Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MOTOR CAR CRASH j

MOTOR CAR CRASH. j I LITIGATION IN BR!DGEND COUNTY 1 COURT. I i HOW MR. ALEXANDER WAS THROWN. I The disastrous motor car crash-between Bridgend and Cow bridge—on Sunday, May 28th last. was the subject of litigation, in the form of a claim and counter-claim, at Bridg-! end County Court—before His Honour Judge Bryn Roberts—on Thursday last week. Plain- tiff was Thomas Rowe (Southerndown), and the defendant, D. Ai. Price, fishmonger, Maes- teg. Rowe claimed £ 50, and Price JE40 in the counter-claim. j This was a collision in which, it will be re- membered, Mr. D. T. Alexander, the well- known auctioneer, was thrown over a hedge, i and a distance of 7 yards, into a field. Mr. St. John Francis Williams (instructed by Messrs. Stockwood and Williams) appeared for the plaintiff, Mr. Villiers Meager conduct- ing the defence upon the instructions of Mr. J. R. Snape (Maesteg) In opening, Mr. St. John Francis Williams said this was a claim and counter-claim aris- ing out of a collision between two motor cars, which took place about 2 o'clock on the afternoon of Sunday, May 28th, on the main road about half a mile out of Bridgend. At the spot in question were the cross-roads-- 1: Hernstone Lane, and opposite Waterton Lane. Plaintiff had come out of Hernstone Lane, and nearing the main road he looked, towards Bridgend, and saw defendant's car approaching. He had nearly crossed the road, when defendant charged into his near side hind wheel with such force that his (plain-, tiff's) car was turned right round, and after the collision was found with the stern on the bank on the right-hand side of Waterton' Lane. Defendant's car went on about 30 yards, and cut through the thick quick-set hedge—the front part, and one of the wheels —whilst the other wheel was in the hedge. j Thomas Rowe, the plaintiff, reiterated the facts in evidence. He said he lived at South- erndown, and was the owner of the motor landaulette which was in collision on the oc- casion. On this Sunday afternoon he was taking Mr. Alexander from Southerndown to Pencoed, and left Mr. Alexander's house, about 2. He explained that there were a lot1 of "bends" in Hernstone Lane, which was only just wide enough for one conveyance. Witness drove slowly, and as he approached the main road he blew the horn repeatedly. Looking in the Bridgend direction, he saw de- fendant's car 50 or 60 yards away, and accele- rated speed so as to get over in time. His front wheels were in Waterton Lane, and he was over the middle of the road, when the crash came, and swerved him right round, and knocked him nearly ten yards onwards on to the bank, as described. Mr. Alexander was thrown over the hedge, seven yards into the field. Defendant's car ran 30 yards along the main road towards Cowbridge, and dash-ed through the hedge (also as described) with three wheels in the field, and the fourth half- j way down the bank There was room for de- fendant's car to have gone round, and con- tinued on it& way; and, really, there was sufficient space for two cars. Defendant made no attempt to swerve, and practically' kept his course, not deviating more than half- a-yard. It was a freshly-tarred road, and ifi the brakes had been applied, the tar would. have been torn up. As a fact, however, none of the tar was turned up. There were dan- ger posts in the vicinity. Defendant was driving a Bedford-an American—car. Wit- ness was injured, and attended by a doctor, and his car was also damaged, the hind weels, being smashed- Witness (in reply to Mr. Villiers Meager) said his speed was perhaps eight miles an hour. Whilst witness was under, examination, His Hononr said in these cases each side al- ways said it blew the horn, and that the other side did not; and, at first, he came to the con- clusion that one side was saying that which was not true—though now he thought that one side did not hear the other. Whenever he (the Judge) was travelling in a car, he no- ticed that the driver always blew the horn, but he was bound to say he had never heard the horn sounded in another car. He had watched in main roads and at numberless corners for miles and miles, and had never heard any horn sounded. He came to the conclusion that the drivers could not hear,! and his advice was, "Don't go fast, relying on the horn as sufficient." It is no safeguard. It may be all right for pedestrians. Mr. Alexander (in evidence), with dramatic gœturæ, demonstrated how it all happend. Mr. St. John Francis Williams: And the subsequent proceedings interested you no more?" (Laughter.)—Well, they didn't in tereat me far some considerable time. Mr. Villiers Meager: This is what comes of; doing Sunday work. (Laughter.) ) Mr. Alexander: I suggest that under simi- lar circumstances you would have done the same.—Lapsing into eloquence Mr. Alexan- j der said: I was not looking. I was thinking, J and I didn't bear or see the car until it came! like that (with a clap of the hands to convey some slight impression of the extreme violence of the impact). t Evidence for the plaintiff was given by Mr. Henry Abbott (member of Bridgend Urban District Council), who was out for a walk on the occasion; by P.C. Gomer: Lewis (ex- chauffeur and mechanic), who described it as a "tremendous clout," and by Inspector Rees Davies, who particularised as to the position of the two cars Later, defendant said, "I didn't see the car until I struck it. I looked up, and saw the car in the air. I put the speed on, and my steering gear went wrong, J and then I turned her into the fields" Three hours after, when the car had been brought; into Bridgend, he said his eyes were falling, and he would never motor again. This concluded the plaintiff's case. Defendant said there were in his car six j passengers, including two children, aged 6 and 2. He was not troubled with his eyes, and had never worn glasses. His speed at the time was perhaps 18 miles an hour. Seeing the danger posts, he blew the horn as usual, but heard ro other horn sounded. Witness swerved to the right to get behind and avoid plaintiff's car, but he struck the hinder part, near the wheel. His steering gear becoming useless, he lest control of the machine. By Mr. St. John Francis Williams: I have had one motor accident before—about 12 months ago. Mr. Villiers Meager, for the defence, said perhaps it was a fact that in the din the par-I ties did not each hear the other's horn. De- fendant's was a family party; they were 'not ¡. "bean-feasters," and it was not likely they I would have run any risks. The speed of both was about the same. ) His Honour, in giving his decision, &aid the injury done to plaintiff's car indicated the I speed at which defendant was coming. It was claimed that plaintiff contributed to the catastrophe. That was not so. If they had: met ea-ch other, as was often the case, it, might have been; but here they were going partly in the same direction, and the quicker the plaintiff's speed the less the impact would be lilzelv to be. Plaintiff, he thought, had rather swollen some of the items in his claim, and he allowed him £ 35, and dismissed the counter-claim.

OFFICERS DEATH OF WOUNDS

OFFICER'S DEATH OF WOUNDS. LIEUT. R. D. BEARDSHAW, TONDU. I I Deep regret is felt in Tondu and district at, the death, \n France, of Lieut. R. D. Beard- shaw, of the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Bor- deitis, who died of wounds on the 21st Octo- ber. Lieut. Beardshaw joined the colours shortly after the outbreak of wir. Joining the K.R. Rifles as a private, he gradually worked his way up to the position of sergeant, and was ever.L- offert-i a commission, which he ac- cepten. He then proceeded to Oxford Uni- versitv to undergo a course of instruction and The Late Lieut. R. D. Beardshaw. training, aft?r wh:ch he was gazetted to the South i raent. After spending j some time &t B'-u-s < own, Liverpool, he was; offered a position as French interpreter in! France, which he declined. He was after- wards transferred to the South Wales Bor- derers, and proceeded with the Battalion to; Suvla Bay, where, as will be remembered, the South Wales Borderers played a very import- ant part. Lieut. Beardshaw remained with his battalion until the evacuation of the peninsular, when the regiment was ordered to Egypt for a much-needed rest. Here Lieut. Beardshaw underwent a course of instruction on the "Lewis" machine gun, and was ulti- mately transferred to France, where he was placed in charge of a machine gun section. Here again the regiment from time to time has taken part in some furious fighting, and the late officer was recommended for promo- tion. Before this could take effect, however, he has been denied the realisation of his efforts. On Tuesday, the 24th October, a letter was re- ceived from his Colonel, stating that he I been severely wounded. Then followed the sad news from the War Office that he had died of his wounds. The Commanding Officer, in the course of his letter, spoke of Lieut. Beardshaw as a capable, trustworthy, and fearless officer, beloved both by his fellow officers and his men. The late officer was well known in the district as an all-round sports- man. He excelled at tennis, and was asso- ciated with the best players of Glamorgan, having played successfully in the South Wales Tennis Tournaments. In football (Soccer) circles he was considered one of the I best amateurs in the district, and he was also a good all round cricketer. He was born at Byfeld Gardens, Barnes, London, S.W., where his family now reside, and was educated at King's College, London. Later he became associated with a company which took over a colliery business in South Wales, and acted as its secretary and sales agent here. Lieut. Beardshaw was 32 years of age, and was married in 1913 to Miss Lit. Whitting- ham, seoond daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Whittingham, of Aberkenfig. Deceased leaves a widow and one son, who now reside at 34 Castelnau Mansions, Barnes, S.W. Al- though an ardent Conservative in politics, he was a man of broad sympathies.

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL FOR THE I VALE I

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL FOR THE I VALE. Pte. M. J. Crook, son of Mr. Jenkin Crook, Sears Farm, St Marychurch, near Cowbridge, killed in action in July last, has been awarded the Military Medal "for the great gallantry he displayed at the capture and defence of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, March 2nd to March 5th, 1916." Pte. Crook belonged to the Royal Sussex Regiment, and spent nearly 12 months in France. Before joining the col- ours he was employed on his father's farm.   ?'?*  **?**?* 

No title

We are asked to say that the Elizabeth Thomas, Maesteg, who was fined last week for stealing coal, is not the wife of James Thomas, 49 Llwydarth Road, Maesteg.

S COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

S COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS. (By VELOX.") I We congratulate our townsman, Mr. D. C. Watts, P.A,6.1., for the business-like way in which he conducted the jumble auction sale at St. Athan last week. He has been in a good school, and, like his schoolmaster, be has ac- i quired the knack of making people bid, whether they want to or not. The sale, which was in aid of the Barry Island Hospital fund and the St. Athan Church Hall, was a huge success. Ill We are pleased to see Quartermaster-Sergt. Ernie Morgan home, looking better than we expected, after his terrible experiences at SUTla Bay. After a short stay here, he has to return to hospital in Liverpool, and we trust, when next he comes home, he will have completely recovered. 1 < 1 A group of Cowbridge men were discussing the war. Various suggestions were made as to the punishment to be meted out to the Kaiser. Suddenly one lusty working-man finished the argument. "Do with him? Why, if I had my way, he should be transub- petrified on the Isle of Patmos." "Hear, hear," said the company; "good shooting, Bill." And then there was silence, each mem- ber of the company thinking hard what it meant. n i i A well-known Cowbridge man was sifting at sapper on a recent Saturday night. Hearing the sound of a policeman's whistle in the street, he bravely rushed out to the rescue, only to receive a stinging smack in the face for his trouble. On the other hand, a man who calmly watched the struggle and the shindy near the Boar, from his bedroom win- dow, without offering to help, is (we hear) to be awarded an iron cross. It isn't fair. The excuse that someone held him back by the tail of his shirt isn't quite good enough.

I COWBRIDGE POLICE COURTI

COWBRIDGE POLICE COURT. I Tuesday.—Before: Col. Homfray (chairman), I Messrs. Illtyd Williams and E. T. Lloyd. EDUCATIONAL. I Norah Say, Llantwit Major, for not sending her child to school regularly, was fined 5s. j DRUNK AND DISORDERLY. E-nest White, Penllme, for being drunk and disorderly, had to pay 10s. NO LIGHT. Rees Williams, Prisk, for driving without lights, was fined 7s. 6d. Emlyn Howells, Treoes, for riding a bicycle, after lighting-up time without lights was fined 15s. NON-COMPLIANCE. Thomas Milsom, for non-compliance with a I maintenance order of 15s. a week in favour of his wife, was sent to gaol for one month. ABSENTEE. Arthur Fletcher, of no fixed abode, charged with being an absentee from Military service, was ordered to be handed over to the Mili- tary authorities.

I GRUESOME FIND ON PORTHCAWLI BEACH

GRUESOME FIND ON PORTHCAWL BEACH. PROBABLY A LADY OF MEANS. On Monday morning, Mr. Hugh Thomas, Railway Terrace, Porthcawl, found the body of a woman on the rocks near the "Rest," Porthcawl. Mr. Thomas was taking a walk in that direction, when he noticed the body, which was leg-less, practically devoid of clothing, and in an advanced state of decom- position. On Tuesday, the District Coroner, Mr. L. M. Thomas, held an inquest at Porthcawl into the circumstances of the discovery and the mystery which is involved. Dr. J. D. Alexander, who had examined the remains, said the legs from the knee joints 1 were missing and the thigh bones were bare of flesh. She had hair of dark brown colour, her height was about 6ft. 8in., and she was. II evidently a tall, big woman about 35 years of age There was a band round the waist, the remains of a woman's nether garment, and on the second and third fingers of the right hand were fire rings, one a wedding ring. In his opinion the body had been in the water for about three weeks. There was no sign of foul play. The cause of death was drown- ing. In reply to some questions the doctor stated that the remains of the garment pointed to some person of means; it was a mixture of cotton and silk. It was mentioned that a Clifton lady had been advertised for as missing, and that her description tallied very much with that of the deceased. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned. The mystery is still unsolved, nobody having come forward to identify the body, although a full description has been circulated. The body was interred at Newton on Wednesday, the Rev. T. Holmes Morgan officiating.

RAOB PRESENTATION

R.A.O.B. PRESENTATION. KENFIG HILL PRIM0 HONOURED. A numerously attended and very interest- ing function in connection with the Lord Kit- chener Lodge, No. 2025, of the Royal Antedi- luvian Order of Buffaloes, took place on Wed- nesday night, at the Ship Hotel, Bridgend. The occasion was the presentation of a hand- some jewel, suitably inscribed, to Primo Fred ¡' James Powell (Kenfig Hill), for services ren- dered to the Lord Kitchener Lodge. The presentation was made on behalf of the Lodge by Primo, Pottinger, Worthy Primo of thej Lodge, who, in his remarks, enlarged upon the good qualities of the recipient, and the I many services he has rendered to the cause the brethren have at heart. Primo Powell, j in a neat speech, suitably responded, thanking j the Lodge, aild, especially, Bro. Bartlett, who I carried through tha- arrangements so success- j fully. J, "■

GARW SERGTS WEDDINGI

GARW SERGT.'S WEDDING. I ROGERS—SAUNDERS. The marriage took place at the Parish Church, Exeter, on Saturday, of Staff-Sergt. Idris T. Rogers, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Rogers, Pontycymmer, and Miss Ellen Saunders, daughter of the late Mr. J. Saunders and of Mrs. Saunders, 73 Howell Road, Exeter. The wedding was a quiet one, only the immediate relatives being invited, but a large number of people assembled to witness the ceremony, which was performed by Rev. Ivor Gregory, B.D., priest in charge of St. Michael's. Miss The Bride and Bridegroom. I Saunders, who was given away by her bro- ther (Mr W. J. Saunders), wore her travelling! costume-a smart coat and skirt of gaberdine in Bordeaux shade, faced with velvet, and' worn with a dainty blouse of Bordeaux ninon over ivory lace and pale shell-pink satin rib- • bon. Her hat was of Bordeaux berries in lighter shade, and she wore also handsome grey wolf furs, the gift of the bridegroom. Miss May Stenlake (niece of the bride)- wearing a pretty nigger brown coat and skirt with velours hat to match, and a gold R.A.M.C. badge brooch (a souvenir gift from the bridegroom)—was the bride's only atten- dant. Second-Lieut. R. Saunders, Devons (brother of the bride), performed the duties of best man. There was no reception after the ceremony, Mrs. Saunders having held two "At Homes" at 73 Howell Road on the Tuesday and Wednesday previous, in honour of the wedding. Sergt. Nesbitt and men of the R.A.M.C., from the Higher Barracks, formed a guard of honour after the service, outside the church, from which Staff-Sergt. and Mrs. Rogers motored to the station en route for Newquay, where the honeymoon is being spent. The bridegroom is well-known in the Garw, where, prior to enlistment, he worked as a blacksmith at the Ffaldau Colliery, Ponty- cymmer. He was also secretary of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, Garw Division, and was one of the initiators of the Garw Nurses' Division, a member of all the Garw Nurses' ties, and interested in all the movements con- nected with Tabernacle Chapel, Pontycym- mer—of which church he was a faithful mem- ber. He has also passed through all the offices of the "Rose of Garw" Lodge of the United Order of Oddfellows, and he was ever ready to assist in any good cause in the Garw Valley. LIST OF PRESENTS. The following is a list of presents:— Mother of Bride, brass standard lamp and household linen; Mother and Father of Bride- groom, cheque, hand-quilted bed spread; Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Saunders, cheque and tea set; Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Saunders, cheque, desert and table spoons, forks, and two water-colour paintings; Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Saunders, oxi- dised silver curb; Miss C. Saunders, oxidised silver over mantel mirror and cheque; Second- Lieut. R. A. R. Saunders, revolving bookcase; Mrs. Stenlake and Miss D. Saunders, toilet brushes and hand mirror; Miss Stenlake, tea cloth; Miss Holden, oak writing bureau; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, oak salad bowl and servers; Miss Lawrence, hand-embroidered table cover; Mrs. Briddon and II. Briddon, silver sugar tongs and work basket; L. Brid- don, satin pen-painted cushions; E. Briddon, hand-worked afternoon cloth; Miss Shepherd, combined purse and card case; Miss Bain- centres; Miss Hodge and Miss Phillips, royal Douiton junket set; Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas and family, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Legasick, embroidered bed spread; Miss Legasick, tra- velling jewel case; Capt. Macmiiian, silver sugar dredge and franed photograph; Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins, silver-plated toast rack; Mrs. and Miss Jones, table centre and tea cosy; Miss Southward, table ornaments; Mr. and Mrs. Towell, silver and china jam dish; Mr. and Mrs Rogers (Exeter), cut-glass vases; Mrs, Nicholas, copper ash tray; Mrs. Trot, satin table cover; Mr. and Mrs. Eland, cheese knives; Mrs. Lucroft, calendar; Rev. T. M. Bell Salter, M.A., inlaid tray; Mrs. Spiller, Honiton lace handkerchief; Mrs. Kingston, Honiton lace and d'oyley; Mrs. Maton, silver inkstand; Rev. Ivor and Mrs. Gregory, Ten- nyson's poems; Mr. and Mrs Morgan, brass crumb tray and brush; Mr. Isaacs, lounge chair; Mr. and Mrs. Pidsley, pickle fork; L.- Corpl. Tobins, sugar bowl; Mrs. Tyler, cut- glass and silver vases; Mr. and Mrs. King- don, silver cream jug; Mr. and Mrs. Billett, flower bowl; Mrs. Bennett, bread knife and board; L.-Corpl. Strut, Chippendale clock; Mr. and Mrs. Rowden, silver serviette rings; Mrs. Driner, card tray; Mr. and Mrs. Hall, case carying knife, fork and steel; Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, brass kettle and stand Mr. and Mrs. Rice, ivory and silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Denham, silver sugar dredge; Miss Taylor, silver vase; Mrs. Elston and Mrs. Chown, silver-plated fern pots; Mr. and Mrs. Coat, silver sugar tongs; Mrs. Price, damask table cloth; Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, household linen; Miss Watts, nightdress case; Mrs. Kent, table oentre; Miss Hain, carved tray; Mrs. Warren, cut-glass and silver vase; Mrs. Short, Japanese vases; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, household linen Misses Dria and Vera Searle, pictures; Mrs. Hutchings and Mrs. Helmore, silver jam spoons; Miss Hancock, cut-glass and silver jam jar; Miss Northley, water jug; Mr. and Mrs Heard, silver-plated salts; Mr. Availet, silver-plated cheese set; Miss Saun- ders, curtain ties; Miss Curtis, vases; Mrs. and Miss Millman, silver sugar tongs; Mr., Mrs., and Miss Passmore, Wedgwood bowl; Mrs. Passmore, photo, frame; Mr. and Mrs. Blake, handkerchief sachet, liberty set; Mr. White, water jug; Mrs. Tudor, hair brushes; Mrs. Jones, shaving set; Mrs. Henry, silver lace brooch; Mrs. Pearoe, household linen; Mrs. Towell, sideboard cloth; Miss Harvey, flower pot; Mrs. Wykes, photographs; Miss Southward, table ornaments; Mrs. Smith, embroidered table cloth; Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Hills, cheque; N.C.O. 's and Men, R.A.M.C. Detachment, case of fish knives and forks; Officers R.A.M.C. Detachment, silver and cut- glass biscuit barrel; Warrant Officers and Ser- geants, Devonshire Regiment, silver egg- stand staff of J. and W. J. Saunders, Pinhoe, I case of silver spoons. I I-

I dI MINERS AND MILK PRICES I

I d- I MINERS AND MILK PRICES. I I PROTEST MEETING AT CAERAU. I A public meeting, arranged by the Caerau Lodge of the South Wales Miners' Federation to protest against the high prices of food and milk, was held on Friday evening at Caerau. Councillor A. Hicks, who presided, pro- tested against "the infants and children of soldiers and sailors being made victims of a gang of profiteers." One milk vendor at Caerau, he said, had retained 17 to 18 gallons of milk, refusing to sell it at the old rates; and the milk, going sour, had been disposed of at 2d per gallon for pigs. (" Shame.") It was a shame that milk should be sold at 2d. per gallon for pigs, and 2s. for children. The resolution of protest was moved by Mr. Wm. Betty, and seconded by Mr. Evans (manager of the Caerau and Maesteg Co-oper- ative Society). Both gentlemen made out a clear case that there was no reason for such advances in the price of food. The latter was very much opposed to the Government taking over the control of food They did so with the wheat, with what results they all knew. The resolution was supported in an able speech by the Vicar of Caerau (Rev. R. Da vies), who asked how were mothers going to build up the manhood of our nation, when they have not the necessary means of doing so? The question would have to be Settled in the immediate future, or we should be face to face with a generation of wrecked humanity. If our children were to resist epidemics or infectious diseases, or even or- dinary sickness, they must have plenty of wholesome, nutritious food, warm clothing, and well-shod feet. As it was, dozens of chil- dren came to school every morning without having had a mouthful of food-npt because they had not the appetite for it, but because there was no money to buy it. The Rev. T. J. Hughes (Noddfa) followed, and urged upon all to try and come to some better understanding by means of a public conference between the consumers and those who were responsible for advancing the price of food. The other gpeakers were Mr. J Dodd (school- master), Mr. John Hughes/and Mr. F. Price. The resolution was carried unanimously.

I MAESTEG RED CROSS HOSPITAL

■ MAESTEG RED CROSS HOSPITAL. The Commandant of the above Hospital wishes to thank those who came with gifts on Pound Day," and also those who have sent gifts during the past month. Gifts of Pota- toes would be thankfully received during the next month. The Concert given by the Cymmer Male Voice Party realised the sum of L46, and the "Benefit Night" given by Mr. Danter amounted to jE:42 8s. 3d (not £41, as already I stated). These two sums will be a great help to the local Red Cross Fund. 8983

NEWS OF THE GARW BOYS

NEWS OF THE GARW BOYS. GARW SERGEANT KILLED IN ACTION. Mrs. E. Thomas, Dunraven Hotel, Bryn- cethin, late of Alexandra Hotel, Pontycym- mer, has received the sad official notification from the War Office that her brother, Sergt. John Mainwaring, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action in France on October 11th. The late Sergeant had served nearly two years in France. Prior to the war he worked at the Ffaldau Colliery, Pontycymmer. He was a native of Penrhiwoeiber, where his widowed mother now resides. He was very popular in the Garw. Mrs. Thomas' huaband and three other brothers are also serving their King and country—Gunner Elias Thomas, Royal Garrison Artillery, is stationed near Cork, Ireland; Pte. Joseph Mainwarizig, South Wales Borderers, was wounded at Mons and also in the "big push," and is now lying in a hospital at Liverpool; Pte. Wm. MAin- waring, 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, wounded at Givenchy four months ago, is now in a hospital at Stowbridge; and Pte. E. Mainwaring is stationed at Sheerness. GARW SOLDIER BROTHERS WIN MILITARY MEDAL. Mr. and Mrs. John Howells, Bridgend Ed., Pontycymmer, have received news from their son, Pte. Ebenezer Howells, R.A.M.C., that lie has been awarded the Military Medal. The following is an extract from the letter :1 was awarded the Military Medal on Tuesday morning, and had to go to the orderly room to get the ribbon. The O.C. said he had great pleasure in handing me the ribbon, on behalf of the Corps Commander, for good work as stretcher-bearer 'You have done good work, from what I have seen of you myself,' he said, 'and from many reports I have re- ceived from Captain Wallace.' Pte. Howells joined the Army soon after the outbreak of war, and left for France in June, 1915. He was the youngest member of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, Garw Division. His brother, Pte. Henry Howells, R.W.F., has also been awarded the much-coveted medal, as already reported in our columns. HIT IN FIVE PLACES. Pte. W. Lester, S.W.B., who is now lying in No. 6 Ward, St. Luke's War Hospital, Halifax, Yorkshire, writing to his sister at 3 Wood Street, Pontycymmer, says he was hit in five places—right leg, thigh, neck, left hand and right arm, the wounds in the leg and thigh being the worst. Pte. Lester was oper- ated on at the 1st Base Canadian, General Hospital, and had three pieces of shrapnel ex- tracted. He describes the battle of the Somme as hell itself, and he is delighted to be in Blighty." We are asked to say that our report last week should have read, "Pte. Layton Prit- chard, Blackmill," not "Pontycymmer." The letter we published from Pte. Pritchard was received by Mrs. Richie Thomas, Llangeinor.

COYTRAHEN PARK HOSPITAL TONDU

COYTRAHEN PARK HOSPITAL. TONDU. The Commandant (Mrs. Ernest Llewellyn) wishes to thank the following for their kind gifts of fruit and vegetables to the above Hos- pital:—St. Paul's Church, Nantymoelj St. Barnabas' Church, Gilfach Goch; WesJeyan Chapel, Tondu; St. John's Church, Tondu Penyfai Church; English Presbyterian Church, Ogmore Vale. Also £ 1, donation from Coytrahen Mission Church.

PROSPECTIVE COMMISSION FOR PENCOED MAN I

PROSPECTIVE COMMISSION FOR PENCOED MAN. I The first Pencoedian to receive a commission on active service is Sergt. J. Phillips, Royal Engineers. Before joining the Army, Sergt. Phillips was an official at Cwmciwc Colliery. He enlisted from Llanharran, but his wife has since made her home at Penooed, of which village she is a native. After nearly twelve months service in France, Sergt. Phillips is now at Bedford attached to a Cadet Corps, for officers.

GLENAVON COLLIERY CHECKWEIGHER

GLENAVON COLLIERY CHECKWEIGHER The result of the first ballot for a check- weigher at Glenavon Colliery was as follows: -E. J. Quinlan, 36; J. Morgan, 10; D. Williams, 9; W. Rees, 6; M. McDonald, 5; W. FranCis, 4; C Davies, 4. Messrs. Quinlan, Morgan, and Williams are therefore lèftffor the second ballot.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. WEDDING.—The wedding took place at St. Theodore's, Pontycymmer, on Saturday last (St. Simon and St. Jude's Day) of Mr. W. H. Plummer, junr., and Miss Lucy Hep- worth, daughter of Mrs. Hepworth, Oxford Street. The bride was given away by Iter cousin, Mr. Roland Hill, and was attended by Miss Maggie John, Pencoed (cousin), and Misses Violet and Lily Plummer. The best man was Mr. Matthew Spark. The service was fully choral, Mr. W. Plummer, sear, (father of the bridegroom), presiding at the organ. After the ceremony, a reception was held at the house of the bride, and the happy couple left later'for Cardiff, where the honey- moon is being spent.

PENCOED

PENCOED. FUNERAL.—The funeral took place on Saturday of Mr. Fisher, who for the last few months had resided with his niece, Mrs Smith, at the Old Post Office. Deceased was 79 years of age, and had spent the whole of his life at Cardiff. A short service was con- ducted at the house on Saturday by the Rev. R Williams, B.A. The body was taken by train to Cardiff, and afterwards by road to Ararat Baptist Chapel, Whitchurch. The chief mourners were Mr. Allen, Mrs. G. Smith and Mrs. E. Marsh.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. Winning Number, Drawing for Aberkenfig R.C. Church, No. 265. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE CEOTKAJ. GLAMJQCUUN PBINTISG AND PUBLISHING COMPANY, LTD., AT THE GLAMORGAN GAZETTB" OFFICES, QUEER STREET, BRIDGEND, GLAMORGAN. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 1916.