Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
SWEET ARE THE USES OF ADVERTISEMENT

SWEET ARE THE USES OF ADVERTISEMENT." PORTHCAWL COUNCIL DECtDES TO WAKE UP IN THE MATTER OF ADVERTISING. I Mon'.b.y night's meeting of the Porthcawl 'CaunciL was interesting if only for what we must call the almost passionate speech of Mr. R,. E. J en. in favour of advertising Porth- -awl. People don't know what a treasure W3've got here in Porthca/wl," said Mr. Jones, ind now can they know unless we tell t.)em?" Mr. Jones' colleagues very heartily agreed. "If it was a pill or a special soap t'i?y were wanting to boost,' they wouldn't lj. dilly-ds-nying with the thing as they had ;aEowed themselves to do with this matter of adverting their own town." But, of course, that was only one aspect of t'i3 matter. There were others. It was a quastioa< after all, of £ s. d. The Clerk gave it as his view that the Council certainly had Dot the unlimited right to draw on the rates for the purpose. However, the Council so "vowed" themselves, and "blew for their own dilatoriness ir atbwing things to drift, that the members &2-3mro genuinely repentant, and probably a n'.ovc wiH be made in the matter in the near future. THE MEETING. ) Mr. T. James presided over the meeting, 3:"d there were also present: Messrs. R. E. Jones, T. E. D&ere, D. J. Rees, D. Davies, and Rv. D. J. Arthur. The Clerk read a communication from Mr. W. NantySylIon, in regard to a "stand'' for swing boats on the sands for the coming summ-er, and asking for the Council's d?ision on the point as soon as possible. ?lle Chairman proposed that Mrs. Brown b3 giten the same piece of ground as last year, ,nd at the,ame rent; and that Mr. Howells be o8Pered a piece of ground near the new railings, the rent to be .€1 a week. A Councillor: Payable in advance (Laugh- ter.) The Chapman: Oh, certainly; payable In ad va-nce. Mr. R. E. Jones: How much ground will be g& for €1 ? The CLerk: Well, quite four times as much as Mrs. B.o-,rn gets for her 5s. 'rhe motion was agreed to. A btter was read from Mr. Buckingham Mying that he had not been able to get the BtMtta done on account of shortage of labour. Mr. D. J. Roes: This is rather a serious mJ.tte-r The seats ought to be done. A Letter was read from the police in regard tj the new Registration Orders, pointing out tLt the Local Government Board suggested that Ic-al Registration Authorities should SMk the assistance of the police, and asking whether the Council required such assistance. It was decided thab it would be well to enlist the a:d of the police. INCREASE OF ASSESSABLE VALUE. A better was read from the Bridgend and Cowbrids:e Board of Guardians announcing thtt tbe a.:>sessable value of the Union was £145,()G2. Mr. Dan Davies pointed out that this was a' mcrease of P.5,000, of which R.4,000 was — f'om Porihpawl, so that there was only .€1,000 increase for the whole of the remainder of the Union. PORTHCAWL AND ADVERTISING. After the transaction of some further minor business, Rev. D. J. Arthur rose to ask whether any- thing had been done in the matter of adver- 'tsuing Parthcawl. The matter had been up before them so often, yet nothing seemed to bo done. M". DMi Davies said he was glad Mr. Arthur had raised the question. It was a one for Porthcaw!. Other places were djing it. He movied that a committee be appointed forthwith. The Chairman: There was a committee ap- pointed, and it had an advertisement in the ccLe.eds Mercury." Mr. Dan Davies: WeU, I think something ought to be done. I believe we have power ta defray the cost of advertising the town out of the' rates? The Clerk was understood to say that was not so, or at least only te a very limited ex- tent. Mr. R. E. Jones: Porthcawl is not adver- tised as it should be by any means, and if we c-Mi anord it-I do not say we can—we ought to spend a few hundred pounds in this way. The general public does not know what we have here at Porthcawt. Here we are, with a breeze and a sea and an ozone right straight from the Atlantic. How many cases do we kn-ow of of people who have come here literally at death's dvor, and have found new life and health here! We as-a Council ought to take cognisance of these cases. A man came to stay here the other day with an invalid child. The child had to be carried into the house. It took weeks before the little fellow could go a .aew feet from the do)0f. At last he got on to tne Common-a. Common we Porthcawlers 

PORTHCAWL COUNCILLORS WEIGHING MACHINE

PORTHCAWL COUNCILLOR'S WEIGH- ING MACHINE. —————- -————— SUMMONS AT BRtDGENO POLICE COURT. Shortage cf men and ina.bility J 'get a man to test a w'Cighing madun was, put forward as the defence in a case at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, in which John Grace and Son, Ltd., coal merchants, John Street, Porthcawl, were summoned for having been in possession of an unjust weighing machine used in trade, and further for having delivered coal without a weigh ticket. —Mr. C. E. Davios, Porthca-wl, defended. Rhys Williams, Inspector of Weights and Measures, said on Saturday, 29th April, he visited Porthca.w!, ajid' tested: a nve-ton weigh- in- el machine, the property of defendants. He found an error of 84 pounds, the balancing ajranigements defective and the machine could not be adjusted. Witness tested it with If) cwt. of coal and it gave the weight as 10-41 cwt. and 1 ton of coal was given as 21 cwt. In the presence of Stanley John, who repre- sented the nrm, witness said the machine was unnt for further use. He removed the omcial stamp, and told John that the machine was weighing heavy, John replied: "I am sorry, I will dismantle it at once." The Chairman: When did you examine the machine before ?-The last time was in the presence of Mr. Grace, and his attention was called to the need of doing something to the machme, and he told me that he was hoping to remove it altogether. Mr. 0. E. Davies: Was it pe-riodica.Ny ex- amined by a nrm engaged by defendant?—I am assured that it was. On the second summons the Inspector said on the same day he intercepted a delivery of coal and asked the man what he had in the cart. He replied 8 cwt. of coal for a person in Fenton Place. Witness asked him if he had a weigh ticket of the wagon, and he replied m the negative. He did not know the tare weight of the wagon, and witness weigher it an a corfect scale, and in addition to 16 empty bags and an empty shovel it weighed 23 ewt- Witness j weighed the coal a-nd found that the pre- sumed 8 cwt of coal only weighed 7} cwt. with the bags and 8 bags similar to the ones holding the cool weighed 161b., so that the weight of the coal was reduced to 7 cwt. and one quarter. Witness toH the ma.n he could deliver the coal to the intending purchaser, a.nd witness sent a constable to inform the puDoh&ser of the true weight. Mr. C. E. Davies sa.id! the fact that the weight was denclent was due to the clenk being out of the omce at the time the coa'1 was taken away. Mr. Grace had had the machine for over twenty yea'ra, and it haid been of great public service. It had been periodically examined) by a nrm, but owi;ng to the shortage of men, they ha-d been una-ble to attend to it. Mr. Grace was unaware that the machine was cut of ofder, and left the matter in abeyance. Nine men had joined the Army, and they were working short staSpd. Mr. Gxaee and hia aon had been workiing at great pressure, with the resuH that Mr. Gra'ce had had a breek-down and had been ordered away for a rest. He asked the tustices not to proceed to convictton, but to c!r

Advertising

Puritan Picture* No. 4. ?T?"————————————————"?jT? ??Jf /?7Z?

PURtTAN SOAP AND THE WAR I

PURtTAN SOAP AND THE WAR. I We w€ire looking at the charming pictufre reproduced in our oohimna by the makers of Puritan Soap. "OurimM, isn't it" aaid my &-iahd, the munitions expert, "how far )rea<'hi:ng are the raminoationa of thia great world war. Every pound of Puritan Soap sold means that the end of the war is so much nearer." "How do you make tha.t out to be," said I, for it seemed a somewhat farfetched statement. "Its true enough," sa-id my sci'onttRc friand. "Every ton of olive atl used for makingPuritaji Soap gives a couple of cwts. of glycerine, the baae of cordite. Cordate aa everybodjy knows is the chief propellajit ex- plosive used by Army and Navy alike. A ton of olive oil gives glyceMne for a ton of cordSite or thereabouts. Practically the whole of the glycerine producecd m the manufacture of Pumtan (Mive ON Soap is renned and dis- tilled by Chnistr. Thomas and Bros., Ltd.. the maJtara, and used for expJiosiva mamu- factupe." "So that the housewife who buys Puritan Soap N not only getting the best soap tha.t money can buy, but is hoping to give the Govermnent more glycerine and to pile up the munitions that a

J PBNCOBD

J PBNCOBD. BIBLE SOCIETY MEETING.—A united meeting in connection with the British aad Foreign Bible Society, was heM at Triin&ty schoolroom, on Monday evening. Those pre- sent were privileged to listen to an a

I LLANGENOR PRIVATE Kitted in Action

I LLANGE!NOR PRIVATE. Kitted in Action. Mrs. Fanny Moore, Ffrwdd Villa, Llan- geinor, has received intimation from the Infantry Record Omce, that her son, Private Charles Moore, Royal Sussex Regiment, was killed in action while serving with the British Expeditionary Force in France. Private Moore worked a.s a collier at the Duchy Col- liery, Pontyrhyl, and enlisted in the Army on Neath Fair Day, 1914. After nearly twelve months training he left for France. He was reported on the 4th October, 1915, to be suf- fering from a sprained back at Neuve Chapelle as a result of an accident, and after six weeks in hospital, he returned to the trenches. About a month later he was again sent to hos- pital as a result of being slightly asphyxiated by gas. From the time he returned to the trenches., right up to the last, Private Moore wrote very cheerful letters home, and he was entitled to bis leave just a day or two follow- ing his death. He was 8ft. lin. in his stock- ings.

ISAPPERS REPLY TO PENCOED FREND

SAPPER'S REPLY TO PENCOED FR!END. A Peueoed friend asked Sapper D. R. Williams, of the 2nd Guards Brigade, France, why he enlisted. ThisishLsreply— Time after time I have been asked, "Why did you enlist; what made you enlist?" Well, I remember it quite well; I shall always remember it. as long as I live. It was August, 1914, when this terrible war broke out. I was at a country place spending my August holiday when I heard that war had been declared en Germany. But I could hardly believe' in the possibility of war until I came back from my August Bank Holiday visit, and found soldiers and sailors saying Good-bye" to their families at the Stations, j And even then there was an air of unreality' about everything, which rendered realisation dtScuIt. But day after day I saw women waving handkerchiefs to the men who went away, and holding up their babies to railway carriage windows to be kissed; and day after day seemed to burden me. I opened the daily papers, and all that could be seen was the Kaiser's Army sweeping through Belgium, trampling on everything good and beautiful, throwing down and hurting, killing and des- troying wantonly and odiously. Yes, I read of Louvain, then of Liege, and of Lille and Xafmur, a,nd other town and beautiful places Then, later, our boys were almost near enough to stricken Belgium to catch the echo of women's criesz and the shrieks of young girls and of babies. Yes, they were near enough to know and report all about the un- armed, helpless people who were not spared by the soldiers in the grey coats. It was this that brought me to realise my responsibilities and my duty to King and country in such a crisis. And, let me say this to all of you, I am glad to be doing my little with the boys for you all.

WtLLtTFtZZLEOUT

WtLLtTFtZZLEOUT? Garw Captain's Query. We are stiU in our little place behind the trenches, with a country around us bristling with guns—big ones and little ones-but as there has not been a lot of 'stranng' lately, we are able to hear each other speak; but w hen the big guns a hundred yards from us begin to speak, the windows rattle, the mor- tar drops about the room, and the place shakes." Thus writes a Garw omcer. "The Huns put a lot of big stug over at us the other day-90 shellsj and only one casualty. Not bad was it ? The men live in dug-outs with their guns. Gunners and signallers only are up here, the drivers, saddlers, smiths, etc., being down at the wagon lines with the horses. I was up in one of our observation posts this week, and had a look at some of our own shooting. Incidentally I saw some Germans walking along behind their trenches —the nrst I have seen in six months. They were som-e distance away, and we were, of course, looking through a telescope. One gets a wonderful view of the actual neld of battle from one of these observation posts. You see our own Tommies beneath, then no man's land* with a brown line of rusty wire entanglements, the sandbag parapets, numer- ous craters of explosive mines, and there is ab- solute stillness at times. It is extraordinary to think there are thousands of men there, and not a. sign of movement except for a- rat toddling along a parapet indifferent to Minnie or Crumps. Then at night It all becomes more lively. Bombs begin to go over, rifles crack. Machine gun& splutter, and during the whole time magnesiums, stars of shells, are being shot up into the air, lighting up the whol& district. This goes on until dawn, when the artillery duel starts again. Most of the nghting is done by bombs, grenades, trench mortars, and, of course, mines, while the men in the front line rarely see the men they are fighting against. The artillery deal more with works emplacements and reliefs. What the end of it may be one cannot ima* gine. I dont *think the best informed General knows whether a big battle, with tremendous casualties, will end it, or j whether it will fizzle out. It is impossible to 1 say."

I EDUCATION IN WALESI

I EDUCATION IN WALES. I I tMPORTANT CHANGES PENOtNG? Some very important matters renting to the future of secondary, technical, and higher education in Wales were considered at the half-yearly meeting of the Central Welsh Board at Llandrindod Wells last night, and the full report of the proceedings is eagerly looked for. We understand that the consti- tution, statutory powers, and nnanciat means of the Board were discussed, and the question raised as to the need for further legislation with a view eventually of placing the powers now exercised by the Welsh De- partment of the Board of Education in the hands of an elected Welsh authority.

I FROM GARDEN BOY TO AUTHOR

I FROM GARDEN BOY TO AUTHOR' I ABERKENFtG POSTMAN'S RtSETQ FAME. Many readers of the shoi-t-sto-ry magazine have no doubt read! the sketches written by "Win H. G. Carlyon," but probably few axa aware that the author was a young auxiliary postman living at Aberkenfig, an account of whose death was .reported in the "Gazette" a week or two &go. Wil];i)am H. G. Carlyon lived with his. widowed mother and .a.n only sister, now aged nfteen, in a cotta.ge In Pack-terrace,. ? Aberkenng. He was educated .at the etemen- tary school at Tondu, leaving when he was 13,. when lie was engaged by the Ia.te Mr. J. Boyd Hafrvey to do odd jobs about the garden a't Tondu House. Soon after leaving school he began to write short storie& in his spar& time. The par.Iouj- at the h.ttle cottage was set aside for him, so that he might do his writing undisturbed. He plodded on, but his stories were steadily rejected by the magazine editor. He gave up his work a.t Tondu House a'nd became a labourer in the yair,d at Tondu work&hops of Messrs North's Naviga- tton, Ltd. He continued his literary eifoTts in the evenings, but recognition was still I denied! him. I Four years ago he became an auxiliary postman at Aberkcnng Post Omce, and still plodd&d on bravely with his literary work, thuiking out his plots while ma.king his postal rounds, and putting them into literary form in the hours he was oS duty. But It was not until two years ago, after he had been; toiling at his literary labours for .seveji years, that he was encouraged by the acceptance of a story for one of the popular magazines. This success stimulated him, and he redoubled his courts. He devoted every mojnent that be could spa-re to story writing, enlistmg the assiste of. his little sister, Louie, 

GAS IN THE STOMACH IS DANGEROUS

GAS IN THE STOMACH IS DANGEROUS. PHYSICIANS RECOMMEND THE USE OF MAGNEStA. SuNerers from Indigestion or dyspepsia should remember that the presence of gaa or wmdi in the stomach invaria.bly indioatea that the Stomach is troubled by excessive acidity. The acid causes the fcod to ferment, afnd the fermenting food in turn gives rise to noxious gases which distend the stomach, hamper the jMrmal functions of vital internal orgasms, cause acute headaches, interfere with the actmn of the head, ajid charge the bliood stream with deadly poisons, which in time must ruin the health. Physiciana sa.y that to quMddy dispel a dangerous accumula-tian of wind in the stomach and. to stop the iood (fermenta-tion which creates the gas, the acid m the stomach must be neutralised, ajodi that for this pmrpose there is nothing i[mte so good as 'half a teaspoonful of pure bisurated ? m.a.g'nteaia, tavern in a Uttle water tnuBoda-atety after meals. This instantly neutralises the acid, thus stopping fermentation of gas, acd ena.Minig the inflamed, distended stomach to proceed with its work under natural can- ditions. Btsurated magnesia, is obtainable in powder or tablet form from J. Jones, 31, CaroMne Street, Bridgend, tLnd other high- class chemists and stores everywhere, butaa there are many dINerent forms of matgniesLa it is important that the bisurated which the physiiciajis presoribe should be dtistinctly a

No title

I At the annual meetings of the Eastern Division of the South WaJes and Monmouth- shire Federation of Evangelical Free Church Councils, which were resumed held at Aber- sychan. Alderman the Rev. D. H. Williams, M.A., Barry, was elected president for the ensuing year.

Advertising

ADVICE FREE.—Mr<. Steward Herbat SpceiaUat. 9 Guinea Street. Briatol. M7t