Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PORTECAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTECAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL TO MEET MONTHLY tNSTEAD OF FORT- NIGHTLY. HAS PORTHCAWL HAD ENOUGH FLAG I DAYS? An ordinary meeting of the Ponhcawl U.D. Council was heid on Monday. Mr. T. James presided, and there were also present: —Messrs. T. E. Deere, T. G. Jones, and R. E. Jones, with the clerks (legal and deputy), and the surveyor. A vote of condolence witL the families cf three heroes, fallen' since the last meeting of the Council, v.z.. Private John, L.as -"ouci Private Trevor A. Thomas (-on of Rev. T. Tuon.as); and Corporal Ormonde Rove, Lias Cottages, wa's passed, aM present SLalld;llg. The Deputy Clerk read correspondence that had passed between himself and Supt. W. Davies, Bridgend, in regard to the new Light- ing Order. The Council asked to have ex- emption for a couple of lights in John Street, and Sn' Davies wrote that he would come and insect them. It is understood that that has now been done, and that the superinten- dent is satisfied that the lamps in question may be safely exempted. It was the Council's next duty to do vio- lence to its own feelings by curtailing its times of meeting. "In order to enable the omcials to devote more time to their duties" —so ran the preamble of the i:dl-the C'oun- cil decided, at the Instigation of one of its committees, to meet monthly instead of fort- nightly for the next six months. A self- denying ordinance, indeed' During this period, it is understood that the day of meet- ing will be on the first of each month. The next matter to engage the Council's attention was the question of the speed of motor cars going through the town. The speed limit had already been nxed at 6 miles an hour, and it was resolved that notices to this effect should be posted up at convenient points. RUSSIAN FLAG DAY. I A letter was read from the Central Russian Flag Day Committee, asking the Council to arrange for a Flag Day in their town at an early date. The movement, said the letter, existed with the object of showing in a tan- gible form our appreciation of the sacrifices and magnificent valour of our Russian allies. Already the splendid sum of 250,000 had been raised and handed over to Her Imperial Majesty the Empress of Russia. But the need was very great, and it was hoped there yould be no slackening of interest and en- deavour on the part of those who had already responded so generously. The Chairman thought that Porthcawl might be reasonably excused any further Flag Day activities just now. It was getting late In the season to do anything creditable. Mr. R. E. Jones: Could we promise to do anything next year, Mr. Chairman ? Mr. T. E. Deere would not like to see Porthcawl failing in its duty at a time like this. He thought that, late as it was in the season, and in, spite of the number of Flag Days they had had, the town might well rise to another. He moved that the Chairman be authorised to arrange, without delay, for a Russian Flag Day. Mr. T. G. Jones seconded. They did very well last year with their Russian Flag Day, and it was late then-in September, if'he re- membered rightly. He thought it was just as well to keep the ball rolling and to preserve the good name of the town in that respect. The proposition was carried. It was announced, to the satisfaction of the members, that no less a sum than 920 clear, after all expenses had been dedmted, had been handed over to the Belgian Artists' Fumd. TOWX PLANN'" I A letter was read from the Cory Workmen's Silver Band, asking permission to give a con- cert in the town on Sunday next, the 10th inst. The previous fixture had fallen through owing to the band being unable to procure a char-a-banc to convey them to vrthcawl. The Clerk was authorised to give the neces- sary permission. A letter wa& read from the South Wales Town Planning Association recalling that the Council some time ago received a deputation from that body, and that they, the Porthcawl Council, had made certain promises to the deputation. Had the Council, the letter asked, taken any steps in the direction prom- ised ? The question rather took a guilty Council aback. It is sometimes inconvenient to be reminded of promises, which, like pie-crusts, are notoriously made to be broken. The Chairman remarked that he supposed the only reply was, that nothing had been done. Mr. R. E. Jones: I think what they are ex- pecting us to do is to take steps. I think something ought to be done. We are on the eve of very big developments here, and I think that, as a. first step this Council ought to meet with the landowners. Had we had a body like the South Wales Town Planning Association to help and advise us in the early days, we should have a very different town from what we have. He proposed that a com- mittee be appointed to go into the matter. It was agreed that such a committee should be appointed some time during the coming winter, and with this Mr. Jones had perforce to be content. A letter was read from the Mumbles Hotels Association announcing that they had com- pleted their organisation, and asking whether the Porthcawl Council had done their allotted part. Had they, for example, apP'¡octed Mr. Brace, the member. The legal Clerk pointed out that nothing Ttad been decided by the Council in the matter either of approaching Mr. Brace, or of join- ing the deputation to the Board of Control. Mr. R. E. Jones moved that the Mumbles Association be asked to write Mr. Brace direct, while the Council on their side would Send that gentleman a copy of the resolution they had passed.—This was seconded and agreed to. I WAR LITLRATFRE COLLECTION. A communication was read from the Nat- ional Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. The Library, It seems, with a benevolent eye to posterity, has set itself to collect everything in Wales relating to the great war,-especially in regard to the recent celebration of the second anniversary of the declaration of war, an3 they a&ked' for copies of all posters, cir- culai- leanets, etc.. that the town had issued or that description. It was hearti!y decided that copies of all such literary matter issued by the Council be sent to the National Library. A letter from the Local Government Board on the subject of post-war work was the next matter considered. The 1-ocal Government Board wants to collect information from public bodies as data for an estimate as to the pro- bable amount of work of a public character (whether carried out by private Individuals or by public bodies), that will be undertaken at the close of the war-this with a view to estimating in advance the approximate amount both of labour and of capital that will be required. The wisdom of tackling the question now would, the president of the Local'Government Board' thought, be gener- aHy recognised. It was of vital importance to form some sort of forecast as to the amount of labour and capital likely to be available after the war. The particulars wanted were :—A short des- cription of the work contemplated, the degree of urgency of such work, the approximate amount of expenditure involved, the approxi- mate period of time over which the work would extend under ordinary conditions. Mr. R. E. Jones said they might report the number of private enterprises that are pend- ing in the town. He moved that the matter be left to the clerk and brought up at the next Works Committee. This was seconded by Mr. T. E. Deere, and carried. The Council were gratined by the reading of a letter from the National Patriotic Organi- zation thanking them and congratulating them on the result of their efforts in the direction of the celebration of the second anniversary of the outbreak of war. In regard to an application by a motor-ear owner for a license to ply for hire in the town, the license was granted, the vehicle having been duly inspected and found suitable. But Mr. R. E. Jones once more put in a protest against this system of applying for licenses "in dribs and drabs," and Mr. Deere moved, and it was seconded and carried, that next year public notice be given to that eSect.

Advertising

f I 1 PUMYAN SOAP I I is used in Britain's happiest homes is used m Brita* 's hanni*est homes I

LANDLORD OF PtER HOTEL FtNED I

LANDLORD OF PtER HOTEL FtNED. I Frederick NIcholls, of the Pier Hotel, I Porthcawl, was summoned at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday in respect of unobscured lights. Edward Lyons, a coast watcher employed by the Naval authorities, said that on Sunday. August 6th, he had occasion to speak to defendant concerning certain lights at the Pier Hotel. At five minutes past 9 at night he saw bright lights in three wiidbws on the nrst floor facing the sea; and the blinds were not drawn. Seeing a young lady In the omce, witness called her attention to it. She sent for the "boots," and the blinds were drawn. Witness added that on March 21st he cau- tioned the defendant, and thrice he warned membera of the hotel staff. Defendant said he did his best, and further explained that people, unthinkingly, turned on the lights. The Magistrates imposed a fine of JE2.

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED I

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED. I CoHectiom at Laieston and Tythegston. t On Sunday and Monday (August 20th and 21st). a very successful collection of eggs for our wounded soldiers at the "Rest," Portb- eawl, was made in the parishes of Laleston and Tythegston. The Laleston collection totalled 180 eggs, gifts in money being also received to the amount of Ss. 3d. At Tytheg- ston the respective totals were: Eggs, 152; money, 15a 6d. The following letter has been received from the Commandant of the "Rest,"—"I cannot tell you how grateful we are to you and to the inhabitants of Laleston and Tythegston for their splendid gift, which will be so much appreciated by the soldiers. Every man will have a real fresh egg for his breakfast to-mor- row morning, and the money so kindly collect- ed will start a "ncst-egg" for some future time. Will you please convey to all contri- butors our heartfelt thanks for their kindly Interest, and also, that we shall bf more than pleased to see any or all of them and to show them over the hospital any afternoon between 2.30 and 4.30." The list of contributors is as follows:— Ch&rlie Ball, Mra. Cross Mrs. Wm. David, Mrs. Durston, Mrs. Francis (Rhosia), Mrs. A. John, Mrs. Rees John (Brynawel), D.R.J., Mrs. Bateman Jones, Mrs. Bertie Jones, Mrs. J. Jones (Souare), Nurse Jones, Mrs. Wm. Jones, Mrs. Mason, Mrs. Matthews (Red Hill), David Morgan, Mrs. L. Ndcholl (Laics- ton House), Caasie Owen Mrs. PIttard, Mrs. PoweII (Mackworth Terrace), Mrs. Stenner, WiUie Stew, May Williams, Mrs. Young, Mrs. Cornelius (Tythegston), Miss Mordecai (Court (Continued on Bottom of Next Cohnnn.)

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED I

(Continued from previoua column). Isha), Mr. D. J. Jones (Turnip House), Ser- vants from Tythegston Court, Percy Hart, Gertie James, Katie Smith, Cora Smith, Cecil Knight, Mary Knight, Henry Knight, and John Knight (Tythegston Court), Gwyneth Pritchard, Bertie Evans, Leslie, Walter and Winnie Jones, Frank Hording (Penyrheol), Phyllis Harding, A. Hopkins, Eva Mordecai, and Mrs. Hunt (Wig Fach).

S COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

S COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS. } (By VELOX.") v & L' One day this week I enjoyed the following conversation with a farmer out Colwinstone way:- Well, Mr. ——, you have had a glorious hay harvest this year?" Aye, sure; very good; but my hens are laying very bad—and eggs 2s. 2d. a dozen in Bridgend. too." Your rickyard looks well." Yes, sure, but the ricks are taking up a lot of room this year." I see you have had to build ricks in the neld; no room in the yard." Yes, sure; but a lot of bother and ex- pense it is to cut postes to fence them round." This rain has improved your root crops." "Yes, sure, but the thistles are growing un- common quick." "Your cattle ought to do well on the latter- math. Yes, sure, but there are too many mush- rooms, and people do trample the grass." Have you had much dimculty in obtain- ing labour?" No, sure, but these old 'strlctions' is the worst of it. The men would want a couple of glasses extra after ave-off, instead of spend- ing their own money in the pubs, because they was shut." How has the Daylight Saving aNected you?" Oh, very good, sure; we have gained a lo of time in the evenings. But the men will have an extra hour in bed when we put the clocks back." Are you satisned with the prices you get for your stock at the auction marts?" Yes, sure, but, caton pawb, look what the butchers are getting for the skins." 1 t H Failing to get an expression of thankfulness without a "but," I ventured to suggest that we ought to be very thankful that we were so far removed from the Zepp. raids. "Yes, my boy, we are lucky; but in that big wind we had in the spring a tree fell across the shed and killed a duck for me." It is a good thing to know that all faxmeri of the Vale are not like this one. When walking home, I was glad to think that by- and-bye, when every church and chapel in the Vale will be echoing with the strains of Come, ye thankful people, come," there will be few more earnest and more sincere in praise and thankfulness than the farmers themselves. The noble work which the Farmers' Red Cross Society has done proves that they are alive to their obligations and re- sponsibilities. Turn where we will, we cannot forget the war. We have been pleased to welcome home Sergt. T. Edwards, Llanblethian, and Pte. J. Case, both recovering from wounds. It. seems a simple thing to say, "Home, wounded"; but only those who are "doing their bit" and nobly going through It know what it means. It was with sorrow that we heard on Satur- day evening that Lance-Corporal Fred Gibbs had been omcially reported as missing. Corpl. Gibbs is the son of Mr. Joseph Gibbs, Cow- bridge Printing Works. With the Sth Welsh, he went through that terrible experience at 8uvla Bay. After being invalided home he was transferred to the machine gun section, and while doing his bit in the "big push" in France, he has failed to return. He volun- teered for active service during the early stages of the war. A good athlete, a mem- ber of the Cowbridge Cricket Club, and an ex- ceedingly promising batsman, he was very popular in Cowbridge. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs, who have another son in the firing line, have the hearty sympathy of all. There are, of course, reasons for hoping that he is still alive and well. 1 1 We read that in Germany all household utensils of brass and copper are being collec- ted, but we were not aware that such a collec- tion was taking place In LIantwit Major. If such IS the case, then we can understand the mysterious disappearance of "two brass candlesticks" on Monday last; if not, then— "for shame." The more we get to know the good folks of Llantwit, the better we like them, but—sorry we have to ask—no offence, of course—but still, the candlesticks, Where are they? (Llantwit papers, please copy). Now, Pela-giua," can you In your excellent and interesting notes, endeavour to bring about a "rendering unto Caesar the things which are Csasar's"?

Advertising

ADVICE FREE.—Mrs. Stewart, Herbal Specialist, 9 Gumea Street, Briatol.

ITHE PILGRIMS OF THE NIGHT

THE PILGRIMS OF THE NIGHT. I The Song of the Shirt (New Style). ,I 1 (Written by Ptf. N. L. SHAW, 1st Batt., ) R.W.F.). When you take King George's shilling, And express yourself as willing To come out and nght the Hun, Then your troubles have begun, ]Vor you'll also have to fight With the Pilgrims of the Night. There are many things out here That you won't quite like, I fear- 'Gainst which you must contend, While'your country you defend But the thing to make you grouse Is—that aggravating louse. When you're going on' to sleep, They areeforming up two deep, When you're in the land of Nod, They are forming up in squad; And you'll And it most annoying When the sections start deploying. We don't mind the German boasts, We don't mind the German hosts; We can always play our cards When we meet the Prussian Guards; But it's fit to turn you balmy Wiping out this lousy army. When you've little army corpa On your body forming fours, Always on a night attack, Making charges up your back, Till you shout with all your might, Gott strafe the Pilgrims of the Night." You can pick them off In batches, You can burn them off with matches, You can kill them by the score; But you'll always find some more; You can scratch yourself to pieces, But you'll find your stock Increases. Though a hundred you may kill, You will find there's hundreds stil!, For they hide behind each other, They're Al at taking cover; And they hfve a useful bite, And a shocking appetite. There are families in dozens, Uncles, sisters, mothers, cousins; AItd they've al! got married quarters Where they hatch their sons and daughters, And they take a lot of catching, Also cause a lot of scratching. Then at last there comes a day When you throw your shirt away, And you cast your trousers, too (If they only let you do), And adopt the ancient style— Wearing nothing but, a smile. When your clean shirt's nicely on, Then you think the beasts are gone, But with sorrow you will learn That, like the Russians, they return, Reinforced from far and near, To attack you in the rear. Night and day you get no rest, Troubled with these dainty pests, And they never will be beaten While there's any flesh uneaten; And they'll give no peace until Kaiser William's paid his Bill.

ANSWER IT HONESTLY I

ANSWER IT HONESTLY! I Are Not the Opinions of Bridgend Residents I Better Than Those of Strangers? The above is a vital question. It directly concerns Bridgend people. It can't be ev&ded or ignored. The Bridgend woman who speaks here, speaks for the good of the district. Re&d right through for yourself, and ack- nowledge the truth of these facts. On March 27th, 1914, Mrs. M. Watkins, of "Primrose Villa," Vernon Street, near the Intermediate School, Coity Fields, Bridgend, said :—"I was troubled with my kidneys for a- number of years. At times the pains were very sharp and cutting across the kidneys and the loins. They used to take my breath away sometimes when they were so severe. I was often obliged to lay up for a time. I had touches of rheumatism, too, ip. my shoulders, and unnatural headaches; &y were almost unbearable. The urinary system showed signs of the complaint. "I was recommended to try Dean's back- ache kidney pills, and am pleased I did, for they gave me splendid relief. I took a course of them and gradually got better. It was not long before I was quite cured. Though this was some twelve years ago, I am pleased to say I have scarcely had any trouble with my kidneys since. I have taken Dean's pills occasionally and they prove most satisfactory. I often recommend them. (Signed) M. Wat- kins. On March 9th, 1916-TWO YEARS LATER —Mrs. Watkins said:—"I am keeping In very good health. After my experience of Doan's for sixteen yeara, my opinion of them is as great as ever. I have advised many people to try them as I did." Of all dealers, or 2s. 9d. a box, from Fcster- McCIelIan Co., 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kid- ney piIls,-ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mrs. Wat- I had. kins had.

Advertising

PIANOS: PIANOS I PIANOS I All British Made. Best Value in the World: An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS. A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH BVBRY INSTRUMBM. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terma M — — —Prices.— — — WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR 8TOOK<. Jrr.. Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), !nvite nspeetion ef the Latest Designs by the Leading British Hanafactarers, Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinsqn, Challen & Son, Collard 8' Collard, Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. La..geBii 3DIscalaimto 1'019 Cttatt Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey OrgtHM. t QuotatitM Gtwan for Pianos 

PENCOED I

PENCOED. MEMORIAL TO FALLEN SOLDIERS.— On Sunday evening a service was held at Trinity English Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, in memory of two Pencoed soldiers, Driver D. Matthews, Penprisk, and Private Henry An- derson, Tymerchant, who have fallen in the war. References to the deceased soldiers were also made at Salem Chapel by the visiting minister, Rev. M. H. Ellis, Trealaw; at Pen- uel Baptist Chapel by one of the deacons, Mr. Phtllip Hill; and at Bryn Seion Independent Chapel by Mr. Owen James. At the two latter places of worship a special hymn was also sung. Driver Matthews died in France as the result of an accident, and Private An- dersen as the result of wounds. WAR NEWS.—The great advance in France has cost the Empire the lives of many brave men, and Pencoed has not escaped the toll. We have already announced the death of Pri- vate F. Ashman. Intimation of this reached Mrs. Ashman some time ago, hut in the casu- alty lists last week the name of her husband! appears amongst the wounded. Unfortunate- ly the hopes thus raised were delusive. In Saturday's papers it was stated that the War Omce had sent the names of several soldiers to the Press Bureau under the heading of "wounded," when the names should have been placed under the tragic heading "killed." And included In the reclined list is the name of Private Frank Ashman.—Another fine soldier, from the village. Private Emmanuel Goss, is among the missing." The omcial intimation sent to his wife states that her husband has been missing since July 1st. Private Goss was a reservist when war broke out, and was employed as a postman at Pen- cced. He rejoined Ms old regiment, the Somerset Light Infantry, and went through the early part of the campaign without wounds. His visit to the village on the only furlough allowed him was not many months ago. There is a slender possibility that Prir vate Goss is a prisoner, as some of the Somer- sets fell into the hands of the enemy on July 1st. The missing soldier was of attractive personality, .and all will earnestly wish that one so well and deservedly liked may have been spared.—To the number of Pencoed sol- diers in hospital we regret to have to add) the name of Gunner John JeSries, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jenrles, Wimborne Terrace, Penprisk. Gunner Jenries served at the Dardanelles. Comitig through'that disastrous business, he was next included In the Mesopotamia. Ex- peditionary Force. He Is now in hospital In Bombay, suffering from enteric fever, or from Its results.

ICOWBRIDGE POLICE COURT

I COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT. ——-— ? ——— I Tuesday.—Before: Mr. IIItyd Williams anj the Mayor (Councillor D. Thomas). t MAJNTENANCE ORDER. M. A. Bendall sought to obtain a mainten- ance order against her husband, Joseph Ben- da! tinworker, of Talygarn Terrace, Llan- harry.—Complainant alleged ill-treatment, which was corroborated by two daughters.— Mr. Davies, solicitor, Pontyclun, appeared for complainant. Mr. Illtyd Williams, In giving the decision of the Bench, told defendant he thought' he was a "bad lot," and made an order for 21 a week, with jEl 6s. advocate's fee and costg, complainant to have the custody of the two youngest children. STRAYING COLTS. Tudor Thomas, LIsworney, for allowing colts to stray on the hiehway, was fined 10s. DRUNK IN CHARGE. John Jenkins, St. Athan, for being drunk In charge of a wagon and horses, had to pay 20s.

Advertising

I' Advertise in the "Glamorgan'Gazette If you want to eeM/ buy or exchange; yoc eMmotdobtttef.