Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
POLICE COtfST CR GROCERS SHOP

"POLICE COtfST CR GROCER'S SHOP ?" SERIES OF THEFTS FROM RAILWAY TRUCKS. 0 BRYNCETHIN MEN SENT TO PRISON. The Bridgend Police Court on Thursday last week presented a strange and unusual aspect. The large solicitor's table, usually empty save for a few papers and a sleepy-looking law- tome or so, literally groaned under a motley assortment of articles, ranging from a packet of salt to a pair of lady's corsets. There were bottles of whiskey, cloths of butter, tins of tobacco and sweets, and metal polish, packets of tea, of salt, of cigarettes, boxes of crochet cotton, a pair of lady's cor- sets, many pairs of ladies' stockings, rolls of bacon, and packets of biscuits. Well might t one of the &olicitors engaged in the case des- cribe it as "a Police Court turned into a grocer's shop," All these articles, it was alleged, had been found in the house of a young railwayman named Henry Francis Pride, employed at Bryncethin Railway Junction, and it was sug- gested that they were the spoils of a long series of thefts carried on over a period of several months, by Pride and a lodger of his named Ernest Gore, an insurance agent. In the dock with these two men stood James Chiswick, also of Bryncethin, charged with having received a portion of the goods, namely a quantity of tobacco and a packet of table salt. Pride and Gore, who were represented re- spectively by Messrs. L. M. Thomas, Port Talbot, -and D. Llewellyn, pleaded guilty. Chiswiok, for whom Mr. L. M. Thomas ap- peared, and who was charged with "receiv- ing" only, pleaded not guilty. Mr. Vachell, Cardiff, prosecuted for the G.W.R. Company. Mr. Vachell, in opening the case for the prosecution, explained that it was the custom for trucks coming from Cardiff with goods consigned to Maesteg to be detained a short time at Bryncethin. For a long time thefts from these trucks had been going on, and at last the matter became so serious that the Railway Company resolved to set a special in- vestigation on foot. The result of this inves- tigation was that the house where Pride and Gore lived together was searched under a search warrant, the "bag" being the whole of the goods now produced in Court. The Rail- way Company regarded the case as a very serious one, the thefts having gone on for a long time, to the very great annoyance and inconvenience of clients of the Company. THE GAME IS UP. E. Townsend, a detective in the employ of the G.W.R., was the first witness called by Mr. Vachell. He said he formally charged and cautioned Pride at the latter's house. Pride's reply was, Yes, I am sorry to say I have been doing it, but I will turn over a new leaf from now. You will find the stolen things in my box in the bedroom. Charged speci- fically in regard to a quantity of tobacco and cigarettes, he said he had taken them about three months ago, and that "Gore and Jim Chiswiok had some of it." Witness found a quantity of tea in Core's kitchen, which Gore admitted having stolen in oonj-unction with 'J Pride. He said "I admit we stole it. The game is up. It is now use telling lies about it. I helped Pride to carry it from the trucks. I have destroyed several tins of to- bacco because I did not want it." Witness later saw Chiswick at his house, and charged him with regard to the tobacco. He replied: Yes, Pride did give me a pound packet of tobacco, but I did not know it was stolen." Afterwards, on being arrested, he made a statement to the same effect. Chiswick, who elected to go into the wit- ness-box, said he was a collier living at home with his mother. Pride came to him one day and said, You smoke? Well, I have a bit of tobaoco here. I shan't use it myself—it has been sent to me. If you won't have it, I shall chuck it away." As to the packet of salt (the only other item witness was charged with receiving) Pride left it at his house one day in his absence. Mr. Vachell: Didn't it surprise you when Pride said he would throw the tobacco away ? —No, not* particularly. AN ELOQUENT APPEAL. Mr. L. M. Thomas, addressing the Bench for Chiswick and Pride, made an eloquent J and forceful appeal for both men. For Chis- wick he claimed that there was not a jot of evidence that he knew the goods were stolen. In the case of Pride, which he described as a sad one, the man being only 22, and recently married, with one child, he appealed for leni- ency. Why has the prosecution turned the Police Court into a grocer's shop, except to work on your Worships' feelings in order to induce you to inflict a heavier penalty than you wOlld otherwise be inclined to do?" Pride's attitude when charged proved that he was not yet a hardened criminal—not yet be- yond redemption. In such. a case the Bench, if it liked, had the power to merely bind the man over. If their Worships were not in- clined to that course, then he submitted that the case ought to be met with a substantial fine. Mr. D. Llewellyn, in briefly addressing the Bench on behalf of Gore, pointed out that he had lost an arm in a colliery accident, and in case was "not the chief villain in the piece:" Their Worships, who took a serious view of the case, said all three men must go to prison —Pride and Gore for two months, Chiswick for one month.

LIVED AT ST DONATS

( LIVED AT ST. DONATS. PETITIONER IN DIVORCE CASE. Thomas John Blyth, ia, pt-tty officer in the Navy, on Monday in the Divorce Court was granted a divorce from his wife on the ground of her adultery with a shipmate of petitioner's, warned Skinner. Petitioner stated that after he married respondent they lived for two years at St. Donats. On the outbreak of war petitioner joined his ship, and when he returned on leave respondent conf essed she had been staying at Southampton with,another man.

THIRTY COLMERS I THIRrTYCrtIERS

THIRTY COLMERS THIR!,rT Y Cr..tIERS FROM K t, F [G H ILL. During the hearing of a summons against 14 colliers at Bridgend Police Court on Satur- day, for having been unlawfully on licensed premises, one of the defendants, when asked how many drinks he had had replied, One, but I could have done with eight." The defendants were: William J. Evans, John Thomas, Thos. James, Eddie Williams, Arthur Powell, Cornelius Gerrard, Frederick Robinson, Walter Sweetman, William Ger- rard, William Herbert, and Edward Hopkins, Kenfig Hill, and John Taylor, William Taylor, and Lewis Taylor, Pyle. Inspector Rees Davies said at 5 p.m. on Sunday, in company with P.C. James, he visited the Knight's Arms Hotel, Porthcawl, and in the bar saw Frederick Robinson, under the influence of drink, with a pint measure containing beer in front of him. Witness asked him what his business in Porthcawl was, and he replied, I came for a drink." Wit- ness saw him leave the house about 7 p.m. At 7 p.m. witness again visited the hotel, and in the bar and smoke room he saw all the other defendants, all slightly under the influence of drink, and had glass measures containing beer in front of them. P. C. James took their names and addresses. Defendants said they came for a drink, and one of them said they had come far enough. Another said, "I can't answer you and drink at the same time." He drank up the contents of the glass and called for another drink, which was supplied. Witness drew the barman's atten- tion to the condition of the men, told him they were not bona fides, and that he .should not have allowed them on the premises, and in a while they were all turned out. There were more men from Kenfig Hill, but they were quite sober. Mr. D. Llewellyn (for a number of the men): Do you propound the theory that men must have business in Porthcawl before they can have a drink ?—They could go down for health, but not for drinking beer. Were you told that these men had had some bread and cheese ?•—No. You say they were under the influence of drink. Have they been charged with that?- Xo. Have you reported the landlord ?--No; be is dead. P.C. H. James corroborated. Mr. D. Llewellyn quoted decided cases where it had been held that it was immaterial whether the persons had travelled for business or pleasure, if they had gone beyond the three mile limit. In one case men had travelled 20 miles, put up at a hotel, stayed there for three hours, and then proceeded to a second house, and had a drink, returning afterwards to the first house at which they had called. It did not follow he argued that because they had stayed in the first house for a length of time that they ceased to be travellers. What had got to be proved was that the men went to Porthcawl for the purpose of having drink. Defendants were each fined 10s.

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES BRIDGEXD v. TOXDU v. PORTHCAWL. An interesting and unique triangular friendly match was shot on the Tondu range on Saturday between the above three clubs. Bridgend and Porthcawl having previously beaten each other by a point on their own ranges, were anxious to settle the tie by a trial of strength on a neutral range. Tondu readily placed their range at the disposal of their neighbours, and they themselves took a hand in the game. A somewhat exciting and enjoyable meeting was the result. The vexed question between Bridgend and Porthcawl was settled without the shadow of a doubt, the scores being: Bridgend, 774; Tondu, 772; Porthcawl, 753. Bridgend shot remarkably well. F. Dangerfield and J. McLellan's dra- matic appearance at the last moment saved the situation, and with a couple of 97's, got under disadvantageous conditions as regards light. Tondu were also a man short, and A. A. Sanders was sent for, and pluckily filled the breach at great personal inconvenience, putting up a well-got 98. It is a pity that Mr. Sanders' business does not permit his shooting more often for his team. Space does not allow of a detailed account of this long match, but mention must be made of a fine 99 got for Bridgend by A. Davies, of Southerndown. For Tondu the skipper, J. Power, had a good 98, and the veteran Mr. Tapp had 96 with a seven and one all-in nine in it. For Porthcawl, T. Henry and A. W. Thorne each put up a good 99, and S. J. Phillips (93) had hard luck by putting his practice shots on his competition card, by which he lost four points. Altogether this match was much enjoyed, and will be well remembered, ;as it will prob- ably be the last match to be shot on the Tondu range previous to its removal to a new site close by. Scores:— Bridgend: A. Davies, 99; Tom Lewis, 98; W. James, 97; Ivor David, 97; J. McLellan, 97; F. Dangerfield, 97; W. Thomas (Coy- church), 95; F. T. Arnold, 94. Total, 774. Tondu; J. Power, 98; Sergt. J. Moles, 97; A. A. Sanders, 98; J. Tapp, senr., 96; D. Hopkins, 95; J. Burford. 96; W. Davy, 95; Jack Lewis, 97. Total, 772. Porthcawt: T. Henry, 99; A. W. Thorne, 99: J. P. Leat, 94; W. Tichbon, 93; S. J. Phillips, 93; O. Evans, 92; J. Jenkins, 92; H. C. Riley, 91. Total, 753. I am pleased to notice that two members of the Tondu Club, who are with the colours somewhere in England, has just received well- deserved promotion. Congratulations to Sgt. Harold Riley and Lanee-Corpl. A. Cloke. Sergt. Harold Rilev has just returned to his regiment after a course of instruction with the Royal Engineers. In the closing examina- tion he came out top man of his company with "excellent." Knowing that the "Gazette" follows the colours everywhere, I shall always be glad to hear of the doings of any of our old members, either at home or abroad, to whom we send greetings and hearty good wishes. »

Advertising

-I Pur-tan Pictures No. 3.  T '?Z' 1 From an 

l SHOTFIRING ACCIDENTI

l SHOT-FIRING ACCIDENT. I ——— TAIBACH COLLIER'S DEATH AT PYLE. l An inquest was held on Friday last at the Taibach Police Station, before Mr. Lewis M. Thomas (Coroner), to inquire into the death of Idris Jones, Gallipoli Street, Taibach, who was killed at the Cribbwr Fawr Colliery, Pyle, on the previous Tuesday. Mr. Perkins ap- peared for the relatives; Mr. Bull, Swansea, for the Colliery Co., and Mr. Dyer Lewis, H.M. Inspector of Mines for the Home Office. William John Jones, 28 Cwmavon Road, Aberavon, steward of the Workmen's Club, said deceased was his brother, and was 18 years of age and a single man. Deceased worked as an assistant collier at the Cribbwr Fawr Colliery. Witness last saw deceased alive on the Saturday afternoon previous. David Howells, Avon House, Pyle, said he was working with the deceased, who was his assistant. The accident happened between 1 and 1.30. Both were together charging a hole in order that the shotsman could fire it. When the hole was charged, all three (witness, deceased, and the shotsman) retired from the spot from which the shot would be fired. Wit- ness had charged two holes. He had put three pills in one hole, and four pills in the other. After retiring the distance of the cable, witness left deceased and the shotsman, and went out further. Witness heard the two shots explode, and went back, and he saw the deceased lying out on the heading some 7 or 8 yards from the holes. Witness called for help, and nearly all working in the head- ing came to his assistance. In reply to Mr. Dyer Lewis, H.M. Inspector of Mines, witness said the shotsman was re- sponsible for the connecting up of the cable. Deceased's lamp was hanging on the first "collar." It was not customary to leave the lamp so close to a charged hole, but witness could not account for its having been placed there. William Jenkins, High Street, Kenfig Hill, shotsman at the colliery, said deceased and the last witness were working in No. 5 Head- ing. Witness said he was present when the charging took place, and had given the neces- sary "pills" to the last witness. Witness said he was satisfied that everything was in order as to ramming, etc. Witness said he and deceased were 12 yards away before they fired the shot. After the first shot exploded deceased ran back to the stall face. Witness also went back to connect the second hole, ac- companied by Idris Jones. After doing so deceased went one way and witness went down the heading, and it was arranged that he should shout and be acknowledged by the deceased, who did acknowledge. Wit- ness said he did not see the lamp. In reply to the Mines Inspector, witness said the lamp was hanging about 6ft. 3in. from the floor. After the shot had been fired the lamp was still alight. The Inspector con- sidered this extraordinary. The Inspector: As you did not see this light does it not suggest that you did not go back to connect the second shot ?-Yes, I did con- nect the shot. The Inspector said the deceased was lying in the line of fire when the shot went ofL-Wit- ness concurred. Witness thought that de- ceased had remembered his lamp and had tried to recover it. The deceased was found at a distance of 5 yards from the hole. Dr. J. Cooper, practitioner at Kenfig Hill, said he saw the deceased at about 3 o'clock. He examined him. He had a compound frac- ture of the right thigh and a fractured skull, which presented a large gap in the vault, from which the bones and brains protruded. He considered this to be the cause of death. It appeared to witness that concussion was the most likely cause of the accident, as the bones seemed to point out and not thrust in. Answering the Mines Inspector, witness said the blow might have come from a lump of coal if the deceased was in a stooping posi- tion. Rees Thomas, Blue Street, Pyle, a collier at the same colliery, said he was working at about 20 yards from the stall, in which the deceased was found. No warning was given the witness before the second shot. The Coroner said that this was a very extra- ordinary case. The shotsman did not suggest that the deceased was a careless boy. It was unfortunate that Howell was not there the whole time. He might have been able to corroborate Jenkins' statement. It was ob- vious that Jenkins had not an acute sense of hearing. It was peculiar that the lamp, al- though it was between the shot and the de- ceased, was still alight, and yet it seemed quite possible that the deceased was killed by the concussion. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death."

ST BRIDES MAJOR I

ST. BRIDES MAJOR. I FUNERAL.—The funeral of Mrs Rees Ace, of Green Hill, St. Brides Major, took place at the Parish Churchyard, the Rev. D. T. Griffiths, M.A. (vicar) officiating. The num- ber present at the funeral spoke eloquently of the great respect in which the people of St. Brides and Southerndown held Mrs. Ace and family. Many wreaths were sent; also num- erous letters of condolence with the family. Those who sent floral tributes were:—The widower and children. Mrs David and Maggie, "all at the Fox and Hounds," Mrs. B. J. Day, May, Mr. and Mrs. F. Smith, Sally, Mrs. Pearce and Evelyn, Florrie, Nora, Ruth, Gwyneth, Mrs. D. Miles and family, Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs, Kathleen and Jack, Mr. and Mrs. William Bevan and family, Alf and Florrie, Uncle, Emeline and Maggie, Mrs. J. M. Ran- dall, Mrs. Booker, Uncle and Auntie (Cardiff), the wounded soldiers of Tuskar Red Cross Hospital, Jessie, Katie, Ena and Annie, and Mrs. Pratt and family.

Advertising

Advertise in the Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to tell, buy or exchange; you 04nnot do betW. f

SC1I to PUELICM WARNED

-:SC:1I- _"to! PUELICM WARNED. DID NOT SPEAK THE TRUTH. I BUT TRIED TO MAKE POLICE UN- I TRUTHFUL. REBUKE FROM THE BENCH. I When David J. Thomas, a publican, of the Bell Inn, Laleston, was summoned at Bridg- end Police Court on Saturday for having sup- plied intoxicating liquor during prohibited hours to three men named Frank Dumaine, Robert Dumaine, and Thomas Rowlands, he alleged that the men had stolen the beer, but he refused to charge them. It was part of the police evidence that when defendant was spoken to on the matter he asked Inspector Rees Davies to "square it" with him, and let the matter drop.—Mr. J. R. Snape defended. On Sunday last, P.C. Stockford said, he visited the Bell Inn, Laleston, at 10.45, and in the bar saw the three men. He asked them their business, and they said they were going to Merthyrmawr. Witness left the premises and kept it under observation until 1.45. Then he saw the three men leave and go to- wards Kenfig Hill. He went to meet them and found them under the influence of drink and staggering about the road. Witness tried to persuade them to accompany him back to the Bell Inn, but owing to their con- dition they refused to do so. Witness visited the Bell Inn, saw the landlord, and asked him what time the three men who were in the house when he visited it in the early morning left the premises, and he replied, They have just gone." Witness then told him that he had met the three men on the highway with a flagon of beer each. Witness also told him of their condition.. He replied, "I did not supply them." Witness called his attention to a brand on the flagons, and told him that no one else in the village sold the same brand, and he made no reply. When told that he would be reported defendant said, "Surely you will overlook it this time; if you don't I know what it will mean." t8 Mr. J. R. Snape: Do you swear that the men were hopelessly drunk when you stopped them ?-Yes. Have you been told that the men left the house by the back way ?—Yes. Did you lock these men up ?-It takes a good man to lock three men up. But I went to Kenfig Hill and returned with P.C. Wil- liams., and failed to find them. Did you threaten, or did you hear anybody else threaten these men after you found out where they lived, that they would be arrested if they did not admit they were served on the premises ?—No. What made you go and see these men ?-On instructions. What instructions ?—It was said by the landlord that the flagons had been stolen, and I was instructed to see the men. "CAN'T YOU STOP IT?" Inspector Rees Davies said at 3.20 p.m. on Sunday, in company with P.C. James, he visited the Bell Inn, Laleston, and was ad- mitted by the landlord. In the passage the landlord came towards them, and asked, "Any complaints?" Witness replied, I Yes." Defendant then said, "Can't you stop it; can't we square it now, and not let it I go any further?" Witness said the case would have to be reported, and defendant then said, "I don't know how they could have got them they must have taken them from the cellar." Witness asked him if he meant they had stolen them, and he replied "Yes." When witness asked him if he wanted to charge them, he said "No," and again asked witness if he couldn't square it. He invited witness to go down to the cellar, and witness went. There defendant again asked him to let the matter drop. Mr. Snape: If these men had gone out the back way, would they have to pass close to the cellar ?-Yes. When the landlord took you to the cellar, was the cellar door open?—Yes. I am sorry to put it to you, but I have got to. I suggest nothing was said to you about squaring it. What he said was, "If you can stop it, do so" ?—He said what I have given in evidence. P.C. James gave similar evidence. For the defence, Mr. Snape said when he came to Court he was not aware that any- thing like the evidence given by the police would have been given. His client instructed him that he knew nothing about it either, and in fairness to his client he felt compelled to ask the Justices to adjourn the case so that a man who was in the passage when the conversation between the police and the land- lord took place could be called as a witness. Supt. W. Davies: That is most unfair. After hearing the police evidence an appli- cation is made for an adjournment—I object most strongly. The Chairman: The case must proceed. Mr. Snape then asked the Bench not to pay the slightest regard to the evidence to which he had referred. There were discrepancies in the police evidence, and he dealt in detail with the evidence of the witnesses, and finally submitted that the defendant's story should be believed. THOUGHT INSPECTOR WAS THIRSTY. [ Defendant said the men came to the house, and he served them with two pints and some bread and cheese. They were quite sober when they came in, and were sober when they went out. They were not served with the lfagons by witness, nor by anyone else. They could have slipped into the cellar and taken them while witness was serving. The cellar door was close to the passage which these men would have to pass. When P.C. Stockford spoke to him witness said, If the men had the flagons, they must have stolen them." He did not say anything about squaring it. He did offer the Inspector a drink in the cellar, because he thought he might have been thirsty. (Laughter.) Supt. Davies: You say these men were per- fectly sober ?—Yes. Have you called on the men since that Sun- day ?—No. You swear that ?— Yes. Mrs. Thomas said she heard P.C. Stockford I conversing with her husband. She did not hear her husband say, Surely you can over- t •/ J-, look it." WU-kss said she saw the men whe- » had been served leave- the house, and she- could not say whether they had flagons with them. Robert Dumaine, one of the men, said he asked defendant to serve him with the flagons but he refused. On the way out witness took one of the lfagons, thinking that as he was on old friend of the landlord, lie would pay for them again. In cross-examination defendant had denied1 that he had seen the men after the police called on Sunday, but Dumaine said defend- ant called to see him on Sunday night. Mr. Suape said he did not propose to call any more evidence. Fined tl in each case, £ 3 altogether. Defendant afterwards applied for the trans- fer of his license to Joshua Thomas, and Ellen Owen applied for the transfer of the Lamb Inn, Maesteg, to David J. Thomas. The Chairman said the Bench granted the transfer of the license to Joshua Thomas, but regarding the transfer of the license of the- Lamb Inn to David J. Thomas, they had been giving it seriOlts consideration. They con- sidered defendant's attitude in the case just ? heard was very bad. He did not put the truth before the Bench,ut instead attemp- ted to make the police untruthful witnesses. Defendant said he was very sorry, and the Bench ultimately granted the transfer, and warned him of his future conduct. Rowlands was fined 20s. for having been on licensed premises during prohibited hours, and Frank and Robert Dumaine were each nne

BETTING AT PYLE

BETTING AT PYLE. SHARP FINE IMPOSED AT BRIDGEND.. A fine of £ 10 was imposed on John Tyler,, collier, Kenfig Hill, at Bridgend Police Court ( o.J1 Monday, for "frequenting a public high- way for the purpose of betting," the highway- in question being Pvle Road, Kenfig Hill. > P.C. Willi a m.s, who was the only witness, said lie saw the defenda,nt on severaf occas.ions receiving bets and betting slips in- Pylc Road, Pyle. He saw numbers of men go up to him. and money and papers passed. Mr. W. M. Thomas (defending): Where i '%I I -%I. Thom a's (dCfeD?ding): Where P. C. Williams: I object to tell you. The bench, however, ruled that the question was in order, and witness then, stated where- he had been hidden while making his obser- vatvon. He Ni-,fis about 200 yards from de- fendant. He could only identify one of the- men who went up to defendant. By Ir. Thomas: He had been in Kenfig Hill; about five years, and knew nearly every- body in Pyle. But so many men had gone- away and new ones had come in their places. On bell,(; t arrested and charged, the de- fendant sai "It is all right. It is my fault. I hope the fine won't be severe." C3 18s. 8d. in money was found on him, together with .3>' number of betting slips, and 26 bets on hor.scs that were running that day. De- fendant further said that if the constable would not press the case too hwrd against him he would throw the job up. By Superintendent Davies: The money found oii defenclai-it corresponded roughly with the amount of the bets Ooll the slips. Inspector Davies, giving evidence of what took place a t the police station, said1 defendant stated that he was "running for Matthews, of Bridgend, and he had arranged for Williams- to come and bail him out." A ifne, as stated, was imposed. t'

RELIEVING OFFICER PAYS UP

RELIEVING OFFICER PAYS UP THEN FINDS HE HAS BEEN DUPED. "I did not think I was doing any harm, said Rachel McCann, Bridgend Road, Aber- kenfig, when charged at Bridgend Police Court, on Saturday, with having made a false statement in order to get relief from the Guardians. ■ i Relieving Officer Thomas said defendant applied for out-door relief, saying that her husband was unable to work, as he had I poisoned his finger. Witness gave her a note- for 1.j,. worth of provisions. Witness called: later in the afternoon to see her husband, but the defendant '.said he had gone out. On the following Tuesday she again applied, and he gave her another note for 15s. Defendant said her husband was much better, but was not yet able to do anything. Later ho again called at the house, and defendant told him that her husband had just gone out, and that. it was a wonder he had not seen him. Wit-- nes asked her if he had not been at work all-! the time, and in the two weeks had c&rne(t. JE1 6s. 2d. and £1 14s.ld. Defendant said she did not know she was doing any harm and she did not know that she was going to and she d-?,I. i,,ot know that s h e ii,?-t,s going to get 15s. Mr. J. P. Gibbon: Why did you net give. some of it back then. Defeii(laiit ii-,zs finc-d Ll.

YSTRADOWEN

YSTRADOWEN. CHURCH HALL.—The new Church Halt was opened with a cinema entertainment given by Rev. I. Roberts, M.A., R.D., Vicar of Cowbridge, and his assistants. The films were both instructive and amusing, and were fully appreciated by the large audience. The proceeds will be devoted towards liquidating; the debt which still remains on the building.

I HEOLYCYW

I HEOLYCYW. PARISH COUNCIL.—The members present J. at the annual meeting of the Heolycyw Parish Council were .Messrs G. Edwardis, T. Edwards, R. J. Pa if reman, and G. J. Hawkins. Mr. E. Llewelyn also attended. It was agreed that Messrs Pa If reman and Hawkins be chair- man and vice-chairman respectively for the ensuing year. The overseers appointed were. Messrs Edward Thomas., W en Farw, J. J. Jones, Bridge Stores, and Evan Llewelyn. The clerk reported that he had received the precepts for the half-year ending Sept. 30th, a-nd it was. resolved that the poor rate be 3s. 10d., and a special expenses rate of 9d. il* tile 2. s.