nolton Street, Ell Bridgend.   P* Not five minutes from Station

NANTYFFYLLON COLLIER KILLED

NANTYFFYLLON COLLIER KILLED Mr. Lewis M. Thomas (district coroner) and a jury, of which Mr. W. Richards was fore- man, held an inquest on Friday morning at the Nantyffyllon Workmen's Institute, touch- ing the death of Mr. William John Preece, of 8 Cavan Row, who was fatally injured at St. John's Colliery, Cwmdu, on the previous Mon- day. The Miners' Federation and relatives were represented by Mr. Evan Williams. Mr. Jenkin Jones, manager of the colliery, was also present. David Preece, father of deceased, gave evi- dence of identification. He said that de- ceased was 33 years of age. He had been a collier for many years, and had worked at Cwmdu for two years. David Mark Thomas, 13 Zoar Avenue, said that he had been at Cwmdu 18 months, and was deceased's partner for one month. They worked in a new place a 2ft. 9in. seam. They started work at 3 o'clock, and the acci- dent took place at 5:30 p.m. Witness was present at the time of the accident. They started ripping as soon as they got down, and also took one post down. The bottom bed fell; also the slant from the middle of the road running on the right-hand side, where deceased worked. He saw the stone hanging in the centre of the road. He said that he did not like the look of the stone, but he did, not think it would drop, so they started crop- ping the sides,, leaving the stone there. Wit- ness said that as he did not feel very satisfied he tried to keep his eye on the stone. He suddenly heard a crash, and jumping back saw that the stone had fallen on Preece. He took the stone off, and drew him under the timber. He thought that Preece was dead then. Witness said that it was a narrow heading, and there was about 3ft. distance between the props after taking this one out. The stone was 2ft. in length, running to a thin end, and weighed about 2 cwts. George Isaac, of 42 Maiden Street, a fire- man on the afternoon shift, said he had not been to the place before the accident, because the day fireman had given him the report. Isaac went there after the accident. He said he had seen Thomas and Preece on top of the pit before they went down, and he told them that their place was all right. Witness said that after attending to Preece, who he thought was still alive, he examined the place I and found that there was a fairly good top. The stone bad a smooth top, and would come J L -———-———————— — down unknowingly. He thought that they had gofce too far on the right side with the ripping. Walter Jones, the day fireman, of 21 Tur- bervill Street, said he was at the place where Preece and Thomas worked at 1.45 p.m. He oould not see the stone, and thought that everything was all right. Dr. McCausland said he was summoned to the pithead at 6 o'clock and saw Preeoe, who was then dead. He examined him at the house, and saw that there were two deep marks at the side of the head, and fracture of the skull. The cause of death was shock following injuries. The jury returned a verdict of "Acciden- tal Death."

Advertising

FASHIONABLE NOVELTIES FOR. SPRING WEAR at HENRY LRVIERS THis Week. SEE OUR SHOWROOMS for Smart and Up to-date Millinery, for the newest productions in Ladies' & Maid's Costumes, Coats, Skirt, Rainproofs, etc. JjAAY ROOM. Children's Pretty Costumes, Bonnets and Hats. Ladies' and Children's Underclothing at practically old prices. DON'-R MISS OUR BLOUSE SHOW. A choice selection of all the latest productions in Silk and Voile Blouses. JAP BLOUSES, SPECIAL, 10 Momme, 3/111 (Worth your notice BUY YOUR CORSETS NOW. All the Celebrated Makes at very little advance in prices. Lace and Casement Curtains, just in, and at Old Prices. New Goods in the Print, Delaine, and Flannelette Departments, received daily. GENTS' OUTFITTING and BOY'S DEPARTMENTS. Call and See our Men's, Youth's and Boy's Suits, Overcoats, Showerproof Coats etc. We are Agents for burberry Coats, Christy's Hats, etc. 38, 39, 40, 41 & 42, COMMERCIAL STREET, MAESTEG. i    ?    Complete Hou )" T. H. Jenkins, Successor to 1N. Jenkins & Sons, 14" and 15, (commercial Street, MAESTEG. We are now showing many new designs in BEDROOM SUITES Solid Oak. Walnut & Mahogany. ?''? f ?ices: ?jBp ? It has always been our N

FLAGON TRADE

FLAGON TRADE. ITS REMARKABLE GROWTH. 1. The Chairman (Alderman N. Jones) con- gratulated the licensees at the Tredegar Brew- ster Sessions on the report presented by Super- intendent Saunders, and proceeded to say that the Bench felt very strongly upon the growth of the flagon trade. In his opinion, licensees who conducted the flagon trade were only making whips for their own backs. It was becoming a very serious matter for the coun- try and it was un-English in these times off stress and trouble that these facilities should be given to the wives of soldiers at the front to get drink, and to ruin their homes. The Bench could only make an appeal to the licensees, and especially to the brewers, that they should put a stop to t), tre in the in- terests of the country. If it was persisted in the voice of the country would undoubtedly be raised very strongly against it, and might affect lieeming altogether. All the billiard premises in the division would be required1 to close at 10. With re- gard to the Blackwood licenses the renewal of which had been deferred owing to no provi- sion being made for luncheons for travellers in any of the licensed houses in that district, Mr. H. S. Lyne said the licensees had now undertaken to make such provision and the Bench renewed the license.

No title

An instance of an Anzac battalion comman- der's devotion to duty is given by Mr. Mal- colm Ross, the official press representative with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. The officer was wounded in the landing and wounded again- "riddled" an officer called it —in the Lone Pine affair. Shipped to Eng- land, he had finally broken loose from the doc- tors, paid his passage back to Egypt and re- joined his battalion. But the strain had been too great. Wounds and sickness had told their tale. He had broken down at the finish. The word "debility" had been writ- ten opposite his name. He was in the last hospital ship to leave Anzac.

Advertising

Up-to-date applianmv tor turning out clam of work at competitive prions, at ih- I "Glamorgan Garatts" Printing Works., The Glamorgan Gazette" would be pleased to publish letters from Maesteg Soldiers on Active Service or sent home wounded. ? ?????"?} ??P??B??M 16 I HAYMANsi (BALSAM S B' t — ?'VYt???'e& BM." I CURES K CGMS&COLPSB ? I¡ lID. vaJuahleln the Nursery S? }j! I Bottles 1/3 and 3 Rfp !J FL OF ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. ?? J11i WIII!LI WI