Teitl Casgliad: Glamorgan Gazette

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PENYBONT RURAL mSTMlCT COUNCIL

# PENYBONT RURAL mSTMlCT COUNCIL. THE SCAVENGtNG OF TYTHEGSTON I HIGHER. An ordinary meeting of the Penybont R.D. Council was held on Saturday at the Union Oiiices, Bridgend, jlr. William Evans presid- ing. There were also present: Colonel J. I. D. NiehoIJ, Messrs. J. T. SaJathiel, Thoa. Davies, Thos. Morgan, D. H. Price, W. But- ier, Reea John, HoweLi Williams, Geo. Joanes, Thos. Preaoott, Jenkin Jones, and the Rev. T. D. Bevan, with the clerk and deputy clerk (Messrs. R. Harmar Ccx and Eu':>wœ Bevan), and other officers '!)f the Council. One of the nrst things to c<)me up for con- sideration was the question of the scavenging of Tythegston Higher. To acavenge of not to scavenger—that was the question, and over this a lively battle was fought. Tendeo-s had been advertised for, and several had been re- ceived, and th<*se were in course of being con- sidered, when Mr. Price rose to make a strong plea for "no scavenging in Tythegston Higher during t:k The estimates which were read out, were for £30 12s., .&.51, and .653 respectively. Mr. W..Eiryn Davies (sanitary inspector) having warned the Council that every district in his area was "under-scavenged," that is, that the work was being done too cheaply, it was moved that the highest tender, that for JE53, be accepted. Mr. D. H. Price rose to propose an amend- ment—that the whole nmtte.r be postponed tiil after the war. A Tythegston Higher penny rate yielded JE15, eo that this business of scavenging, taking the estimate proposed, would meah a 3,1d. rate for the parish. That was not the time to lay such a burden on the parish, and he asked the Council to postpone the whole question till after the war. There had been some sort of system of scavenging the district two or three times a year, and he did not know that any very bad en'ects had arisen from that system. To enter on such an enterprise as that proposed was equivalent to borrowing JE1,000, and Tythegston Higher had borrowed right up to the hilt. Mr. Thomas Morgan, who seconded, said it was full time to curtail every avoidable ex- penae. CoL J. I. D. Nicholl felt bound to oppose the amendment. He did not know why Tythegston Higher should not scavenge even during the war. All the other parishes were doing so. Complaints were constantly being made about refuse being left about at Tythegston Higher. This proposed expendi- ture was absotutely necessary. Let them curtail wherever possible—as regards roads, for example—but not in a matter vitally affecting the health of the community. Mr; D. H. Price urged that they had no in- dustries in Tythegston Higher to bear the cost of the rates. Mr. Jenkin Jones: Will Mr. Price guaran- tee that fever and other diseases, will keep away from the parish for the duration of the war? (Laughter.) Diphtheria had never been out of the district for years. Mr. D. H. Price: I only suggest that the matter be postponed; not abandoned. At this point a question was raised as to Mr Price's amendment being in order. The Clerk, however, ruled that it was; it was accordingly put to the meeting, and lost. Mr. Price then proposed a further amend- ment. From what the surveyor had told them, the men who had tendered were prac- tically tendering in the dark, without knowing what the duties were. He moved that the matter be postponed until they had received definite information on that point. Col. Nicholl thought this was merely block- ing the motion. All the inspector had to do was to tell them where to tip. That' was all there was in it. This amendment also was lost, whereupon Mr. Thos. Morgan proposed as a third amend- ment (or was it a fourth ?) that the lowest tender, which worked out at 10s. 6d. a day as against JB1, be accepted.—Mr. Price seconded, observing that the difference was equivalent to a Id. rate. This amendment was carried. The scaven- ging of Tythegston Higher, therefore, goes to Mr. D. Davies, Col Farm, Cefn Cribbwr, fot JE39 a year. A Member: Anyhow, it ought to be well done after this. (Laughter.) Some discussion also arose on a motion of Mr. Presoott's (of which he had given notice at the previous meeting) to rescind a resolu- tion of the Council, passed at the September meeting, it regard to a nuisance at Pandy, Aberkenng. This nuisance, it may be ex- plained, is the tipping of house and garden refuse in a private road at the back of some cottages owned by a Mr. Jones. The question at issue in September was, what steps were to be taken to abate the nuisance? Should the Council do It themselves, or, alternately, should they take steps to (1) prosecute the offenders, or (2) compet Mr. Jones, the owner, to deal with the matter? The Council at that time decided in favour of the latter course, and Mr. Prescott'e motion was for the rescinding of this. He urged thav,in the nrst place it was unjust, and in the second place that Mr. Jones could retali- ate if he Hked by closing the top end of the read, which would render It useless. The Clerk: If Mr. Jones did that, these people would still deposit their rubbish in the lane. Mr. Preacott: That is so. The Clerk: Then it would not abate the nuisance. Mr. Thomas Morgan asked whether a small committee could not be got together to meet Mr. Jones. Mr. George Jeanes, who seconded, said the proper and just course would be to prosecute the people who were actually responsible for the nuisance. He was not upholding Mr., Jones, but he had given a big piece of ground for the use of these tenants, and he (Mr. Jeanea) hoped some of them would be caught and brought to Court. Mr. Thomas Morgan, having elicited from the surveyor that these houses were scavenged from the front, said it was the wrong way. They ought to be scavenged at the back. Mr. Prescott said the dimeulty was that there was not room for a horse and cart In the lane. Eventually, Mr. Prescott's motion was de- feated; whereupon he further moved that, in the interest of public health, the original mo- tion should be put into force at once.—This was carried. HEALTH VISITORS' REPORTS. The reports of the two lady health visitors were read. No. 2 had paid i2 nrst visits and 66 re-visits. No less than 44 of the children were naturaUy fed, only six being fed from the bottle.—There had been 75 notifications oB measles a.t Pencoed, bringing the total up to 83. The majority wpre very light attacks, but there were two very serious caaes. The spread of the epidemic was due (said the Visi- tor), in great part to the small regaxd, of the parents to the seriousness of the disease. Iso- tation was often disregarded, because the par- ents thought it unnecessary, and no attempt was made by the members of infected areas to prevent the spread of the disease by carefully avoiding contact with others. In some cases the mothers put heaJthy children in the same bed as the infected cMH, on the ground that the disease was bound to go round tbo family, and isolation waa useless. The report from No. 1 district was in genera! highly satisfactory. The Visitor, howarer. h

YOUhG MEN OF WEALTH

YOUhG MEN OF WEALTH. CORNELLY COLUERS' CORNER. E12 A WEEK AND POOR LADY'S" RABBIT. There stood in a row in the dock at Bridg- end Police Conrt on Saturday, four young men-not undergraduates from Oxford, as might have been mferred from their attire, but just ordinary colliers from North Cor- nelly. They were Herbert Smith, David J. Howell, John Smith, and David Thomas Hicks; and they were summoned for trespass- ing in pursuit of coniee on land in the occu- pation of David Thomas, and owned by Miss Talbot, of Margam. Mr. Harry Lewis (Messrs. Lewis and Llewellyn) appeared for the prosecution; Mr. W. M. Thomas defended. In opening, Mr. Harry Lewis said that on Monday, December 3rd, at 11 o'clock, two gamekeepers were on duty, and saw defend- ants get over a fence, and with two dogs, hunt and search the hedges without finding any- thing. They joined three other men, and en- tered another neld, and nnaUy they rose two rabbits. Presently, one of the keepers came out of his hiding-place, and caught one of the two Smiths and David Joseph Howel!, the rest running away. The gamekeepers and P.C. Thomas Wil- liams (Pyle) gave evidence for the prosecu- tion. Gamekeeper Arthur Groom swore that defendants had two dogs—a retriever and a terrier. Mr. W. M. Thomas suggested there were two different parties, and that his clients had nothing whatever to do with the other party. Witness: No; the six were altogether. Mi\ W. M. Thomas: I put it to you the three men were together, and the others were a long distance away, and didn't know who they were ?-N o. Mr. W. M. Thomas submitted that it was hardly likely men in recetpt of such good wages would go out of their way for a. palftry rabbit.—(To Groom): You are aware that these young men are in regular employment? —Yes. And that they earn .62 a day P—Yes. They are perfectly respectable ?-Yes. Well, seeing that these men aj'e perfectly respectable, and that they have never been in trouble before, do you think it likely they are the sort of men who would steal a paltry rab- bit from & poor lady like Mias Talbot?—Wit- ness I can't say. Albert Nugent, Groom's colleague, also gave evidence, and would not admit it as a fact (as suggested by the solicitor for the de- fend) that the retriever belonged to the other men. (Continued on Bottom of Next Cotumn).

YOUhG MEN OF WEALTH

(Contmued from Previous Colutnn). P.C. WiUiams having given evidence, Mr. W. M. Thomas put it to him if he didn't think the young men could afford to buy rabbits?— The witness answered "Yts," Mr Harry Lewis saying that it was "sport" to catch rabbits. Mr. W. M. Thomas argued that the parties were detached, and that his clients, m an adjoining neld, saw four or five other young men, who were absolutely unknown to them. The brothers Smith gave evidence, denying the alleged trespass for* conies. Herbert ad- mitted the terrier, but denied beating for game. He saw some men in the adjoining field, but swore they were not ofhis party, nor had he any knowledge of the black re- triever that came through the hedge. Defendants were fined JB1 each.

KENFtGHILL BROTHERS

KENFtGHILL BROTHERS. 1 HEROES WHO HAVE DONE THEIR "B!T." Al-e publish the phot&s of two Kenng Hill brothers who, though they have come with their lives out of the furnace of war, have nevertheJess paid the price, like so many more. (pi. Wm. James and Gunner Sydney James, 2.5 and 21 respectively, are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Benj. James, Commercial St., Kenfig Hill. and worked at Aberbaiden Col- liery up t') the date of their voluntary enrol- ment In Kitchener's Army. Cpt. William James. I CpL WiHiara James, after having faced the enemy ix the trencher for nearh' four months, has been invalided home, sunering from the pn'ect.s of shell-shock. He has been dis- charged from hospital and temporarily dts- charged from the Army, and is now in recept of a pension, and he is at present making &a.tisfactory progress towards recovery. f Gunner Sydney James. I Gunner Sydney James, in spite oj the Hun, stuck to his gun for about 12 months, until he was very severely wounded in the struggle on the Somme. He has, however, just reached "Blighty," and whilst looking forward to the day when he shall be discharged from* hospital, and allowed to walk home with the help of an artincial limh, he reports himself "in the pink," and able to play cricket on or with crutches. He was a member of Pisgah Baptist Church Orchestra, and judging by the tone of his letters, he still revels in the realm of music, in spite of his very severe wound. The inhabitants of Kenfig Hill join with their father and mother in being proud of their brave and patriotic sons.

UNLABELLED SPIRITS AT A8ERKENFIG

UNLABELLED SPIRITS AT A8ER- KENFIG. UCENSEE'S HONEST BELIEF." HIDDEN WHISKEY. I Before the Bridgend Magistrates on Satur- day, Frederick Hurley, licensee of the Prince of Wales Inn, Aberkenng, pleaded not guilty to the charge that he, on Nov. 30th, "unlaw- fully did sell certain spirits-to wit, whiskey- to be consumed off the premises in a. bottle not bearing a label showing the name and situation of the premises."—P.S. William David deposed that following complaints re- ceived, he visited Aberkenng Brickworks, and there saw some empty whiskey bottles. From enquiries, and influenced by what he was told by workmen, he visited the Prince of Wales Inn, and saw the defendant. Asked if Wm. Jenkins and John Selby were there on Satur- day night, the landlord answered in the amr- mative, but denied that he had supplied them with a bottle of whiskey. Witness then said The two men'have signed a statement say- ing they purchased a bottle Of whiskey at your house, and paid 4s. 6d. for it." Defendant replied, "I did not supply Jenkins at all. I supplied Selby with two bottles of whiskey on, Thursday last. I know he hides them. I have supplied him with a bottle every week for months for Sundays." Witness exhibited two empty bottles, upon which defendant said Yee; it's what I sell." Witness next toldi him that he had not labelled the botties as re- quired which he admitted, and on being in- farmed that he would be reported, he an- swered, It's a bit off to say I sold on Sat- urday nightz when I didn't."—Defendant now ur d av niir submitted he had no case to answer, and raised the point that in the four days that elapsed it was possible for the labels to have come off the bottles. He honestly believed he affixed the labels, and, moreover, his in- structions were to label full, and not empty, bottles.—Fined JE2.

ENTERTAINING THE WOUNDED 1

ENTERTAINING THE WOUNDED. 1 Is I A TR!P !N THE FOG. I The En Avant Concert Party from Tondu augmented by two Bndgend friends, viz., Messrs. Bedford Morgan and D. J. Gwyn, visited Dunraven Castle on Tuesday evening last. The journey was made in two motor- cars, the well-known Bridgend yellow car, a reminiscence of stage coach d&ya or the Lord Mayor's Show with its gaudy to-lours, leading. Soon after leaving the town a thick fog was encountered, and it was necessary to crawl along. The chauffeur alighted And reported that caution ;wa.s necessary, but agreed to proceed. After a run of ten minutes or so we enquired of the knowing one of the party, a well-known man with a deep voice, as to our position on the map, and he explained that the same was somewhat dangerous as we were about to negotiate a "deep dip" and a "big bend." Thank Heaven the corner was passed and one of the party wags exclaimed "Yeo Ho! my lads Yeo Ho!" Then was no further incident until the Caatle was reached with the exception th::t one of the cars took the wrong turning in the Park, and nearly met with a watery grave. It turned up ten minutes late, so "AJI's well that ends well." f Now to!* the entertainment, which was a success. The choruses of the party, in spite of the fact that the fog had aSected their throats, were excellently rendered. The songs of Messrs. Bedford Morgan, D. Thomas and T. Thomas were greatly appreciated and applauded. Mr. T. Davies soon installed himself as a genera] favourite in his comic songs, and was undoubtedly one of the even- ing's "ntberts." Mr. D. J. Gwyn was as usual, and Messj-s. W. H. Yeo and Wynne Hitchings gave a humorous aong each, the last mentioned being the Master of the Cere- monies. Mr. R. Nickles wa& "O.K." at the piano. "God Save the King," joined in heartily by pur brave soldiers, brought a pleasant evening to a close, and the party once more advanced to meet tHe chilly air. The big- voiced man remarked "Watchman what of the night?" but, behold! the fog had lifted and we had n& dimculty in negotiating the homeward journey without fear and trem- bling for the "deep dips" and "big bends." The following is the programme of the enter- tainment—First Half: Overture, R. Nick- less; chorus, "Row, Boatman Row"; song, Mr. Bedford Morgan; recitation, Mr. Gwyji; song, Mr. W. H. Yeo; song, Mr. D. Morgan; chorus, "Laughing Chorus"; song, Mr. T. Thomas; song, Mr. T. Davies; recitation, Mr. Gwyn; chorus, "Soldier's Chorus." Second Half:—Chorus, "We'll sing a merry Roundelay"; song, Mr. Bedford Mor- gan; recitation, Mr. Gwyn; song, Mr. D. Morgan; chorus, "With laugh and song"; song, Mr. T. Davies; recitation, Mr. Gwyn; chorus, "Comrades Song of Hope."

TONDU AND MERKBNFIG I

TONDU AND MERKBNFIG. I GARDEN ALLOTMENTS.—It is to the credit of Ynysawdre Pa-rish Council that they are going ahead with the matter of allot- ments and are arranging to take over mo$ ground for garden purposes. The allotments already in cultivation have proved a step in the right direction, and it is hoped other local bodies will take up the matter with the land- owners of the neighbourhood with a view of increasing the number of plots available for handing over to the applicants in time for spring cultivation. OBITUARY.—It is with regret we record the death of Mrs. Newman, wife of Mr. Jaa. Newman. of Meadow Street, Aberkenng. The deceased Ia

TONDU AND MERKBNFIG I

(Continued from previous column). Syllon), Mr. D. Mattock (Qaerau), Mr. J. Mattock, Mr. E. Philips, Misses PhiUips, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas (Pontycymmer), Mr. and Mrs. Tuck (Caerbryn), Mr. D. J. Hughes, Mrs. Lane, Mrs. WiUiame, Mrs. Mattock, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. Mattock, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. WaJes, Mrs. R. Llewellyn (Nantyffyllon), Mr. Sem Davies and son (Nantymoel), Mrs. S. Thomae (Maesteg), Mrs. M. J. Davies (Caerau) and Mrs. Lewis (Abergwynfi). Florae tributes were sent by friends at Bryngarw House and the .neigh- bours.

Advertising

ri -=-====-= II OTHolI CILERATŒC II Pi" J CTO ? ???????????? ? ?  ??????S-????S < ,çøDlaiD alllDerø l,/j' BEST 'i ALUE IN Tft£ WORLD. ?!j ? c? .? ?p? ? Instrutdtnu. ? %N? ? e\l"OR ,iiid PLOUGH FITTING. Inspect our Sto,-k of B4fn Maehiaery, Cbaffcutters & Crinding Mi!!s, Sote Agents for Homsby's Ploughsand Machinery. „ ? Bøntait'. Chffcutters A Mills, &a.

LALESTON LABOURER AND WIFE 1

LALESTON LABOURER AND WIFE 1 -qp GET 14 DAYS FOR PARENTAL NEGLECT! NO FOOD; NO FtRE; FURNITURE PRACTICALLY NIL. CHILDREN'S "EXCRUCtATtNG PA)N." Painful revelations of neglect on the part of a Laleston labourer and hia wife, on Saturday were investigated by the Bridgend Justices. It was a prosecution by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and defendants were William James Wood- ham, and his wife Elizabeth, of Laleston, who were summoned for neglecting their children in such a way as to cause them unnecessary suffering. The little ones alleged to have been sadly neglected were William (10), Edward (6), and Matthew (2).-Mr. Harry Lewis, in stating the .facts, said the male de- fendant, if he worked full time, was capable of earning 36s. a week, though, as a fact, he did not earn anything like tnat amount. For some time he had lived separately from his wife, and he had contributed 7s. a week, and 4s. last week, towards the maintenance of his wife and family. He lead a dissolute eort of life, whilst the children were badly nourished, and indifferently shod, and were in a poor and sickly condition. Finding no food whatsoever in the house, the Society's inspector (Richard Best) purchased 16s. worth of necessaries and for the defendant no sort of excuse could be offered. The man was found in an inn, and his wife refused to allow him to enter the house. Whatever the trouble between the parties, there was no justification for the children being in such a state e'P'L'eiall YyA 'p he added, "at this season of the year."—In- spector Best gave evidence of his visit to the family at Laleston, and said defendant, lived about 100 yards away, with a man and his wife, to whom he paid 6s. a week for lodgings. Finding Mrs. Woodham had no food in the house, witness accompanied her to the reliev- ing omcer, to whom he gave 16s. for provi- sions. There was no nre, and the furniture was practically nil. Upstairs were two dirty bedsteads without bed clothes. The condition of the children witness described;—as already outlined by Mr. Lewis in hit. opening, and pro- ceeded to say that he found the male defend- ant in the New Inn at Laleston, partially under the influence of drink. His wife re- fused him admission to the house. He ac- cused IW of drinking brandy with him in a public-house on the previous night, and she said "it 'was a fact." Daily the children went about Laleston begging, one lady sup- plying them with a dinner every day, and also 1 they obtained food at various other places. No,doiibt tney bad suffered excruciating pain. —William James Woodham now said that "since he came out of gaol" he had done no work. "I have been very ill," he went on; "and am not fit to be here to-day."—Both defendants promised to do better.—Mrs Annie Stenner (Laleston) gave evidence'to the effect that she had seen the children asking for food and begging.—P.C. Stockford Raid the male defendant was a good workman < though ad- dicted to drink, and if hA wished he could get regular employment at Laleston. The female defendant was slishtly givpn to drink, and he had seen her In Bridgend in the company of certain women, and once with a soldief. The children were in a most pitiable state. A Laleston lady daily supplied them with meals and milk.—The Chairman (Alderman Wm. Llewellyn) said the state of the children was as had as, if not worse than, hefcre: and they would lie sent to the Union. As for the de- fondants, they would be committed for 14 days.

Advertising

Adrvertise in the, "Glamorgan Gazette." !if you wamt to a&H, buy. or excimBge; you tMrnotdobetiiwr. 1

IA YISIT TO BRIDGEND

A YISIT TO BRIDGEND. I KENFIG HtLL MAN AND LADIES. In a charge at Bridgend Police Court OBt Saturday, in which William Arthur GriiRth& (44), EenRg Hill, was charged with being drunk and di&ot'derly in Nolton Street on Dec 15th, P.C. Waterman deposed that at 10.15 on the previous night he saw defendant in the- street named, with two women. He was very drunk, and became abusive, and acted "like a madman" all the way to the Police Station.. —Inspector Rees Daries stated that all tltre& were in drink, defendant more so than the- women.—Defendant: I have seven children, and am a widower at that.—Fined jEl.

HOW TO tNCREASE THE PRODUCT104 OF HOMEGROWN FOODSTUFF

HOW TO tNCREASE THE PRODUCT104 OF HOME-GROWN FOODSTUFF.. To the Editor. Sir,—The Government seems to be getting. a bit nervous owing to the probable shortage of food in 1917, and it is to be hoped that the, truth will be made known as to our present position in that respect, so that all may, be- fore the heat of urgency oools, do what they- can to .remedy matters. The Food Controller, we are given to under- stand, is to regulate the price, distribution.- and use. of food stuns, but surely he shouhi nrst stimulate the production of home-grown food, for now shipping, which has hitherto brought three hundred millions pounds worth of food to our shores annually, has become & very uncertain quantity, owi to causes- which are well known. And unless looal authonfies generally take a bold line at once.. and do something oonstructive, I am afraid the new Minister of Food will soon have very littleAood to regulate and control; at any- rate, ae far as British-grown food is con- cerned. We cannot harvest unless we till and sow.. "Fine words butter no parsnips," nor brings any extra food to the larder. The nrst duty of a nation, as of the individual, is to fee