Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CHEERING THEM UP I

CHEERING THEM UP. I SPORTS FOR THE WOUNDED AT PORTH- I CAWL. Sports were held at the Portheavvl Rest on Saturday for the entertainment of the wound- ed soldiers, Colonel Herbert Lewis and Mrs. Lewis (commandant • of the hospital) being chiefly responsible for the organisation of the event. The attendance included the Lord Mayor of Cardiff (Dr. R. J. Smith) and the Lady Mayoress (Miss Smith), Sir W. J. Tatem and Colonel J. P. Turbervill. The wounded and visitors were entertained to tea in the grounds, and the 3rd Welsh band played selections of music. The results were as follows:—Three-legged race-I, Bryant and Grove 2, Burgess and Oakman; 3, Robinson and Whittaker. Bun- eating—1, Crump; 2, Carpenter; 3, Maule. Sack race—1, Young; 2, Geddon; 3, Whit- taker. Tug-of-war—No 7. Ward patients. Pillow fight-I, Mole; 2, Carpenter. Wheel- barrow race—1, Mole and Carpenter; 2, Bur- gess and Oakman; 3, Young and Crump. Boot race—1, Mole; 2, Stinchcoombe; 3, Mc- Claude. Bread and butter cutting, for nurses—1, Nurse Alexander; 2, Nurse Pearce 3. Nurse Llewellyn. Tug-of-war, for nurses- St. John's Ambulance Team. Colonel Tuberville presented the prizes to the winners, remarking that it was quite right an old soldier should present the prizes to young soldiers who had just done their bit. (Cheers).

FORTHCAWL

FORTHCAWL. RUNAWAY PONY.—On Saturday a Porth- cawl pony, belonging to a milk-vendor, bolted through Messrs. Thomas Phillips and Sons' plate-glass window, smashing it to bits. The pony was so injured that it had to be shot.

TONDU AND abebkenfig I

TONDU AND abebkenfig. BRYNGARW V.T.C. BAND.—The Bryn garw V.T.C. Band paid a second visit to Coy- trahen Red Cross Hospital on Saturday last, and rendered an interesting programme of music, to the great enjoyment of the patients. Included in the programme was: March, Black Dike"; selection, The Spanish Carnival"; waltz, "Woodland"; overture, "Diamond Cross"; Lancers, "Hoopla"; se- lection, "The Golden Cross" march, Ter- ritorials." Mr. J. Barton was the conduc- tor. SUNDAY SCHOOL FESTIVAL.—The an- nual Sunday School Festival of the St. Bridos Minor Parish Church was held on Sunday last. The morning service was taken by the Rev. W. R. Wild, and the evening service by the Rector (Rev. E. J. Rosser), both of whom preached appropriate sermons to large con- gregations. In the afternoon the scholars, assisted by the clioir (under Mr. Barton's leadership) gave a good rendering of the sac- red musical service, entitled, The Great Teacher." The following took part:—Reci- tations, Minnie Watts, Phyllis Jones, Violet Green, Maggie Williams, Violet Thomas, May Watts, Florrie Thomas, Olive Watts, Phyllis John, Florrie Strong, Eva John, May John, Edwards, Olive Jenkins, Hilda Phillips, Ethel Hitchings, Gladwys Jenkins, and Harriet Hughes; solos, Blodwen Williams, Violet Thomas, May Watts, Phyllis Jones, Inez Morgan, Florrie Thomas, and Florrie Strong. The organist was Mrs. E. Mole. FRENCH WAR HONOUR. Sergeant (acting Piper-Major) D. Anderson, recently discharged from the Coytrahen Red Cross Hospital, where he had made a host of friends by his genial manner, was formerly a member of the Edinburgh City Police Force. When the attack began on the 1st July, three of the pipers asked permission to go forward with the men. Anderson was one of the three, and he was hit shortly after he had crossed the parapet of the Royal Scots trench. In spite of his injury he went ahead, and was hit a second time when he reached the German trenches, where he was attackd by one or more of the enemy. Describing what hap- pened at this juncture, an officer of the batta- lion says:—"Throwing down his pipes, Ander- son weat for the enemy with his fists, knocked one out, seized a rifle, and joined in the fight. After that he was lost sight of, and we feared he was killed, till we got word of him in a hospital with three or four wounds." The division of which the battalion formed a unit was awarded one Croix de Guerre, and An- derson; was selected for the honour of receiv- ing it, his being considered a most conspicuous case of gallantry. Anderson, who is a native of Edinburgh, is 26 years of age. He enlisted on the 8th October, 1914. He was very popu- lar with his colleagues, and to them and the friends and staff of Coytrahen Hospital, and district the news of the distinction has given great pleasure.

BETTWS I

BETTWS. CONCERT.—A grand concert was held at the Bettws Schoolroom on Wednesday even- ing last week in aid of the fund for the re- ception of local soldiers home from the front. The singing and reciting were excellent, and, judging by the loud applause after each item, were greatly enjoyed by the audience which packed the hall. In the unavoidable absence of Mr. David Morgan (Celfydd Evan), the chair was taken by Mr. J. A. Williams. The programme was as follows:—Solos, Misses S. A. Riggs, Gwen Evans, Blodwen Evans, and Messrs. David Lewis, John Evans, David Jones, T. D. Williams, W. Griffiths; duet, Miss Gwen Evans and Mr. John Evans; reci- tations, Miss Cassie Duckett and Mr. Jenkin Evans; pianoforte solo, Mr. Gomer Jones. The aceompanist was Miss S. A. Riggs. At the conclusion the audience sang the National Anthem with great enthusiasm.-It is the in- tention of the Committee to present a fine silver medallion, suitably inscribed, to each local soldier returning from the front.

Advertising

ADVISE FREE .—Mrs. Stewart, Herbal I Specialist, 9 Guinea Street, BriatoL I co, cOO" h I PURITAN SOAP is used in Britain's happiest homes 260

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL i

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL FOR GILFACH GOCH. Following closely-on our last week's report of the winning of the Military Medal by Cpl. W. J. Winn, we are glad to learn that the coveted honour has been awarded to another Gilfach man, namely, Pte. Percy Harvey, Welsh Regiment, whose invalid and widowed mother lives at Penybryn, Gilfach Goch. On the 7th ult., when volunteers were called for to looked after a wounded man in an ex- posed position. Private Harvey, although half-stunned by a shell, volunteered to do so. He collected six more wounded men and stayed with them for four day-, feeding them on what British and German rations he could get, until he was relieved by Captain Macken- zie, R.A.M.C., Cameron Highlanders, on the 11th ult., when the wounded men were taken away. He showed courage, resource, and tenacity of purpose, and probably saved several lives. Previous to joining the colours Private Har- vey was employed at the Britannic Collieries, Gilfach Goch, and was an enthusiastic member of the local "Llewellyn's Own" Troop of Boy Scouts.

OGMORE VALE I

OGMORE VALE I SCHOLASTIC SUCCESS.—Our heartiest congratulations to Miss Edith Pope, Ogmore Vale, who has been successful in passing the Welsh Matriculation Examination, at the age of 16-an unusual feat for one so young. Miss Pope is at present employed at the Aber Girls' School, under Miss E. Rees. Her sis- ter, Miss Annie Pope, was also successful, and has qualified for entrance to a training col- lege. Our best wishes for the success of both sisters are cordially extended to them. HARVEST FESTIVAL.— The harvest thanksgiving services in connection with St. David's Church, Ogmore Vale, were held on Sunday and Monday last. The preacher on Sunday was the Rev. P. Francis, Treorky, who delivered excellent sermons to crowded congregations, while on Monday evening the Rev. David Phillips, Vicar of Newcastle, Bridgend, occupied the pulpit. His sermon was eloquent and most impressive. The sac- red building was crowded. The choir, under the conductorship of Mr. T. Dorney, beauti- fully rendered the anthem, Seed-time and Harvest shall not Cease." The following clergymen also took part in the service:—The Revs. D. Matthias, Ogmore Vale; Adams Evans, Nantymoel; and J. D. Jones, (lay reader). The singing, was excellent through- out. CHILD'S FUNERAL.—The funeral of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Treherne, j Dunraven Place, Ogmore Vale, took place on Friday last at Ogmore Vale Cemetery. The funeral was well attended, and great sym- pathy is felt for the sorrowing parents. Mrs. Treherne has recently lost a brother in France. The following were the mourners: Messrs. H. Treherne (father), W. Treherne, Ernest J. Treherne, Emlyn J. Treherne, D. M. Treherne (brothers), J. O. Treherne (brother of Mr. H. Treherne), G. Rogers (bro- ther of Mrs. Treherne), Mrs. Sarah Treherne (wife of Mr. Wm. Treherne, who is now serv- ing his King and country at the front); Mr. Shem Davies, Nantymoel (uncle); Miss M. A. James, Nantymoel (cousin); Mrs. Davies, Nantymoel (cousin). The Rev. T. Thomas, Philadelphia Chapel, Ogmore Vale, officiated at the house and at the graveside. GARDEN PARTY.—An interesting and enjoyable function took place on Thursday last week at Gorwyl, Ogmore Vale, the resi- dence of Alderman W. Llewellyn, J.P., when Mrs. Llewellyn gave a garden party to the members of the N.S.P.C.C. Committee. It was a happy thought of Mrs. Llewellyn's to include also the War Sewing Class and the Red Cross V.A.D. The weather was all that could be desired, and the uniforms of the Red Cross Nurses scattered here and there about the grounds made the scene a very pleasing and picturesque one. The very in- teresting musical programme included harp solos by Miss Ada Thomas, of Swansea, who played in very finished style. The other items included songs, recitations, and piano- forte duets. The lady palmist was in great demand, and (so it is whispered) caused quite a flutter amongst the ladies. The function was a great success in every way, and every- body present thoroughly enjoyed themslves. Thanks are due to Mrs. Llewellyn and to Alderman W. Llewellyn for one of the most enjoyable garden parties ever held in Og- more Vale.

SUCCESSFUL FLAG DAY AT NANTYI MOEL

SUCCESSFUL FLAG DAY AT NANTY- I MOEL. On Saturday last the young ladies of the Nantymoel district were busy selling flags to help the Red Cross. Particulars will be given next week. The presence of several wounded soldiers added much to the success of the appeal made.

PYLEI

PYLE. I SCHOLASTIC.—Miss Doris M. Davies, I M.A., Comelly, near Pyle, has been appointe4 I assistant teacher at Aberayon County School. J ? ?- 1 -1

NANTYMOEL I

NANTYMOEL MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday even- ing last at St. Paul's Church a memorial ser- vice was held in honour of the late Mrs. Clara Griffiths, of Pleasant Villa. She was a highly respected member of St. Paul's, and when her health permitted she took an active interest in the work of the Church. The Vicar, Rev. — Pugh, conducted the service, which was impressive throughout.—Reference was also made to the death of the late Sergeant Ed-* ward Richards.$ OBITUARY".—We regret to record the *death of Mrs. Hughes, Vale View, the, wife of Mr. David Hughes, checkweigher at the Ocean Colliery. She had not been strong for some time, but at the end of last week she was taken seriously ill, and died on Saturday morning. 52 years of age, and a member of Saron Welsh Baptist Church, she was much respected by all who knew her. Much sym- pathy is felt with Mr. Hughes and the children in their bereavement. The funeral took place on Wednesday. DEATH OF A SOLDIER.-News has reach- ed Mrs. Prynne, Ogwy Street, that her brother, Sergeant Edward Richards, 13th Glcucesters, died in a Red Cross Clearing Hos- pital in France on September 1st. An old Grenadier Guardsman, Sergeant Richards, fought through the African War without a scratch. He had medals in recognition of his active service in that war. A very cour- ageous man, he formed one of the rescue party at the Senghenyd Explosion in 1913. He was 38 years of age, and he offered his. services early in the war. The following 1 letter was received from a Sister in the hospi- tol, dated Sept. 3d: —"Dear Mrs. Prynne— I am very sorry to have to convey to you the sad news of the death of your dear brother (Sergeant E. Richnrds, 13th Gloucesters). He was admitted to this clearing station several days ago suffering from very severe wounds in the right leg. He was so ill and collapsed that the medical officer was unable to operate on him until the following day, when he had his leg amputated, but nothing seemed to help him, the gangrene had gone practically through his body. Until a few hours before he died he suffered very little pain. He-died about 9 -p.m., on 1st of September. He was an excellent patient, and I was very sorry indeed that nothing could save his life. Everything that was possible was done. It is one consolation for you to know that he had, a comfortable bed, was well cared for, and spent his last hours in peace and comfort. Accept my deepest sympathy at this time in your sad bereavement.—Yours sincerely, J. .Gray (Sister)." Sergeant Richards was quite a favourite among his friends, and there is very sincere sympathy with his relatives in their sad loss.

IHEOLYCYW PARISH COUNCIL VACANCY

HEOLYCYW PARISH COUNCIL VACANCY. To the Editor. I Sir,—Anyone unacquainted with the facts \might gather from your account of the pro- ceedings at the Heolycyw Parish Council meet- ing on Tuesday of last week that the opinion of the workmen, as voiced by me, was that Mr. Morgan Rees, manager, at Raglan Collieries, should be elected to fill the vacancy on the Council caused by the removal of Mr. J. B. Hawkins; whereas nothing could be further from the fact. The position is as follows:—It having leaked out (quite accidentally, for the Council do not court publicity in these matters) that the vacancy was going to be filled, and that Mr. Rees was a hot favourite for the position, a message was sent to the parishioners in Heol- cyw, asking them to attend the Council meet- ing to request the Parish Council to fill the vacancy by electing Mr. John Evans. A large number of voters attended, and a grudging per- mission was given me to voice their opinion, which was, that Mr. Evans was entitled to the seat on the ground that he polled the highest number of votes of those who failed to get re- turned at the last election, and that his devoted work in the interests of the people during a great number of years, especially his great fight in the interests of the Commoners, pre-emi- nently fitted him to represent the people on the Parish Council; and, further, that if the pro- posed Provisional Order goes through in its pre- sent form, Mr. John Evans had an unimpeach- able claim to be one of the two members who would have to be appointed by the Council to sit on the Board of Conservators. But no reason that was, or could be, brought forward had any effect on the Council. A plea that they would defer the election, and call a parish meeting to decide on a successor to the retiring member was equally ineffective. Dame Rumour for once was not a lying jade. For, ignoring the claims of a man whom, it would be safe to say, would poll 80 per cant. of the votes in the parish, the Council elected their own choice, and Mr. Morgan Rees romped home in a canter. The fact is, the Council has never forgiven Mr. Evans his championship of the Commoners' rights, and they never will forgive him. In acting as they have, they no doubt acted within their Ifcgal rights, and once more clearly showed that there is a difference between law and jus- tice.—But, let there be no mistake about this: We shall remember!—Yours, etc., MERVYN W. PAYNE. Heol-Iaethog, 9th Sept., 1916. v ? ? ?. I-  .? I ?? h !-I

HARYEST IN FLANDERS

HARYEST IN FLANDERS. WHAT FRANCE LOOKS LIKE !N WAR TIME. The following interesting and well written impression" of La Belle France, from the pen of a South Glamorgan soldier, reaches us from "General Headquarters, 9th Army Corps, B.E.F." :— As I have spent many vacations in harvesting in the Vale of Glamorgan (writes our corres- pondent), I thought it would not be a waste of time to write something about a harvest in Flanders under war conditions, especially as you have many farmers among your readers. The .country reminds one of Kent in the ab- sence of hedges and its general flatness. The soil, rich in itself, is well fertilised from year to year, and the sight of the grain on the fields at the present time is one to cheer the heart even of a Glamorgan farmer. The corn harvest is earlier here, being practically over by the 3rd week in August. During the past months I have travelled through,much of this area- from the trenches to some twenty miles or so behind the firing line. The land behind the fighting area appears like one huge garden- evep under the difficult conditions that prevail during war time. This is due, primarily, to the great industry of the people. They are hard-working, careful, and thrifty, though not as clean as one would wish to see. It was a common sight in the spring-time to see men, wearing knee-pads, crawling along to weed the rows of mangolds or chicory. f Women and girls were busy from dawn to sun- set, hoeing and weeding and planting. When the history of this war comes to be written a place will surely be found to chronicle the heroic efforts the women of France and Bel- gium have made to keep up the cultivation of the land. No labour has been spared, with the result that the land is as well cultivated as in times of peace. The people here adopt many methods and employ not a few instruments which appear ^trange and old-fashioned to the eye of a Gla- mcrganite. A great deal of the work is done by hand, where we at home would employ horse-machines. Perhaps this- is due to the lightness of the soil. For instance, the ground between rows of root crops is kept clear of weeds by means of a hand-hoe, a kind of miniature "horse hoe." It has a big wheel in front, behind which are two sharps knives bending inwards, and two handles, be- tween which the worker stands to drive it ahead of him. The farm wagons, especially, appear heavy and clumsy. This is due to the flat country the absence of hills allows of the carrying of huge loads, and consequently the wagons are more strongly made. The most striking thing about the whole harvest is the method of cutting the corn. Wheat is chiefly grown in this area, and the harvesting of this was started about the middle of July. From that time until now I have seen only three self-binders at work. The vast bulk of the work is done by hand, an implement some- thing like a miniature scythe being employed for the work. It is manipulated with one hand, the left hand-being free to wield a long single prong, which is curved so as to arrange the fall into sheaves at the guidance of the harvester. The days of competition in the harvest field are not passed; there is some- thing of an echo from the past when we see the keenness between riral mowers, and a man can earn quite a name for himself in the locality by his prowess in the harvest field. Instead of counting the number of rabbits captured during the day, they count the num- ber of acres reaped. Whatever else this method may lack, it does not lack in point of thoroughness. The fields show hardly an ear of corn left uncut, and a similar appearance must have prompted the poet of the past to compare a freshly shaven man to "fields of stubble newly mown." The work of reaping is done by men—sol- diers on leave often lending a hand. The loose sheaves are tound and "stocked" by girls and women; a new illustration of thoroughness is seen in this, for the "stooks," usually containing six sheaves, are placed in a few thick rows and the head of each sheaf in the stook is tied together by means of a binder; then within a few days the land be- tween the rows is ploughed up to prevent the growth of weeds. As there are no hedges, the reaped fields can be seen for miles around, and it.. is a pleasant* sight to see the brown cornfields in the light of the setting sun. Truly, it is a land fair to look upon outside. the zone of fire. A great variety of crops is grown. Very little hay is produced in this area, but that little is of the very best, rich clover. Two crops are grown during the year, and har- vested in May and September. It is garnered in small stacks in the fields, a long pole is placed upright in the ground, and the hay built round in the shape of a cone. A sub- stitute for hay is pea fodder, which is exten- sively grown, and is harvested at the same time as the wheat. Horse-beans are grown to a great extent, but the harvest comes much later. Oats are also grown, but there are but few awes of it; it is harvested at the same time as tme wheat. Many acres of land are devoted to growing French beans. These- "haricot" beans form the staple dish for the poorer people, who are almost entirely vege- tarian. At the time of writing the hop-fields pre- sent a very picturesque scene. The tall poles I, J flourish green garlands of hops in bloom. The I harvest will come towards the end of Septem- ber. Maize and chicory are somewhat new to the visitor. The former grows well, but the growth varies in different parts of each field. in one place it will be quite sickly, and in another the plants will be tall and flourish- ing. A regular growth is seldom seen Tobacco is grown in parts of, Belgium, and it is a common sight to see the leaves hang- ing in long lines to dry outside the Belgian cottages. It would not be out of place to mention the condition of the land near the firing zone. Up .to within sight of the lines, the land is well cultivated, especially if a hill intervenes. Last spring it was an interesting, sometimes diverting, sight t6 see the big German shells dropping in some newly sown fields and send- ing up clouds of dust and smoke as the only evidence of their arrival, and doing no more damage than to excavate a big hole.—The in- dustrious husbandman would come along the next day, fill up the shell-hole, and sow more seeds on top. The land near the trencnes is a waste and barren place, where long grass and weeds flourish amid barbed wire defences, and cover up traces of former trenches. Nature here is laid desolate. The aspect is a strange con- trast from the gardens of France and Bel- gium. The heart of the stranger is saddened after coming through those fertile plains of France and Flanders. A chill steals over the soul as when one emerges from a fair garden into a wilderness abounding with traps and devices for the snaring of man and wild beast.

Advertising

J  n?B:??s?S   PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS t All British Made. Best Value in the World* An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS, A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms on —Prices.— WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK,, Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Invite rnspeetion of the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead, Broadwood PIa yer Pianos, Hopkinson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Largest Discounts fOIl Ca.sh. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. « Quotations Givon for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingtfam. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' .1., Wyndham Street, BRIDGEND. I WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. FOR OR ff?. I SALE''i '-HHl i v" yN y  ø TA tJNIVE RShL' CA?? ? There is Not a Distributing Trade In the Country that does not use :FORD VANS And Not One of them is likely to revert to any Other Form of Haulage. There are More Ford Vans in Use THAN VANS Of ALL OTHER lIAKES (OF THE SAME t CAPACITY) PUT TOGETHER. Just because the FORD VAN, literally as well as metaphorically, DELIVERS THE GOODS. Price (Complete) £130. Less S10 Rebate j  OSCAR CHESS, ™ Ford Service Depot (Tel. No. 2), KENFIG HILL, GLAIK.

BLAENGARW I

BLAENGARW. MEMORIAL SERVICE.—An impressive memorial service to the late Mr. Gwilym Richards was held at St. James* Church, Blaengarw, on Sunday evening last. Rev. H. Campbell Davies, B.A. (ivar), officiated, anw delivered an excellent sermon on the text, "If a man die, shall he live again?" (Job xiv., 14). The processional hymn was "There is a blessed home," and the recessional, "On the Resurrection Morning." The hymn, "Holy Father, in Thy mercy," was very feelingly sung as a vesper. The "Dead March" in Saul was played by Mr. W. Plummer, junr., after the benediction. Special lessons were read by Mr. G. H. Simon. The singing was. .under the conductorship of Mr. Evan Griffiths.

OGMORE VALE CORPORAL AT SALONIKA

OGMORE VALE CORPORAL AT SALONIKA. The many friends of Corporal E. Williams* 7th South Wales Borderers, and of JohttSt. Ogmore Vale, will be pleased to hear that he is in the pink of condition, and with his regi- ment at Salonika. The gallant Corporal, in. a letter to a chum of his, Pte. Ben Lewis, R.D.C., Ogmore Vale, writes as follows:- Whenever this division gets into action it is going to make a name for itself. We have been mentioned in dispatches for the fine work we did when we fame here last winter. We saved Salonika, as very likely you have read in the papers at home. We dug trenches- in weather that was unbearable—especially our Brigade, which is composed of the 7th apd< 8th S.W. Borderers, 11th Welsh Royal Fusi- liers, and the 11th Welsh Regiment (Cardiff Pals). I should like you to see those trenches—all rock, in the finest position I ever saw. They are impregnable, and the Bulgars know it. It is "God help them" when they meet us. I can honestly tell you we are waiting for the day. Remember me to all in Ogmore.—Your old pal, Ted." Corporal Williams was very popular in Og- more Vale. He was one of the tallest and' biggest men in the district, and was familiarly known as Big Ted."