Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Furniture and The immense Stocks of this well-known Firm supply you with everything for Complete FurrtfShing, whilst their Sixty-six years' unbroken record, and their position in the Front Rank of the Furnishers of the Kingdom affords conclusive proof of Customers receiving entire satisfaction! All Goods delivered free in the Bridgend District! BEVAN COMPANY, Ltd. íZIIIa" YkN Pianofortes! For the 1916 Piano Season, BEVAN and COMPANY have secured a very ftne Selec- tion of Instruments from most eminent British Manufacturers! Perfect in Touch and Tone! Splendid in Finish! And at many pounds each bcilow the prices usuaily charged by Music Warehousemen solely dependent upon their Pianoforte Sates. Every Instrument Fully Warranted Ten Years! 97, ST MM? STREET f! I T)T\{ED l a.I. I I.( 1-4' KMTE?? ?EE?I? ?AM?irf-

EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE IN CHILD CLAIM j

EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE IN CHILD CLAIM. QUISTIONS OF DEPENDENCY" AND INTENTION." Jttfige Bryn Roberts had before him at Brid- I gend County Court on Friday a singular oom- penoation case, and His Honour's decision, wiien it is given, will it is believed, be opera- tive in several other similar cases in the coal- field. The evidence given at Bridgend was re- niwkable. Elizabeth Ann Best, aged 9, through Mrs. Elizabeth Hotchkiss, her grand- mother, of Court Sart, near Neath, sued the Gtenavon-Garw Colliery Company fos oom- peouation in respect of the death of her Ii father. Ms. Ivor Parry (Messra. Morgan, Bruce, and Nicholas) was for applicant, whilst Mr. Proasear (Messrs. Kenshole, Aberdare) was for I' the eespondent company. Ms. Ivor Parry, in outlining the facta, des- cribed them as unusual, and said the question I at imm was solely one of dependency. Best was married on May 19th, 1906, and the child was born of the marriage. Subsequently, Mrs. Best, for reasons it was not neoessary to expAstn, left her husband, and went to live I witfl a man named Chapman, whom, since the de&1ft of Best, she had married. Before the I parties separated, there was a conference be- tvreeti the husband, the wife, and the wife's j mother (Mrs. Hitchkiss), Chapman being also j present, and it was arranged that Mrs. Hotch- kiss should take the child, the husband oon- tributing 5s. a week towards its support. Mm. Catherine Ann Chapman, in evidence, said she married Bertie Best (deceased) at the Registry Office at Swansea, in May, 1906. He was then employed at Briton Ferry Steel- works, and they lived at Briton Ferry. The child was born at Melyncrythan, Neatb, on November 17th, 1007, and was the only child of the marriage. Having reason to complain of Best's treatment, she went to Chapman, whom (since the death of her husband) she had married. She communicated to her husband her bitention to leave him, and asked iJ she could take the baby, and he refused. She then said, "Will you allow my mother to have it?" He said, Yes." Then," said witness, "I will take the baby the next morn-' ing." Best offered to contribute to her j mother 5s. a week, maintenance money, and witness did not see him again until a few months ago, when he came to Consult her with reference to a divorce. Witness, in answer to Mr. Prosser, said she led a very unhappy life during the five years I she was with Best, who was cruel, and she was forced to leave him. It was not a fact that she and Chapman took away the child on the same day. Her mother was looking after the child, which witness, if possible, would like to have. Best, she had been told, joined the Army as a single man, and she knew he fought I in the battle of Loos, and was invalided home. Witness's mother told her that Best had not paid up for several months. She denied that she and her present husband had kept the child, which she saw every six weeks; and the little girl, she admitted, spent her summer holidays with her. Mr. Ivor Parry read letters home ironi Best whilst he was at the front. These letters were couched in affectionate terms. In all pf them Best made enquiries after the child, A,rhom, he said, he missed very much. Mrs. Elizabeth Hotchkiss, the widowed mother, said she saw the parties in response to a telegram. For the child's maintenance Best offered 5s. a week. For some time he kept up the contributions, which, after six or seven months, became more or less irregular. The payments continued, altogether, for a period of about nine months. Best used to speed week-ends with her, and she last saw him some months ago. When she asked him fo* money, he made the excuse that he had beeal ill or out of work. Witness's daughter had not contributed a penny towards the child's support, and witness did not ask her for money, thinking "she had enough to do to keep herself." Her daughter had no child- ren by Chapman, who was "doing very well" as a baker Although she knew that Best was in the Army, she took no steps to get money from the authorities. BLm Emma Vale, Pontycymmer, said de- ceased, after he had been discharged from the Army, in March this year, came to lodge with her, and he was with her at the time of the accident. He died from his injuries at King Edward VII. Hospital. He often spoke about the little girl, whose photograph she found in his box. His Honour pointed out that the question of intention was the only point at issue. For the defenoe, Paymaster Vaughan (Shrewsbury), paymaster to the Welsh Regi- ment, produced the book containing the rooards of pay, and said Best, on making a declaration as to who was the next-of-kin, mk%, if he so wished, have got 5s. a week from the Government for the child. Best joined the Army as a single man. Similar evidence was given by Jenkin Thomas, clerk to the respondent Company, r and Morgan Price, clerk to the Ffaldau Col- liery, who said Best signed the books as a single man, 42 years of age. This concluding the case, Mr. Rosser sub- mitted there was no evidence of pay- ments after the separation. True, Best made enquiries, in his letters, and that was all. He did not for three years carry out his promise; there was no evidence that he in- tended to carry it out, and in all probability, had he lived, he would never again have con- tributed. Hence, the child oould not be held to be a dependent, The real position was that after the marriage with Chapman, the grandmother took the child, and became re- sponsible for its maintenance. His Honour pointed out that Best's letters conveyed a feeling of affection, and his view was that the man probably traded upon the love of the grandmother, thinking that she would look after the child and keep it, whether he contributed or not. His Honour went on to say he waa satisfied Best would have maintained the child if necessity had arisen. Mr. Prosser: It is not a case of total depen- dency. If there is dependency at all, it must be very partial. It was stated that the decision in this case will affect other cases, and finally the Judge intimated that in due course he would trans- mit his judgment to the Registrar.

NEWS OF THE OGMORE BOYS I

NEWS OF THE OGMORE BOYS. I PTE. G. E. PETERS, OGMORE VALE. I The many friends of Pte. U. E. Peters, South Wales Borderers, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Peters, High Street, Ogmore Vale, will be sorry to hear that he is in hospital in France, and will hope that he may make a quick re- covery. Although only 19 years of age, Pte. Peters has seen active service. Previous to joining the colours, he was employed at Messrs. Howell and Co. 's, St. Mary Street, Cardiff. IN HOSPITAL AT SALONICA. Pte. W. Cottrell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cot- trell, River Street, Ogmore Vale, who is do- ing his bit" for King and country in Salonica as an Army farrier, is in hospital, down with fever This is the second time Pte. Cottrell has been rendered hors-de-combat. We understand that he is progressing favourably. Pte. E. Dunn, R.W.F., and son of Mr. and Mrs. Dunn, Bryn Road, Ogmore Vale, has been in hospital in Salonica for the last three months, suffering from severe wounds. All his friends-and he has many in Ogmore Vale —hope he will make a speedy recovery. In civil life Pte. Dunn was employed at the Wyndham Colliery. PTE. "DOWIE" ISAACS, M.M. A stirring reception was given to Pte. Geo. Isaacs, K.S.L.I., Military Medalist, on Satur- day last. He was met at the station by a large crowd, headed by the Ogmore Valley! Temperance Band (under the conductorship of Mr. Gillard), and he was conducted in tri- umph through the principal streets, being everywhere enthusiastically cheered en route. "Dowie" is home for a few days, after a long sojourn in Edmonton Hospital He looked well, and seemed very happy. Mr. Bartlett and Mr. Hodgson made suitable speeches. Pte, Isaacs is the son of Mrs. Isaacs, 28 High Street, Ogmore Valê.

mI OGMtiRE TOLL OF WARI

m OGMtiRE TOLL OF WAR. I PTE. VAUGHAN GORDE, OGMORE VALE It is with sincere regret that we have to Announce the death, in action in France, of Pte. Vaughan G. Gorde, Welsh Guards. Pte. Gorde is the first Ogmore Vale shop assistant who has fallen in the war. Though only 20 years of age, he was an active member of the Shop Assistants' Union, and previous to join- ing the colours, was employed at the Co-opera- tive Stores, Ogmore Vale.

GILFACH GOCHI

GILFACH GOCH. I ACCIDENT.—An accident occurred to John Morgan, of Gilfach Goch, on Tuesday after- noon of last week, at the Trane Pit, in the new Pentre Seam. On examination, it was found that he had broken his arm in two places.

Advertising

THE GROWING OF British Herbs" Discussion has enabled everybody to plainly understand how important is the correct selection of medicinal herbs. Now, if you get Kernick's Vegetable Pills whenever you want an Intestinal correc- tive for the Relief of Acidity, Wind, etc., you have a medicine with over 50 years' solid ACCUMULATED EXPERI- ENCE behind it. Any Chemist, and Boots Cash Chemfsts, can supply them at 9d. and Is. 3d. per box. A Report of a Meeting of the Ogmore and Garw Council will be found on Page 7.

1 LAND OF THE PHARAOHSI

1 LAND OF THE PHARAOHS. I PONTYCYMMER MAN IN EGYPT. Dating from U B.M.E.F., Egypt," Pte. Layton Richards, 1st Glamorgan Yeomanry, gives an interesting account of his voyage ] through the Mediterranean, and his subse- quent experiences with his battalion in the I Land of the Pharaohs. The trip," he says, "took us just nine days, and was a pleasant one, barring the overcrowding. But, then, I slept on deck—on a bare plank.. The weather was beautiful, | and the sea smooth. We wore life-belts the whole time, in case we were torpedoed. As a matter of fact, we were chased by a sub- marine, but escaped. But we were reminded of what our fate might be by one day seeing several bodies floating about in the water—a ghastly sight. On landing at Alexandria we were taken to our camp in the desert in open goods wag- gons—a run of about four hours. We are under canvas, there being no town or village near-nothing to be seen but sand and a few shrubs. The temperature is well over 100 degreee, and we have to wear helmets and drill clothing. As for rain, a tremendous shower we had a day or two after our arrival was the first they had had for five months 1 We had a welcome night's rain last week. Sand-storms we get about once a week, .and very terrible they are. You can't see a yard in front of you, and if the sand gete into the eyes, you have a bad time of it. Last week we had the worst I have experienced—tents blown aown, etc. I don t want another like it for a bit. We also get an occasional shower of locusts. All parades are over by 11 a.m., as it gets too hot by noon. So we get up early. It is hard work marching over the sand, and on the whole I shan't be sorry when we leave; it is much too hot for Englishmen. We are leaving here next week for a place 150 miles away. We had a big inspec- tion last week. The General was pleased with us, and said "if the men were half as good as they looked they were fit to go any- where." The regiments here are nearly all Welsh, so I have met scores I know-Dai Leake, Maesteg; Llewellyn John David, auc- tioneer's clerk, Cowbridge. Eric Hughes and Roy Jenkins are officers out here. On my next leave day I hope to go to Cairo to see the Pyramids and Sphinx." (The remainder of the letter will appear next week.)

PONTVCYMMER I

PONTVCYMMER. BAPTIST ZENANA MISSION.—A meet- ing of the Garw Auxiliary was held at Noddfa on Wednesday evening last week. Mrs. B. Jones (vice-president) occupied the chair, and the secretary, Mrs. Reynolds, gave interesting. reports of committees and of the annual con- ference recently held at Neath. A paper on "William Carey" was read by Mrs. Stone in I English, and a paper (in Welsh) was read by Miss S. J. Howells, the subject being "David Brainherd, missionary to the Red Indians." Miss Rosser, Mrs. Hughes, and Mrs. Howells (Blaengarw) took part in the discussion. A duet, "Let the Sunshine in," was sweetly ren- dered by Misg Vi Jones and Miss C. J. Thomas. Hearty votes of thanks were ac- corded at the close. OBSEQUIES OF HIGHLY-RESPECTED RESIDENT.—The funeral of the late Mr. John Davies, 53 High Street, Pontycymmer, who died on the 22nd October, took place at the Pontycymmer Cemetery on Thursday of last week. Revs. David Hughes and D. D. Evana, D.C., officiated. Deceased was 59 years of age, and had suffered from chronic bronchitis for the past two years. He was forced to relinquish. ros position as fireman, which position he held at the Ffaklsu Colliery, Pontycymmer, for 20 years. He was highly respected, and had resided in the valley over 30 years. He was well known as "John Maenclochog," and was a member of the Tabernacle Chapel, Pontycymmer. Mrs. Daries and the late Mr. Davies were natives of Maesteg. The mourners were:—Mrs. M. Davies (widow); Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Pook, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jones (sons-in-law and daughters); Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Davies (son and daughter-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Davies (son and daughter-in-law); Mr. D. E. Davies (son), Miss Glanville M. Davies (daughter); Mr. Stanley Davies (son); Mr. Oliver Davies (son); Miss Bronwen Davies (daughter); Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Davies, Maes- teg (brother and sister-in-law); Miss Maggie Davies, Maesteg (niece); Mrs. Thos. Thomas; Mrs. Joseph Thomas, Mrs. David Thomas, and Miss Lizzie Rees (cousins), Maesteg. Floral tributes were sent by :The widow, children, friends at Maesteg, Ffaldau Colliery officials, Mrs. Evans (High Street), and Mrs. John Fry.

Advertising

SAILOR'S DAY.-A flag day was held on Saturday last at Ogmore Vale, under the aus- pices of the Navy League and the British and Foreign Sailors' Society. The sum realised was over E20, despite the inclemency of the weather.

Garw Gleanings

Garw Gleanings w (By LLOFFWR ARALL* We regret to learn that Sergt. John Main- waring, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been killed in action. Ill He is a brother to Mrs. E. Thomas, late of the Alexandra Hotel, Pontycymmer, now at the Dunraven Hotel, Bryncethin. 111 We also regret to learn of the sad death of Sergt. T. E. Evans, of the Canadian Contin- gent, who died from pneumonia at Shorn- cliff e. 1 Til His widow is Nurse Letitia Bowen Evans, daughter of Mr. George Bowen, Oxford St., Pontycymmer. 1 1 1 Nurse Bowen Evans has been to the front in France, attending wounded soldiers, and waa only married four months ago. 111 What haa become of the proposed jumble sale at Pontycymmer, towards which many subscribed, both in cash and in kind? Ill We hope the Pontycymmer lamp-lighters will soon have their strike settled by the Council. Ill Otherwise the Council is likely to be sued heavily for compensation as the result of acci- dents on street corners. Ill The strange part of the business is that Blaengarw and the lower part of the valley have their lights. Ill At Ponty, the most populous part of the valley, people have to feel their way. 111 We are delighted to learn that a represen- tative meeting of all the churches have de- cided to have house-to-house collections to- wards providing Christmas puddings for our brave soldier and sailor heroes. Bravol 111 We feel sure that no on will hesitate to put their hand down deep into their pockets and part with the most valuable coin he can find towards this most deserving cause. Ill Many of our "toffs" will no doubt part with a few notes signed by John Bradbury! Ill If anybody deserves consideration them days—God knows-our gallant warriors dot 111 The Garwite that lost the train at Bridg- end on Saturday last was seen on Sunday afternoon washing up the dishes! Ill 4 Nothing wrong, of course, about that—ex- cept that it was one way of paying for his lodgings! Ill We are glad to leaxn that a Workmen's In- stitute is about to be erected between Blaen- garw and Pontycymmer, and another at Pon- tyrhyl, Glengarw and the oollieries in the lower part of the valley having amalgamated for the purpose. Ill The idea is an excellent one, and for these results thanks are due to the organising abili- ties of Councillor Llew. Jones, J.P., secretary of the Ffaldau Workmen's Institute. Ill We sympathise with the young Blaengarw damsel, who made such a thorough search for three half-pennies. Ill After finding two, was she shocked to find a crowd had gathered to witness her abstract- ing the third from her stocking? Ill We are delighted to learn that both sons of Mr. and Mrs. Ebenezer Howells, Bridgend Road, Pontycymmer, have been awarded the Military Medal. Bravo I Til When assisting the altos at choir practice it Is not absolutely necessary to squeal like a pig being killed-a word to the wise is suffi- cient. Ill The owners of the Glengarw Colliery will be well advised to supply more trams to the col- lier&especially in the Yard Seam. Ill We are glad to learn the men are earning good wages for the work done. But if there is any need of more "coal for the Navy," why can't sufficient trams be supplied? I I The more coal that can be supplied to the "boys in blue," the sooner this dreadful war will be brought to a successful issue. 1 1 A local person got his "rag out" because he heard the boys shouting Sunday papers. Ill If he isn't interested in the latest war news, he might sympathise with those who are. Who was the absent-minded beggar that asked his better-half to hand him a pen and ink? Ill The next moment he coprected himself, and said it was tin-tacks he required. Ill After receiving the tacks and upsetting them on the chair, he absent-mindedly at down-to his sorrow. And then, springing up, wondered what he wanted them for? Ill A local fop declared he wouldn't take any- one else's leavings or scraps. Ill In future we hope he will realise that "dis- cretion is the better part of valour," especi- ally where our brave soldier heroes' wives are ¡ concerned. 111 We congratulate the Rev. David Hughes, Tabernacle, Pontycymmer, upon being elected president of the Congregational Association of the Eastern Division of Glamorgan. Ill Mr. Hughes has been a most staunch and devoted pastor at the Tabernacle for 24 years, and has interested himself in every good move- ment throughout the valley. We hope to be able to publish a photo next week. Ill Who was the official that put his arm round an employee's neck (on the stroke of 9—stop- tap), and vowed he was the best haulier he had under him? Ill Can it be true that a few hours later, on the same evening, he was heard bemoaning the fact that none of his hauliers would obey his orders? Some" fickle-mindedne661 1 1 Who was the knut who bounced the fact in a certain dance that he was an uncle to everyone he spoke to? Ill We hope he wasn't taken for a pawn- brokerl Ill Of course, the Garw has always been a great "competitive" centre. Ill The latest is a pickled-cabbage eating com- petition at Blaengarwl Ill We should like to know the name of the successful competitor—as the award was to be a pickled cabbage supper-the vegetables to be Garw allotment cabbages! Ill The Garwite that ate his fellow-workman's "grub" in the mine, was "some" shark! 111 Is it true his only defenoe was to declare, "Well, boys, I didn't notice the difference until I came to the cheese"? Ill A young lady of Blaengarw, who was acci- dentaUy "bumped" in the middle of the back, declared she nearly had her brains knocked out. She must have carried them low. Ill A certain member of the well-known Blackpool Gang" of the Garw went to drown a cat in a cask of water which was situ- ated in his garden. Ill After placing the cat inside, he went to fetch a cover for the cask from the house. Is it true while he was knocking the last nail into the cover, he heard the caS "mew- ing" from outside? Hard luck, boys!

Advertising

  I 1/ ri -y:i..c- "é'    < "I:J UM THE fe|   {*. *3 ft S Ik's 52 3 pWMfx*i* i«ttim'„y!!3 i s isi ??? ? S  ??. ?? -?' ? ?'??? ? ? ? S S W? ??? ?????'* S ?M? ??-T ? '-) ?? ? ? '??  ? ? fl'; ¡ H !f. EC g¡ llS ?%???????sJr S?ESS???__???????????? j -< '& I!!I -.= to;¡  ?.  '?/'  J—'3????    EX: '$;/ 11!!J¡Sf.Z;i'r,?2';j2.¡,1' 1/1 -¡¡-" \.a" -,¡¡ /I'_c==-=".=C?_ ==" .I:=ims and-t'tI. Ë í/.U I-c 8EST V^UB L WORLD- d g » ifil Can .ad Inspect the IIItruetlt' X?t?S!? Caiatc?? P? Frm  (ji !Y- l" 0-3 = = WADDINGTON & ?ON<5? JL& | | ROAD (ESTABLISHED 18M.) Lt4, STATION ROAD (Opposite the County Schools) PORT TALBOT. O f

No title

BENEFIT CONCERT. On Wednesday night, last week, at the Workmen's Hall, a grand variety and bioscope concert was held for the benefit of Mr. Gomer James, Commer- cial Street, Nantymoel. There was a good attendance, and it is hoped a substantial sum will be rea lised.

IBLAENGARW

I BLAENGARW. LATE MR. T. WILLIAMS.—A memorial service to the late Mr Tom Williams, R.W.F., took plaos at St. James' Church on Sunday morning. Signaller Williams was a faithful Church member. A parade by the variom organisations was arranged, but had to be abandoned owing to the inclemency of the weather. The Rev. J. Davies officiated, and preached from the text, "Greater lore httth at man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends" (John xr., 13). The hymn, For our valiant soldiers" (Church Army) was sung as a processional, and Palms 23 and 39 were chanted by the choir. The lesson was read by Mr. C. Sansom. After the Benediction the "Dead March" in Sasl was played on the organ by Mr. W. Plummer, junr. Mr. Evan Griffiths ably conducted the singing. C.E.M.S.—A successful social and whist drive, held in oonnection with the St. Jamer branch of the Church of England Men's So- city, took place at the Church Hall 011 Thursday last week. Thirty sat down to an excellent spread, presided over by the follow- ing members' wives: Mesdamee H. B. Jones, J. Lewis, J. A. Williams, and IL Prft- ehard The members provided the prorisioaM, oollected by the hon. secretary, Mr. J. J. Williams. Afterwards the members were pre- sented with "smokes," and a very vacoessfal whist drive ensued. The following were the winners:—Ladies' prize, Mrs. R. Pritchard; gents', Mr. John Lewis. The prizes, which were given by Mr. J. J. Williams (bon. sec), were presented by Mrs. D. Watta Thomas. The M.C. for the evening was Mr. J. J. Wil- liams. ST. JAMES' CHURCH IREADINGS.-The usual series of "readings" in connection with St. James' Church was continued at the Church Hall on Tuesday evening. Mr. C. • Sansom presided, and entertained the audi- ence with his ready wit. Mr. D. C. James ably adjudicated, and Miss Frances Waite, A.L.C.M., accompanied with marked ability. Awards:—Boys' and girls' solo 1, Miss Har- riet Hughes; 2, Miss Hilda Williams. Open solo: Mr. D. J. Williams. Humorous story: Prize divided between Messrs. A. Gwynne and David Hug bes. General knowledge: Mrs. Trigg. The following contributed to the pro- gramme :—Mr. D. L. Thomas (recitation), Mrs. Warden (song), Master Bobby Parry (solo), Mr. Evan Griffiths (solo), Miss Clara Salmon (recitation), Miss Nora Morris. The National Anthem was sung by Mr A. Gwynne. The secretary is Mr. J. J. niliiams. BETHANIA Y.P.S.—A competitive meet- ing was held in the vestry last Thursday week, Mr. John Francis presiding. The awards were as follows:—Recitation for child- ren under 6 years, The Lord's Prayer": Prize divided between Elvira Urch and Dilys Urch. Solo (children under 12): 1, Miss M. A. Parry; 2, divided between Miss Bessie John and Miss Margaret Howells. Recita- tion (children under 12): 1, Master Idwal Jones; 2, M. Howells; consolation prizes, Misses Lily Maria Davies and Bessie John. Solo for boys under 16: Master John H. Lewis. Solo for girls under 16: 1, Miss Ethel Francis; 2, Catherine Bateman. Re- citation for children under 16 years: 1, Miss Prydwedd Parry; 2, divided between Penar- wen Jones and Edna Davies. Open solo: Master J. H. Lewis. The following took part in the miscellaneous programme :-Mi. Annie Jane Davies (solo), Messrs. William Rowland and Emrys Davies (duet), the Juven- ile Choir (conducted by Mrs. John Griffiths, Llanwrda House); Mr. David Howells and company (sketch). Mr. W. John ably dis- charged the secretarial duties, and Mrs. John Griffiths (Llanwrda House) acted as accom- panist. The adjudicators were: Recitations, Rev. W. Thomas, Bethania Villa; music, Mr. D. Howens, Pretoria Street.