Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CAP ROLAND PHILIPPSI

CAP?. ROLAND PHILIPPS. I LCRD ST. CAVJD'S HElP. KILLED IN ACTS ON. I SOUTH GLAMORGAN LOSES LIBERAL I CANDIDATE, -h 1 h h' "I Some measure of the toll that this great war is exacting may be gleaned from the fact that South Glamorgan ha. both its Parliamen- tary candidates by deatii jn the held within a couple oi months of each other. First, lt was .J. L Colonel Gaskeli; now it is captain me JUUal. Roland Philipps. second son and heir of Lord St. David's L.-Lieut, of Pembrokeshire. It was only in May of last year that Captain Philipps' elder brother. Captain the Hon. Cdwyn Erasmus Philipps, Royal Horse Guards, found a hero's grave in France, and the double bereavement leaves Lord and Lady St. David's son-less, and the family estates without a direct hell*. Captain Philipps' death-wound was received during the heavy fighting of the 7th of this month. His battalion was engaged in the desperate struggle for the possession of Ovilliers, which was strongly held by the Prus- sian GiiardQ. Captain Philipps was hit as he was waving his men on to the charge. -Mes sages from the front are necessarily few and brief as yet, but some few letters have already reached! the sorrowing parents. The Acting- Colonel of the regiment writes from France On July 7th our brigade was ordered to at- tack the German lines. Roland, in his usual o-allant way. led his company over the parapet and was waving his men on when I saw him drop. One of his men informed me after- wards that bo had been killed. I cannot ex- press in woids the loss it is to me, and to the battalion in every way. No one could snow a higher si-aidard of courage, coolness, and de- votion to duty than he did. All ranks share, with you the loss of n very gallant son." Previous to the war Captain Philipps took a keen and active interest in the Boy. Scout movement, being commissioner of Boy Scouts in East and North-East London. and assist- ant-commissioner to Colonel Lord Glannsk. In politics he was an ardent Radical and a candidate for South Glamorgan. His death, following that of Colonel Frank GaskeU in action, leaves the two great political parties in the division without standard bearers. He had a charming disposition, and was ex- tremely popular at his old home, Lydstep Haven, in Pembrokeshire. The following is a "first impression" of one who spoke to Captain Philipps on the occasion of his adoption as Liberal candidate for South Glamorgan at Bridgend three years ago :—"Tall, slim. dark complexioned, with hair carefully parted and brushed, and piercing, intelligent eye?, he looks older than his 23 years. He is a racy speaker, fluent and stronpr, with a sugges- tion of comhativeness about the set of the jaw."

INTERESTING LOCAL WEDDING

INTERESTING LOCAL WEDDING AT COITY PARISH CHURCH. A marriage, in which the contracting partitls are very well-known and highly respected, was quietly solemnized on Monday t Coity Parish Church, when Mr. Emlyn C. Jones, nephew of Mr. J. P. Jones, Paris House, was united to Miss Margaret Stuart Cameron, eldest daughter of the late Mr. G. S. Cameron and Mrs. Cameron, Coity Road (Bridgend). The officiating minister was the Rev. Price Davies. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. Geo. Cameron. The best man was Mr. J. P. Jones, uncle of the bridegroom. After the ceremony the happy pair left by oar for London, where the honeymoon was spent. The bridegroom is in the Army Service Corps, and expects to be called upon shortly for service abroad. Numerous presents and OOngT3t ufut ions testified to the esteem in which the newly-wedded pair and respective families is held, and to the sincerity of the good washes for their future happiness and success.

I BRIDGEND POLICE COURTI

I BRIDGEND POLICE COURT, Thursday.—Before: Mr. Oliver Sheppard (in the chair), and Mr. D. H. Lloyd. OVER-RUNNING HIS LEAVE. John Davies, a young man in khaki, was brought up charged with absenting himself from No. 334 Protection Company, Royal Defence Corps, filing's Dock, Swansea. Defendant seemed readily to acquiesce in the order of the Magistrates putting his case back pending the arrival of a Military escort. TRILBY HAT TRICK. I John Williams, haulier, Glyn Neath, was charged with stealing a Trilby hat, value 4s., the property of Robert Roberts. The latter is a ripper lodging at 117 Caerau Road, Caerau. He said it was his practice to hang up the hat in the pat&age, and the Trilby was on its ac- customed peg when he and defendant had dinner together on the 16th inst. At half- past 4 witness missed the hat-and the de- fendant. Espying defendant hurrying off (and wearing a cap), witness, with Sergeant Evans, followed, and came up with the run- away at Cymmer Station. There, a bulky pocket excited suspicion, and from the pocket the sergeant extracted the Trilby. On being charged, Williams said he "took the lend" of the hat. Defendant now explained that he was there on a visit to his grandmother, and took the hat in mistake for his uncle's. Inspector Rees Davies said defendant had been in custody since Sunday. He was fined 21. SEDUCTIVE FLAGON. I •Joseph Manning (40), collier, Pencoed, was charged with stealing a flagon of beer, value 9d., from the bar of the Coity Castle Beer- house, Bridgend, the property of Frank Young, on July 17th. According to the pro- secutor, who is the licensee, defendant looked in at 4 on Monday afternoon, and asked for beer, and then for a a flagon, and each of these requests was refused. Witness had oc- casion to leave the bar, and on his return saw defendant running away. He followed, and seeing the flagon concealed under defendant's coat, took possession of it. Defendant, who was arrested by Sergt. Loveluck, told the officer, and now repeated to the Court, that he was sorry, and he des- cribed the incident as "a bit of foolhajdinees." Defendant is a married man with three child- ren. A cpeckweigher >dTom Heol-Laethog Col- liery, Where defendant is employed, described him as '

BRIDGEND CINEMAI

BRIDGEND CINEMA. We are glad to find that Bridgend audiences are showing their increasing appreciation of the fare provided at the Bridgend Cinema. "Quality tells." and there is no doubt about the quality (If the Cinema pictures-nor about the music discoursed by the .very excellent little orchestra, which certainly contributes very substantially to the excellence of the performances We understand that the management has this week entertained the wounded soldiers, and inmates of the Workhouse.

EKXED IN ACTIONI

EKXED IN ACTION. I HILL BOY AND H!S PALS. I Information has been received from France of tjie death ::1 action of Private George Jas. Crot-tciibe, 10th Lanes. Fusiliers, whose home is ar Evan Street, Kenfig Hill. Pte. Cro- coriibt. who was only 2>1, had been out at the front for about 12 months, and -ome measure of the esteem in which he was held by his pa;s v -.thcred from the following letter addressed to his mother :— W Pte. George James Crocombe. It is with the deepest regret, and the re- gret of my comrades, that I am writing to let you know that your son was killed in action on the 26th Maj He was not with any of his Ktiifig Hill chums at the time, as he was out with the battalion bombers. We all felt very much the parting with such a fine fellow as he was. He was a good soldier and was well liked by all who knew him. On behalf of all the Kenfig Hill boys out here, and the remainder of his Company, we offer you our deepest sympathy." k addition to the writer, Sergt. Bevan, this letter is signed by the following:—Sergts. Smith, Edwards, and Hitchings, Cpl. Reed, and Pres. J. J. Davies, W. J. Jones, A. J. Dyer, G. Harris, W. Howells, and T. Almond. All thesp are Kenfig Hill boys who enlisted at the same time as Pte. Crocombe, and have been able to keep together.

I COWBRIDGE OFFICER INVALIDED I I I

I COWBRIDGE OFFICER INVALIDED. ——— I Lieutenant Arthur W. Gwyn, son of Mr. I I W. T. Gwyn, Town Clerk of Cowbridge, and brother of Mr. Vivian Gwyn, clerk to the Cow- bridge Bench, had a narrow escape during the fighting on the 7th of this month. He took part in the battle not with his own regiment, Lieut. Arthur W. Gwyn. I but as an officer of the brigade bombing sec- tion. During the attack on the German posi- tions a shell burst near him, and he was buried in the debris and rendered unconscious. After a thorough medical examination in London, the doctors found that he was suffering con- siderably from shell shock, but there was no serious injury to the spine, and it was decided that he should return home for a period of rest. He is now at Cowbridge. Prior to taking up his commission, Lieut. Gwyn was a solicitor. He is a nephew of Mr. D. J. Gwyn, manager of the London, City and Midland Bank, Bridgend.

COITY GIRL DIES FROM FOXGLOYE POISONING

COITY GIRL DIES FROM FOXGLOYE POISONING. The fact that a Coity little girl has suc- cumbed to foxglove poisoning should put parents on their guard against the hidden perils of the hedgerows. The circumstances of the case were investigated at an inquest 'held at Coity on Tuesday afternoon by Mr. Archibald Daniel, deputy coroner, on Miriam Gwendoline Thomas, aged 3, daughter of Mr. Llewellyn Thomas, collier. The father said that before she was taken ill the little girl had been playing with fox- gloves in the fields. Dr. E. B. M .Atkins, Pencoed, said that the child showed symptoms of poisoning by digitalis, a drug obtained from the" foxglove. He believed the child must have eaten fox- g loves and thus caused her death. He had frequently stopped children putting foxgloves into their mouths, because of the poisonous nature of the flower. The Deputy Coroner said he understood it was the custom of children to play with fox- gloves, placing them in the fist between the thumb and index ifnger, and then smacking them. The verdict was Death from misadven- ture."

PONTYCYMMBR

PONTYCYMMBR. WEDDING.—At the English Congrega- tional Chapel on the 3rd inst., a wedding took place by special license, the contracting parties being Miss Harriet E. Burt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Bvrt, Pontycymmer, and Mr. Ernest John Belben, Shrewsbury. Rev. D. D. Evans officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, was dressed in a navyl blue costume, and black hat, andi the bridesmaid—Miss E. M. Burt (sister)—also wore a Navy blue costume and black hat. FUNERAL.—Amid many manifestations of sympathy the mortal remains of the late Miss Nellie Williams, aged 28 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Williams, late of Manches- ter House, Pontycymmer, were conveyed to Pontycymmer Cemetery on Tuesday of last (Continued at bottom of next column).

PONTYCYMMBR

(Continued from ftrovious Column.) week. The deceased lady met her sad end through a canoe capsizing in the Thames at Reading. She and a fnend (Miss Barham) went for a row in a punh, afterwards changing with anotifer friend into a canoe. Coming back against a strong current the canoe capsized and the three occupants, none of whom could swim, were thrown into the water. Fortunately, the other two ladies were rescued, but no trace of Miss Williams could be seen. Later the body was recovered, and conveyed by train to Pontycymmer. As the cortege wended its way to the Cemetery all the blinds en route were lowered. The Revs. D. Williams, Treherbert; D. Mardy Davies, W. Saunders, C.C., David Hughes, Pontycymmer; E. Moses Evans, Blaengarw; and David Evans, Bridgend, officiated. The mourners were:—Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams (father and mother); Mr. Collwyn Williams (brother); Misses Claudia and Gwyneth Wil- liams, (sisters); Mr. Thomas Roberts, M.A., Normal College, Bangor; Mr. John Williams (uncle); Mr. W. D. Williams (cousin); Mr. James and Miss Blodwen Williams (cousins), Pontycymmer; Mrs. Annie Williams (aunt), Blaengwvnfi; Messrs. E. C. Williams and Llewellyn Williams, and Miss M. A. Williams, Blaengwynfi (cousins); Mr. William Davies, Bargoed (uncle); Mrs. B. Lewis, Bankfylon (aunt); Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Mydium (uncle and aunt); Mr. and Mrs M. J. Evans, Mydium (uncle and aunt); Rev. Isaac Thomas and Miss Thomas, Ferryside (uncle and cousin) Rev. and Mrs. B. T. Jones, Neath (cousin). Messrs D. A. Davies, T. 0. Morgan, Griffith Jones, and Edward Davies represented the deacons from Bethel Calvinistic Methodist Church, Pontycymmer. Floral tributes were sent by: "Dada," "Mamma," Brother. Sisters, Mr. Roberts, BaIlgor; Mr. and Mrs. Evans (uncle and aunt), Mr. and Mrs. Davies (uncle and aunt), Mr. and Mrs. Lewis (uncle and aunt), Granny," and other friends.

OGMORE AND GARW URBAN1 DISTRICT COUNCIL

OGMORE AND GARW URBAN 1 DISTRICT COUNCIL. J SALARY OF LADY HEALTH VISITOR. I An ordinary meeting of the Ogmore and Garw District Council was held on h riday last. In tne ausence of Mr. Lucas, Mr. A. J. Lilorgaii presided, and there were also present: Alder- man W. Llewellyn, Messrs. T. C. Jones, D. fhoinas, Jenkin Phillips, G. Griffiths, D. uavies, Llewellyn Jones, Wm. Williams h omas, and Wm. (Garw), W. Pennant, D. J. Thomas, and Wm. vv imams (Ugrnore). On the motion of Alderman W. Llewellyn, seconded by Mr. W. Pennant, a congratula- tory message was sent to Dr. Parry on the good news that lie was on the high road to re- covery from his recent severe illness. A letter was read from the FTaldau Colliery pointing out that Adare Street, Pontycym- mer, was not passable, and urging the Council to put what pressure they were able on Lord Dunraven to put it in order. Mr. Pennant said it was usual to leave the making of roads until the houses were built. It was decided to write Lord Dunraven in the matter. Arising out of a complaint in regard to the system of flushing at certain schools in the Council's area, Mr. Pennant asked whether they could not compel the Water Co. to supply water for flushing on the basis of rateable value. A Member: What is the complaint of our officer ? Alderman W. Llewellyn: The complaint is that the system of flushing is defective. The water is supplied by meter. JIr. T. C. Jones: The meter system should be done away with. A Member: It is a matter for the County Council. The Clerk: No; as a sanitary matter, it is for us. Mr. Pennant: That is what I want to know. He moved that the medical officer should look into the matter, see what was wrong, and take such steps as were necessary. THE WATER SUPPLY. i Arising out of a letter from the Garw ¡ Water Company in reply to one from the Council urging that the water supply be pro- tected by fencing from contamination by cattle, etc., the Clerk said he could find no trace of any powers to compel the Company to undertake such fencing. The only thing to do was to take some specific case, and deal with it. A member having pointed out the impossi- bility of fencing the innumerable mountain sources of the water supply, Mr. Pennant said that that was not the proposal. The pro- posal concerned merely the water courses lead- ing down from the mountain. Discussing the Medical Officer's monthly re- port, Mr. T. C. Jones pointed out that the infantile mortality for the month showed the very gratifying drop over the corresponding period of last year of 60 per cent. (Hear, hear.) Dr. Peebles' report gave the analysis of air taken for the purpose from six of the cinemas. The purest was that obtained from Stone's Cinema, Pontycymmer, while Nantymoel Workmen's Hall contained the highest per- centage of carbon dioxide. Dr. Peebles sug- gested, and it was resolved, that another sample of air should be taken from these cinemas in October, and the proprietors warned of this. I LADY HEALTH VISITOR. In regard to the question of the appoint- ment of a lady health visitor, it was pointed lout that the salary advertised by the Council was lower than that paid by any other author- ity in the district. The second lowest was the E90 paid by the Bridgend Council. There were no others paying less than ZCIOO. A Member: It is no use our offering JE85 while others are offering £ 100. It was moved and seconded that the salarly offered be increased to 2100. "preference to be given to a fully qualified hospital-trained nurse." The meeting concluded by the passing of a silent vote of condolence with the family of the late Captain Dr. Lawrence.

PONTYCYMMER SERGEANT KILLED IN ACTION

PONTYCYMMER SERGEANT KILLED IN ACTION. ——— ——— CAPTAIN'S TRIBUTE. I Mrs. Bessie Rowlands., Victoria Street, Pon- tycymmer, has received the sad news that her husband, Sergt. Fred Rowlands, Cardiff City Battalion, has been killed in action. Mrs. Rowlands received the information from his officer, Captain Boyd, who wrote as follows:— "Your husband died most gallantly in lead- ing his platoon into battle. He is a great loss to me, as he was one of my best N.C.O.'s. I am sure it will be a help to you to know that he did the great thing in the greatest way, and died the finest death a man can die. Sergt. Rowlands joined the colours soon after the outbreak of war, and left for France eight months ago. Prior to enlistment, he worked as an assistant timberman at the International Colliery, Blaengarw, and was highly respected. He had three brothers also in France, and he leaves a widow with one child to mourn their sad loss.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you wamt to eell, bay or exchange; you I cairnot do better.

MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

MAESTEG URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. The inci-Lt h l I The monthly meeting of the Maesteg Urban District Council was held at the Council Offices on Tuesday evening, when there were present: Mr. Jenkin Jones, J.P. (in the chair;, Messrs. David Davies, Gomer Davies, H. Laviers, fcL. M. Jones, J. Hocking, T. E. Hopkins, A. Nicholas, J. Evans, P. Jones, Jotm Hughes, and T. Lewis; ivith the clerk (Alderman E. E. Davies), the surveyor (Mr. S. J. Harpur), and the sanitary inspector (Mr. G. E. Howells). The minutes of the last meeting having been read and confirmed, a letter was read from Mr. Skinner, Garnwen Road, informing the Council that he had written to Mr. J. W. Hutchinson, general manager of Messrs. North's Collieries, with a view to providing two wicket gates on the pn th leadi ng from G'I.: iiweii Itoad to the old J iii, Pit, instead of tb" existing stiles, and that Mr. Hutchinson had replied regretting that circumstances would not a-llow of his acceding to the request. He appealed to the Council to take such steps as they considered necessary in the matter. Mr. Thomas Lewis having pointed out that the path was a public right-of-way, and that to his knowledge it had been used by the pub- lic for the last 35 years, on the motion of Mr. Gomer Davies, it was agreed to defer the matter for a month, the Clerk promising in the meantime to make enquiries into the legal aspect of the question. A letter was read from the tenant of a house in Glanavon Terrace, complaining of the state of the road, and the floodin", of his house on various occasions during heavy rain. and warning the Council that if it happened again he would have no alternative but to sue the Council for damages. Mr. Philip Jones said the matter was an urgent one, and should have the immediate attention of the Council. A disused slaughter-house was situate at the rear of these premises, and evidently choked grat- ings caused the water that should be taken away by these drains to overflow to the back of the houses. He hoped the Council would give such instructions as would remedy the matter without delay. The matter was ultimately referred to the surveyor for report at the next meeting. AN AUSTRALIAN M.P. A letter was read from Mr. Samuel Davies, Alma Road, informing the Council of a pro- mised visit to the town of the Honourable David Watkins, M.P., of the Commonwealth Parliament, New South Wales, Australia, and asking the Council to take such steps as they deemed necessary to accord him a welcome to the town. In the absence of sufficient information, no action was take. A letter was read from the County Council with reference to their scheme in connection with. the Naval and Military Service Act, ask- ing the Maesteg Council to appoint six mem- gers (one to be a direct Labour representa- tive, and the others not essentially members of the Council), in addition to Mrs. Howells, Mrs. Sinclair, Mr. J. Evans, C.C., Rev. C. P. Thomas, and Rev. Brynwg Thomas. It was decided to elect the following:— Messrs. T. E. Hopkins, J.P., Gomer Davies, T. Lewis, and Philip Jones, with D. Davies, Williams to represent Labour. Mr. Evan Williams to represent Labour.. A letter was read from Mr. Arthur Jenkins applying for the use of the Town Hall to hold a select "ball," for the conduct of which he would himself become responsible, the pro- ceeds, less expenses, to be devoted to the Cottage Hospital. As the conditions embodied in the Council's regulations of letting the hall insisted upon all assemblies terminating at 12 midnight, with which the application did not comply, the request was accordingly refused. WAIFS' AND STRAYS' SOCIETY. The Rev. H. M. Jones (Vicar) applied for the free use of the Town Hall for the purpose of holding a Church of England Pageant on the 19th and 20th of next month, in connec- tion with the Waifs' and Strays' Society. Mr. T. E. Hopkins, seeing this was an ex- ceptional case, and one that had a worthy ob- ject in view, moved that the application be granted. Mr. Gomer Davies expressed himself in per- fect sympathy with the object, but having re- gard to the fact that it did not come within the conditions of the regulations, he could not give it his support. It was not by any means a national charity, but a society having its direct connection with the Church of Eng- land, and if they allowed this charity to come within the meaning of the conditions for the free use of the Town Hall, then they must be prepared to extend the same privilege to every other denomination making similar applica- tions. Mr. A. Nicholas, in seconding the motion, informed the Council that the fact of this Society having a branch at Maesteg brought them within their right to make the claim, and he thought it was within the province of the Council to grant it. Mr. Gomer Davies: It is a Society in con- nection with the Church of England. Mr. Nicholas: No; it is not a sectarian question at all. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: If Tom, Dick or Harry applied for the Town Hall free of charge for a charitable purpose, he ought to get it, and de- nominational affairs should be kept out. Mr. Thomas Lewis, while being in sympathy with, the object, said this matter was thoroughly thrashed out when the Council framed their regulations, and he hoped they were not going to set back the conditions ar- rived at then. Had it not been for this re- solution, a benefit for Dr. Barnardo's Homes would have been arranged. But in face of the resolution, the hall could not be let free of charge. Mr. Henry Laviers said the ladies respon- sible for organising benefits for Dr. Bar- nardo's Homes must have been under a wrong impression. The Prince of Wales' Fund was only mentioned in the regulations as an ex- ample of the charities to which the resolution referred. Mr. Thomas Lewis said Mr. Laviers was the chairman when this resolution was passed, and he was surprised that he should put such a construction on the resolution. Mr. J. Evans said that the Llynvi War Emergency Committee, being a local institu- tion, was refused the hall free of charge, and had to pay the fee. Mr. Gomer Davies: Quite so. In framing the regulations, it was in the mind of the Council that the Town Hall should pay for itself, and the way to do it was to put every- one on the same footing, and disregard all such applications for free lettings. The Chairman said that rather than violate the regulations, he would pay the fee charged for the hall in this instance. Mr. Nicholas: It is for two days. Mr. Laviers: If the Chairman will allow me, I will pay for one day. The Chairman: Certainly, I quite agree. Mr. Nicholas: But I don't think it is neces- sary, Mr. Chairman. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: Neither do I think so. The Clerk has expressed his opinion that this application is in conformity with the regula- tions. Mr. Laviers: I think so, too; the regulation reads that the hall shall be granted for charity purposes, such as the Prinoe of Wales Fund. Mr. John Evans t If the Chairman pays the fees in this case, the matter will be re-opened again upon a similar application. Mr. Nicholas: Yes; I think we ought to vote on the question. Mr. John Evans: Does Mr. Laviers contend that the regulation gives us a free hand in the case of all charitable purposes? Mr. Laviers: Certainly. Mr. Hopkins' motion was now put, and car- ried. On the motion of Mr. Gomer Davies, it was decided to grant the Town Hall to the Libanus Choral Society on Boxing Day. The Council's workmen were granted one day's holiday, on the first Monday in August. Also the committee's report recommending a 12 per cent, increase of wages to all work- men employed on manual labour under the Council was agreed to. A DANGEROUS SPOT. I Mr. John Evans called the Council's atten- tion to the danger caused to the public using the road from Nantyffyllon Station to the "New Hearts of Oak" Hotel by the tipping of rubbish on the Coegnant Tip, and large stones rolling down into the public road. He thought they ought to insist upon the Colliery Company observing the rights of other people. It was decided to write Mr. J. W. Hutchin- son, the general manager, pointing out the I danger as explained. SUGGESTED INCREASE OF SALARIES. Mr. 1. E. Hopkins gave notice of motion to increase the salaries of the Council officials in consequence of the increased cost of living. He thought the time had arrived when the Council should do something for their officials, seeing that the cost of living had gone up 60 per cent. He thought the officials were jus- tified in their claim for an advance, or at least entitled to some consideration in this re- spect. The Board of Guardians had allowed a bonus of 10 per cent; to their officials and lie thought the Maesteg Urban District Coun- cil would be lacking in their duty if they did not increase the salaries of these men. They could can it a war bonus if they liked, and give it only lor the duration of the war, and he moved to this effect. Mr. Thomas Lewis seconded. Mr. Gomer Davies, opposing the motion, inox-ed on amendment. He thought the offi- cials were well paid men, and should not come in for any consideration such as was given to men doing manual labour. He thought it was the duty of the officials to make a little sacrifice at such times. They had plenty of ratepayers in the town who had to bear the burden as best they could, without a chance of falling back on anybody. Was it right to increase the burden of these people? Mr. Nicholas said he quite agreed with the remarks of Mr. Davies, and he had no hesita- tion in saying that the amendment would meet with the approval of the ratepayers. Tradesmen, for example had to make a big sacrifice, and suffer big losses these times. Mr. P. Jones thought the officials had been working extra hours, and should be con- sidered. Mr. John Evans: Who are the officials that come under this motion, and what are their salaries? It is impossible to judge unless we know that. The matter was ultimately referred to a special meeting of the whole Council. EAST WARD VACANCY. Mr. Gomer Davies said it was the custom of the Council, in case of a seat being rendered vacant by death, to allow it to remain so for a resonable period, as a mark of their sym- pathy and appreciation of the deceased mem- j ber, and he saw no reason why the Council! should depart from this arrangement in the case of the seat rendered vacant by the death of the late Mr. J. P. Gibbon. There was no particular reason why this vacancy should be filled at once. They could very well afford to allow it to stand over until next April, when probably the war would be over, and the rate- payers would again have their opportunity of selecting a representative by ballot vote. He moved that no action be taken at present.— Mr. A. Nicholas seconded. Mr. J. Evans said there might be a certain amount of sentiment in Mr. Davies' remarks, but he thought the same course should be adopted in the East Ward as was done in Nan- tyffyllon. Mr. Gomer Davies said the case was not on a par. It was a case of a member retiring by resignation at Nantyffyllon. And to ap- point a representative at a meeting by show of hands, was not always satisfactory. Mr. T. E. Hopkins said that, in spite of his own frequent differences with the late member for the East Ward, there was no one that re- spected him more than he did, but he saw no earthly reason in keeping this seat vacant. The late Mr. Gibbon would not benefit by it, and the present members of the Ward would j have another colleague to support them in the Ward. Mr. Gomer Davies did not think the rate- payers of the East Ward would have a fair re- presentation by any other means than the -pro- per vote. There was nothing urgent in the matter. Mr. Thomas Lewis said he had been on the Council long enough to remember other seats rendered vacant by death and other causes. There was a decided advantage in having a full representation on the Council. The question was now put to the vote. the motion to allow the seat to remain vacant until April being carried. Mr. Hocking was empowered to ask for the exemption from Military service of five mem- bers of the Fire Brigade.

GLENAYON COLLIERY ACCIDENT I

GLENAYON COLLIERY ACCIDENT. I PONTYRHYL COLLIER'S DEATH. I David Williams, aged 33, of 33 Bryn Cot- tages, Pontyrhyl, on the 13th April last, whilst working at the Glenavon Colliery, Blaengarw, sustained accidental injuries, from which he died on the 15th inst. An investigation into the cause was held on Monday at the Forester's Hall, by Mr. S. H. Stockwood (coroner). The mishap was occa- sioned by a fall of roof on the day named. Elizabeth Williams, the widow, said her husband had been seven years at the colliery. William John Power, collier boy, said that at 11 on the morning in question he was at work, and heard deceased shout for "Mog Evans." Witness went to him, and witnessed the fall of stones. Then he called from his roao Tne man Mog Jwans, who came, and between them they extricated Williams from his position of danger. Deceased was then able to move and talk. Levi W. Jones, 33 King Edward Street, Blaengarw, fireman at the colliery, said de- ceased's place was quite safe when he (wit- ness) made his usual examination of it. After the accident he found a "slip" and a "slant." In reply to Mr. Hodge^ (miners' agent), who was present, witness said he did not think deceased neglected anything he should have done. Dr. Maurice Jos. Cogan. the medical man in the case, said deceased s legs were para- lised, and he suffered from fractured disloca- tion of the spine. The eause of death was ex- haustion, brought about by sepsis, following fracture of the spinal column. The jury found accordingly.

COYTRAHEN PARK RED CROSS HOSPITAL ABERKENFIG POUND DAY

COYTRAHEN PARK RED CROSS HOSPITAL, ABERKENFIG, POUND DAY. The Commandant, Mrs. Ernest Llewellyn, would like to thank all kind friends who visited or sent gifts to the Hospital on Wed- nesday, the 12th inst. Notwithstanding the very bad weather, there were over 100 visitors who brought most acceptable gifts towards the up-keepof the Hospital. Visiting Days: Sundays and Wednesday, 2.30 to 4.30 p.m.

NANTYMOEL

NANTYMOEL. FLAG DAY.—A "Flag Day" in aid of the Koyal Lifeboat Institution was held on Satur- day of last week. The collections reached the very creditable amount of L15 2s. 4d. SI CCESS.—We are pleased to announce- that Miss Sarah Jane Hughes, Brooklands,, has passed the B.A. examination of the Uni- versity of Wales with honours in Welsh literau- ture and language, at the end of three years* training at the U.C.W., Aberystwyth. This success is highly creditable to her. Next year she proceeds to qualify herself in education as a normal student. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES.—On Satur- day evening and all day Sunday the annual, preaching services of Soar Welsh Congrega- tional Chapel were held. The Rev. Samuel Williams, jLaudore, officiated, and delivered four eloquent and inspiring sermons. The meetings Oil Sunday afternoon and evening were held in the Workmen's Hall. The meetings were well attended, and the collec- tions were very satisfactory. The singing was under the leadership of Mr. David Davies, and Miss Miriam Jenkins presided at the organ. PROHIBITION.—The Free Church Coun- cil arranged a procession on Tuesday evening as a demonstration in favour of the proposed prohibition of the sale and manufacture of alcoholic drinks. The local Silver Temper- ance Band headed the procession. A meet- ing wa aftenvards held at Horeb Chapel, under the presidency of Mr. E. David, Post Office. Addresses explaining the proposals about to be submitted to the Government were made by Rev. T. Hirwain Jenkins, Mr. Sidney Watson, Mr. J. R. Evans, Rev. D. J. Williams, and Rev. D. Glanmore Jenkins. WEDDING.—At the Congregational Church, Bridgwater, on Tuesday of last week, the mar- riage took place of Mr. T. E. Jones, only son of Mr. and JI r". William Jones, Commercial St., Nantymoel, and Miss Ethel Mary Green, third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Green, 15 .Korth Street, Bridgwater. The bride was given away by her father. Mr. Melbourne Thomas (Nantymoel), University College, Cardiff, car- ried out the duties of best man. After the cere- mony, Mr. and Mrs Jones left for the Quantock Hills and Minehead, where the honeymoon is beipg spent. Mr. Jones, who during the last yealt has been lecturer in Commerce at the Municipal Technical Institute, Belfast, has ac- cepted a post as Naval schoolmaster under the Admiralty, for the duration of war, and takes up duties at Shotley, Harwich, on the 22nd July. SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY.— Last Sunday the Mount Zion Sunday School held their anniversary services, when large congregations were present. In the after- noon the programme consisted of singing and recitations; and choruses were rendered by the choir. The following took part:—Misses Mary Gorvin, Maggie Davies, and Griselda Selmon. The drama of "The Prodigal Son" was acted by MT. Thomas Pope and party. Solos were rendered by Miss Nellie Pope and Mr. A. J. Shepstone. The evening service consisted of the performance of the cantata, entitled, In the Rough," the reading of which was ably done by Mrs. J. R. Evans, School House. The soloists were Miss Pattie Howells, Miss Evans, Mr. W. E. Thomas, Mr. A. J. Shepstone, and Mrs. James. The con- ductor was Mr. Thomas Pope, while Mr. Ernest Pope presided at the organ. The per- formance reflected much credit on all.-O, n Monday afternoon the School held their annual treat. They marched through the principal streets, led. by their well-known hand. Tea was provided for all members in the chapel, and the scholars spent a pleasant I evening in games on the mountain-side, fav- oured with delightful weather.

I OGMORE VAiE

I OGMORE VAi-E. I RECOVERING NICELY. The many friends of Air. William Lewis, Mr. W. H. Squires, and Mr. Abel Jones will be glad to- hear that they are progressing favourably at Cardiff Infirmary. PANSY DAY.—A Pansy Day was held on Saturday at Ogmore Vale in aid of the British and Foreign Sailors' Society. There was a ready sale of pansies for this deserving object, all the pansies being sold out before 4 o'clock. Hence the success of the "Day" is assured. SOLDIER'S SEND OFF.—An interesting presentation took place on Monday last at Ogmore Vale, when a handsome gold wristlet watch was presented to Mr. Wm. Jones, Rail- way Villas, Ogmore Vale, who has been called to the colours. Mr. Jones was foreman of the Co-operative Stores, and chairman of the Shop Assistants' Union (Ogmore Vale. branch), and is very popular in the district. Mr. T. Howells presided. Mr. Ben Davies, in a few well-chosen remarks, made the presentation, and Mr. W. Jones suitably responded. Mr. J. Swash, the secretary of the Ogmore Vale. Shop Assistants, also spoke, and said how keenly the branch would feel the loss of Mr. Jones, and felt sure that he would give a good' account of himself in the army. Sos and recitations were given, and the singing of God save the King," terminated a most suc- cessful event. FUNERAL.—The funeral of Isabel May Willmott, aged 4 years, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Willmott, of High Street, Ogmore Vale, who died under sad circum- stances, took place on Friday last at Ogmore Vale Cemetery. The funeral was largely attended, and much sympathy is felt with the sorrowing family in their bereavement. The following were the mourners:—Mr. and Mrs. G. Willmott (parents); Master J. Will- mott (brother); Miss Beatrice Willmott (sis- ter) Mrs. Shelley (grandmother); Mrs. Green (aunt), Pontypridd; Mr. F. Russell, Ogmore Vale; Mr. Dowling, Cefn Cribbwr; Mr. and Mrs. Peters and son, Ogmore Vale; Mr. and Mrs. Watts, Ogmore Vale; Mrs. Pring, Ken- fig Hill. Wreaths were sent by Miss Gladys Lewis, King's Head Hotel, Ogmore Vale; Mr and Mrs. Ball, Ogmore Vale; Mr. and Mrs. Watts, Ogmore Vale; and several others. Amongst the many friends that attended were Mr. and Mrs. Ball, Ogmore Vale; Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, Ogmore Vale; Mr. and Mrs. Parsons, Ogmore Vale; and Mrs. McKnighi. ————,

IPORTHCAWL

I PORTHCAWL. EXAMINATION SUCCESSES.—At the exam- illation held by the Incorporated Society of Musicians, at Cardiff, on July 11th, the following pupils of Breaksea School, Porthcawl, passed in Pianoforte Playing: Higher Intermediate, Dorothy Morgan, pass; Elementary, Kathleen Edwards, pass with distinction; Constance V. Power, pass; Emmie Clatworthy, pass; Prepara- tory, Kathleen Hutchings, pass. 8286

I MAESTEG COTTAGE HOSPITAL BENEFIT

MAESTEG COTTAGE HOSPITAL BENEFIT By sanction and approval of the Cottage Hospital Committee, Mr. William Thomas, Maesteg Market Inspector, arranged with Mr. W. H. Freeman, proprietor of the galloping horses and side shows on the Market Grounds, to give a Cottage Hospital Benefit on Monday last, Mr. Freeman kindly agreeing to give the total takings without any deduction for expenses. The staff .of the Red Cross nurses were in attendance at each of the pay boxes, and received the whole of the takings them-. selves, which resulted in a benefit in the one evening of £ 30 5s. in favour of the Hospital f unds. PBIOTKD AND PUBLISHED by ,the CINTBAL GLAKOISAH PBIKTING AND PUBLISHING CompArd, LTD., at the "GLAMOMAN GAZETTB" Orfioxi, QCMM STRnT, BBIDGEND, GLAMORGAN. FRIDAY, JULY 21st, 1916.