Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
1918 NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD I

1918 NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD. I BARRY COMPETING W!TH PORTHCAWL I Barry, which made a powerful claim for the National Eisteddfod held at Aberystwyth this year, is again In the neld renewing its appli- cation for the eisteddfod of 1918. The Rev. J. S. Longdon, M.A., rector of Cadoxton- Barry, presided over a committee meeting on Monday evening, when substantial guarantee were reported, and arrangements were made for a public meeting to be held to further the object in view. Mr. D. Arthen Evans is the hon. secretary, and Councillor C. B. Grimths, J.P., chairman of the Barry District Council, attended the gathering, and he will preside over a town's mating to be held shortly.

PORTHCAWL WARTME OFFENCES

PORTHCAWL "WAR-T!ME' OFFENCES. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, William Williams, a commercial traveller who keeps a boarding-ho at Pot'tlM-awI, was summoned for failing to notify the departure of an alien named Esther Hyman, in compli- ance with the. Act—The omcer who proved the case, in reply to the Chairman, said defen- dant took in only two lodgers in the summer- time, and no book for entries to be made was kept upon the premises.—Fined 10s. Marv Morgan, single, Rose Cottage, New- ton, was also nned 10s. for a similar offence. The alien in this case was a lady named Andrias Johanna Alum. Defendant ex- plained to P.O. Vallanse that defendant left so hurriedly that there was no time rn which to fill up the form.—Fined 10s. Evan Rees, grocer, Suffolk Place, Porth- càwl, was fined tl for not having Ms lights obscured on 30th August. Defendant, who had been previously warned, said, "I forgot all about it. Give me another chance." Thomas A. Watkins, grocer, also of Porth- cawl, was fined JE1 for a similar offence.

WORK THAT TELLSI

WORK THAT TELLS. I PLENTY OF WORK HAS BEEN DONE IN BRIDGEND. Cures that last are cures that tell. To judge a remedy study its lasting effect. You have plenty of evidence here in Bridgend. A Bridged woman who testined years ago, now declares that relief has been permanent. How can the word of so earnest a neighbour be doubted ? Read it: On November llth, 1905, Mrs. M. A. Pur- neU, of 3, Brackia Street, near the Hermon Welsh Chapel, Bridgend, said:— "Owing to my kidneys being out of order I suffered for several years with sharp pains in my back. I often felt as if I were being stabbed. It was only with great pain and dimculty that I could stoop, and when-I got up it seemed as if my back would break in two. I also had headaches and attacks of dizziness, my rest was broken, and I seldom felt fresh and well in the mornings. "I found a good medicine, however, In Dean's backache kidney pills. These suited me splendidly, and I gradually got better. I was able to do my housework without the dart- ing pains in my back; the dizziness and head- aches went away, and I could again sleep well. I think Dean's pills an excellent medi- cine for the kidneys, and shall not fail to tell my friends of the good they have done for me. (Signed) M. A. Purnell." On March 9th, 1916-0 VER TEN YEARS LATER-Mrs. Pumell said:—" I was cured by Dean's pills over ten years ago, and I am pleaesed to say there has been no return of the complaint. This speaks well for so effect- ive a remedy. Doan's backache kidney pills relieve con- gestion and innammation of the kidneys ,and promote a free now from the bladder, so that the uric acid poison which causes rheumatism, backache, gravel, urinary disorders, and so many other complaints is flushed out of the system. Of all dealers, or 2s. 9d. a box, from Foster- McClellan Co., 8, Wolls Street, Oxford Street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kid- ney pills-ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mrs. Pur- nell had.

I CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORSI

I CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. I COURT MARTIAL SENTENCES AT I KtNMEL PARK. Ott Monday, at Kinmel Park, Rhyl, the following sentences by District Court Martial were promulgated, the offence in each case being a refusal to obey all military orders :— John Day, boot dealer, Nantygyllon, Maes- teg, two years' hard labour. Edwin R. Anthony, assistant schoolmaster, Cefn Cribbwr, two years' hard labour. Willie Lewis, assistant schoolmaster, Cefn Cribbwr, two years' hard labour. The sentences will be served in Wormwood Scrubs Prison.

PONTYCLUN UEUTENANTS SAD ENDI

PONTYCLUN UEUTENANT'S SAD END. I Intimation has been received by Mr. Gomel Morgan, civil engineer, Pontyclun, that his second son, Lieutenant Arthur Lewis Mor- gan, of the Welsh Regiment, has died as the result of injuries received accidentally near the Suez Canal. The deceased omcer, who was 24 years of age, joined the Welsh Regi- ment with one of his brothers, and they re- 'ceived commissions in March of last year. Lien. A. L. Morgan went to Suvia Bay in August last year, and served through the Gallipoli campaign, and subsequently proceed- ed to Egypt. In civil life he was a civil en- gineer, and prior to the war, was assistant to the surveyor of the Llantrisant and Llantwit Vardro Rural District Council. Three bro- thers of the deceased officer are serving in his Majesty's forcoa.

Advertising

PURITAN SOAP 1 is used in Britain's happiest homes I MO ?

BOARD OF GUARDIANSI

BOARD OF GUARDIANS. ACCOMMODATION tN COTTAGE HOMES. I GUAROtANS TO START POULTRY- II KEEPtNG. The ordinary monthly meeting of the Bridg- end and Cowbridge Board of Guardians was held at the Union Omces, Bridgend, on Satur- day, Colonel J. I. D. NichoII presiding. After the routine business of the day, the nrst communication of interest to be brought before the members was a letter from the Local Government Board asking fcr informa- tion in regard to projected works enterprises after the war. Mr. Long," ran the circular, "has in con- templation the establishment of a register of works available and likely to be undertaken at the conclusion of the war, and is of opinion that this can best be compiled from Informa- tion which local authorities may possess or be able to obtain. While realising the im- possibility of attempting to forecast the posi- tion at the end of the war as regards either the supply of material or capital or the prices at which these can be obtained," Mr. Long was yet of the opinion "that the release of transport now engaged on war work should have the effect of reducing the cost of mate- rial," and that "there seems every reason to anticipate that plenty of labour will be avail- able for almost every class of work." The information asked for concerned work to be undertaken both- by public and private enterprise., though as regards the latter, "the information obtainable cannot be regarded as absolutely reliable in all circumstances. The inclusion of particular works in the re- gister, the circular went on to say, "will not in any way bind the undertakers to proceed with such works. AH that is wanted is to form some idea of the character and extent of the works which may be undertaken at the close of the war, and the capital and labour they will be likely to absorb." On the motion of Mr. P. H. Price, the matter was referred to the Workhouse Com- mittee. ACCOMMODATION IN COTTAGE HOMES. I The Board had next to consider & query from the Newport Guardians as to whether the Bridgend Board could accommodate some of Newport's children in the Cottage Homes. Mr. W. A. Howetl, chairman of the Cottage Homes Committee, said that there were at present two cottages empty. Each cottage would hold twelve children. Mr. T. C. Jones: Are the empty cottages staffed ? The Superintendent of the Cottage Homes: No, sir. Mr. Jones proposed that Newport be told that 12 children could be received. Mr. D. H. Price: Why not the full 24 ? Mr. Jones: Because we don't want to use up all our spare room. We may require more accommodation for our own children. (Hear, hear.) The Superintendent hero Intimated that al- together there was room for another 30 child- ren in the Cottage Homes. Mr. Jones said that in that case he was quite willing to make the number 24, seeing they would still have a substantial margin. Mr. W. A. Howell said he was quite In sym- pathy with Mr. Jones' motion, but the dim- culty was the stamng. Could Newport send a "mother" with the children? He moved that they be asked to do so. Both motions were carried, and the ques- tion of terms was discussed. MT. D. H. Price asked if they might know the cost of maintaining the children in the Homes. The Chairman (Colonel J. I. D. NIchoII): 11s. 7d. a week, according to the returns for the half-year ending September, 1915. Mr. T. J. Job said the cost to-day waa con- siderably higher than lls. 7d. It would be found to be nearer 13s. The Clerk (Mr. R. Harmar Cox) more than confirmed Mr. Job's view, saying that the increase since the date mentioned was 2s. per head. It was decided* to ask Newport to pay the full cost per child—it being understood that the iigure quoted would include the payment of the "mother." MISUSE OF THE WORKHOUSE." I A letter was read from the Swansea Guar- dians asking the Board's support for a resolu- tion condemning the alleged misuse of the workhouse by persons insured under the Nat- ional Insurance Act, and suggesting, as a remedy, that in such cases the insurance bene- fit under the Act should be paid to the Guar- dians, and not to the person insured. The gist of the resolution, as read out to the Board, ran as foJIows:— "Resolved, that inasmuch as insured per- sons who use the workhouse for periods during which sick pay runs, and draw the accum- ulated sick pay due to them on their discharge returning to the workhouse after drawing the same, to repeat such procedure, and thereby get the bcnent of sick pay and institution treatment at the public expense-it is the opinion of the Guardians. that the National Health Insurance Acts should be so amended as to permit of payment by approved societies to the Guardians of the sick pay for the periods during which the in. ured persons have been maintained and treated in the work- i house. The Clerk announced that he had received a further letter from Mr. G. Davies, LIantwit Major, in reference to the case in which re- lief had been stopped. j Hev. D. PhiUips: I move, Mr. Chairman, that we don't hear it. (Laughter). Mr. T. J. Job said that he thought the Board ought to hear the man's letter. If there were a genuine grievance it ought to be ventilated. Mr. D. H. Price: It will g-ve us a. good laugh, at any rate. The Board having decided by a narrow majority to bear the letter, it was accordingly read. It was much on the saae lines as the writer's previous communication to the .Board, which it charged with (among other thing), caHing the woman in question "nithy names." The Clerk: I don't understand what he means by "filthy names." A Mem ber: What are the real facts of this case? The Clerk: The facts in ait word are these. It is perfectly simple. We a!fowed the woman relief because we understood the husband was an interned alien. We find he is not, hence we have stopped the relief. As a matter of fact we have no power to pay this woman re- lief. After this explanation, which the Board un- animously accepted as a completely satisfac- tory one, the matter was allowed to drop. A letter was read from the Incorporation of National Institutions for Persons Requiring Car.? and Control, Westminister informing the. Board that they would shortly have additional accommodation for children under 16 years of } age, and asking whether the Board would be likely to want to make use of this accommo- dation. The Chairman: It is something for us to know In case we should want a-ccommodation. On the motion of Rev. D: Phillips the matter was turned over to the House Com- mittee. VOTES OF SYMPATHY. I Mr. T. C. Jones moved a. vote of sympathy and condolence with "their colleague," Rev. Morgan Thomas, the Vicar of Bettws, in the sad loss of his brilliant son, Lieutenant Wynd- ham Thomas. The words of such a resolution would not be much use to Mr. Thomas, but would, at least, prove to him that they, his colleagues on the Board, appreciated and valued the great sacrince Ira son had made on the altar of duty and patriotism. The late omcer was a young man of brilliant prospects, one who would inevitably have forged ahead and carried out a great future for himself. Mr. CanniS, as one who had known the late omcer from his early youth, associated him- self very heartily with the remarks that had faUen from Mr. Jones. He had never met a man of such charming character. Mr. T. J. Job moved a. similar vote of con- dolence and sympathy to another of their colleagues, Rev. W. R. Boven, Maesteg, on the loss of his wife. Both votes were passed by the mem bers rising to their feet in sconce. CARE OF FEEBLE-MINDED. I Mr. David Thomas, w&rrant omcer, now in- troduced the matter of the half-dozen or so feeble-minded persons at Maesteg, whom the Board is anxious to get into the Drymma. In- stitution. As instructed at the previous meet- ing he had threatened the relatives of these people that unless they consented to their re- moval to the Institution their relief would be stopped. The reply in each case was that they would not consent to the removal. They "would rather beg their bread from door to door." Rev. D. Phillipa said he wae sorry these people had refused. The matter had been thrashed out in committee, and he must move in the interests of the feeble-minded as well as of the ratepayers that the relief In these cases be stopped. Mr. Michael Dalles seconded. Mr. T. W. Job thought that if there was to be compulsory remova'I the Government should take the action necessary, and Mr. Francis Cox protested against "starving people into submission. Mr. T. J. Job moved an amendment that a full statment of ea<;h case be presented to the Board before taking action, and this was agreed to. EGGS I Rev. Dd. Phillips reported that the Work- house Committee, In view of the fact that they were now about to pay at the rate of JE200 a year for eggs for the Workhouse and Infirmary (RIOO for the ensuing six months), recommended the purchase of a number of fowls so as to reduce this enormous cost. Mr. T. J. Job: But where shall we put them ? Mr. Michael Davies: Are we sure to get the eggs after all? They don't always lay, you know. (Laughter). The Committee's novel recommendation was agreed to. The Assessment Committee asked for, and wa granted, permission to defend the appeal of the Llantrisant and LIantwit Fardre Rural District Council against the assessment of their water-works, should an amicable settle- ment not ba arrived at in the meantime. A roll of service, bearing the names of 51 old boys of the Cottage Homes who have joined the Army and Navy, prepared by the superintendent (Mr. C. V. Sayer) was pre- sented, and It was decided to hang it in the Board room.

EXBRIDOEN BARMAID I

EX-BRIDOEN!) BARMAID. I AND FiCKLE MOTOR DRIVER. I L jE120 DAMAGES. The Under-Sherin of Glamorgan (Mr. H. H. Watkins) and a jury sat at Swansea on Friday t.4 assess damages in an action brought by 43dith Annie Evans, of Pen\ illia Read, Swan- sea, formerly a barmaid at Bridgcnd, and lat- terly a munition worker, against Charles Wil- liam Bt'ocmneld, motor driver, of Stockley Cottage, Erwood, Breconshhe. Mr. Leyson was for the plaintiff. The defendant was neither present nor represented. Mr. Ley- son explained that the action was an unde- fended one, and that the only duty conse- quently of the jury was to assess the damages. The claim was for breach of promise and seduction. Mr. Leyson said that the action of defendant had been disgraceful. At the time of the promise plaintiff was living with a lady who had put her up, and at defendant's request, after the engagement, plaintiff went to visit his relatives at Erwood and it was there he took advantage of her. On being acquainted with her condition, he made a cer- tain proposal to her, and later on informed her that "I now find I don't love you." In his earlier letters he told her he was able to marry, and was going to do so; but after wards said his means would not enable him to do so. Plaintiff told the jury that at the time she became acquainted with defendant he was a gamekeeper at Bridgend. He had written her a number of affectionate letters, in which he had said- he could not lire-,without her; but after she had informed him of her con- dition she noticed that he was "cooling off," and she wrote to h'a mother at Erwood to ask what had become of him. Getting no reply, she went to Erwood to see him. At his house he saw defendant and his mother, and defendant admitted he had kept a letter she had sent to his mother, and had not shown it her. On hearing what the letter was about, defendant's mother told defendant there was nothing to do but "make it up and go straight." After that defendant wrote say- ing he had changed his mind about marrying her, and that she had not made him love her better by going to his h

DRINK IN PROHIBITED HOURSI

DRINK IN PROHIBITED HOURS. I WICK LICENSEE FINED. I Jane Harry, licensee of the Royal Oak Beerhouse, Broughton, Wick, pleaded not guilty, at Bridgend Police Court on Saturday —before Alderman Wm. Llewellyn (chairman) and other Magistrates—to supplying drink in prohibited hours. P.O. Osborne deposed that at 5.30 on Wednesday night, 6th inst., he was on duty in plain clothes at Wick, and visited the Royal Oak. In the smoke-room were four men seated at a table. In front of two of them-a man named Hill and John Davies (who later, was summoned as a defendant)— was a half-pint measure, and a glass full of freshly-drawn beer. Asked who supplied them with the beer. Hill took hold of the half- pint measure and drank it, and said, "I sup- pose a fellow can have hop bitters." Davies remarked that he had "only just come in." Defendant, asked why she supplied the men, made answer that it was "only a few minutes to 6." He retorted that It was 5.30, and called attention to her own clock, which was at 20 minutes to 6. Defendant said it was hard times with her." Witness told her she would be reported. Defendant: The policeman never called at- tention to the time, and he didn't mention beer. I only drew hop bitters for one man. Defendant added that a mushrooming party had partaken of tea earlier in the day, and the beer was left on the table. By the Superintendent: There was FROTH ON THE BEER." I Inspector Rees Davies said that on the fol- lowing day he visited the Royal Oak, and told defendant she would be reported. She replied, "It was hop bittera I supplied to Hill, and not a half-pint, and the glass of beer in front of the man from LIantwit Major was supplied before 1 o'clock." She also said it was ten minutes to 6, and she was "not much before the time," and she added, "You needn't be so strict." The other two men, she went on to explain, had had nothing, and were waiting for tea. John Davies, haulier (for whom Mr. David Llewellyn appeared), in the employ of Messrs. Morgan and Co., contractors, Llantwit I Major, pleaded not guilty to consuming the liquor. His point was that he had only just come in, and had taken nothing, and that the constable, was mistaken. His business was to deliver goods, which he deposited in the kit- chen. The Bench, bearing in mind that there was nothing against Mrs. Harry previously, and that the Royal Oak was a small beerhoujse, imposed a fine of E3. To Davies they gave the benefit of the doubt, and dismissed the sum- mona against him.

Advertising

??? PIANQ! PMNOS! PIANOS!" All British Made. Best Value in the Wor!d An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS, ??NH??M??BBBSMt? A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terma 01 -Prices.- WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK. Thompson <& Shackell, (Ltd.), invite fnspeetion of the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead.Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopldnson, Challen & Son, Coliard &* Coilard, Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. ]Ltgswjlost Dløcouuti. fcilw Cetait Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Eatey Organs Quotations Given for Pianos tn< Organs by any Maker in tha Kingdom. Tuninga and Repairs a Speciality. Repast of every deaor!pttoH. E

LLANTWIT MAJOR I

LLANTWIT MAJOR I DEATH OF AN OLD INHABITANT.—We regret to record the death of Mr. Edmund Sweating, of this town, which took place a.fter a long illness at the Bridgend Hospital, on the 9th inst. Deceased had reached the advanced age of 71 years, and had been a suSerer for some years. Of a quiet, inoffensive disposi- tion, he was respected by all who knew him. He was the last surviving son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Sweating, at one time liv- ing at Boverton, but in their latter days at Llantwit. The deceased was a bachelor, and lived for many years in his own house in Col- hugh Street. Of an intelligent turn of mind, ho made his cottage a rendezvous for his less- fortunate fellow-workmen, who, unable to read themselves, gathered here to hear the papers read. Especially has this been so during the present war, for Edmund was looked up to as an authority on the war. The funeral took place on the 13th inst. Leaving the de- ceased's old home for St. Illtyd Churchyard, the comn was borne on the shoulders of his old comrades, followed by a large number of the- townsfolk. The Vicar (Rev. Richard David:) omciated. The chief mourners were: Mrs. Davies, Llanmaes (sister) and Mr. Da\rÏes¡.. Miss Sweating, Great House, Llanmaes (sis- ter); Miss Davies (niece); Misses Powelt (nieces); Mrs. Evan David, Marcross (niece) and Mr. Evan David; Mrs. William Hugh,. Sigginstone (niece); Mr. Edward Sweating (nephew); Mr. E. Davies and Mr. J. Davies,, Barry (nephews); Mrs. Curtis, Llanmaes (niece), and other relatives.

TONDU AND BERKENFIG

TONDU AND &BERKENFIG. KILLED IN ACTION.—We regret to aii* nouce the death in action of Private Walter J. Cooke, son of Mrs. Jas. Cooke, Bridgendt Road, Aberkenng. OBITUARY.—It is with great regret w,& record the death of Mr. Walter Thomas, Dun- raven Street, Aberkenng, whose funeral took place on Monday last at LlansantSraid Churchyard, where a large concourse of people-including all the local ministers and many prominent tradespeople of the towc— had assembled to pay their last tributeof re-i- spect. Deceased, who was a young man highly respected, had identified himself with the church at Jerusalem, Tondu. Being of a musical turn of mind, he associated himself with the various musical organisations in the place, and was ever ready to help and respond to every call. Floral tributes were sent from the Church and Sunday School of Jerusa!em Welsh Baptist; the Choral Society; the Ebenezer Orchestra, together with wreathe from the family and personal friends. Much sympathy Is extended to the young widow and family in their sad bereavement.—At the weekly practice of the Choral Society, a vote of condolence was passed with the family,

Advertising

AOVtCE FREE.—Mrs. Stewart, Herbal Speciaiist, 9 Guinea Street, BriatoL .'tt S ?. < < .< ;J. 'c. JC/