Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BRIDJEND POLICE COURT

BRIDJEND POLICE COURT,  :? Tl-, 1- I !< -1 ? i- ? 1). .3 ?' W. J. Lewis. DRUNK AND DISOUD1RLV David Jones (31), haulier, Aberkei-fig, charged with being drunk and disorderly in Angel Street, Bridgend, at 9-30 p.m., on Wed- nesday. P.C. Hurley spoke to finding Jones in Angel Street. He was very drunk and using bad language, and refused to go away when ordered. Prisoner said he was sorry. It WPS the first, time in his life that anything of this kind had happened to him. Mr. D. H. Lloyd: It would be a good thing if -it could be ascertained where the man was last served with drink. You are fined LJs. ABSENTEES. There were two absentees dealt with by the Court. The first was the case of Cyril Evans (24), charged with being an absentee from the 2nd Battalion Welsh Guards, since the 10th August. The second prisoner was Wm. Howell (31), charged with absenting himself from the 1st Battalion Worcester Regiment. Both men were remanded to await an escort. Howell made a statement to the Magistrates to the effect that his reason for not re-join- ing was that his ''little wife and three child- dren" were being constantly subjected to annoyance by a relative. "He won't leave her alone, and she's got no one to protect her when I'm away." Prisoner said he had only been back from France a month or so. The Magistrates requested the police to look into the man's statements, and if there was anything in them b take steps to protect the woman.

WE ARE NOT PROGERMANS

"WE ARE NOT PRO-GERMANS." MR. WINSTONE'S DEFENCE OF SOUTH WALES MINERS. A strong denial of the charges of pro-Ger- manism in the South Wales Miners' Federa- tion was made by the acting-president, Mr. James Winstone, J.P., at a meeting in the Rink, Merthyr, on Monday night to protest against the action of the local authorities in refusing to allow the use of the schools and buildings for the purpose of peace meetings. Mr. Wintone said he was sorry to find re- flections made upon the Welsh miners, and particularly upon some of them v. ho were I.L.P. men. He strongly resented the un- just, unfair, and untrue imputation. He knew the Welsh miner, and he knew the I.L.P., and these statements were made with- out bringing forth a tittle of evidence. But he would declare: "We are not pro-Germans. If you say that we are anti-war I will say yes, but if you say pro-German, no. Some of us know where it emanated from. Some of us know not what was paid, but we do know something was paid. To say that we are pro-Germans could only have emanated from a diseased mind-in the mind of some- one who has no more love for his country than I would have for a mad dog." The resolution of protep was carried un- animously.

MARVELLOUS SURGERY

MARVELLOUS SURGERY. SOME STAGGERING CASES. A Press Association correspondent describes an extraordinary operation performed at the Millbank Hospital. It was the case of a ,soldier wounded by shrapnel. The jagged piece of metal was seen to have come in con- tact with the heart. The pericardium was opened by the surgeon, and to avoid any movement of the chest air was forced in by the use of a comparatively new apparatus, a tube being inserted in the trachea. At a favourable moment there was an insinuation of the hand of the operator at the back of the heart, and the piece of shrapnel was carefully removed. A few years ago all this would have been thought impossible. Not the most skil- ful could have foretold the immediate result of interference with a foreign substance so placed, but the soldier, who might have been within a hair's breadth of death is now go- ing about in a perfect condition of health. Another case he refers to was of so astonish- ing a character that it becomes almost neces- sary to give an assurance of its absolute au- thenticity. One of our men was SQ wounded in the arm that he had four inches of nerve substance destroyed. The surgeon, by use of a telephone, found that in another London hospital amputation of a leg was about to take piace. By arrangement-time being all im- portant-the amputated limb was plunged into a saline bath, and removed as quickly as possible to the other hospital. This limb was instantly opened and a piece of healthy nerve transferred to the other patient's injured arm. In ansethegia a patient operated upon may now smoke a cigarette within a quarter of an hour of returning to consciousness, and feel no ill effects, even though he be kept on the operating table for a couple of hours. That & another advance since the war.

WORKERS PROTEST AGAINST FOODI PRICESI

WORKERS PROTEST AGAINST FOOD PRICES. The South Wales and Monmouthshire Rail- way Shopmen have passed the following re- wl-ution:- "That this conference emphatically protests against the action of the Govern- ment in permitting the South Wales coal- owners to increase the price of coal and we warn the Government that if it further re- -auires the "hearty cooperation of the workers of this country it should immediately take the necessary steps to reduce the prices of commo- dities generally."

PORT TALBOT POLICEMAN HONOURED I

PORT TALBOT POLICEMAN HONOURED. I In the list of the latest recipients of the Military Medal appears the name of Private A. H. West, Welsh Guards, who, previous to joining the army, was a police constable stationed at Port Talbot

AT ABERAYON SERIOUS CHARGE AT ABERAVON I I

  AT ABERA.YON SERIOUS CHARGE AT ABERAVON I I MISSING MONEY AND JEWELLERY I RECOVERED. I YOUNG MAN'S SUDDEN TEMPTATION. I FINED E10. At Aberavon yesterday (Thursday)—before Mr Charlh J Ollh (Chairman) and other Magis- trate-Williani Ivor Phillips (22), said to be re- spectably connected, and living in Llewellyn Street, was charged with breaking and entering 8 St. Mary Plac. Aberavon, between July 29th and August 12th, and stealirg money and other valuables of the total value of k20 10s. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas defended. Supt. Ben Evans explained that the occupier (Mrs. Gribben) went away for a fortnight's holi- day, securely fastening the windows and doors, and on her return she discovered an entry had been effected, and missed 27 10s. in Treasury notes, t5 10s. in half-crowns and two-shilling pieces, a sovereign, a lady's dress ring value 40s., a gentleman's gold albert chain value < £ 4 10s.— < £ 20 10s. in all. Mrs. Gribben (widow) was then called, and gave evidence. She said her daughter lived in apartments with her. They all left for a holi- day on July 29th, and before going she carefully fastened the windows And doors. They returned on Saturday last only to miss from her bedroom the money and articles of jewellery. The house was the same as when they left it, except for the front-room window, which was unfastened. Replying to Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, witness said she had known defendant for years. He had visited the house as a friend. She saw him about a week before July 29th. He and her son had always been friends, and were still on very friendly terms. He had slept in the house, and she had always regarded him as a nice, respectable young man. Witness's son (who was in the Army) had a motor cycle, and he wrote to defendant asking him to see to one of the wheels, which had got out of gear. The wheel was kept in the middle room, and was there still. Mrs. Brockensha, 4 High Street, daughter-in- law of the last witness, said the key of 8 St. Mary Place was handed to her, the arrange- ment being that she should visit the house from time to time, and forward her mother-in-law's letters. Witness's first visit to the house was on August 8th. The back door was then un- bolted on the inside.. She did not notice the front window. She bolted the door, and told her husband what she had seen. On several occasions she saw defendant. He spoke to her, and in Bank Holiday week asked who had the key of the house, and when were they coming home. Nothing was disturbed downstairs. Abra ham Lyons, Jeweller and pawnbroker, re- siding in Walter's Road, and carrying on busi- ness at 25 High Street, Swansea, deposed that defendant called at his shop on August 8th, and asked if he bought old gold. Witness asked him what he had, and he said, "A gold chain." Asked if it was his own property, he replied, Yes." "Why do you want to sell?" witness next enquired. To that he replied that he had really no further use for the chain, as he was "shortly joining up with the Army," and wanted to have a good time before he went. Witness gave 35s. for the chain, which was Ii ounces, and was 9-carat gold. The worth of the chain to him was X2. The retail price would be about £3 3s. Defendant signed the declara- tion, now read to the Court, in the name cf "William James, William Street, Aberdare." By the Supt.: No other entry of the transac- tion was made. It was not a pledge. Sergt. William Swaffield said that having re- ceived information of the robbery, he made en quiries into the case. Defendant, when first seen, said he "knew nothing at all about it." On visiting defendant's house, a search in his box revealed the Treasury notes, and the silver, and the gold ring produced. On being charged, he began to cry, and said, "I got in through the back door, which had not been properly fas- tened. On the day they left for their holidays I found the key of the drawer, and took the- money and noes, the sovereign, the lady's dress ring, and the gold albert. I lost the chain on my way home, through a hole in my trouser't; pocket. That's the God's truth." Later, ht expressed a desire for a further conversation, and explained where the gold albert really was. Accordingly, on the following day, witness ac companied him to Swansea, and recovered tlu chain from the last witness. tlO 10s. of the money had been recovered, leaving .£3 10s. miss- ing. Complainant (re-called), in answer to Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, said when she found defen-. dant was the culprit she felt sorry for him, and she had no desire to punish him. By the Supt.: When I returned I found the front-room window "catch" had been tampered with. Mr. Lewis M. Thomas, for the defence, sub- mitted that as. his client admitted taking the things, their Worships themselves might very well administer the law without putting the' county to the expense of sending the man for trial at the Swansea Assizes. After some argument, their Worship retired. After a protracted absence, they returned, and then the Chairman said they found there was not sufficient evidence to support the charge of breaking and entering, and therefore the charge would be reduced to "stealing and taking away." Mr. Lewis M. Thomas then mentioned some circumstances in support of his plea for leni- ency. As they had heard, complainant was ex- tremely sorry for the defendant, and took the view that she did not wish to have him dealt with severely. Also, defendant was a friend of the family, and they had been told that he was on visiting terms, and had slept on the premi- ses. The whole thing transpired very simply. The question was, how did defendant gain ad- mittance? His object was to get the cycle wheel, and once inside, the unfortunate thing Happened. Knowing the people were fafrly well-to-do, he ransacked the place, which was a mean thing to do, though there was no premedi- tation, and hitherto he had borne a good charac- ter, and was prepared to make reparation. The Chairman said they were sorry to see a young man likfc defendant taking advantage of a friend, especially a widow, and the Bench

AT ABERAYON SERIOUS CHARGE AT ABERAVON I I

(Continued from i^revions Column.) hoped these incidents would mark the turning- point In his history. Defendant would be fined £ 10, and given a month in which to pay, and they were pleased he had offered to make the money good.

I COWBlDiE SIFTINGS

I* COWB^lDiE SIFTINGS E OX" ? ?y VELOX. ") J The good qualities of some of us will never be known till all incredulous public rtads them on our tombstones, and then—well, 'nuff said. There are others, again, whose good qualities are so evident that there is no nee d to wait for a tomb-stone to break the news, as it were, in writing. In these notes I never have to resort to soft soap and whitewash. There- fore, in all sincerity, I can truly say that the Vicar's announcement on Sunday last was re- ceived with regret by all, whether inside or outside the fold. His genial presence, his earnestness in the work of his high calling, his resourcefulness, his ability to adapt himself to all circumstances, and his record of good and useful work, have won for him the good feel- ings of all. By his removal Newport will gain what "sleepy old Cowbridge" will lose. nil On Friday evening last it was my pleasure to visit the camp of the Ferndale Boy Scouts, and while watching them go through some of their movements, I could quite understand why so many of the boys are anxious to have a troop here, but who will lead them? We had a first-rate-troop here once—but, alas! duty has called some of the old leaders to the battlc- j fields of France and elsewhere. If there are eligible leaders left, will they help the Cow-. bridge boys to live up to the Scouts' motto, and Be Prepared"? 111 The Ferndale Scouts have promised to pay us another visit in larger numbers next year. They were delighted with their experience here, and we liked their company. They de- sire to thank all for the kindness shown to them, especially Mr. and Mrs. Owen, of Ash Hall; Mr. R. Thomas, Midland Bank; Coun- cillor W. L. Jenkins, Councillor D. Tilley, and Mr. A. G. James, and last, but not least, the Cowbridge Corporation for the free use of the Swimming Baths.

CWMAYON CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR IN COURT

CWMAYON CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR IN COURT. CASE ADJOURNED. At the Aberavon Police Court on Tuesday, before Mr. Wm. Jenkins (chairman), Major Gray and Percy J. Jacobs, Dan Morris, Cwm- avon, a conscientious objector, was charged with failing to join the army. The prisoner had been serving a term of imprisonment at Swansea goal on a charge of distributing literature which was held to be liable under the Defence of the Realm Act. Prisoner was released about three weeks ago, the warrant was +hen issued for his arrest. He did not return home un4-:1 Sunday morn- ing (a.m.). And on Monday night he was arrested by P.C. Cole. In reply to the charge he said he had nothing to say, except that he was a conscientious objector In the court prisoner asked leave to make a statement. He said that under the new Army Order, June 24th, a! conscientious ob- jectors were to be released to take their appeals to the Central Tribunal, and he asked that his case should be adjourned until his appeal had been heard. The Military representative said that the man was called up previous to the promulga- tion of the Army Order. Prisoner: All the men are going to be re- leased irrespective of the decision of previous tribunals. They were all deserter too. They did not give themselves up willingly. The Military Representative: This man has been out of prison for three weeks, during which time he has been evading the police. The prisoner explained that he had been ill while in goal, and went down to Pembroke- shire to recuperate in preparation for the trials he anticipated having to go through. The Military representative asked for an adjournment until next Monday, when the Hon. F. C. Bailey, Cardiff, would be present to conduct the prosecution on behalf of the I Military. The Bench agreed to this, and prisoner was I bound over.

ABERAYON POLICE COURT

ABERAYON POLICE COURT. I Thursday (yesterday).—Before: Mr. Chas. Jones (in the chair), Messrs. W. J. Williams, John Phillips. EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES. A lad named Daniel Morgan, hailing from Treboth, near Swansea, was charged with work- .ing a horse in an unfit state on August 8th. P.C. John Fitzpatrick (Port Talbot) said he was in High Street, Aberavon, and saw the horse attached to a waggonette. In the wag- gonette were 8 people. The horse was lame, suffering from a wound on the left hind leg near the fetlock. Defendant, questioned, said he hadn't noticed anything was the matter until he was at Neath. Inspector Lindsay (R.S.P.C.A.) said the in- jury from which the horse suffered was caused through the animal kicking a fortnight ago. The Inspector and the Superintendent confirmed the story of the lad's employer that on this par- ticular morning he (the employer) was injured in the stable, and being laid up after the acci- dent, was not cognisant of the horse's condition when taken out by defendant. Under these circumstances, the fine was 5s. only.

No title

Sergeant W. C. Bearer, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Beazer, Company Street, Resolven. He enlisted in the Grenadier Guards at the commencement of hostilities, and was one of the first to transfer to the We!sh Guards when the regiment was formed. Sergeant Beazer was in the police force for a number of years, and was last stationed at Maesteg. He had previously worked as a miner at Resolven.

THE HUMAN ELEMENT IN i FACTORIES I

THE HUMAN ELEMENT IN FACTORIES. i ELIMINATING DISCOMFORT AND DiS- CONTENT. 'I WELFARE SUPERVISORS AND THEIR DUTIES. I By B. SEEBOHM ROWNTREE. I II. I In my last article I discussed very briefly the question of improving factory conditions I in general. I want to say something about the work of welfare supervisors. I Employers hardly recognise the importance of a girl's first introduction to our factories. It i..ay make all the difference if, instead of being hurriedly engaged by a foreman, her first interview is with the welfare supervisor. The latter, after ascertaining her qualifica- tions, and deciding to recommend her for em- ployment, can have a talk with her about her future, and try to interest her in it, making her feel both that the firm intends to do "the square thing" by her, and that she must do "the square thing" by the firm. After this, for a time at least, the welfare supervisor should keep closely in touch with the new- comer, visiting her at the end of a day or two to see how she is getting on, and enquiring whether she has any difficulty that caft be re- moved, and after this paying her periodical visits so long as may be necessary. If the welfare supervisor has the right personality, this will make the girl feel from the start that she has a friend in the factory, who cares for her individually, who not only wants her to "make good," but will help her to the utmost of her power. Great care must, of course, be taken in the selection of the supervisor. She should have a real love for girls, and be methodical and of business-like habits, and she should in the best sense of the word be a lady. The term is no doubt ambiguous, but it does connote certain qualities of tact, gentleness and honour, and a dignity seldom asserted and seldom chal- lenged. For it will be her business to keep in touch with all the girls under her charge. They should feel that she is their friend. One of the great difficulties in even the best organised establishments is to secure perfect justice in the treatment of every worker. Although the general rules may be perfectly fair and reasonable, there must alway, be a few excep- tional cases in which a worker may have a real grievance. Yet it may be-impossible for her to put the point to her over-looker. On the other hand she will not be afraid to explain her particular grievance to a sympathetic wel- fare supervisor. By this means the manage- ment may frequently gain information as to those petty tyrannies and the like, which oc- cassionally lower the efficiency of a workroom in apparently mysterious fashion, and which cause a great deal of unnecessary discomfort and even misery to the workers. There is a rule, I believe, at a certain fac- tory in America that no worker may start in the morning if she has any grievance or cause of irritation against the management. The employee who suffers under a sense of injury will never be able to do herself justice, argue the management. Consequently, any such grievances are cleared up first thing in the morning, before the operative starts work. There are a number of causes which may adversely affect the happiness and the effi- ciency of women workers, which a welfare supervisor can remove. For instance, a girl may be worried by ill-health at home. This worry will prevent her from attaining her nor- mal output. But a chat with the welfare supervisor will often lead to some means being found for relieving the strain upon the girl's mind. This may take the form of a sugges- tion from the supervisor that the firm might make a small advance to meet the abnormal expenses of the household, if the case proves to be genuine. On the other hand, the mere fact that someone at the works has sympath- ised with the girl about her home trouble will make her feel herself about to be a member of the factory family. It would be difficult to enumerate all the direct and indirect influences which such a worker exercises over a factory. But one thing is certain. Her work not only in- creases the happiness, health and efficiency of girh under her charge, but it tends to attract a better type of worker. Many employers can show "how they have been able to obtain girls with better education, and from better homes, through the work of welfare super- visors at the factory. Now, rough, unskilled labour is seldom economical in the long run. And everything that tends to increase the per- sonal responsibility and the efficiency of em- ployees will help to give him a higher rate of output. A good illustration of the "advantage of treating employees individually instead of in the mass is in the means adopted to reduce the amount *>f broken time, and this is work in which a welfare supervisor may be of great assistance. The following effective way of keeping a grip on the time broken by individuals has been adopted in a large factory with excel- lent results. An attendance chart was ar- ranged on which is entered each day every ab- sentee. In the "first column the worker's number is written, in the second her name, and against each name in a square is allowed for each day of the week. If a girl is away in the morning without any reason being given, the fact is recorded by a heavy full stop in the extreme top left-hand corner of the square allocated to that day. If she is away in the afternoon a similar dot is placed in the bottom right-hand corner. Should the reason for her absence prove to be un- avoidable, e.g., ill-health, the dot is trans- formed into a cross, which represents an un- avoidable absence as distinct from unjustifi- able time-breaking. Now by looking at a chart of this sort, which extends on each page .for three months, it is possible to see at a glance— (a) Which girls are keeping bad time. (b) What departments are keeping bad I time. (c) Whether time is frequently broken on any particular day, e.g., Saturday or Monday. In the case of girls, this chart should either be prepared in the welfare supervisor's office- the necessary facts being supplied daily by the time office-or if prepared elsewKere should be sent to the welfare supervisor at least once a week. It then becomes her busi- ness to take up the matter with any employee who is keeping bad time, and to find out what the real cause is, and seek to remedy it. The cause for keeping bad time usually falls under one of the following headings:— (a) A specific illness, such as scarlet fever, which may keep a girl away for several weeks. (b) Occasional illness, which may show that the girl's general state of health is poor. (c) Slackness, which may be caused by either dislike of or distate for the work. (d) Possible demands of parents that the girl shall do housework at certain times. It is obvious that these causes cannot be re- medied in any wholesale way, nor can bad time-keeping be effectively dealt with by severe disciplinary regulations. It is worth the employer's while to treat each case indi- vidually, and this can best be done by wel- fare supervisors. This is much more effec- tive than to send a clerk or a busy foreman concerned with a multitude of other matters to interview a girl who has broken time. If a tactful woman asks the girl quietly just why it is that she is breaking time, she will often get an illuminating answer. If the girl is aneemic or otherwise unwell, she can encour- age her to adopt health rules that will make her stronger. If she is merely wearied by the monotony of the work, she can try and interest her in it. In any case, she can get a personal approach to the girl, who knows that although the welfare supervisor is an em- ployee of the firm, she is not in the usual sense I "in league with the management." By con- stant care a good welfare supervisor is able materially to reduce the amount of broken time. A point that arises in appointing a welfare supervisor is, of course, the cost of such an officer. But this expenditure should be consi- dered not merely as an additional outlay, but as a legitimate expense for improving the com- fort and efficiency of the staff. A small firm can generally secure a suitably trained person for L2 per week. Larger firms should pay. from C3 to R5 per week, if they desire a. worker conversant with all the subtle difficul- ties that arise in handling large numbeVs of women. If there are 500 girls working in a fac- tory, and the management pay P,150 per year for such a supervisor, she is costing the firm less than lia. per worker per week. If the average rate of wages is 12s. per week, the supervisor is costing the firm; 1 per cent. of the annual wages bill. If they are paying their girls an average of £1 per week, she will only cost 0.6 per cent. of bhe wages bill. If, as a result of a more contented personnel, each girl does not produce far more than lid. of extra output per week, then something is very much amiss. It is certain that such an officer is an economy in every sense of the word. She saves the manager from worry- ing over the thousand and one points that can be dealt with by women far better than by the best business man. Consequently, she frees the executives for more important work. It is clear that the whole success of welfare supervision -will depend upon two things— firstly, the employer's recognition of its im- portance; and, secondly, the personality of the welfare supervisor. It is not easy to find the right woman for this work. The Welfare Department of the Ministry of Munitions has prepared a panel of ladies qualified to under- take it, with a view to help all employers en- gaged in munition factories to meet with suit- able workers. After more than 20 years' experience of wel- fare supervision in my own factory, I am thoroughly convinced of the wisdom of appoint- ing welfare supervisors where large numbers of girls are employed. They not only pro- mote the well-being, the health and efficiency of the girls, but they save the management an enormous amount of trouble. And it must be ?remembered that an increase of efficiency is important not only to employers, but also to the workers; for there cannot be progressive improvement in wages unless there is progres- sive improvement in methods of production.

I I SOUTH WALES AND NATIONAL INSURANCE

I SOUTH WALES AND NATIONAL INSURANCE. I PRESENT RATE FOR MINERS SAID TO BE TOTALLY INADEQUATE. The Commission appointed by the Faculty of Insurance to inquire into the position of Na- tional Health Insurance again sat at the House of Commons on Wednesday. I Mr. E. B. Nathan, a member of the Commis- sion, stated that there were a large number of I' approved societies whose membership consisted almost exclusively of coal-miners. For such so- cieties the flat-rate of contribution was too low, and the initial reserves were quite inadequate. Such reserves and contributions assumed that less than 9 per cent. of the members were en- gaged in coal-mining, whereas, in fact, the whole membership were so engaged. He sug- gested there were about twenty societies whose membership was made up almost entirely of hazardous or semi-hazardous occupations. He thought the membership of such societies must exceed one million insured males. More than one-third of all the societies ap- proved by the Welsh Insurance Commission ap- peared to reserve their membership to coal- miners and similar hazardous callings. The cost of sickness in Wales was far higher than that of any other part of the United Kingdom. All these societies must, under the present con- ditions, be in a normal condition of deficiency at every valuation. The problem was a diffi- cult one, and involved a redistribution of the present resources rather than the introduction of further additional money. It could not be adequately tackled until the position was more or less disclosed by a first valuation. The Commission was adjourned.

ABERAYON TOWN COUNCIL

ABERAYON TOWN COUNCIL. -»■ » I LADY HEALTH VISiTOR APPOINTED. NO MOTOR SERVICE TO KENFIG YET. ihe Aberavon Town Council met on Wednes- day, the Mayor (Mr. Pcrcy J. Jacob), presid- ing. The Medical Officer reported that during July, 31 births and 13 deaths had been re- gistered, equivalent to a birth-rate of 28.6, and a death-rate of 12 per 1,009 respectively. It was unanimously resolved to appoint MLss Annie Jones, Lewis Gt., Pontrhydyfen, as Medical Health Visitor, at a salary of £100, and i-'o expenses, per annum. A YON VALE WELL. Ine Manager of the Waterworks reported that the engines had been installed and tried at the Avonvale Well, and that the pumps were able to raise 16,000 gallons an hour. It was resolved to keep the pumps working from i 10 p.m. until 5 a.m., the water to be pumped i direct to the reservoir. I -N-"OTOR SE?-V MOTOR SERVICE TO KENFIG. The S.W. Transport Company, Ltd., wrote to the Council stating their inability, owing to shortage of petrol, to run a motor service to Kenfig Hill, but added that when matters became normal the question would be con- idered. The Town Clerk reported that the question of the Shops Act (1912), had now been settled, and the Order would be advertised simultane- ously with these of the Margam and Giyn- I corrwg Councils.

I PRESENTATION AT TAIBACH TINPLATE WORKS

I PRESENTATION AT TAIBACH TINPLATE WORKS. I CHIEF CLERK HONOURED. I A presentation was held at Taibach this week to present Mr. William George, chief clerk at the Taibach Tinplate Works, with a Marble clock (subscribed for by :the members or the Dockers Union at the Taibach Tinplate Works), and inscribed "To Mr. Wm. George, on the occasion of his marriage, June 10th, 1916. Councillor William Lewis presided, support- ed by Messrs. Dd. Morris, Wm. George, W. Davies, and a very pleasant evening was spent. The Chairman, in making the presen- tation, made eulogistic references to the re- cipients career. Mr. George suitably re- sponded, and Messrs. Jas. Sutton, William I Davies, David Thomas, James Cassidy, also spoke. An excellent programme was rendered by the following friends: R. W. IIarry (songs) R. Williams (recitation); T. Davies (recita- tion) Wm. Davies and Dd. Sees (duet). A vote of thanks was passed to the Chair- a.nd the meeting concluded with the National Anthem.

IMAESTEG PARTYS SUCCESSFUL ICONCERTS

I MAESTEG PARTY'S SUCCESSFUL CONCERTS AT.WESTON SUPER-MARE. While a number of Maesteg people were spending their holidays during last week at Weston, someone suggested that they should gather together on the sea front and hold con- certs, the proceeds (if any) to go to the wounded soldiers at the Weston Military Hos- pital. The idea was taken up immediately, as is usual with Maesteg people-particularly when the proceeds are for such a good cause. Even- tually two very succesful concerts were held- on Wednesday and Friday evening respec- tively. Ihe Choir, which was chiefly com- posed of Maesteg people, was under the able conductorship of Mr. Obadiah Roberts, Bank Street, Maesteg, to whom great credit is due for the masterly style in which he wielded the baton at so short a notice. Among the chief items given were a spirited rendering by Mr. Thomas Birch, the Maesteg baritone, of "The Veteran," which was followed by Mr. Reuben Phillips with his wonderful imitation of the gramaphone and his rendering of "Blue Eyes." Mr. William Richards (Maesteg) then followed with a solo. Miss Beatrice Rees, the renowned Maesteg contralto, delighted the- audience with Boys in Khaki," and Mr. W. M. Thomas gave The Vacant Chair." The choir sang beautifully, the pieces rendered being: "The Martyrs," Crusaders," Tyrol," Abide with Me," "Hen wlad fy nhadau," and "Aberystwyth." At the close, Mr. Obadiah Roberts, on behalf of the choir, addressed the audience, and thanked them for the splendid way in which they had contributed to the collection. He was pleased to state that they would be able to hand to the wounded sol- diers the handsome sum of R20 18s. 6d. (Loud applause.)

ISOLDIERS TRAGIC DEATH IN A TRAIN

I SOLDIER'S TRAGIC DEATH IN A TRAIN. A tragic incident occurred in the 11-35 train, which, yesterday (Thursday) morning, was conveying a large body of soldiers from Pembroke Dock to Cardiff. Eetween Neath and Port Talbot, Arthur Geo. Evans (23) 3rd Kings Rifles, presumably unmarried, who had been some months in the military hospi- tal, and was being transferred to the 3rd Western General Hospital, Cardiff, developed serious symptoms. Lance Corporal. Davidwn noticed that the man had changed colour, and on reaching Port Talbot it was found that he was dead. Deceased was a native of Cadox- ton, Barry.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette. If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED by the CENTRAl. GLAMOBSII PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY, LTD., at the GLAMORGAN GAZETTE" OHICK, Qu- STBEET, BRJDGEND, GLAMORGAN. FRIDAY, AUGUST 18th, 1916. H