Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PORTHCAWL MILITARY TRIBUNAL I

PORTHCAWL MILITARY TRIBUNAL I At Porthcawl Tribunal on Saturday, Mr. Blundell presiding, a concert manager/was exempted till the end of the year on personal grounds. An insurance inspector, married, I with four children, was exempted for two months conditionally on joining the V.T.C. An employer's appeal for his son, a shop man- ager, in charge of three shops, was refused. A Council's employee in charge of two en- gines, was exempted for a month.

KENFIG HILL I

KENFIG HILL. I FUNERAL.—We regret to announce the death, at the age of 70, of Mr. Edwin Fithen, winch took place on the 8th instant, after a short but painful illness. An old and highly respected inhabitant of Kenfig Hill, deceased had been an active workman at the Bryndu and Ton Philip Collieries. He was a very faithful member and deacon at Moriah Cal- vinistic Methodist Chapel for a large number of year. He was of a genial disposition, and his many acts of kindness will be long cher- ished by those whom he assisted, and his loss will be keenly felt. On Thursday, the 12th inst., the funeral took place at the Cornelly Chapel Burial Ground amid many manifesta- tions of sympathy from a large concourse of people desirous of paying their last tribute of respect to the deceased, despite the inclem- ency of the weather. The Rev. D. Teifi Davies, the former minister of Moriah Chapel, officiated at the house, and after singing a suitable hymn, a procession was formed towards Cornelly Chapel, where the mortal remains were interred with those of his wife, who pre-deceased him about two years ago. The Rev. T. M. Williams con- ducted the service at the chapel, and the Rev Teifi Davies delivered an appreciative dis- course, based on the 13th chapter of Hebrews. The hymn, Bydd myrddo rhyfeddodau," was sung with great fervour, Trader the leadership of Mr. Ben Thomas.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIGI

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. I.O.G.T.—A public meeting in connection with the visit of the English Grand Lodge of Wales, I.O.G.T., Executive to Tondu was held at Ebenezer Chapel on Thursday of last week, presided over by Mrs. Pretty (Barry), in the regrettable absence of Mr. J7 Pickford, G.C. Templar. The speakers were Mr. C. Jones (Colwyn Bay), G. Sec.; and Mr. T. J. Hughes (Brymbo), G.P.C.T., both of whom gave some interesting accounts of the work of the Order in different parts of the country, as also their impressions of the work on the Continent. Selections were given by the Aberkenfig Orchestra, under the conductor- ship of Miss Blodwen Hopkin.—On Friday, the Executive met in the I.O.G.T. Institute. The local Lodge entertained the visitors dur- ing their vist. CAREY ENGLISH BAPTISTS.-The har- vest thanksgiving services in connection with the above church were held on Sunday and Monday last The Sunday morning service was conducted by the Rev. B. T. Roberts, Cowbridge. At 2.30 a sacred cantata was given by the choir, the solo parts being taken by Mies Webster, Mr. Emlyn Thomas, and Mr. J. Hopkins. In the evening the preacher was the Rev. B. T. Roberta, who preached a powerful sermon. The choir sang an anthem, and there was a solo by Mrs Whittingham.—On Monday, at 7.30, Rev. B. Roberts, B.A., B.D., of Whitchurch, Car- diff, was the preacher. The services through- out were well attended. Mrs. James Thomas presided at the organ, and Mr. D. C. Whittingham conducted the singing. Collections were made for the church funds.

PYLE I

PYLE. I PRESENTATION.—On Saturday, at the Pyle C.M. Chapel, Mrs. Owen Thomas (nee Edyth Rees) was presented with a silver tea service, suitably inscribed, upon the occasion of her marriage and consequent resignation of the post of chapel organist, which she had held for many years. Mr. F. G. Davies (schoolmaster) presided over a crowded audi- ence, and the presentation was made by Mrs. T. R. Williams in a few well-chosen words. Mr. Richard Morgan, who also spoke, testi- fied to the high esteem in which Mrs. Thomas was held. She had established a high reputation as a skilful accompanist, and had for" some years been regularly selected for the festivals at Bridgend, Pyle, and Kenfig Hill. During the evening, musical items were contributed by the following:— Mrs. Dodd, South Cornelly; Mrs K. Beynon, Cornelly; Messrs. Edward Hicks, Arthur Howells, and William James (Water Street), and Mr. Rees Morgan (Cornelly). I ————— ————-

GLYNOGWR I

GLYNOGWR. I HARVEST FESTIVAL.—The harvest ser- vices were held at Llandyfodwg Parish Church on Tuesday and Wednesday of last week. On Tuesday, at 9 a.m., there was a celebration of Holy Communion. At 7 p.m., the Rev. J. R. Pugh, B.A., Vicar of Nantymoel, delivered a very inspiring dis- course. On Wednesday, at 7 p.m., the Rev. D. Mathias, B.A., curate of Llangeinor, oc- cupied the pulpit, preaching in Welsh. There was a very good congregation on each occasion. The Vicar (Rev. W Edwards) con- ducted the services, and Miss James (the or- ganist) presided at the organ. On Thurs- day, at 6.30 p.m., the services were continued at All Saints' Mission Church, when the Rev J. R.Pugh preached again. Mr. R. Rad- cliffe (the lay reader) intoned the service, and Mr. J. Lang (stationmaster) read the lessons. Miss Prtchard presided at the organ. Both churches were very tastefully decorated with flowers, fruit, and vegetables.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you I caumot do better.

BOARD OF GUARDIANS I

BOARD OF GUARDIANS. I THE DRYMMA INSTITUTION AGAIN. I WORKHOUSE DIET TO BE ALTERED. I The monthly meeting of the Bridgend and Cowbridge Board of Guardians was held on Saturday, Colonel J. I. D Nicholl presiding. Among the matters discussed were the re- lief of dependents of conscientious objectors, the postponement of local elections, and the burning question of whether it is right to force certain weak-minded persons living at Maesteg into the Drymma Institution. The last-named topic provided an animated de- bate, for there was, and remains, a sharp division of opinion on the Board as to the course to be pursued. CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS' DEPENDENTS. There was first the usual lengthy list oi correspondence to be gone through. Follow- ing a communication from the Local Govern- ment Board, asking for a list of the public works which the Guardians might be likely to engage in after the war-a commuiaication which was referred to the Works Committee for dealing with-a letter was read from the same body on the subject of the relief of the dependents of conscientious objectors. Arrangements have been made," ran the circular, for the employment on work of national importance under civil control, of soldiers who have been convicted by Court I Martial for disobedience to lawful com- mands, and whose cases have been referred to the commitfee of the Central Appeal Tri- bunal. In cases where the dependents of conscientious objectors so employed are left in a position likely to necessitate poor re- lief, it is intended that the usual "separation allowance" should be paid to them. For this purpose, it is necessary that inquiries should be made as to whether the persons who are alleged by the conscientious objector to be dependent on him are in fact so dependent; and if so, what are their resources." The Board's object, in communicating with the' Guardians, was to ask the latter to "assist H.M Government" by making these inquiries. The payment of separation allowance, it was added, would be made "by means of postal drafts issued under the authority of the Home Office- Committee, and the Guardians would have no expense in regard to these pay- ments." As far as the Bridgend area was concerned, there were, it was stated, two of these cases to be investigated. The Clerk was directed to- obtain the necessary information. MEDICAL OFFICER. A letter was read from the Local Govern- ment Board approving the appointment of Dr. W. E. Thomas as medical officer for the "Workhouse, Cottage Homes, and the district of Bridgend and Cowbridge Union." LOCAL ELECTIONS PONTPONED. A Local Government Board communication regarding elections to local authorities— Boards of Guardians, County, and District Councils, etc.-was read. All such elections are to be postponed for twelve months. The term of office of the existing Councillors and Guardians is accordingly extended (or fur- ther extended) for one year. This provision, however, ia to apply only where the next sta- tutory election would take place before the 1st June, 1916; moreover, "the customary fine paid as a condition of resigning before the full term of office had expired would not, in these circumstances, be exacted"—which means that if a Councillor does not wish to go on for another twelve months, and wants to resign any time during that period, he can do so without having to pay the usual fine re- quired in such cases. (It may be noted that this does not affect Guardians, inasmuch as there is at present in their case, no liability to any such fine.) LUNATIC PAUPER GRANTS. Communications were read from the Associ- ated Poor Law Unions and the County Coun- cil Association, on the subject of Pauper Lunatic grants, and enclosing the following resolution, the provisions of which (it was stated), Mr. Walter Long was disposed to adopt:—" Resolved, that in order to save the large amount of clerical labour involved in the present system of calculating the pauper lunatic grants, it is most desirable that a Bill should be passed without delay ex- tending the provisions of section 9 of the Emergency Provisions Act, 1916, to the whole county, so that the amounts payable on ac- count of pauper lunatics for the year 1916-17, or any subsequent year, should be the same as the amount paid for the year 1915-16." A Member: That is rather bad business for us, is it not ? The Clerk (Mr. R. Harmar Cox): It won't make much difference for this year. The Chairman moved, and it was carried, that the suggestion be accepted, providing it was for the period of the war only. POWER TO ALTER WORKHOUSE I DIET. A resolution, emanating from the Hems- worth Union, and having as its object the conferring on Boards of Guardians of the power of altering the menu of the Workhouse inmates in certain directions, was next con- sidered. The resolution ran thus:— That the Local Government Board be re- quested to allow Boards of Guardians in fram- ing dietary tables to depart from the specified quantities set out in the regulations. providing the total cost of the food supplied is not more than the cost would have been if the quantities specified had been adhered to." Rev. David Phillips: I move that the matter be referred to the House Committee. Ae a matter of fact we are doing the very same thing ourselves. This was accordingly done. CHILDREN ACT. I The Medway Union wrote asking for the Bridgend Guardians' support for the follow- ing resolution Resolved that the Guar- dians are of opfnion that the Children Act should Be amended by the addition of a clause to the effect that when a child is remoea from one foster mother to another, in con- sideration of a sum of money or for any other consideration, permission of the Local author- ity should be first obtained." Surprise was expressed by several of the Guardians that this was not already the law. As the Chairman observed, a system such as that at which the resolution was aimed, was one that suggested certain ugly possibilities ("Traffic in babies," was Colonel Nicholl's phrase). On the motion of Mr. D. H. Price, a similar resolution was passed. THE DRYMMA INSTITUTION. At this point two questions connected with the Drymma institution came up for discussion, arising out of the presenting of the minutes of the House Committee by the Rev. David Phillips. The first of these ques- tions related to two persons at present in the Asylum. Dr. Finlay, the asylum medical officer, had been written to asking if he could recommend any of the present inmates of the asylum chargeable to the Bridgend Union for transference to the Drymma Institution. Out of eleven patients chargeable to the Bridgend Union, six were epileptics, three were idle, and the remaining two feeble- minded. Only these last-named (if any) were at all suitable for the institution. On this report, Rev. D. Phillips, on behalf of the House Committee, proposed that the two cases mentioned should be sent to the Drymma Institution. They had gone to great expense in building and equipping the institution, and they ought to use it. These two men were not lunatics, and they ought to go to the Drymma. Mr. T. J. Job dissented. Dr. Finlay's re- port dfd not say that the two inmates were not insane, and if they were Insane, then they ought to be left in the Asylum. If, on the other hand, they were not Insane, then they ought not to have been put in the Asy- lum. A Member: How will sending these two men to the Drymma benefit us ? Rev. D. Phillips: They will be working, and earning their own keep. The Chairman, speaking to Mr. Job's amendment, reminded the Board that when these two cases were sent to the Asylum they had nowhere else to send them to. The fact that now they had this Institution, al- tered the whole matter. The Clerftj The pofnt !s that these people have been medically certified insane, and the -L: -.I:.t I Drymma Institution is not for lunatics. If the Commissioners discharge them, then they can go. Otherwise they cannot. On the matter being put to the vote, there was a majority for the motion, Mr. Job's amendment being accordingly lost. The question next arose as to whether out- door relief should be withdrawn from the re- latives of the three feeble-minded persons at Maesteg, who refused to permit their charges to be taken to the institution. Warrant Officer David Thomas having read his report on the cases, the Chairman moved that the relief be stopped. Mr. Francis Cox moved that it be not stopped. If the people were prepared to look after them, why should they take their nearest and dearest away from them, even if they were feeble-minded? Mr. T. W. Job also spoke against the mo- tion. He agreed it would be desirable to have these people in the institution, but he could not sanction the proposed method of getting them there. The remedy, in fact, was worse than the disease. Besides, if, as seemed likely, the relatives would not send them to the Drymma, whether the relief were stopped or not, the remedy would prob- ably turn out to be no remedy at &U. He proposed that a Magistrate's Order should be procured. Mr. Edward Cox said he did not think, whatever happened, these people should be starved into submission. The matter was put to the meeffag, and the motion was lost. I MR. SALATHIEL'S GRIEVANCE. I The report was read of the usual visitation of the County Asylums at Angelton and Pare Gwyllt by Messrs.' Salathiel, Howell, and Hopkins, who certified that they found the inmates of both in- stitutions "well kept and clean, and appar- ently contented. One female patient at Angelton (Elizabeth Davies, aged 67), who had fallen and fractured her leg, was par- ticularly well cared folp and carefully dressed." As arising out of the report, Mr. J. T. Salathiel complained of the great inconveni- ence which Guardians appointed to visit the asylums experienced in getting to and from these institutions, and moved that the Asy- lums Committee be requested to provide con* veyances for them. The Guardians who had .-F ."Æ..c., visited the asylums recently had encountered very stormy weather. He remembered that when he was a member of the County Council members of the Asylums Committee and County Councillors were treated very differ- ently, being provided with conveyances, and also being treated very differently while they were at the institutions. Boards of Guar- dians were contributing authorities, and he thought that visiting Guardians should re- ceive the same consideration as members of the Asylums Committee. Mr. T. W. Job said it was not far from the station, and he thought visitors should be prepared to walk. Mr. W. A. Howell: I don't suppose the ratepayers would grumble if we all went in the asylum and stayed there. (Loud laugh- ter.) The resolution was carried. I WAR BONUS FOR RATE COLLECTORS. A request was considered from the poor- rate collectors in the Board's area for an in- crease oi salary "in the shape of a war bonus," the reason being, of course, the in- creased cost of living. "The principle of granting assistance," the letter added, "has already been adopted in this Union, and we trust we shall be treated in the same way as other outdoor officers." Mr. D. H. Price: Do these men depend on this work for their livelihood? Mr. T. J. Job: Some do, and some do not. The Chairman proposed that the matter be referred to the General Purposes Com- mittee. Mr. J. Edwards: Why not settle the mat- ter on the same basis as before—a ten per cent. advance? The motion, however, was carried, a mem- ber remarking that at present they had no facts to go on. A similar application from the Cottage Homes employees was also referred to the committee. The Board passed on to consider a com- munication from Messrs Bevan and Lloyd in regard to their contract for supplying butter to the Workhouse. A mistake had been made, it teemed, in one of the prices quoted. "Clonmell ones" had been quoted at Is. 10d., whereas it should have been 2s. On the motion of the Chairman, it was de- cided to hold Messrs. Bevan and Lloyd to their oontract.

Advertising

n ¡ ¡ i ¡ i I It' 1 ¡ ¡ n ¡' ¡¡ d ¡ ¡ ¡ 1 ¡ II ¡ ¡ i It is the olive oil in Puritan II j ¡ Soap which saves the Ii ¡ ¡ clothes from wash-day I   I wear and tear. G II U For this reason alone thou- II Ii sands of housewives say I! it quite truly that I II PURITAN II I | SOAP Ii I Ii saves its cost every week II ¡! in the clothes it saves. II i ¡ i 0 j j Will you order Puritan Soap ,101 i i from your grocer, oilman or J ¡ stores ? It is sold In several s I i sizes—a size for every need. II II  j( CHRISTR. THOMAS & BROS., LTD.. BRISTOL. I j ?' ?  r :??:???:???. —?.—-?=? t PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOSr Mgt. All British Made. Best Value in the World H|H|HBMIBMI An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS, N A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms 01 WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK, Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.)* Invite rnspection of the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moore, Crow ley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Largest Discounts for Cash. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs., Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description* Estimates Freft Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. Mm PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' G S FDR OR I., Wyndham Street, ALE! BRIDG END. WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. J

C COITY SOLDIERS AND SILORS FUND

C COITY SOLDIERS' AND S!ILORS' FUND. FINANCIAL RESULTS OF AUGUST FETE Coity is doing remarkably well for its brave boys at the front, and is setting a splendid example to other localities. Upwards of 40 Coity boys volunteered at the beginning of the war, and are now on active service. Of the total, one has been killed, another died of disease, and a third is a prisoner in Ger- many. The public-spirited Coityites started a fund to provide comforts for the "boys of the Tillage." The fund is generously sup- ported, and we are informed by Mr. Evan Thomas (Brynheulog), hon. sec., that the fete held in its behalf at Coity Castle on August 1st was attended with most gratifying re- sults. The bazaar, which was the outstanding feature of the occasion, realised a total of L108 18s. Id., and after payment of expenses (LIS los. (jd.), a balance of £ 93 2s. Sid. This is highly creditable to the committee, and all the workers, and it may be said the accounts have been audited and found correct by Messrs. John Francis and William David, to whom they were submitted. Towards the general fund there was collected, during the year ending Sept. 27th, L96 5s. 4d., of which I £81 14s. ld. has been spent upon "comforts," leaving E14 lis. 3d., and making, with the aforesaid L93 2s. 81d., a grand total of JE107 13s. lljd. As Mr J. M. Randall said, in the course of his speech at Coity fete, it is hoped to give the boys a splendid home-com- ing when peace has been declared, and with that object in view, it is to be hoped that the inhabitants and friends generally, will con- tinue to rally round the indefatigable secre- tary (Mr. Evan Thomas) and committee, and .to send in their subscriptions, and render such other help as they can, in the same spirit of liberality.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at th* "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

REMOVAL OF SWINE

REMOVAL OF SWINE. FROM BRIDGWATER TO BRIDGEND. G.W.R. AND A MISAPPREHENSION. COMPANY'S "FIRST APPEARANCE" AS DEFENDANTS. Before the Magistrates at Bridgend on Satq urday, the Great Western Railway Company was summoned tor an alleged infraction oj the Swine Fever regulations. The exact terms of the summons were that on Aug. 21st the Company unlawfully conveyed 31 swine from Bridgwater to Bridgend without a license authorising such movement, from the inspector of the local authority. Alfred Trew, butcher, 24 Queen Street,, Bridgend, was summoned for causing the re- moval of the swine without the necessary license. Mr. Arthur Vachell (Cardiff) appeared foii the Company, and Mr. David Llewellyn waa for the defendant Trew.—Supt. Wm. DavieS said Mr. Trew came to the Police Office, an4 handed him the license (produced) foir the conveyance of the pigs from Bridgwater to Bridgend. He said 26 were at his farm, and 9 fat pigs were at the slaughter-house. The license produced by Mr. Trew was from thø police at Bridgwater, but that was not sufli4 cient, a license from the county authority ix £ Glamorgan being absolutely necessary. The license given by the Bridgwater police was foil use only within the county of Somerset. Mr. Trew, however, explained that the polioemaig whom he asked about it at Bridgwater said it "would be all right." Witness then pointed out to him the words on the back of tho license—"only pigs for immediate siatightejS can be brought from one scheduled area to an* other without a license, and they must be con* veyed direct to the slaughter-house." Mrd Trew said, "I am very sorry." Witnesa toitt him that he would have to report him to the local authority, which he did, and was in* structed to take proceedings. Mr .David Llewellyn said the mistake was made by the police at Bridgwater, wh<3 mainly were responsible. The Supt.: Every person, according to the order, is liable. Mr. Vachell: Coming from the police, they, naturally thought everything was in order 3 —Yes, they most likely took it in that light* Mr. Vachell: This is the first time for the Company to have been reported in this wayR -N o proceedings have been taken in this diSoi trict so far as I am concerned. The stationmaster has made enquiries, anci it was thought the animals were for immedi., ate slaughter?—Yes, but they should bavo known different. All pigs for immediate slaughter have to be marked on each form of the license used. I have acted on the inst rue-* tions of the clerk to the County Council.* Mr Vachell, for the defence, said his clients understood that all the pig9 were to be im- mediately slaughtered. This, he said, was a license that should not have been issued un* less everything was in order, and it was en. tirely the fault of the Bridgwater police. The Company had issued most minute instnio* tions, and were confronted with no end of dif-i ficulties owing to permanent men being taketii away for military service Everything poa4 sible had been done, and he submitted that a caution would suffice to meet the justice of the case. Mr. David Llewellyn, following, agreed that this was a case in which no convictioo should be recorded. The Superintendent had! not been able to help himself, and had been misled by the Somerset police. That he should now be summoned was hard lines upon; Mr. Trew, who had been in business for many; years, and was highly respected in the di-q- trict. The Chairman (to Supt. Davies): I suppose you have no record of convictions against the Company ? (Laughter.) The Supt.: Ihave none, sir. (Laughter.) The cases were dismissed, though the de. fendants were called upon to pay the costs- the Company 5s., and Mr. Trew 4s.

No title

For Style and Quality and Fit, Levine is absolutely "IT." Breeches for men, Costumes foil ladies— It boots nt>t what the out or shade fax Pattern, or price,—he's got 'em aIr, So just pop in and give him a call. Levine, Market Buildings, Bridgenct.