Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

,,< Place Your Furnishing Order In the Hands of this Old-Established & Reliable Firm. YOU WILL NEVER REGRET IT A Visit to our SHOW-ROOMS will show you the Kind of FURNIFURE you require-tastefully designed, soundly con- structed of the best materials, and carefully finished-Furniture that will last a. lifetime, and be a source of pleasure all the time. Our Huge Stock caters for all tastes and all pockets, and is always open for free inspection. You are cordially invited to pay us a visit, and we shall be pleased to give advice and quotations if desired, to help you in furnishing your home in the best, most comfortable, and at the same time-, most economical manner. CARDIFF, SWANSEA, and— BEYAN 'T COMPI LTD WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS! Immense Selection of Everything Required for COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHING w y*' Every Article Warranted, and all Goods sold at the lowest Penny consistent with Reliable Quality. Delivery Free to Bridgend and District, and the Train Fares of Cash Customers paid. Pianofortes far Below the usual Music Warehonse Prices i Throughout SOUTH WALES.

3CM ONE HOUR OF GLORIOUS LIFE I

^3—CM— "ONE HOUR OF GLORIOUS LIFE." I GILFACH MINISTER'S BROTHER IN THE I' "GREAT PUSH." Rev. Emlyn Macdonald, Congregational mini- ster at Gilfach Goch, sends us the following in- teresting letter from his brother, Pte. A. Mac- donold, who was in the Great Push" I see from the papers that the recent fighting out here is being referred to as The Great Push," and well it may. + has indeed been a great time, and the first week of July, 1916. will long live in my memory. As you know, one poet sang somewhere :— One crowded hour of glorious life Is better than an age without a name." Well, the boys who have been, and are, in the advance now taking place on one part of the Western Front have had many such hours. We have heard a bombardment the like of which has never been heard before, not even, I feel sure, at Verdun., Many bf the German pri- soners we have made say themselves that the Verdun bombardment was not to be compared to it. Then we have been in close contact with the enemy from day to day-, and found ourselves his equals, and, in most cases, his superiors, both in nerve and resource. To be fair even to the Hun, I must say that there was one regi- ment of his that fought exceedingly hard. In one case when the hostile bombers had run short of bombs, they took to throwing bricks, pieces of iron or wood, and anything that would serve as a missile. This regiment fought well, but ultimately it had to give way, leaving be- hind many dead. Some of the enemv't. regi- ments, however, surrendered practically in a body, due, probably, to the shattering effects of the heavy bombardment our big guns gave them. I only trust that the Germans will treat any British prisoners they might make as humanely as our fellows treat theirs. Only last Saturday I saw a wounded German being dressed, and then carried down the trenches on a stretcher to one of our dressing stations by four of our chaps. ",1. am, afraid that Fritz Would not take that trouble with any wounded Tommy. THE ATTACK BEGINS. As you will know from the papers, the attack began on Saturday morning, July 1st. We got into action early on Sunday morning. Many people ask how one feels when in an attack. Regarding my own feelings, I may say that it is far from easy to describe them. When we first got over the top we all ran forward toward s the enemy's first line as fast as we could. By my $ide ran a young chap with whom I have been on very friendly terms all the time we have been in France. We got about fifty yards when he was knocked over. I hadn't time to stop to help him in any way, even if I had been allowed to do so. I just managed to tell him to look after himself, and the next I heard of him was that he had managed to hobble to the First Aid Post. He had been wounded by two machine gun bullets in the right leg. After passing him I had about another fifty yards to go, which I managed to do without being hit. The dominant idea in my mind during the run was to get over to the opposing lines as soon as possible. I had no time to think of anything else. After taking the first line our subse- quent advance was done chiefly by means of bomb throwing down the trenches. Regarding the share of our Brigade in the advance, I might say that our Divisional General has com- plimented us on the manner we carried it out, saying that he felt sure no regular troops could have fought any better. 7n, A HUMAN TOUCH. At a time like this, you will quite understand that many interesting human incidents are tak- ing place if one could only have the time to ob- serve them all. I haven't space to tell you of them all, but there is one about which I must write. At the time I am thinking of we were = being relieved after some very trying days. On the way back to our own lines we naturally passed many of our own dead. In one place We passed a poor chap lying dead in a small shell-hole. He was lying on his side, while in his hand he had an open Testament. The con- clusion to which we naturally came was that he had been reading the Book as' he was dying. I only wish I had gone to see at what chapter the Testament was opened, but at the time I. like everybody else, was too tired to do more than walk to our original lines. Before closing I would like to tell you a little about the German trenches. Everything in them is evidence that the enemy intended to be as sale and as comfortable as possible. All his, dug-outs, and there were many, were deep arfd roomy. Most of them were provided with 6toves and tables, while many had electric lights and speaking tubes. The machine gun emplacements and snipers' posts were exceed- Ingly strong and well covered, while the trenches themselves were exceptionally deep. In short, all that men could do to make trenches difficult to take, the Germans had done. but, owing to the close co-operation of our artillery and infantry, a great breach in these formidable lines has been made. The artillery did very well in levelling the enemy's, barbed wire, which helped our attack very much. Speaking of the German dug-outs, I might say .that in them we (Continued on Bottom of Next Column.)

3CM ONE HOUR OF GLORIOUS LIFE I

(Continued from Last Column). I found quite a number of spiked and ornamented helmets carefully wrapped in paper, clearly showing that they were kept chiefly for wearing when out of the trenches, probably with the idea of impressing the French and Belgian civilians behind the enemy's lines. In some of the dug-outs we also found whips. We had often heard of these before, but had never be- lieved .that the Germans used them. But having seen them for ourselves, we are forced to believe that whips are usfed as instruments of discipline in the German Army. They were cruel-looking things, real cat-o' -nine-tails.

PONTYCYMMER SENSATION I

PONTYCYMMER SENSATION. I MYSTERICU? HAPPENINGS. I SINGLE WOMAN'S PREDICAMENT. At an inquest which Mr. S. H. Stock wood (coroner for the Manor of Ogmore), held on Tuesday evening at the Institute, Pontycym- mer, sensational evidence was given, and tra- gic incidents disclosed. It was an inquiry into the circumstances of the death of Francis Williams, aged 20, a single woman. The Coroner, in opening, explained that the circumstances were unusua1, and many sen- sational rumours were afloat. He exhorted the jury, however, to pay no heed to those rumours, but to listen only to the evidence. At the same time, if any juryman knew any- thing it would' be his duty to bring it forward, so that it might be publicly investigated. Mrs. Francis Booker, Thornton Crescent, Pontycymmer, mother of deceased, said her daughter was in service at Maesteg until Saturday, the 5th inst. On Friday last her daughter, who seemed in her usual health, went out of the house about 5-30 p.m., with- out telling witness where she was going. About 10 p.m. her daughter was brought home by a young man, named Emlyn Edwards. She appeared to be very ill, her clothes were disarranged, and she had no shoes or hat on. She tolcf witness that she had been taken ill at Llangeinor, and that "Garfild James un- did my clothing because I could not breathe." Her daughter added, "Don't bla.ue him, be- cause he told me not to -do it" Witness asked her what she meant and she replied, '•Not tight lace myself, as he would see me out of my trouble all right. Deceased added that she had taken "some stuff" which she had procured in Maesteg. Witness did not know that she was in troub'e. The girl was then attended by a doctor but died the follow- ing morning. Mrs. Minnie Pantoll, sister of the deceased, said that her sister tol. r tÀtit "Garfield" was the cause of the trouble, and that she was going to see him at Llangeinor last Frday. Emlyn Edwards, collier, who brought the girl home, said that. on Friday night about 0-45 he was in Llest Road, Pontyrhil, when Garfield James came along in a motor van and called him. On the seat alongside James was the young girl with her hat off and her clothes open. James &a-,d, "I want your assi- tance to take the girl home." Witness asked what was the matter with her, and he replied, "Tight lacing and eating something." Witness rode on with them, and then carried the girl into her house, as she seemed very ill and was vomiting. Garfield James, a baker, Meadow Street, Poutycymmer, said that on Friday he was de- livering bread from a motor van at Llan- geinor, and met the deceased, who stopped him, and said she was very ill, and asked him to take her .home in the van. Her hat was off, and her shoes came off in the van. He did not meet her by appointment. He de- nied that he was responsible for the girl's trouble. He had had absolutely nothing to do with her for about 12 months. The wit- ness explained to the Coroner that he reached Llangeinor at 9 or a quarter to 9, and served customers on the way, and he did not him- self take the girl home, fearing that such a step would not have been advisable, and that his position might have been misunderstood. Thomas Thomas, coliier, Mount Pleasant, Llangeinor, gave evidence to the effect that .he saw the young woman taken into Garfield James' car, by Llangeinor Village, some time before 8 o'clock, and that she appeared to be there by appointment. Finally, the inquiry was adjourned for a fortnight in order that in the meanwhile the contents of deceased's stomach might be sent to the Home Office analyst for examination.

PANTYGOG SOLDIER WOUNDED I

PANTYGOG SOLDIER WOUNDED. I Mrs. E. Goss, Cuckoo Street, Pantygog, Pontycymmer, has received information that her husband, Driver H. Goss, R.F .A., has been wounded in the head and hand through the bursting of a shell, and is now lying at Ford Hospital, Devonport, and is progress- ing favourably. Driver Goss has informed his wife that whilst placing his hand over his head to protect it as much as possible, he lost a finger, and that his horse was killed under him.

TRAGEDY OF DRINK

TRAGEDY OF DRINK. 11 BLAENGARW MAN FOUND DEAD INL-A HELD. f Mr. S. H. Stockwood, coroner, held an in- quest at the Workmen's Hall, Blaengarw, on Saturday, into the death of Thomas John, ostler, Blaengarw, whose body was found in a field on Tymynwr Farm, Blaengarw, two days previously. The first witness cabled was Jenkin Rees Davies, miner,1 King Edward Street, Blaen- garw, who said that deceased lodged with his (witness's) mother. Deceased was an ostler at the Ocean Colliery, and was a widower. He was 54 years of age, and he had lived in Blaengarw for the last 20 years. He was un- fortunately given to drink. Witness last saw him on Monday night, when he was not sober. He had in fact been drinking heavily for some time past. Three weeks or so before an accu- mulation of bonus had come to him, and he had not been sober since. Richard Jones, farm labourer, said deceased had put in a little work at Tymynwr Farm "in the hay." Witness saw him on the day in question sitting under a hedge in a field on the farm'; he was then not sober, but he (witness) did not see him drinking. About 8 o'clock next morning he saw him in the same place, lying down. Witness summoned Mr. Price, the farmer, who at once came, and pronounced the man dead, and went for the police. George Price, farmer, Tymynwr Farm, agreed with the last witness, that John was slightly drunk on Wednesday, when he worked for about an hour in witness's hay. On Thursday the man was "middling sober," and had dinner at the farm; but did not work at all that day. After dinner he told witness he was going to sit down in a field. Corroborating the evidence of the previous witness as to the fiending of. the body, Mr. Price .said deceased was lying on his side. When P.&. Watts came, they examined the place to- gether, and found a bottle (produced) labelled "Irish Whiskey," and having in it some white powder, and by it a packet with a red label marked "Salts of Lemon—poisonous, not to be taken," with the name of the che- mist on. Deceased had slept in witness's house on the Wednesday night. He was as cheerful as usual on Wednesday and Thurs- day. P.S. G. W. Watts, giving corroborative evi- dence described the position of the body, which he subsequently conveyed to the man's lodgings in King Edward Street. In the pockets of the clothes he found a 2s. piece, two 3d. pieces, and 3d. in coppers; a watch and chain; a pipe and tobacco box, and -a handkerchief. Witness had known the man for the last three years. He was often soaked 1 in drink. From inquiries made he found that deceased had bought whiskey in various places. Six empty whiskey bottles were found in the kitchen of his lodgings. Dr. Frederick John Rees giving medical evi- dence, said deceased must have died between nine and ten on Thursday night. The cause of death was oxalate poisoning, accelerated by alcohol. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, adding that there was no evidence to show whether the poison had been taken intentionally or accidentally.

PONTYCYMMER SOLDIER KILLED IN I ACTIONI

PONTYCYMMER SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION. Mr. and Mrs. E. Shakespear, Oxford Street, Pontycymmer, heve received official informa- tion that their son, Private Richard Shake- spear, Cardiff City Battalion, Welsh Regi- ment, was "killed in action" on the 7th July, in France-place not stated. He joined the army soon after the outbreak of war, and served in France about four months. He was 23 years of age, and prior to enlistment worked on the coke ovens at the Ffaldau Col- liery, Pontycymmer. Another son, Private Harry Shakespear, Swansea Battalion, is now at Kinmel Park, Rhyl, recovering from the effects of bad shell shock. Much sympathy is extendied to the bereaved parents, who have received the following letter from 2nd Lieut. W. J. Richards:— "I very much regret to have to inform you that your son was severely wounded in action on July 7th, and died shortly afterwards. He was a.t first reported missing, but news has just reached me that his body has been found and buried by another battalion."

Advertising

INN ¡,' full õf ,¡.!I Subtle Delicacy AdveJtiae in the Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.

WEDDING AT PONTYCYMMER I I

WEDDING AT PONTYCYMMER. I HIBBET-LLEWELL YN. A pretty wedding took place at St. Theo- dores' Church, Pontycymmer, on Monday morning, the contracting parties being Mr. W. J, Hibbet (G.W.R. signalman, Blaengarw), and Miss Sa-rah Llewellyn, Pretoria Street, Blaengarw. The bride, who was given away by her grandfather, Mr. David Llewellyn, was attended Ly Miss Mary Ann Lloyd as brides- maid. The best man was Mr. Robert Hibbet (brother of thel bridegroom), and Mr. D. Howells was present. The officiating clergy were the Revs. John Davies, curate of St. James,' Blaengarw, and J. D. Morgan, Ponty- cymmer. After the ceremony a reception was held at the house of the bride, after which the happy pair left for Cullhamption, Devon, where the honeymoon is being spent.

SUNDAY TRAINS FOR THE VALLEYS I

SUNDAY TRAINS FOR THE VALLEYS. To the Editor. Sir.—Will you kindly grant me a little space in your valuable paper to express my views on the above question. I have very good reason to know that my views expresed here are held by a large number of my feliow- workmea. I have had the following idea in my mind for some time, viz., that the Miners' Agents representing the three valleys, Messrs. Vernon Hartshorn, J.P., Maesteg; F. Hodges, Garw; and T. Lucua, J.P., Ogmore, should make personal representations to the Home Secre- tary and ask him to grant the privilege of a Sunday train. There is-certainly no need for me to suggest the numerous sound reasons that could be put forward by these gentlemen in favour of running such a train. There is no doubt it -would be a boon to the workers. With all bank holidays stopped, colliery workers have no opportunity of getting away from the valleys for a single day. If a train were run to the valleys from Bridgend on Sunday evenings it would enable many to get away on Saturday afternoon and return Sunday without affecting the output at the various collieries. Our leaders, since the outbreak of war, have been impressing upon us the necessity of constant and regular work if we are to ensure a 'continuous and sufficient supply of shells for our gallant comrades at the front. I think on the whole the miners have "stuck to their guns" well, and the running of an "up and down" train on Sundays would be a concession that would certainly be appre- ciated by them. If any persons are at pre- sent in the good graces of the Coalition Government, I should say our Miners' leaders are—and the present would be a favourable time to appeal to the Government on behalf of the miners. Trains could be run from the Rhondda on Sundays—"specials" from Cardiff, say- to Porthcawl, enabling hundreds to enjoy a breath of sea air. Then Bridgend, happening to be situated on the main line, has its re- gular service of trains. Surely the miners of the three valleys are deserving of a little consideration. If they are expected to de- scend to the bowels of the earth it is unfair that on the one day of the week they can caN thei,r own they are to be caged in their own towns like interned prisoners! Finally I should like to remind all that the drink question, which was a strong argument used during the Sunday half-day trips to Porthcawl from the valleys, can now be placed on the shelf. The Restriction Act covers that argument completely. I hope this will meet with the approval of our patriotic leaders, who can at an early date convene mass meetings in the three val- leys on the question, and ascertain the feel- ings of their fellow wor' men on the question. I feel confident they would be successful. I am, myself, one of those who will benefit in health from an occasional trip to the seaside, and I know and can speak on behalf of hun- dreds who could leave the valley to visit re- latives without losing work.— Yours, etc. "REGULAR WORKER." I

MINERS PRESIDENT POINTS THE ONLY WAY

MINERS' PRESIDENT POINTS THE ONLY WAY. Mr. Smillie, the miners' president, sueaking at Bellshill, near Glasgow, advised the Scottish miners to forego the idle Saturday, and as- sured them that until they did everything to maintain the required output of coal they could not successfully stave off the suspension of the Eight Hours Act or the lowering of the age standard for boys entering mines. Mean- while the miners' officials would follow up every increase demanded on the price of coal, I, and they were shortly demanding a further in- crease in wages.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.

1 Garw Gleanings

1 *##*#♦* Garw Gleanings; (By LLOFFWR ARALL) We are delighted to inform our readers that Pte. Luther Stephens, R-.W.F. (Lloffwr), is now on furlough at Felinf-his native heath. 1 1 1 After twelve months in France, he is very fortunate to come home without a scratch. May he enjoy his well-earned rest. I I I We regret to learn that Pte. Richard Shakespeare, Cardiff City Battalion, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Shakespeare, Oxford Street, • Pontvcymmer, has been killed in action. .11 Another son, Pte. Harry Shakespeare, Swansea Battalion, has been suffering from shell-shock, but is now recuperating at Kin- mel Park. nil Mr. D. Rowlands, Pontycymmer, is to be congratulated upon being appointed superin- tendent of the Britannic Assurance Company for the Maesteg district. We hope all the Garw farmers had their hay in before the stormy weather commenced •—if not, they deserve to suffer. Who were the couple seen choosing rings outside a jeweller's window? 111 We hope no purchase was made, or their proper partners might be annoyed. Ill A motor car, containing papers, stopped suddenly outside a business premises on Sun- dav. 111 We learn there was "some" row, and that the "law" soon decided in the motorist's favour—so he stayed! Ill Two children had a very narrow escape from drowning last week at Garw Vechan. Ill Let us hope this will be a warning to par- ents to guard against their children roaming about alone. Ill No doubt many parents will be pleased to see the schools re-opening. Ill This is creditable to the school teachers, as all parents will agree that a certain amount of restraint is exercised during school hours. Ill Who were the party that lost their head- gear recently ? Ill Is it a fact that one declared he lost his through looking out from an express train, and another explained he lost his whilst rid- I ing in a motor car? 1 T 1 We are pleased to learn that the confused ideas of the party were soon explained by the trap driver! Ill Most miners worked the full Bank Holiday week, and earned the extra 6s. promised. I Ill We regret, however, that many lost the following Monday—just, we suppose, to make matters even. Ill We know them to be knuts-the real article—but they might have considered the present critical situation. Ill We congratulate Mr. D. J. Jones, of Bettws, upon winning the open solo competi- tion at Llanwrtyd Wells.

PONTYCYMMERI

PONTYCYMMER. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late. Mr. j Bert Best, aged 39 years, who lodged at 116 j Oxford Street, Pontycymmer, with Mr. andl Mrs. T. Bale, took place at the Pontycymmer Cemetery on Friday. Deceased met with a serious accident to his spine at the Glenavon Colliery, Blaengarw, on the 3rd inst., and succumbed to his injuries at the King Ed- ward VII. Hospital, Cardiff. He joined the Army soon after the outbreak of war, and after having served three months in France he was discharged a few months ago suffering from rheumatism and nervous debility. R-evs. J. Davies (Blaengarw) and J. D. Morgan (Pontycymmer) officiated at the funeral. The mourners were:—Mr. John Evans and daugh- ter (uncle and cousin) ;Mr. and Mrs. Priddle (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. T. Evans (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. H. Evans (cousins); Mr. W. Daniels and daughter (cousins) Mr. and Mrs. E. Nichols (cousins); Misses Connie and Eva Priddle (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. Bale, Mas- ters Alfred and Bertie and Miss Dorothy Bale, and Mr. W. J. Griffiths. Floral tributes were sent by: The Glenavon Colliery Work- men; Mr. and Mrs. Nichols; and Mr. and Mrs Bale and family.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." I If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot ho better. < < ,V I

11 OGMORB VALE

11 OGMORB VALE SANGUINE SOLDIER. —Congratulations to Mr. Dick Meyrick, of Walters Road, Og- more Vale, who has been promoted to Quarter- master-sergeant. He is now in Malta, and attached to the 8th Battalion, K.S.L.I. In a very cheerful letter to his mother he states that the war will soon be over. He also wishes to be remembered to all his friends in the Ogmore Valley. HOME ON SICK LEAVE.—The many friends of Private WT. Hoskings, of the 9th Regt., R.W.F., and of 4, Bryn Road, Ogmore Vale, will be sorry to hear that he is home on sick leave, suffering from heart disease. Private Hoskings, who is only 19 years of age, fought at the battle of Loos, on September 25th, 1915, and came through -without a scratch. We are pleased to announce that he is making good progress. DEATH OF MR. Dd. WILLIAMS.—We re- gret to announce the death of Mr. David Williams, son of Rev. Charles Williams, Calvinistic Methodist minister of Ogmore Vale. Deceased had been ailing for some time, and passed away at the Neath Sanitor- ium a short time ago. Mr. and Mrs. Williams lost a son who died in, France fighting for his king and country. Deep sympathy is felt for the family in their sad bereavement. ANOTHER LOCAL HERO.-Private Geo. Isaac (Dowie), of the Kings Shropshire Light Infantry, and son of Mrs. Isaac, of 28, Hill Street, Ogmore Vale, is lying at Edmonton Hospital seriously wounded, but we are pleased to announce that he is making satis- factory progress. Also, that he has been recommended for the Military Medal. "Dowie Isaac," as his many friends loved to call him, fought in the Boer War, and was a very popular footballer. He was wounded on July 15th at Mametz Wood- PRESENTATION.—A most interesting pre- sentation took place at the Non-Political Club and Institute, Ogmore Vale. The receipient was Mr. T. Biddies, steward of the institute, who is leaving to join the colours. During the time Mr. Biddies has been in- Ogmore Vale he has made himself exceedingly popu- lar, and the large company present wished him every success as a soldier. The presenta- tion consisted of a handsome marble clock, ward's genial wife, will still act as stewardess ward,s genial wife, will still act as stewardess of the club. WEDDING.—A pretty wedding took place on Tuesday at Bridgend. The contracting parties were Mr. Gwilym Kinsey, eldest son of Mr. Lewis Kinsey, of 13, Glyn Street, Ogmore Vale, and Miss Elizabeth H. Quick. eldest daughter of Mr. William Quick, High- land Place, Ogmore Vale. The bride was dressed in a navy costume, with a champagne coloured hat to match. The bridesmaids were Miss Lily Kinsey (sister of. the bride- groom), and Miss Edwina. Quick (sister of the bride). The bride was given away by her father. The best man was Mr. Fred Roberts, of Ogmore Vale. After the happy event, a reception was held at the bride's father's re- sidence. Mr. Gwilym Kinsey is yery popular in Ogmore Vale, and is a well-known baritone singer, and winner of many prizes. The large number of presents testified to the popularity of the bride and bridegroom.

SAD ACCIDENT AT GILFACH GOCH

SAD ACCIDENT AT GILFACH GOCH LADY HAY-MAKER'S FATAL FALL. On Monday evening of last week, Miss Annie Richards, of Cynffig Coffee Tavern, Gilfach Goch, met with a fatal accident whilst em- ployed at haymaking. Miss Richards fell off a waggon load of hay, pitching on her head and sustaining injuries to her head and neck. She was conscious to the last, and passed away at 4.30 the following (Tuesday) morning. Deceased was an orphan and a native of Llan- trisant, but had resided with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Grey, of the above address, for the last fifteen years. She was 34 years old. At the inquest on Wednesday, the verdict of the jury was "Accidental death." The funeral, which took place on Saturday, at Glynogwr, was well attended, deceased being well known and popular in the district. The chief mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Grey and family.

BLAENGARW

BLAENGARW. COLLIER'S DEATH.-Mr. W. L. Yorath held an inquiry into the, circumstances of the death of Bertie Best (39), collier, residing at Oxford Street, Blaengarw, who was injured by a fall of stone while at Blaengarw Colliery. He died at King Edward VII. Hospital, Cardiff, on Thursday from heart failure due to fracture of the spine. A verdict was returned accordingly.

I NANTYMOEL

I NANTYMOEL DEATH.-We regrat to record the deatfc of Mr. Domineco Luscardi, Ogwy Street, of the Italian firm of Moruzzi and Co. He was taken seriously ill a few days ago, and died on Monday night. He leaves a widow and four children to mourn their loss.