Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BAPTIST UNION AT POTTYCYMMEs I CONTINUED PAGE 3 I

BAPTIST UNION AT POTTYCYMMEs (CONTINUED PAGE 3.) WEDNESDAY'S CO.\F £ fl JCE. RETIRING PRESIDENT'S STIRRi.MG ADDRESS. The feature cf Wedn-fsday's proceedings of the Welsh Baptists at Pontycymmer wa a rousing address to the delegates by Mr. Evan Owen, J.P., Cardiff, the retiring President. Dealing with the question of "The Resources of the Deno^ni ration," Mr. Owen asked whether, in view of the great cry fop unity 11 among the churches. Baptists could justiiv tne continuance of their distinctive principles? Answering his own question, the speaker said he had no doubt that it was the duty of the true Baptist to adhere more strongly than ever to the distinctive principles which had been guarded with such jealousy by their fore- fathers. (Hear, hear.) To accomplish this it was necessary for the denomination not only to continue working on the old lines, but to make every effort to discover new methods for the advocacy of those distinctive principles. (Applause.) One effective means of doing this would be through improvement of the denomi- national colleges. (Hear, hear.) Up to the present some 1,200 students had been edu- cated at their institutions, and the spiritual work had been very marked throughout the Principality and in many places across the border. (Hear, hear.) He pleaded for better financial support for these institutions, point- ing out that what was now being ione was very inadequate and scarcely creditable to the denomination. (Hear, hear.) There was also need for a first-class preparatory school, under the patronage and government of the denomi- nation, for the purpose of enabling young men of undoubted ability, but too poor to acquire the necessary preparatory training, to center their Colleges and Universities. SUPERANNUATION. Discussing the existing provision for old and infirm ministers, he said that since its establishment in the year 1871 the Provident Society had paid out in annuities and funeral donations over E8,000, but he pointed out with regret that only 136 out of a total of nearly 800 ministers were members of the society. If all were to join, and if the churches added 25, 30 or 50 per cent. to the contributions of the ministers, su-ch a fund could be accumu- lated as would provide sufficient annuities for the widows and orphans and infirm minis- ters for the rest of their lives. (Loud Ap- plause.) Another valuabe asset of the deno- mination was the Building Fund, which now had a capital of over £14,000, and had since its formation lent, free of interest, to churches no less than L74,000, thus effecting a saving to them of over E20,000 in interest. On the motion of the Rev. Joseph Davies, Birkenhead, seconded by the Rev. Dr. Morris, Treorchy, a hearty vote of thanks was accord- ed to Mr. Evan Owen for his valuable and practical address. The Rev. T. H. Williams, Newport, the new president, and Mr. John Hinds, M.P., the new vice-president, were then introduced to the meeting and delivered short addresses. It was announced that Mr. W. P. Thomas, J.P., Treorchy, had been elected treasurer in succession to the late Mr. J. P. Gibbon. PASTORS FOR SMALL CHURCHES. Principal W. Edwards made an urgent appeal on behalf of the weak churches. It was stated that there were about 200 churches without pastors, the majority because they could not maintain them. The object of the fund was to raise E50,000 to provide a regular and effective ministry. A sum of £5,000 had been promised by the Baptist Union of Great Britain when the Welsh Baptists bad collected £ 25,000, and it was reported that the pro- mises already received were on a larger scale s than anything known in the history of the denomination. He was pleased to announce that among recent gifts to the fund was a first instalment of 100 guineas from Mr. John Hinds, M.P. (Applause). During the day several sectional meetings were held. The Historical Society met at Tabernacle and the Women's Missionary Con- ference met at Bethel. The Provident So- ciety and the Building Society of the deno- mination met to transact business, and a well-attended meeting for children was held at Noddfa, under the presidency of Mr. W. Thomas, Pontycymmer, an object lesson in Sunday schoor work being given by Mr. John Lewis, J.P., Ammanford.

GABW YALLEY BAPTISTS J j

GABW YALLEY BAPTISTS. J HISTORICAL SKETCH. I (The following interesting sketch of the his- tory of the Welsh Baptist Denomination, in the Garw has been edited by the Rev. W. Saunders, C.C., Pontycymmer). Anyone who reads the History of the Baptists," by Joshua Thomas and Spincer, will find that the Baptist principles were preached and believed iv. the Garw Valley in very early times. In the year 1650, according to Joshua Thomas, a large number of peopio were baptised at St. Brides "Minor, "A place- near Tondu, about Severn miles from Pontycymmer." History states (continues our author), that one of Cromwell's officers who was a Baptist lived at "Nantymwth, near Coytrahen, and that several members of the church lived in that district in very precarious times. Mention is made in Thomas's work of a person by the name of Thomas Joseph, Llangeinor, who was one of the 2,000 ministers who were turned out from the Church of England in the year 1662. Thomas Joseph was a Baptist, and from the fact that he was one of the delegates at a meeting at Llantrisant it is supposed that he was a member of that church. A large pari of the township of Pontycymmer is in the parish of Llangeinor, and within two orUliiee miles of the church from which Thomas Joseph was expelled. In the year 1710 we find that the Rev. Morgan Griffiths, pastor of Hengoed, visited the village- of "Penyfai, and preached in several of the cottages there, and as the re- sult of this missionary effort the church at Penyfai was established in the year 1726. One of the elders of the church at Penyfai was Thomas Jones, a native of Newtown. Jones was born in the year 1703, and we are told that he had some land near Tynton, the ;ii thpiiue of the late Dr. Price. The name of the spot that belonged to Dr. Price is Cefn Geiii, a farmhouse situated above Llangeinor Station, about two and a half -nilles from Pontycymmer. and there was born the elder Thomas Jones, and afterwards his son, Dr. ?ei-var d s li's son, D i Samuel Jones, U.S.A. Thomas .Jones went to America in the year 1827, w hen his son Samuel was about two years of age. These facts are mentioned to show that the prin- ciples held by Baptists were preached and be- lieved in very early tiaies, and that the com- ing of these early Baptists to these villages was contemporaneous with the beginning of the Particular Baptists in Wales. Between the years 1755 and 1802, the Rev. Jonathan Francis, the minister of Penyfai, lived at Nantymwth, and preached many times in the Alms Houses of Bettws. The Rev. Enoch Francis, Newcastle-Emlyn, was his son, and a brother of the Rev Enoch Francis, Horseley. It is rational to assume that the Baptists of the Garw went to Bettws and Penyfai to wor- ship at that time. It is-evident that their tenets created a great stir in the district, and won many adherents at that time, for our author tells us 'that Rev. Jonathan Francis baptized many believers. It is said that Mr. Francis was once baptizing in a place called Felin, and that the then Vicar of St. Brides Minor gathered a large crowd of people, and proceeded to the place with the object of pouring ridicule on both baptiser and baptized. The particular method adopted by this man of God was to solemnly baptise his dog Quando, in the presence of the large congregation, in blasphemous imi- tation of the rites performed by the new sect. But the latter were not without their defenders, for when John Bradford, of Bettws, the teacher of lolo Morganwg, heard of the scandalous incident, he wrote a song about the cleric. Unfortunately only a frag- ment of this song survives. Needless to say, clergy of this stamp have long passed away from our midst, and we are happily disposed nowadays to respect each other's convictions. About the year 1825, the Rev. B. Davies, Penyfai, a descendant' of Joshua Francis, commenced to preach at Bettws; and great success followed his efforts, for in the year 1829 the church at Bettws was formed as a branch from the mother church. Another place Mr. Davies preached at was Melyn Cefn Du, in Cwmogwr, and through his efforts and the efforts of others, the cause at Paran was established. Here, then, in Bettws and Paran, are two of the springs of the Baptist cause in this part of the world, springs established through the evangelistic efforts of good breth- ren. From these two churches sprang the whole of the Baptist cause in the Garw. In one the instrument was the minister in the other, one of the ordinary brethren of the church. In this period a very devoted brother of the name of William Davies, Peny- bryn Farm, a member of the church at Bettws, came to Llwyncriau, a small cottage standing on the spot where now stands a school at Llest, to carry on a school every Sunday afternoon. This William Davies was an inhabitant of Cefn Cribbwr, and was for many years a respected member with the Cal- vinistic Methodists. After a while, because the place was more central and convenient, the school was moved to Nantyrchain, the farm on the outskirts of Pontycymmer, and the late Rev. T. B. Pirllis., Tylagwyn, says that the Sunday School then (1825) reckoned from 30 to 35 scholars. Rev. Edmund Jones, the minister of Paran, came to Nantyrchain to preach and to help the cause, and on his leaving the neighbourhood his successor, Mr. Wm. Williams, also came occasionally to preach in the valley. Another very faithful helper of the cause in the Garw Valley at its commencement was the Rev. Hopkin Jenkins, at that time a local preacher, but afterwards the minister of Paran. The old brother, Gwilym Thomas, of The Huts, has been heard to say that at Nantyrchain the Rev. Hopkin Jenkins re- ceived his first payment for preaching. He gave such satisfaction to the old Squire of Braichycymmer that he gave him half a crown at the end of the service. The ser- vant of Christ that night was forced to ask for the grce of humility, because he felt, he says, that the half-crown was a temptation to him. Other brethren that were diligent for the cause in the Valley at that t'me were Mr. Griffiths, and Mr. Henry Edwards, members and preachers from Bethania, Maesteg. Wil- liam Griffiths was a member at Zion, Merthyr. He moved to the Llynfi Valley in-1827, and was a very acceptable preacher in Maesteg, Cwmgarw, and Bettws. Henry Edwards com- menced to preach in 1834, he preached a great deal, it would appear, at Llynfi, Bettws, and Cwmgarw. He was very zealous on behalf of the Sunday school. Subsequently he went to America. It is impossible to measure the worth of the services of these two brethren in this period of the commencement of the Paptist canse ia the Vêy. Hat the man who really organi- zed the cause, and set it on its feet, was the Rev. Thomas Hopkins, Bethania, Maesteg. He was ordained a minister at Bethania, Maesteg, on Christmas Day, 1828, the day that Bethania was embodied as a church. Thomas Hopkins was a strong man, both in body and spirit, and an energetic worker. In a very short time after he was ordained as a minister he took stock of the district and determined to turn his face to Cwmgarw, and to carry on the organlsm-tion that had been commenced at Llwyncriau and Nantyrychain. This was done, and with his entrance into the place the few Baptists that were in the Valley were inspired with new courage and vigour to proceed with the wools. Before long our present old and respected churches of Cwmgarw or Tylagwyn were formed. From that period up to the present the following churches have been established in the Garw Valley:-Noddfa, Pomtyoymmer; Bethania, Blaengarw; Zion English Baptist Church, Pontycymmer; Mount Zion English Baptist Church, "Blaengarw j and Salem, Fantygog. MISSIONARY SOCIETY. I At the annual public meeting of the Mis- sionary Society hhd at Noddfa in the even- ing, over which Rev. W. Evans, Perth, pre- sided, Miss Riekcon, from the Congo, spoke feelingly of her work in that darkest part of the vineyard.. She was followed by a rousing address by Rev. Morgan Jones, B.A., Whitlard, who in turn was followed" by HeY. George Hughes, India, who has worked for the Igst 25 years in the Chitagong Hiils, and other districts of India, and has been responsible for translating the Bible into more than one of the native dialects. Rev. Thos. Lewis, the Congo, followed. Mr. Lewis has laboured in the Congo- for a period of nearly 60 years—a truly remark- able record. He was president of the first college ever established in the Congo, and was responsible for the collation of the various dialects spoken in the Congo, and also with two or three others, for translating the scrip- tures into those dialects. His services to the Royal Geographical Society, in co-operation with Bentley and Grenfell, have already beeir recognised. The venerable missionary, who met with a tremendous reception from the great assembly of delegates, gave most interesting reminis- oenses of his work and long career on the Congo and in the Cameroons, where he was at the time of its occupation by the Germans. WOMEN'S ZENANA MEETING. I The meeting was preceded in the afternoon by the annual meeting of the Zenana branch of the Missionary Society, which was held at Bethel Chapel. Among the speakers were Mrs. (Principal) Edwards (Cardiff), Miss Hick- son (The Congo), and the secretary, Miss Trevor Jones, who gave a review of the past year's work of the Society. It may not. be amiss to recall the fact that the success of the I Zenana movement throughout the Principal- ity has been largely due to the enthusiasm of a Pontycymmer lady, the late Mrs. Saunders, the wife of the Noddfa pastor, whom Miss Trevor Jones succeeds in the secretaryship. I The Treasurer, Mrs. M. A. Owen (Cardiff), read a report, which showed that the past financial year had been very satisfactory. During the meeting, Miss Hannah May Rey- nolds (National winner, Pontycymmer) gave a brilliant violin solo, and was accompanied by Mrs. E. Reynolds, A.R.C.M., Pontycymmer, and Miss Margaret Hughes, L.R.A.M., Ponty- cymmer, rendered a soprano solo most beauti- fully, and was accompanied by Mrs. D. A. Davies, Pontycymmer. I

I16YEAROLD GARW GIRL I

I 16-YEAR-OLD GARW GIRL I I NATIONAL WINNER. I All Garawites were delighted to learn the news that their popular young violinist, Miss Hannah May Reynolds, the highly respected daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Reynolds, of Pontycymmer, had won the open violin com- petition at this year's National Eisteddfod at Aberystwyth. Miss Reynolds has proved herself an expert violinist. Her first prize was won at the early age of seven, after only six months tuition. After her first success she worked steadily for the diploma of A. C. V I Miss Hannah May Reynolds. I which was entered for in June, 1911. At that time she was a little over ten years of age, and triumphantly headed the list, which was an open examination for Great Britain and Ireland, thus winning the exhibition prize of six guineas which was offered by the College of Violinists, London. She has won numerous prizes at the most popular Eisteddfodau in Wales and Monmouthshire, Tiz :-Morriston, Llanelly, Pontypool, Treorchy, Porth, and the semi-National at Mountain Ash, besides nu- merous minor prizes. She has always given her services to the sweet cause of charity. In addition to her mus'cal talent, for which great credit is due to her node, Mr. John Edwards, G. sod JL, Peafcycyjxuaer, wrho is responsible for training her from the begin- ning of her musical career, Miss Reynolds won the County Scholarship for Howells' School, Llanelly, in the year 1913.

MAESTEG RED CROSS HOSPITAL I

MAESTEG RED CROSS HOSPITAL. I The Commandant of the above Hospital gratefully acknowledges receipt of 25, handed over by Messrs. Williams and Maddock, Secre- tary and Treasurer respectively, of the Fete and Gala held in Pontrhydycyff on August 2nd, for comforts for the soldiers of the above Hospital. 8470

BEAUPRE RED CROSS HOSPITAL I

BEAUPRE RED CROSS HOSPITAL. I There will be a "Pound Day" in aid of Beaupre Red Cross Hospital on Wednesday, August 30th. All contributions will lie gratefully received at the Hospital between 2 o'clock and 4 o'clock, or at the Depfit in J Cowbridge. 8468 1

HEROISM ON THE BATTLEFIELD

"HEROISM ON THE BATTLEFIELD.' COYTRAHEN MAN WINS D.C.M. I Sergt. Robert Hitchings, of Coytrahen late of Pontraddu, Shwt, Bettws), now in hospital at Bradford, Yorkshire, has been awarded the Distinguished Con- I duct M (la! for heroic work done on the battlefield. Sergt. Hitchings' promotion in the Army has been very rapid. Joining the Sergt. Robert Hitchings. I Lancashire Fusiliers in September, 1914, in four months he had risen to the rank of Ser- geant. This promotion in such a short period shows his worth as a soldier. He was wounded in the recent magnificent advance, and has unfortunately lost one of his toes, which may possibly keep him from active ser- vice again. Sergt. Hitchings is an old Bettws and Bridgend football forward, and was one of the forwards in the memorable match when Brid- gend defeated Swansea. It was undoubtedly only an injury to his knee that prevented him from representing Wales as a forward. He has two brothers at present serving in the British Army. All his friends wish him a speedy recovery.

GARW SOLDIER WINS MILITARYI MEDAL

GARW SOLDIER WINS MILITARY I MEDAL. Mr. and Mrs. John Howells, 8 Bridgend Rd., Pontycymmer has received the folowing letter from J. H. Oliver Thompson, Second- Lieutenant, 58th Co., Royal Garrison Artil- lery, B.E.F., France, dated 17th inst:— Dear Madame,—I have great pleasure in informing you that for his gallantry in the recent offensive, your son, Gunner Harry Howells, has been awarded the Military Medal. He received his medal for the fol- lowing incident. After being badly wounded he remained at his gun, and assisted in re- pelling a bomb-throwing attack at La I Boiselles. All his companions regret his wounds, as he was very popular." Gunner Harry Howells worked at the Ffaldau Colliery for some time, but prior to enlistment he was employed at the Windsor Colliery, Abertridwr, as master haulier. He joined the Army immediately war broke out, and in the Dardanelles was wounded in the left arm by a bullet, which worked its way from his left arm, through his chest and out under his. shoulder, on the 15th October, 1915. After becoming convalescent he left for France, and was wounded whilst at his gun by a sharapnel shell bursting near him, on the 4th July, 1916, which resulted in the breaking of an arm. He is -now at the V.A.D. Gledow Hall Hospital, Leeds, and is progressing very favourably. Another son of Mr. and Mrs. Howells, viz., Pte. Ebenezer Howells, R.A.M.C., has served in France for the past fifteen months.

MINERS INCOME TAX I

MINERS' INCOME TAX. I PROPOSAL BY MEMBER FOR SWANSEA I DISTRICT. TO BE CONSIDERED BY MR. McKENNA. I Mr. McKenna, we are authoritatively in- formed, has promised to consider an important proposal submitted to him by Mr. T. J. Williams, M.P., by which miners and other workmen who have to travel by train to their work shall have an income-tax rebate corres- ponding to the amount expended on railway fares. A strong case for this concession was put before the Chancellor. It was empha- sised that miners, for instance, were engaged on work of national importance, and that where developments were taking place no house accommodation could be provided near the mine, and the men had to travel out day by day from adjacent townships, special trains bing run by the railway companies for their benefit. Oftentimes the men pay as miich as hjalf-a-crown a *reeik in"fares, and Mr Williams cited a (gpe where 600 men made daily train journeys of considerable distance from a Gla- morgan town to the colliery at which they are epployed. Under the new income-tax collect- ing scheme the tax is' deducted by the em- ployers in such industries. The proposal, which is of such great interest to all parts of South Wales, opens up some wide considera- tions for the Treasury. There are, how- ever such precedents as the ab^ement of tax on L100 to M.P .'s to cover expenses, including travelling. The difficulty is to discriminate between workers who from choice live in the suburbs of the large towns and those who are obliged by the necessities of the case to make these long journeys to and from work. Mr. Williams thinks the case of big bodies of men travelling together to the same colliery stands I on a different footing, and the Chancellor is going to try and work out the problem.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gagette. If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.

OGMORE VALE

OGMORE VALE OFMORE SILVIA LANs).. We under- stand that the Ogn.cre Valley Silver Band win play selections in the Ogiv.cre Park every Wednesday (weather permitting), from 6 p.m. to 8-30 p.m., thfring the month cf I September. FUNERAL.—The funeral of Mrs. Ethel Maud Matthias, ago-d 24 ears, wife of Mr. William Matthias, Cf.n.ptcn House, Ogmore Vale, took place on Saturday last at the Og- more Vale Cemetery. The deceased lady was the daughter of Mr. Daniel Evans, late under manager of the Wyndham Colliery, and was highly respected in Ogmore Vale. A most impressive service was held at the Primitive I Methodist Chapel, and was largely attended, the pastor, Rev. E.W.Hough, conducted the service, and the "Dead March" was played by Mr. Millgate, organist. The funeral was very largely atended, and heart-felt sym- pathy is felt for the family in their sad bereavement. The mourners included Mr. Wm. Matthias (husband); Mr. Daniel Evans (father); Mrs. King (sister); Mr. and Mis. J. Evans (brother and sister-in-law); Miss A. Evans (sister); Miss Agnes Evans, Miss Kitty Evans (sitørs) iMaster Sam Evans Mr. T. Matthias. A large number of other rela- tives attended. Beautiful wreaths were sent by the following: The Family (a harp and I spray); Mr. D. Richards, manager, Wyndham Colliery; Mir. Cunningham, manager of gas plant, Ogmore Vale; Primitive Methodst Chapel; and the offioals of Tormonydd Col- liery, Cwmavon, of which the deceased lady's father is manager. The Rev. E. W. Hough officiated at the house and at the graveside. OBITUARY.—The funeral of the late Mr. David Williams, son of the Rev. Charles and Mrs. Williams, of Prospect Place, Ogmore Vale, took place on Thursday last at the Ogmore Vale Cemetery. The large number of people present at the funeral was a proof of the esteem in which the deceased was held. He had indeed, endeared himeself to all who, came in contact with him, and deep sympathy 1 is felt for his sorrowing family, who recently lost another son in France. The mourners included Mr. W. J. Williams, and Mr. T. Williams, Ogmore VaJe; Mr. Idris Williams, headmaster Boys Council School, Blaengarw and Private Alun Williams, R.A.M.C., Os- westry (brothers); Rev. D. J. Thomas, B.A., Vicar of Tonyrefail, and Mrs. Thomas; Mr. D. Williams and Mr. J. Puntan, Pontardawe (cousins) Mrs. Thomas, Llangeinor; Mrs. David. Aberkenfig; Mrs. Rees, Kenfig Hill (cousins,; Mr. J. Thomas, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Griffiths, Pontardawe, Mr. and Mrs. W. Evans, Ogmore Vale( uncles and aunts) Mr. Randall Williams (nephew). Among the min- I isteirs present were Rev. M. J. Mills, who had charge of the arrangements; Rev. W. Mollins, and the Rev. R. T. Gregory, Nantymoel; Rev. R. John, Tondu, and J. E. Evans, late of Gilfach Goch; Rev. E. Moses Evans, Blaen- garw; Rev. J. G. Jones; Rev. L. G. Lewis; Rev. E. W. Hough and the Rev. D. Matthias, Ogmore Vale. There were also present Alder- man W. Llewellyn, J.P., Ogmore Vale; Mr. T. E. Lewis, J.P., Blaengarw; Mr Jenkin Phillips, J.P., Nantymoel; Mr. P. J. Thomas, Bridgend; Mr. Rd. Thomas, Llengeinor; Mr. Morgan Williams, Glynogwr; Mr. D. Rich- ards, manager, Wyndham Collieries; Mr. J. R. Evans, head-mast-or, Nantymoel Schools; Mr. T. Llewellyn, chemist; Mr. J. Cockram; Mr. H. Mackney; Mr. A Sampson, Ogmore Vale and many others.

ICHURCH PARADE AT OGMORE YALEI

I CHURCH PARADE AT OGMORE YALE LARGE GATHERING AT ST. DAVID'S. The annual Widows' and Orphans' church parade, Ogmore Vale branch, took place on Sunday last, the weather being all that could be desired, and the parade being consequently crowned with success. Headed by the popu- lar Ogmore Valley Silver Band, under the conductorship of Mr. Sam Gillard (which, as usual, gave its services free), the pos-, session marched in brave fashion through the streets. The route of the parade extended from the top of Nantymoel to the bottom end of Ogmore Vale, and was in the following order: Nantymoel Am- bulance Brigade the Fire Brigade; Boy Scouts, with band and banner; Ogmore and Nantymoel R.A.O.B. National Society; Nanty- moel and Ogmore Vale Lodges; Bristol and West of England Friendly Society; Shop Assis- tants Union; Miners Federation; and En- ginemen and Stokers Union. A service was held at St. David's Church, and was conduct- ed by the Rev. D. Matthias, B.A., curate-in- charge, who preached tQ a crowded congre- gation, and greatly impressed his hearers. It was pleasing to see such a large number of the Rational Society of Ruffs in the parade. The success of the whole reflects much credit on Mr. A. J. Skyrme, the branch secretary. The collection taken en (route was JE9 13s. 2d. One of the features of the musical programme played by the band was a march composed by a local musician, Mr. Dagul Pryor.

IMAESTEG t

MAESTEG. < t CATTLE IN A KITCHEN.—Great excite- ment and commotion was caused in Maesteg Row, Garnlwyd, one morning last week. A butcher was seen waving his hands and call- ing for help, shouting that he had two wild beasts down in Maesteg Row. Now, the last house in the Row is one of those old fashioned dwellings, kept in good order, and furnished with the usual chest of drawers, and a dresser loaded with all kinds of china ornaments, in- cluding breakfast and dinner crookery, and a mass of pictures hung on the walls, and the mantlepiece decorated with brass ornaments, etc. There, in this small room, were two in- furiated cattle, wedging each other in as tightly as possible, backing against the dres- ser, crockery' crashing to the floor in bits. The inmates shouted for their lives, but the more they tried to get the cattle out the more helpless the task seemed. One can imagine the state of affairs. One witness said, "Oh, to hear the crockery breaking!" It is at least comforting to know that the animals were eventually got out. <

Garw G leanings

Garw G leanings ? J Li AftALL) c The annual Union meetings of the Welsh BarList Churches of Wales have been held at Pontycymmer this year. > 1i It was a great undertaking to make all the arrangements, and provide the necessary accommodation for so large a number of mini- sters and delegates. .11 As aofull report is published in another part, we. may content ourselves here by stat- ing that the organising work was arranged to perfection. # 111 We heartily congratulate our young violin- ist, Miss Hannah May Reynolds, of Ponty- cymmer, upon winning the national prize at Aberystwyth. Bravo I i She is the daughter of the Rev. W. and Mrs. Reynolds, and a niece of Mr. John Ed- wards, G. and L. (her tutor), Pontycymmer. It 1 1 Dr. J. B. McCutcheon, of Blaengarw, has joined the Army. 111 All Garwites wish him every good luckj and sincerely trust he will return safe and sound. Ill It is with regret we learn of the sad death of anotKer brother of Mr. Idria Williams, schoolmaster, of Blaengarw. Ill Within a fortnight he has lost two brothers —one, Pte. Arthur Williams, R.W.F., killed in action; the other Pte. David Williams, who died at Kimla Sanatorium, Neath. Ill We all extend our heart-felt sympathy to Mr. Williams and his relatives in their be- reavement. Ill The Garw St. John Ambulance Band played through the main streets last Saturday. 111 They certainly looked Al in their smart uniform. Ill A local colliery official went in search of a piece of wood he had hidden two years ago I Ill It appears he was terribly annoyed because it was gone. 1 t 1 Whin-berry picking is certainly a pleasant" pastime and exercise. Ill The question is, should some of our "lead- ing lights" pick on Sundays? Ill A local lance(r) was asked to state his re- gimental number. He replied Twenty-four thousands, twenty-two hundreds, and fifty- six"—his number being 242256. Not far out I 111 A local knut, before the absentee commit- tee at a certain colliery was asked why he was absent from work, knowing the Navy re- quired so much coal. Ill "Well," said the knut, "horses mUtlt also. be fed, so I went haymaking for a few days!" Ill "Soot is a fine vegetable grower," said a local knut to a local gardener. Ill Oh," said the gardener, "where can I buy some ?" I'll sell you a few bags," said the old wag. iii He must be sweeping chimneys eften I Hit Fancy a local chap putting paint and pow- der on his face before going to work! Ill It is whispered that a young man stole a pair of stockings from a damsel. Ill Is it true he cut them down, and wore them on Sunday as socks? Swank—and cheap, too I Ill Another gent of the same kidney actually had his hair trimmed on Sunday last! 1 1 1 We are delighted to learn that Gunner Harry Howells, R.G.A., son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Howells, Bridgend Road, Pontycymmer, has been awarded the Military Medal for keeping off a bomb-throwing attack, and at the same time sticking to his gun, after being wounded. Ill All our readers will be pleased to learn that he is progressing very favourably. Ill $ A certain person thought he had been done down by a booking clerk, so on his next trip he tendered Id. short for his ticket. 1 1 ¡ He took his ticket triumphantly; but what t did he say when he found the ticket he had only carried him within a mile of his destina- tion ? • ■ I 1 t We Teported last week that two Garw child- ren were nearly drowned. r 111 It appears that one boy, aged 3 J years, was in danger of drowning when he was pluckily rescued by a Boy Soout, Harry Walter Hurse, King Edward Street, Blaen- garw.

MAESTEG RED CROSS VAD 186

MAESTEG RED CROSS V.A.D., 186. In connection with the above, will all V.A.D. members meet in Plasnewydd Girls' School on Tuesday, 29th August, at 7 pm, when Lectures on Sick Nursing will be re- sumed. New members enrolled at close of Lecture.—G. S. SINCLAIR, Commandant. 8471 PRINTED AND PUBLISHED by the CENTRAL GLAMORGAN PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANT, LTD., at the "GLAMORGAR GAZETTE" Orriois, Q BTREET, BRIDGEND, GLAMOROAN. FRIDAY, AUGUST 25th, 1916. I