Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PURITAN SOAP is used in Britain's happiest homes 150

THE NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD I

THE NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD. I APPLICATION TO BE MADE BY PORTHCAWL. Mr. T. James, chairman of the Porthcawl I Council, presided last week over a meeting in support of the movement for obtaining the allocation of the National Eisteddfod at Porthpawl in 1918. The Chairman explained the responsibilities that would rest upon the town in making an application for the eisteddfod. A large sub- scription list would be necessary, and also a very Strong guarantee fund. Councillor T. G. Jones moved, and )11". Cavil seconded, a resolution providing that a" application for the holding of the e:stedd- fod in 1918 be sent forward in the name of Porthcawl, and that steps be taken to pre- pare a memorial, and this was heartily sup- ported and carried with accolmation, and at the close of the meeting the guarantee fund stood at t405. Arrangements for the holding of a public meeting were made, and a sub-comn-ittee to be appointed to draft the memorial for presentation to the Eisteddfod Association, and .for the obtaining of subscriptions. Mr. Evan Davies (cle k of the council) was appointed secretary pro tem, Mr. T. E. Davies treasurer, and Mr. T. James chair- man.

CAMPBELL OF THE CAMERONSI

CAMPBELL OF THE CAMERONS. I DROWNED AT PORTHCAWL. I A convalescent soldier from the St. John Auxiliary Hospital at the "Rest," Porthcawl, was drowned on Thursday afternoon while bathing. Private John Campbell (26), Cameron Regiment, who had been medically certified as fit for discharge from the hospital, went for a swim in "Rest" Bay. He was a powerful swimmer, and went into the water alone, leaving his clothes with some convales- cent soldier comrades on the beach. He swam out some distance, but suddenly disappeared, and was not again seen. Campbell's home was in Lanarkshire, Scotland.

IPORTHCAWL MILITARY TRIBUNALI

PORTHCAWL MILITARY TRIBUNAL. I At Porthcawl Tribunal on Tuesday, a jobb- ing painter was exempted till September 15th. A photographer was exempted conditionally upon joining the V.T.C. A grocer's assistant was exempted until September 15th on domes- tic grounds. A retired man appealed on domestic grounds, but his application was re- fused. The deputy to the District Council's clerk was exempted.

I PORTHCAWL I

PORTHCAWL. I FLAG DAY CONTRIBUTIONS.—The flag day at Porthcawl for the national egg collec- tion produced t56, and a cheque for that amount has been sent by the hon. treasurer (Mr. T. E. Davies) to the Lady Mayoress of Cardiff MINISTER'S SON KILLED.The Rev. Thomas Thomas, a Baptist minister, living at vPorthcawl, had a letter on Saturday morning from the Rev. James Evans, chaplain, stat- ing that Private Trevor A. Thomas, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was killed by a sniper on the 22nd inst., and laid to rest the same day. Mr. Evans added, "He was a pure, high-minded, noble liv ng soul, and beloved by all his comrades and officers." R.,s brother a ministerial student, is now serving with the Y.M.C.A.

ABERKENFIG PRIVATE KILLED INI ACTION

ABERKENFIG PRIVATE KILLED IN I ACTION. It is with sincere regret we announce the j death of Pte. Reg. Jones, 17th Welsh Regt., who fell in action on Tuesday, Aug. i5th, Somewhere in France." Deceased was the only son of Mrs. Jones, of St. Brides Street, Aberkenfig, and previous to enlisting worked on the G.W.R. at Tondu, where he had made many friends, being a lad of a genial disposi- tion. He was 18 years of age, but so eager was he to join the Army that he gave his age as more than it was. He enlisted some lo months ago, and had been in France four months. Much sympathy is extended to his widowed mother in her great bereavement. The following is a passage from a letter re- ceived by his mother from the chaplain of the regiment:—" Your son was very seriously wounded on Tuesday night, and died about 10 o'clock. We were being shelled, and one hit his billet, where he was resting. He died as bravely as any lad ever did. He did not seem to suffer, and spoke to me quite nicely until the end. I took him to be confirmed on the 3rd of this month, and I am sure you will be comforted when I say that he received Holy Communion an hour before he died. He was such a nice, quiet lad, tender and gentle, and died for his God and Christ's Christianity. I buried him to-day in a quiet llittle cemetery, which is beautifully kept. I hope' later to send you a photo of his grave."

No title

The men employed in three big mines in Kalgooflie have struck, refusing to work with alleged enemy subjects.

Advertising

ADVICE FREE.-Mrs. Stewart, HerbalI Specialist, 9 Guinea Street, Bristol. t

FOR COYTRAHNE HOSPITALI

FOR COYTRAHNE HOSPITAL. VISIT OF THE TONYPANDY HIBERNIAN BAND TO TONDU. For the purpose of augmenting the funds of the Coytrahen Park Hospital, the Hibernian Institute, of Tonypandy, placed at the dis- posal of a local committee the services of their band, which has the reputation of being one of the finest in Wales, having been successful in competitions at the great annual contests at the Crystal Palace. The members of the Institute undertook to defray the whole cost- of conveying the band to Tondu; also of pro- viding the entire programme for the day. Arrangements were made for Sunday last, the band arriving at Brynmenin by brakes about 10.30. Having paraded the streets in the district, it proceeded to Bryngarw House, taking up collections en route. It was re- ceived at the house by Mr. and Mrs Llewelyn, who thanked the members on behalf of the hospital. Having played a few selections, they proceeded to Tondu, passing through Pwllandras and Bryn Road, the collectors making house-to-house visits with boxes, and, arrived at their headquarters, the Colliers' Arms, their host for the day being Mr. Dan Fitzgerald, who was largely responsible for their visit, and who had provided an excellent dinner. The members of the local committee were in attendance here, and helped in serv- ing at the tables. At 3 o'clock a procession was formed of the various Friendly Societies, the local R.A.O.B., the Bryngarw V.T.C., and the local detachment of the Red Cross nurses, and marched through the principal streets, 1 taking up collections en route. In the even- ing, at 7.30, a grand concert in the Cinema Hall was arranged, when the band (under the conductorship of its bandmaster, Mr. G. H. Thomas) rendered some excellent music, the playing of which was greatly enjoyed by the very large audience which packed the hall. The performance of the band was marked with great finish, and there was loud applause after each item. The chairman was Mr. E. W. Davies, and the programme was as follows: — "The King," Band; March, "Collinwood," Band; fantasia, "National," Band; bass song, Mr. Mog Morgans; tenor solo, Mr. J. Prosser; selection, "II Trova- tore," Band; contralto solo, Miss Winnie Brooks; soprano solo, Miss Arianwen Wil- liams; valse, "Chorister," Band; duet, Messrs. Morgans and Prosser; cornet solo, The Rosary," Mr. J. Morgans. The pian- ist was Mr. Leonard Elston. A vote of thanks at the close was accorded the mem of the Tonypandy Institute for their thoughMulness in helping ihe hospital j also to Mr. Brookes, the secretary, for his valuable help in bringing down the band. Mr. Morgan Owen was thanked for the use of the hall. It is hoped to hand over a substantial sum to the hospital as a result of this effort, which will be acknowledged through the press in due course. The local committee, who worked hard, included Mr. E. W. Davies (chairman), Mr. D. J. Morgan, Mr. G. Williams, Mr. D. Fitzgerald, Mr. E. John, Mr. Phillips, and others, all of whom are to be congratulated.

INTERESTING DECISION

INTERESTING DECISION. BAPTIST PREACHER CHARGED AS ABSENTEE. A point under the Military Service Act, of interest as affecting men connected with the Free Church ministry, was raised at Maryle- bone on Saturday, when the Rev. Henry Kloekers Bentley (29), of Hampstead, was charged with failing to appear when called up for military service. Acouused claimed exemption as a Baptist minister or student. He admitted he was a conscientious objector. The point raised was whether he came within the exemption allowed for "lay evangelists or whole-time agents of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland"—apparently the only Baptist body in England mentioned in the Act. The Rev. Dr. Dixon, of the Metropolitan Tabernacle, described him as a "gospel singer and preacher." Accusued stated that he had accepted an invitation to the pastorate of Queen Street Baptist Church, Godalming, and Mr. Paul Taylor thereupon discharged him.

PENCOED I

PENCOED. I DISTINCTION FOR PENCOED SOL- DIER.—We learn that a Pencoed soldier, Pte. Fred Slade, has been awarded the Mili- tary Medal. Pte. Slade was born at Pen- coed, and his home is at Swansea-Terrace. Pte. Slade is in the South Wales Borderers. The distinction was given for his gallantry in carrying despatches under heavy shell fire. PENCOEDIAN WOUNDED.—We regret to state that Sergt. Edmund Jones, Pencoed (Somerset Light Infantry) has been added to the number of Pencoed wounded. From a letter written by the sergeant it would appear that he was hit by shrapnel or a fragment of shell on the head, and was saved from more serious injuries, or even death, by his shrap- nel helmet. The incident happened when his regiment was waiting in the trenches for orders to attack. The picture drawn by the sergeant of the men joking and others asleep shows the sang-froid and indifference to danger of our men.

I MEETING THE BOYS

I MEETING THE BOYS. I To the Editor. I Sir,—I hope you will allow me a little space in your valuable paper, the "Gazette," for a word or two in regard to soldiers going home on leave from the front. I must congratu- late the inhabitants of the Garw Valley on the, sensible scheme they are adopting to con- vey our comrades to and from Bridgend on Sundays. It is very trying for a Tommy to have to march for 10 miles, with full pack and rifle, to reach his home, after spending many dreary hours in the train. I must say, it is a well-thought-of scheme, and I hope Maesteg and other districts will adopt a similar one. I have met many of our comrades coming back from leave, and they all say that they were surprised to find they had to go home on "shanks's pony" from Bridgend. I hope our friends at home will do their "bit" by lessen- ing Tommy's burdens when going home on leave, and we will do our best here. There are quite a number of us out here from Maesteg and other districts who look forward to having the "Gazette" every week. Myself and a friend, Oswald Harrington, of Tondu, used to be regular readers of the Gazette" while serving out in the Darda- nelles. We are now "Somewhere in France" with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, having been transferred to them while in England.—Yours, etc., (Pte.) D. J. HOWEW, D Co., 4th Garrison Batt., R.W. Fusiliers, B.E.F., France. l

r GOVERNMENT PAY AND PARISH PAY I

r GOVERNMENT PAY AND PARISH PAY. -_u. To the Editor. Sii-. -Will you kindly allow me a very short space in order to call attention to a. slight mistake in your report of last week's meet- ing of Bridgend Board of Guardians. The case of Mrs. Brown is not a case of relief at all. It is a case of an allowance or pay. Mrs. Brown has always earned he liv' g be- fore and after marriage, and about two years ago she volunteered to take charge of her aged mother, over 70 years of age, as well as of her husband. To say that this competent feCJUsewife was living on charity before March 9th is wrong, Mr. dEitor. There is as much difference between "Government pay" and "Parish pay" as between a respectable "Guar- dian," and an insignificant "seed agent." This is not aquestion of charity. It is a ques- tion of "valuation," and as we have at least one professional "valuer" among our worthy Guardians, perhaps he would kindly explain the difference in value between the services of a competent, industrious working house- keeper, entrusted with the care, of an aged mother at home, and her services. from home, If (according to the brutal possibilities. of a stern, merciless war) Mrs. Price may be called back to her own home circle, at any time, if, and when, her brave husband returns, per- haps invalided for life, then, and probably not until then, will our Guardians begin to wake up to the unpleasant fact that hey have made a serious blunder. As I am dealing fully with this matter in my third letter to the Board, I will simply thank you, sir, in antici- pation.-r am, etc., Llantwit MaJ. T. DAVIES I Llantwit Major.

PROHIBITION AND THE WORKER

PROHIBITION AND THE WORKER. I" To the Editor. Sir.—The workers have suffered so many un- necessary evils since the war commenced that one begins to think that there is no limit to the number and variety of fads that can be imposed upon them under the excuse that they are necessary to the proper conduct of the wax. Now comes this "Prohibition" movement, and I say that if the workers accept it, then, indeed, their case will be hope- less. Personally, I don't think they will accept it. The trouble hitherto has been that they have looked upon all such agitations with good humoured contempt and have not reali- sed their seriousness until too late. But there are signs that they are beginning to understand the fact that there are a number of supermoralists in the country, who arc determined, by fair means or foul, to make the country good by Act of Parliament, and to force the people to conform to a standard of conduct set up for them by a set of kill- joys. It is this pitiful crew who spread the lies as to the widespread prevalence of drunken- ness and immorality amongst soldiers wives, of besottled workmen who squander their fab- ulous earnings in the public houses, of muni- tion workers who keep the soldiers without munitions whilst they indulge in periodical drinking bouts. They fostered the belief that Russia and France had prohibited alcohol. Any and every reason for prohibition is given except the true one, which is that they are out for prohibition, war or no war, and many of them would consider the war well lost if only prohibition were won. And I venture to think the workers see through it, and that if "Licensed Victualler" and his fellows had the courage of white mice they would before now have had a four- million petition against prohibition in the Commons to keep the other warm.—Yours, etc., &01. MERVYN W. PAYNE. I Heel. j

Advertising

PIANOS! PIANOS I PIANOS l IEBSSlf All British Made. Best Value in the World An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS. A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms oi —Prices.— WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK. Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Invite Inspection 8f the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Lapsest Discounts for Cash. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. j? PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS'  1, Wyndham Street, BRIDG END. ??s7?!F1? WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AMD ???? ? W MONMOUTHSHIRE. f

I PENCOED FUNERALSI

I PENCOED FUNERALS. I I MISS SARAH EVANS. At the funeral of the late Miss Sarah Evans, of Pencoed, the service in Salem Chapel was introduced by the Rev. W. A. Howell. An address, appropriate in every way, was delivered by the pastor of Salem Church, Rev. R. C. Lewis, B.A. At the graveside Mr. W. Howell, J.P., gave an address, and the Rev. Branch offered up prayer. The chief mourners were Mr. Jenkin Evans (father); Mr. W. Jones, Pontardulais (uncle); Mr. David Jones, Pont- ardulais (cousin); Mr. D. G. Thomas, Pont- rhydyfen (cousin); Miss Short, Treorchy (cou- sin) Mrs. Thomas, Newport (cousin); Mr. Matthew Jones, Pencoed; Mr. and Mrs. Tom Jones, Derlwyn Mr. and Mrs. Tom Williams, Pentrehowell; Mrs. W. Thomas, The Beeches; and Miss C. Jones. The funeral was an im- pressive one, and was in every respect a fit- ting tribute to a life finely lived.—Owing to the absence on holiday of the staff of the In- fants' School, over which Miss Evans was headmistress, the sending of a floral tribute was not taken in hand in time for the funeral. Afterwards, Miss Lily Salathiel took up the matter, and succeeded in collect- ing from the staff and from the families re- presented at the school a sum of money which, together with the willingness to con- tribute, was" sufficient evidence of the high esteem in which the late headmistress was held. As a result of Miss Salathiel's efforts an artificial wreath will be placed on the grave this week. I LITTLE MABEL ASHMAN. I The funeral took place on Sunday at Brynna Church of Mabel Ashman, the five- year-old daughter of Mrs. Ashman, The Beeches. The child had been 'ailing for a considerable time, and death was a joyous re- lease to the little sufferer. The Rev. R. Williams, B.A., Vicar of Brynna, officiated at the house and at Brynna. The chief mourners were: Mrs. Ashman (mother), Mas- ter Frank Ashman (brother), Miss Barnes, Bristol (aunt); Mr. J. Barnes, Brynna, and Mrs. S. Barnes, Brynna. Only a few weeks ago the bereaved mother heard from the War Office of the death in action of her husband, Pte. Frank Ashman, of the Welsh Regiment. I MRS. WILLIAMS, THE BRAGDY. I On Sunday afternoon the funeral took place at Salem Ohapel, Pencoed, of Mrso; Williams, of the Bragdy. Mrs. Williams was ah old re- sident of the village. Her death occurred with tragic suddenness. A young girl who made her home with the deceased lady, re- turning to the house, found Mrs., Williams dead. The chief mourners at the funeral were:—Messrs. William and John Williams (sons); Mr. and Mrs. Hale, Durham (son-in- law and daughter); Miss Ethel Floyd (adop- ted daughter); Mrs. Williams (daughter-in- law); Masters Edwin, Daniel and Ivor Wil- liams (grand-children); Mrs. Rowden, Porth- cawl, and Mrs. Hopkins, Cefn (sisters), and others. The Rev. R. C. Lewis, B.A., offi- I ciated at the house and at the chapel.

THE TRIBUNALSI

THE TRIBUNALS. I NEW INSTRUCTIONS. I The Local Government Board have issued a circular to local tribunals and appeal tri- bunals stating that the Army Council are anxious that all outstanding applications or appeals for exemption shall be decided within the next few weeks, and that subse- quent applications for renewal shall be determined as soon as possible after they are made. It is important that meetings of tribunals should not be suspended at the present time. If some members are tem- porarily absent arrangements will, it is hoped, be made to secure the services of a sufficient number for continuing the work of the tribunal. Tribunals should bear in mind that the immediate need of the Army for men is very great, and that exemption should not be granted in any case unless it is quite clearly justified. In deciding cases tribunals should bear in mind that the men who are of the highest value to the Army- are men who are fit for general service, and after this class men who are fit for service abroad or provisional units. There appears to be an impression, says the circular, that the military authorities do not propose for the present to call up men in the later groups or classes, even if they are fit for the I (Continued on Bottom of Next Cohhpn*)

THE TRIBUNALSI

(Continued from Last Column). more arduous foun& of service. This im- pression is incorrect. In the case of a sol- dier of the Territorial Force, the practical effect of any exemption is to exempt the man from service overseas. The man's liability as a Territorial for home service remains in force. CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. If the tribunal are fully satisfied that the conscientious objection of a man entitt him to exemption from all military service on condition, that he is engaged on work of national importance, he should be granted a certificate accordingly. Attention is drawn to the importance of not taking from civil employment meft, are essential for maintaining work at the docks" A lunatic attendant is included in the list of certified occupations if he is recommended for exemption by the 'Board of Control. Applications in respect, of other men employed in asylums, such as clerks, storekeepers, gardeners, artisans, bakers, etc., whose principal and, usual ,occn- pation is not in rcl to the t must be dealt with in the ordinary course.

MINERS CONCILIATION BOARD

MINERS' CONCILIATION BOARD. FRICTION OVER NON-UNION AGREE. MENT. The Conciliation Board for the Coal Trade of South Wales and Monmouthshire met at Cardiff on Monday to discuss a number of out- I standing disputes. Mr. F. L. Davies presided over the owner's side, and Mr. James Win- stone over the workmen's representatives. Mr. F. L. Davies referred to the fact that the workmen employed at several collieries had recently insisted on holding show-cards on the colliery premises, and that notice to terminate contracts had been given at some collieries. He said that this was distinctly contrary to the terms of the agreement en- tered into in April last between the owners and the workmen's representatives at the re- quest of the Government. Mr. Davis further intimated that the owners proposed to report the matter to Sir. Geo. Askwith, the Chief Industrial Commissioner, as the agreement was effected at the request of the Government with a view to preventing any further difficul- ties at the collieries. The owners' representatives called atten- tion to the position at the Standard Colliery, and stated they were prepared to agree that the colliery agent should meet the miners' agent with a. view to endeavouring to arrive at a settlement of the dispute. With regard tq the notices tendered by the workmen at the Pwllbach Colliery, which the owner said were a breach of the Conciliation Board Agreement, Mr. Thomas Richards, M.P., said that the notices had been with- drawn. THE HOLIDAY WEEK. The claim of the night men at the Lady Windsor Colliery for payment of proportion of bonus turn for Easter holiday week, and that of the afternoon and night men at the Powell Duffryn Collieries, Bargoed, for bonus, for working holidays were referred to the- Disputes Committee.

WELSH GUARDS SPORTS

WELSH GUARDS' SPORTS. The battalion sports of the 2nd (Res.) Bat- talion, Welsh Guards, were held on Epsom Downs, Epsom, on Wednesday week. The event proved a great success, and much omilse is due to Company-Sergt.-Major D. Cossey for the excellent work performed by him in preparing the programme. Representatives of the Brigade of Guards were present, including the Hon. Philip Howard. The Welsh Guards Band, under the able leadership of Mr. Andrew Harris, L.R.A.M., and "attached to the Household Brigade, rendered some bea :utiful martial airs during the day. Results:— 440 yards—1, Pte. T. G. White, Burton-on- Trent; 2, Pte.R. Harris, Caerau. 880 yards -1, Pte. T. G. White; 2, Cpl. W. Davies. Corporals' race, scratch, 120 yards—1, L.-Cpl. J. N. L. Turner; 2, L.-Cpl. R. Lawson. One mile race: 1, Drill-Sergt. Harris; 2, Pte. R- Marel. Hurdle race, 120 yards—1, L.-Cpl. J. N. L. Turner; 2, Ptes. R. Hughes and G. Rees, dead heat. Sergeants' race—1, Sergt. W. Purse; 2, Sergt. R. E. Parry. Three mile race, scratch, open—1, Trooper F. Barnwell, R.H.G.; 2, Pte. J. Smith, Irish Guards,. Officer's race: 1, Col. J. B. Stracey,. Clitheroe 2, Lord Harleeho

PORTHCAWL GOLF CLUB I

PORTHCAWL GOLF CLUB. I ANNUAL MEETING. I The annual meeting of the Royal Portli- cal Golf Club was held at the Club House on Saturday, Mr. W. L. Harris (captain) presid- ing. The report of the captain for the year end- ing June 30th stated, inter alia.: :-The Com- mittee are glad to report that the long-out- standing negotiations with the Porthcawl Golf Club House Company (1898), Limited, have been concluded, with the result that the club house is now the property of the club. In connection with this matter, the Committee desire to place on record their gratitude to the following gentlemen, who generously pre- sented to the club the shares held by them in the limited company: Sir W. J. Tatem, Bart. Messrs. S.H. Byass, J. S. Fraser, J. P. Grant, J. A. Jones, J. E. Moore-Gwyn, J. T. Phoenix, Sidney Robinson, M.P., and H. S. Sutton. During the year, five more of the new greens laid out by Mir. H. S. Colt, have been com- pleted and opened, and are playing satisfac- torily. I wish to acknowledge, with many thanks, the loyal support accorded me by the Ex-Captain (Mr. A. J. Solomon), the Vice- Captain (Mr. R. F. Orr), the Committee, Captain Parker (Secretary), the acting Secre- tary (Mr. A. R. Cavill), and others, during the past year. The Chairman said that having regard to the condtions which had obtained during the whole of the year, he thought the fact that they were able to make a profit of £ 55 17s. 9d., might be considered satisfactory. He regretted that for the second time in the annuals of the club, they held their meet- ing under the dark cloud of war, and he sin- cerely hoped that long before the next anmfal meeting they would be basking in the sun- shine of peace—a peace on terms dictated by Great Britain and her Allies. (Hear, hear). The club had lost by death in the war fouir members- The first was Mr. Rupert Hall- owes, who was, perhaps, not known very n- timately to certain members, but those who knew him respected him and held him in high esteem. Mr. Hallowes distinguished himself very brilliantly in the war, not only receiving the Military Cross, but being honoured by the award of theV.C., though he had been killed before this decoration could be pinned to his breast. Other members who had fallen were Mr. Ted Phillips, Mr. Llew. Phillips, and Mr. Ashol Gibson, who were all good fellows, fine golfers, and good sportsmen. (Hear, hear.) Out of 330 men members there were serving with the forces between 90 and 100. During the year there had been an increase in the membership of the club, which now stood at 536-174 ladies and 32 juniors, in addition to the 330 men. The new mem- bers numbered 25. Thanks to the care and attention bestowed upon it by the vice-cap- tain, Mr. R. F. Orr, the course was playing better than ever. The fact that the grass was rather long a little time ago was account- ed fQr by the difficulty of getting labour. Perhaps at Porthcawl they might be prejudic- ed in judging the course, so it was extremely nice to get an outside and impartial opinion. The secretary of the Berkshire Golf Club wrote "I think your course simply splendid, and I cannot imagine anyone wanting any- thing better." They did not, said the speaker want a better testimonial than that. Dealing with the accounts, Mr. Harris pointed out that salaries and wages had de- creased by £80, in spite of a further war bonus, and ground expenses of about £ 30; while general expenses were down R21. On the other side, men's subscriptions were down J6170, which was caused by the fact that no payments were made by members on active service. Ladies subscriptions showed an in- crease of L8. The accounts were adopted on the motion of the Chairman, seconded by Mr.. Martin Price. Mr. W. L. Harris was re-elected captain on the motion of Mr. A. J. Solomon, who said there had been a great deal of legal work during the year, and Mr. Harris, being a solicitor, had been of great service to the club. He hoped that all outstanding matters would be completed by next year, and that if the war was finished, they would probably go on with the new club house. The chair- man had bespoken a certain sum of money, which would go a long away towards erecting the building. Returning thanks, Mr. Harris acknowledged the assistance of Mr. Hugh In- gledew, Mr A. J. Solomon (ex-captain), Mr R. F. Orr (vice-captian), Capt. Parker (secre- tary), and Mr. A. J. Cavill (acting secretary). Sir W. J. Tatem, Bart., was re-elected pre- sident, and Miss Talbot, honorary president, and the name of Mr. J. Herbert Cory, M.P. for Cardiff, was abided to the list ot vice-pre- sidents. Messrs. H. B. Winfiekl, A. L. Davies, and Frank Shearman were elected to the committee, and the action of the com- mittee confirmed, in electing Mr. W. Harry to the seat vacant by the retirement of Mr. T. Jones. The secretary, acting secretary, and auditor (Mr. H. E. Sweeting) were re- elected, and it was decided to wire Captain Parker expressing good wishes, and the hope that he mitn be able to return. It was suggested tbt a payment be made to the auditor for his services, but Mr. Sweeting considered "that no alteration should be made during the war. An alteration was effected to the rules which give^life members all the privileges and rights possessed by ordinary members. The Chairman presented an exhaustive re- port as to the arrangements made with the Porthcawl Golf Club House Company (1898), by which the club house is now the property of the club. A letter from the whole section of the St. John's Ambulance Society was read thank- ing the club for its sympathy and kindness extended to the convalescent soldiers at the Rest Hospital. Thanks were especially due to the lady captain, Itrs. Orr. The Chairman announced that Mr. R. F. Orr, had again consented to act as vice-cap- tain.