Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PR)MHN<< I II I Of Every Description at Lowest Prices. Compare. "GAZETTE" OFFICES, BRIDGEND.

PORTHCAWL NOTES1 t

PORTHCAWL NOTES. 1 —— ?t-——— Besides the chairman and omcials, there were only three members of the Portheawl Council present on Monday.—Messrs. D. Davids, D. J. Rees and the Rev. D. J. Arthur. Under the circumstances it was amusing to watch the way the business was transacted. Mr. Rees would propose a cer- tain measure, say, and' Mr. Davies would second. "All in favour say 'aye/ said the chairma.n, locking with presidential gravity at Mr. Arthur over his (the chairman's) pipe. And the "Ail" would say "Aye." Or the roles would be changed, and it became Mr. Rces' turn, or Mr. Davies', to represent the ''All in favour," and to say "Aye." It is wonderful, by the way, how expeditiously the business waa got through. H H 1 The ladies who wrote the Council complain- ing of spo-Ued clothes through the tar-spraying are not alone in their troubles. If our Coun- cil propose opening an old clothes shop for the receipt of such ajticle& they will find no dimculty in obtaining any amount of stock. I perscnaHv can oblige with several collars, a tie, and straw hat. ? I If Port wine is a favourite beverage with many people, and a present of a bottle Is most wel- come, but it is a bit disappointing when you nn I' the said bottle is full of water instead of "good old crusted port." What does the family, not 20 miles from the New Road, say about this. 41 ? The fire brigade authorities shouJd pay their attention to the aLarm box in front of ihe lavatory in John Street. The shrubs in front have grown so high that I question if one out of every ten people passing the spot knowa that there is an alarm box there. Why not cut the shrubs away just in front of the box so that It is available for everyone to see ? I It It Most householders have by now received their Rate demand note for this half-years rate, and a very nice present it makes. The great ambition of every city, town and village has be-en, now tha,t the war is on, to reduce the rates considerably, but our Council, as ever, wishes presumably to be different to every other place, and gives us the pleasure of paying more than ever. Granted that our asse<5smenta had to be increased, was it not possible for the rate to be lowered more than it was? The present position is simply ruinous, and how people, under all the high cost of living, are to pay high rates is a big proMem. Here we are going in for an adver- tising scheme to bring people to the town, and on the other hand having such rates levied that will have the effect of driving peo- pte from the town—because that is what it is coming to. I t Fishing is a source of amusement which re- quires a good deal of patience-a fact which was certainly exemplined by the Porthcawl gentleman who went a nshiTig the other even- ing and after about four hours with "nothing doing" returned home with nothing more than half of the bloater which he started out with as bait. I! I! Major J. L. Lambert has been home on teave far a few days, looking remarkably weH. He returned to France on Tuesday.

ANNIVERSARY SERVICES

ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. TONOU ENGLISH BAPTtSTS HOLD SUCCESSFUL MEETINGS. The anniversary services in connection with Carey English Baptist Sunday School, Tondu, were held on Sunday, presided over by the pastor, Rev. G. R. Cole. The morning )ser- vice at 11 was of a devotional character, inter- spersed by recitations by the scholars, the hymns being from the Church Hymnal. The afternoon programme, which was given en- tirely by the children, was of a very interest- ing nature, particularly the portion given by the infants, all of whom did their respective parts well. Special music was arranged, and several girls and boys sang solos, the re- frain being taken up by the choir. The reci- tations, all of which were in keeping with the musical settings, completed a very enjoyable service. Special mention should be made of the "infants' drill," which was repeated at the evening service, by request. At the afternoon service, in addition to the scholars' choruses, the following gave recitar- tions:—Dolly Gubbins, Alice Webster, Reggie Tanner, Walter Davey, Arthur HoweII, Gertie Lane, Doris PHe, Willie Attwood, Grace I Hinds, Doris Hinds, Ivor Richards, Aubrey I James, Ronald Gubbins, Tom Harris, Olive Tanner, Ronald Lane, Gwyn Harding, Elsie Davey, Percy Pethybridge, Bertie Morgan, Nina Webster, and Nellie Jenkins I At the evening service Jamouneau's sacred I cantata, Hezekiah," was efficiently ren- dered by the choir, ab!y assisted by the fol- lowing artistes:—Bass, Mr. D. Phillips; tenors, Mr. Emiyn Thomas and Mr. Chivers; soprano. Miss Robina Webster, accompanied by an emcient orchestra. Madame Jeanes- Thomas presided at the organ and piano, and the conductor was Mr. D. Whittingham. Praise is due to Miss Hurley and Mrs. Heaven for the manner nz which they had trained the children, and to Miss Olive Richards, who ably assisted. The anniversary was a record day both as regards attendance and the quality of the programme, the singing being of a high stan- dard, and the church is to be congratulated on providing such a good programme.

Advertising

Attvertlse in the "Glamorgan Gazette." I If you want to sell, buy or exchange; yo'a 1 cannot do better.

I IS PORT WINE INTOXICATING

I IS PORT WINE INTOXICATING ? I SEQUEL TO COYTRAHEN WEDDING. I WARNtNG BY MAGfSTRATES. The plea that it is not so, or at least that it is generally held not to be, was the de- fence put forward, and partly accepted (as to the latter contention) by the bench, in a case in which Ellen C. Williams, licensee of the Xicholls Arms, Coytrahen, was sum- moned under the new Liquor Control Order for supplying intoxicants during prohibited hours. The police constable in charge of the case said he visited the Xicho'Hs Arms, Coytrahen, at a few minute; past ten o'clock on the 14th, and asked defendajit whether she had not served some ten women with intoxicating liquor (namely port wine), on the Saturday previous during prohibited hours. — She re- plied, "Yes, I supplied them with port wine, and some had lemonade, and I gave them some biscuits to eat with t. I have done it quite innocently, as I thought port wine was a non- intoxicating drink. Through the excitement of the wedding (the marriage of Miss Butler to Mr. Hill), I forgot that port wine wa, in- toxcating until the afternoon of the &ajne day, when I read the Order again. I then found that I had done wrong" By Mr D. Llewellyn :Witness opened the con- versation by saying, ''I hear you had a party here on Saturday"? To which the defendant replied, "Yes, after the wedding." The wine wa.a Bonovin. Mr. D. Llewellyn, addressing the jury for the defence, 'pointed out that the defendant was a highly respectable person. When these ten women came and asked! her if the house waa open, she replied, "Yes, for ladies," meaning by that that it was open for the sale of non-intoxicants. He (Mr. Llewellyn suggested that in fact the wine supply was not regarded as an intoonca.ting wine, but more or less as an invalid wine. Port wine was regarded as a teetotal drink, at least in Wales, and people who da*ank it would be astonished if they were charged with drinking an alcoholic drink. It had even been decided by the Birmingham Stipendary that port wine was not an intoxicating drink. Even if the Bench did not feel able to take that view, he would ask them to#s.y that the whole thing was merely a mistake, and that no offence had been committed, or, if there had been an offence, it was of such a purely technica.1 character that the Bench might pro- perly dismiss the charge. Defendant then went into the witness-box and gave corroborative evidence. Super. Davies (pointing to the bottle of port wine in Court, labelled Bonovine): You admitted suplying port wine when the oScer spoke to you. Is there any port wine in that bottle?—It is what I call port wine. She (witness) did not known that port wine was intoxicating. You have been in a public house for fifteen years, and don't know that port wine is in- toxicating?—No, I didn't know for certain. You require a license to sell it?—Yes. The Bench decided, after consultation, to dismiss the case on the payment of costs, seeing that there was the possibility of a mis- apprehension in regard to port wine being an Intoxicant. It was, however, inti-matedi that this plea would not be allowed to serve in future. The charge against the ten women of "un- lawfully consuming intoxicating liquor in prohibited hours," was also dismissed on the payment of costa (4s. in each case). The names of the defendants, who appealed to be very much amused at finding themselves in their present scrape, were Winifred ThomaSj Anna Alford', Edith Gronow, Mary David, HiMa Vickers, Margaret GrSths, Victoria Neal, ham, Eliza Thomas, 'Elizabeth Lewis, and Eve!yn Tales.

IGLAMORGAN VOLUNTEER TRAINING I CORPS

GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEER TRAINING I CORPS. SMOKtNG CONCERT AT TONDU. I A successful smoking concert was held at the LIyn6 Arms Hotel, Tondu, on Satu.rday. In the absence of the Commandant, Mr. Earnest Llewellyn, who was prevented from attending in consequence of family bereave- ment, the chair was taken by Lieut. E. W. Danes, supported by Quarter-Master Alien. An interesting part of the proceedings was a presentation made to Sergt.-Major Stokes, by the members of the platoon as a token of their respect &nd esteem, and as an apprecia- tion of the excellent service he has rendered to the platoon. The Sergt.-Major suitably responded. Presentations were also made to the success- ful competitors in the annual shooting com- petitions. Sergt. Morgaji having won nrst prize, together with the "Daily Mail" medal, also the Lord Roberts' medal. Corporal Scans wick handed the presents to the success- ful competitors who suitably responded. Sergt. Martin, Maesteg, who spoke in sup- port of the V.T.C. movement, T0'ged the mem- bers to attend all dinH-s possible, so as to make themselves emcient in aM that pertained to the making of qualined soldiers, and thus be prepared to answer the call of duty. Sergt. Hayes spoke in aimilaj' terms. Quart er'Masteir-Sergt. Alien gave a resume of the work done during the year, and asked for help to complete the outdoor ranges so as to be able to improve the facilities for long range shooting. The following programme wae gone through during the course of the evening:—Song, Mr. Tudbr Dagg; song, Private H. David; recita- tioTi, Sergt-Major Stokes; song, Bandmaster J. Barton; song, Mr. Tudor Dagg; song, Mr. W. T. Rees; mystery display, Lieut. E. W. Davies. The accompanist was Mr. T Larkin.

PASS IT ON 1

PASS IT ON. 1 GOOD NEWS IN BRtDGEND. I There has been some excusable doubt in the minds of the few in Bridgend. They have asked themselves whether such singular bene- nt could last. Doubt after doubt has dis- appeared and the proof of lasting cure given here by Mr. Tombs disposes of the last shadow of doubt. Read it and judge. On November 13th, 1905, Mr. J. Tombs, of 29, Highland Place, Bridgend', said :—"A& Mr. Tombs. (From a photo). the result of taking a- severe cold that settled on the kidneys I had &harp, shooting pains in the small of my back and across the loins. I could hardly straighten after bending, the pains were so severe. The water wasn't right, eith- er, 'and left a sedi- ment. "My friends advised me to try Doan's back- ache kidney pills, which I did, and had benefit from the first doses. 1 felt all right again, and better im health than I had been for sometime. I heartily recom- mend Dean's pills for all kidney troubles. (Signed) J. Tombs." On March 9th, 1916-0 VER TEN YEARS LATER—Mr. Tombs said :—Over ten years ago I proved the beneficial qualities of Doan's pills, and I have since kept free of kidney trouble. They are a never-failing remedy." If every cold or chill affects the back and the water, if the least exertion tires you, if you feel dull and unnaturally drowsy, of suSer from backache, gravgl, stone, rheumatism, dropsy, or lumbago. Dean's backache kidney pills will help you, for they are solely for the kidneys and bladder. Of all dealers, or 2s. 9d. a box, from Foster- McClelIan Co., 8 Wells St., Oxford St., London, W. Don't ask for backache or kid- ney piHs.—ask DISTINCTLY for DOAJ\'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mr. Tombs had.

PORTHCAWL

PORTHCAWL. PROPERTY SALE.—Messrs. T. Elwood Deere and Co., A.C.I.S., offered for sale at the Pier Hotel, Porthcaw!, on Wednesday, the following lots of property:—Freehold dwelHng-hou&e, No. 12, Queen's Avenue, Porthcawl.—Withdrawn at .€347 10s. Lease- hold! dwelling-house, Bron-y-Dwn, Well-Street, Porthcawl, held for term of 80 years from 1889 at the annual ground rent of 15s.—With- drawn at JE49.5. Three freehold bungalows, Sandy Bay Bungalows, Mackworth road, Porthcawl.—Withdrawn at ;L920. Leasehold dwelling-house, Killiemorie, Lias road, Porth- cawl, held for a term of 99 years from 1909, at an annual ground rent of -S3 5s. 9d.—Sold at JE560. Freehold building sites, situated on the Victoria Park Estate, in close proximity to Lock's Common, Porthcawl, and numbered 5 to 18 on the estate plan. The plots vary from 40ft. to 63ft. frontage, and 112ft. to 121ft. in d'epth.—Withdrawn but treating privately with a number. Semi-d'etached freehold dwelling-house, The Den, Mackworth road, Porthcaw!.—Withdrawn at JE345. OBITUARY.—It is with regret we record the death of Mr. William Jenkins, Hafan Glyd, Porthcawl, who peacefully passed away on Friday, June 16th, leaving a widow and daughter to mourn his loss, and for whom great sympathy is felt. The deceased had re- sided at Porthcawl for a number of years, and had greatly endeared himself o all who came in contact with him. Prior "fa his taking up residence at Porthcawl, he made his abode at Maesteg, and held a responsible position in that town. The great number of Maesteg in- habitants present at the funeraF was a proof of the esteem in which he was held. The funeral took place on Wednesday, June 21st. Rev. E. W. Pearee, pastor of Bethel C.M. Church, of which deceased was a member, conducted a brief service at the house. The mortal remains were recently interred at Coy- church Parish Churchyard. The last rites were carried out by the Rector, the Rev. F. C. Williams, and the Revs. E. W. Pearee, D. W. Howell (Pencoed), and David Morris (Porthcawl). The following hymns were feelingly sung: "0 Fryniau Caersalem," "Yn y dyfroedd mawr a'r tonau," and 'Œydd myrdd o ryfeddodau." The principal mourners were: Mrs. Jenkins (widow); Miss Len& Jenkins (daughter); Mrs Davies, Maesy- wen Farm, Pencoed (sister-in-law); Mrs. Crickett, London (niece); Misses Lena, Cassie, and Minnie Jenkins (nieces); Messrs. Thomas and Willie Jenkins (nephews); Mr. and Mrs. Richards, Penarth; Miss Lewis, Coychurch. Wreaths were sent by the widow and daugh- ter Mrs. Moles, Aberkenfig; Lena and Ann; Mrs. Griffith Thomas, Well Street; and Harry and Betty, New Brighton. Among the general sympathisers present, the following were noticed:—Messrs. D. Richards, W. Francis, E. Rogers, E. Jones, D. Thomas, D. Walters, Daniel Davies, Isaac Thomas, Levi Jenkins, Wm. Jenkins, Porthcawl; Mr. and Mrs. Mymach Davies, Mr. Robert Delahay, Mr. David Jones, Mr.. John Williams, Mrs. Williams, Mr. Adams, Mrs. Thomas, Miss Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. Jenkin Rees, Mr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Davies, Mrs. Francis, Mrs. Price, Mrs. James, Mrs. Howell (High School), Mrs. Brooks, Porth- cawl; Sergt. Jones, Maesteg, etc. A large number of messages of condolence have been received.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan G&zette." If you wamt to sell, buy or exchange; you I camiot do better.

WELSH CONGREGATIONAL SINGINGI FESTIVAL

WELSH CONGREGATIONAL SINGING I FESTIVAL. To the Editor. Sir,—I beg to correct Mr. Jenkins by stat- ing that Mr. W. Dodd (whom I highly esteem as a musician and friend) was not the nrst local conductor to weild the baton at these festivals. A most strenuous worker with ev" l'y festival'was Mr. John Lewis (LIew Aber), who many years since has emigrated to S. Africa, and led the 1896 festival, which was held at Bethania, Tynewydd, as called then; now Ogmore Vate. I have the pro- gramme in front of me, and I am confident the esteemed pastor of Ebenezer, Aberkenng, and his church will welcome this correction, for there Mr. Lewis laboured diligently with muic for many years. As one present at Kenng Hill last Whit-Monday and at the 1898 festival, led by Mr. Dodd, as well as the one conducted by Mr. Lewis, I am sure Messrs. Dodd and Williams will not feel dismayed by this claim to priority. AH those gentlemen had a. claim to the honour on account of equipment and service, and I heartily join in congratulating Mr. Williams on his achieve- ment, and may the fecunidity of his capacity In the musical realm be further enioved and rewarded.—Yours, etc., ————— D.W. I

MR JOHN GALSWORTHY ON THE II BELGIAN PLIGHTI

MR. JOHN GALSWORTHY ON THE BELGIAN PLIGHT. I To the Editor. Sir.—A job half done is worse than a job not begun. Last month at the General Meet- ing of the National Committee for Relief in Belgium, we were told definitely that aid must come in much faster if the Belgians are to be I kept from starvation. That is the hard. truth. Let us carry our minds forward. Suppose aid does not come in faster, and the Belgian population, now on tne edge of starvation, tips over the edge and actually does stexve; that one in three, or so, especia'Uy of the children, either dies or becomes permanently enfeeMed through privation—what will the world say of us, and what shall we say of our- selves. Suppose, when peace comes and Belgium can pick up her broken life, she finds herself in that shocking state, because the richest country in the world, the country which most benentted by her sacrince, could not find her a matter of three million pounds a year for two or three ye'ar' simply to keep her a/live. Could not find her two days cost of a war which is being waged, so we say, to restore little Belgium-what a ghastly laugh will go up at the expanse of Great Britain. Vu see, there is no question but that we can keep the Belgians from starvation If we like. A perfect machinery is there to feed them adequately, it needs nothing whatever but money. I, for one, will not care to be in the shoes of a Briton, if this starvation is a-llowed to happen. I will consider myself a member of a country which has spoken fair words and not justified them; of a country which has been guilty of ingratitude. The National Committee for Relief's latest special device for the raising of money to a-void this shame is, that on July 10th, all British boys and girls shall hold sports, give concerts, or entertainments of some sort, t'he proceeds of which shall go to the children in Belgium. The British boys and girls will do this with alacrity-no need to appeal to them; the school authorities, who have the organis- ing of the entertainments, wiM do it with a.H their hearts—no need to whip up their good good will. But on what the general public dices will depend the success of this device. If they will only make it sh occasion for giv- ing not only the value of their tickets, but as mucn more as they can spare; for giving as freely as they would give to our own Red Cross, on one of its flag days—then, and then onJy wiH there be collected a sum that may make all the difference in the world to these stoioat unhappy people; and all the difference in the world to the future reputation of our country. This is a grave matter. The search-light that beats on the case of Belgium Is to strong —no country can escape it, least of aM our country. If the public will only think a, moment, then, not only out of pity-though heaven knows that should be enough!—but out of love for our own good name, we shall make good this shortage in our duty towards Ioya.1 Bedgium. I, Ón the tenth of July, let us fill up a real bumper of help to the life and health of this brave, hard-driven, little land.—I am,etc., Jume 23rd, 1916. JOHN GALSWORTHY. I June 23rd, 1916.

Advertising

IF you KEEP ptGS, REEP TTHEM SO THAT THEY WILL KEEP Y°"' There is no need to have pigs hanging about on hand so long, give them one or two of WtLSON'S OANAEHAN P!G POWDERS mixed in the food for each pig a week, and it will save you weeks in fattening. It simply keeps the pigs in the best of health, and helps them to digest every ounce of food, and avoids delays by piga going off their feed at times. Every pig feeder who tries them thinks the world of them; agents write saying, "I always like selling Wilson's Canadian Pig Powders, be- cause all who use them are so satisned." Sold in packets of 7 powders for 6d., post free 7d.; 16 powders for Is., post free Is. 2d.; 48 powders for 2s. 9d., post free 3s.; 144 powders for 8s. post free; and in tins post free 21s. each. Sole Pro- prietor, Stephen Wilson, Pig Powder Factory, Peterborough, and sold by agents all over, in- cluding—Henry Jonea, Chennst, Sycamore St., Newcastle Ernlyn; T. Llewellyn, Chemist, 17 High Street, Cardigan; J. Evans, Chemist, Llandyssul; J. Evans, Chemist, Llanybyther; A. Nicholas, Grocer, &c., 19 Commercial Street, Maesteg. 8054 ? TMH CELEBRATED E ? Wt?wA& O?r?D F%B&9?r?Tr?n?)?t 7? w w ? '?' '??' MuiUN PI.á..ØOS t g M?/?// ???W??§S? f???aKE°3*? ??JEBr? .2????E?3r??????'? W ADDINOTON & 

1 COWBRIDGE SYFTINGS II

1* COWBRIDGE SYFTINGS. (By VELOX.") The many friends of Nurse Rymer will be glad to know that she has been highly suc- cessful in a recent examination held at Cardlif in connection with the Royal Sanitary Insti- tute. Nurse Rymer was one out of four to gain honours out of the large number who sat. Local governing bodies will now be able to put into practice what is just now a very desirable power. 1 Fairplay for the Cowbridge publicans. For the most part they are loyally observing the Restriction Order, but th4 antics of the town clock have during the past week led those living near the Town Hall a lively dance. The clock has three faces, but each face has been a contradiction to the other face. On Sat- urday evening two men left a public-house on the west side just as the west face said "Nine o'clock." Arriving immediately opposite the Town Hall they glanced at the south face. "A quarter to nine," said the south face. "Well, I'm Mowed," said Jack, "look at the time, mun. We have come out too soon. Let us go in by here and have another." Leaving this public-house just as the south face said "Nine o'clock, they proceeded a little to the east. Another glance -at the clock; 'Fiv& minutes to nine," says the east face. "Darrow, mun," says Tom, "we mustn't trust these old clocks too mucn, but we can do an- other bolter' in nve minutes, can't usp" And so they did. t This was not the only case worth recording, either. A man started to walk from Church Street to the Bridge. Instead of taking about two minutes to do the walk, he actually arrived at the bridge a quarter of an hour before he left 'Church Street! H The friends we value most are those who rally around us when misfortune overtakes us. So thought a young lady who, on arriving at her place of business in High Street ond morn- ing, found she had lost the key of the shop. In a few moments there were at her side, trying to help, a wine merchants' manager, an ironmonger, an auctioneer, a grocer, a chemist, an ou tatter, and a motor mechanic. A newspaper man who was hurrying up with screw drivers, etc., arrived too late. By the combined _enorts of the lady's friends, locks, bolts, and bars had been burst asunder. I I! H We want another Daniel in Cowbridge, who will interpret the mysterious writings on the walls of the ancient borough. Here they are: C.ridge T..n C.I1." "Th.u a.t wei.d in t.e ba.ce and fo..d wa..ing. How long, oh, how long, w.Il thy peo.Ie h.ve to w..t f.r the p.re w.ter f.om the S..ver W..1? Thy p..ps are use.-ss, whose w..ers Are like unto the w.t..s of the D..d S.a." 1 Oh, ye City Fathers, hear the cries and groans of the burdened ratepayers, and when thy people cry for water do not give them- well, something else. H H I! By a misadventure, which'might have had a tragic ending, we came very nigh losing a very popular gentleman whom we cannot spare. However, all's well that ends well; and perhaps the gentleman will now tell us whether the navour of hyacinth bulbs in soup is as good as the navour of the homely onion. Our Mayor is justly proud of the amounts raised In Cowbridge from time to time for various patriotic funds. As a result of Life- boat Flag Day, on Saturday last, JB15 goes from Cowbridge and district. IT D There was a much larger attendance than usual at the June Fair held on Saturday last. Buyers were in attendance from Bristol, New- port, Brecon, and from Carmarthen and Car- digan. Mr. John David conducted a large and attractive sale of horses. Several good specimens reached R7.5. Cows and calves were up to JE25; there was a good supply of store cattle, prices ranging from :S16 10s. Business In sheep and lambs was not so brisk.

Advertising

Advertise in the "GTamorgam Gazette." J If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.

COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT

COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT. Tuesday.—Befort the lif%yor (Councinor D. Thomas), and Mr. E. T. Lloyd.. CHARGE OF THEFT. Henry Llewellyn, of no fixed abode, wa& brought up on remand, charged with stealing several articles of wearing apparel, the pro- perty of Thos. Maloney. P.S. Lee gave evidence of arrest. Prisoner, who had been in custody for a week, was discharged. ASSAULT. Charlotte Farvant, Ystradowen, charged Kate Murphy with assault. Both women charged' each other with being the aggressor,. and a written spe.ment of some of the choicest language, alleged to have been used, I was handed to the Bench. Defendant was bound over in the sum of R5 to keep the peace. I FIGHTING. Henry Coles and Henry Humphreys were charged with obstructing the highway by fighting in the Square, Llanharra.n. Hum- phreys, who appealed, was fined 20s., Coles, who did not appear, was nned 30s. I EXCESSIVE SPEED. I G. Morgan, charged with riding a motor cycle at an excessive speed through the street I at Llantwit Major, was fined 20s. I CLOSING ORDER. Sanitary Inspector Whone obtained a clo-g- in,g order in rpspect to a cott,-ige on. the CardifE Road, occupied by David Evans.

IBRYNCETHIN

I BRYNCETHIN. PENIEL INDEPENDENT CHAPEL.—The anniversary services in connection with the above Sunday School took place on June 18th. The services throughout the day were con- ducted by the Rev. Edmund Davies, of Seven Sisters. At the afternoon service the fol- lowing contributed to the programme:—Solos, Misses May Jones, Olive Pugsley, Gwladys Williams, Mary J. Leyshon, Mr. Samuel (Pen- coed), Mr. T. D. Williams, and Master Gor- don Jones; recitations, Misses Eleanor Ed-. wards, Margaret Jenkins, Vivien Elias, May Prichard, Jennie Davit's, Connie Davies, Mr. Wm. Rees and Mr. T. Edwards. Two choruses were given by Classes VIII. and X. of the Sunday School, and the choir (under the able leadership of Miss Bronwen K. Wil- liams, rendered, "We are Marching Home to Zion," and several other choruses. A pleas- ing event of the afternoon was the presenta- tion (made by Mr. J. J. Young, president of the M.I.S-), to Miss Margaret Jenkins, who has acted as secretary to the society during the last winter session. The service ended with a short English address to the children. -At the evening service an English sermon was delivered, and solos were rendered by Miss. May Jones and Mr. Samuel, and a quartette by various singers. The services, which were well attended throughout, proved very suc- cessful. Mr. H. Leyshon proposed a vote of thanks to Mr. Samuel and Mr. T. D. Williams for their aid to the Sunday School, and to Mrs D. M. Ellas, who ably presided at the organ.

IKENFIG HILL

I KENFIG HILL. f/llUUAGE OF FORMER RESIDENT.— A large number of relatives and friends assem- bled in -Rodley Wesleyan Chape! Leeds, on the occasion of the marriage of Mr. William Francis Sriinths, only son of Mr. and Mis. John Grimths, Ivy Dene, Kenng Hill, to Misa Rosa Mary Nelson, fourth daughter of the late Mr. S. Nelson, bank manager, Rodley. The bride, being a member of the Wesleyan choir, the service was fully choral. The Rev. Ov en Jones conducted the ceremony. The bride, who was given away by her sister. Miss Laur& Nelson, wore a dress of white silk crepe de chine and crepe Georgette,, with veil, and! carried a shower bouquet, of dlark red roses. The bridesmaidis were Miss Maud Sugden, sister of the bride, and Miss E-.I.uned Barnett) of Kenng Hill,cousin of the bridegroom. Both were attired in grey crepe de chine ovetT crepe Georgette, with mop caps to ma/tch) and their bouquets were of pink sweet peas. Th best man was Mr. Douglas SugdeD, brother of the bride. A reception was after- ward's held in the Wesley,an schoolroom. Mir" and Mrs. Grl&ths I&ft 'later foo- Blackpool where the honeymoon ia being spent. They were the recipients of many beautiful pre- sents.

Advertising

ADVtCE FREE.—Mrx. Stew&rt, Hertat Spceialiet, B Guinea Street. Briatol. M7t