Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

.4 (i. C. DEAN, The Tailor, Is prepared to pay return fare within 20 miles of Swansea to any customer + placing an order for a Suit or an Overcoat upon pro- duction of Railway Ticket. Please note the address 22, Castle St., Swansea. .4

Advertising

t Ensure a p Prosperous Year by Advertising I in ? ? Our Columns. I +

CHAOS IN SOUTH AFRICAi

CHAOS IN SOUTH AFRICA General Strike Proclaimed I Martial Law in Being I THE AUTHORITIES PANIC STRICKEN. The strike of State railway men, ami the workers ir. the mines, in the Domin ior. of South Africa., has developed with staggering lapidity this week, and on Thursday, the world was confronted with the biggest labour upheaval in history, the resul t of which e-annot be imagined. The source of the trouble is the in- difference of the Government towards the urgent grievance of the railway workers, who want better wages, the abolition of piece work, and the cessation of a policy of irritating victimisation, which has long been in general practice. As we demon- strated last week, the miners also have, distinct cause for discontent, proof of which can be found in the iecent up- rising of the workers in Natal. The strike of railwaymen and miners has therefore come simultaneously, a.nd it is in con- sequence of the refusal of the Govern- ment, and ooalowners to negotiate with the affected workers that a genera l strike was on Wednesday declared throughout the country. THE STRIKE GENERAL. I A special correspondent, wiring late on Tuesday evening, said To-djiy the strike on the Rand and at Pretoria is general, thanks to the Govern- ment's provocativo tactics. Men engaged in every class of industry have ceased work to rnaik their sympathy with tho ill-treated State railwaymen. Even the shops here are closed, with the exception of those which supply the bare necessar- ies of existence. Owing to the great rush to securo food, stocks of provisions are running alarminghly short, and there, is every need for the bread supply which the strikers have already organised. DYNAMITE OUTRAGES DIS- I CREDITED. I Reports of so-called dynamiting out- rages by strikers are still being circu- lated freely here. It is true that there have been explosions—some of them serious ones—upon the railways, but in every case the organised strikers disclaim them, and there is no doubt that any damage which has been caused has been the work of irresponsible men outside the ranks of the Trade Unions. To lay these things at the door of the self- respecting Unionists is merely a.n attempt 1>y imterceted persons to poiron "he public mind. The temper of the natives on the Rand is uncertain. The white strikers, as an organised body, are desirous of pre- serving peace, but none can tell what the natives may do. The blame, however, for any serious disturbances, will, of ocrurse, be placed upon the Trade Union- ists, because it will suit the employers to do so. MILITARY OUTRAGES I STRIKERS CHARGED BY ARMED I MEN. A furth er message published on Thurs- day. states Although martial law prevails in the Transvaal, in Natal, and in the Orange Free State, and although men in all in- dustric-a h-jvo ceased work, the fact that the strikers are more inclined toward peace than the 100,000 troops whose pro- fessed purpose it is to preserve peace is a-n eloquent tribute to the just nature of the toilers' demands. Temper and pro- vocation always take sides with injustice. After the declaration of a gÐnra.1 strike and the institution of martial law at midnight on Tuesday an enormous j mass meeting of strikers, representing all trades, was held in tho earl y hours of this morning. Without a single dis- sentient the miein carri ed a resol ution which, judging by the Government's policy of persistent folly, gives promise of becoming historic. It terms were :— This meeting calls upon the Imperial Government, to take notice of the grave situation which at this juncture is con- fronting loyal subjects in South Africa,, and also to take notice that, as British subjects, we revolt agaiinst the attitude of the Botha Government in calling out Boer troops to trample upon the just and sacred rights of Britishers. We respectfully point out to the Im- perial Government that it only requires a few shots from Boer troops to revive all the bitter feeling of pro-war days. This is a serious and much-needed -warning to the Government, and it- clearly indicates that, if the, authorities continue to follow their insane course an appalling flood of consequences may rise which no power will be able. to stem un- til untold misery has been wrought. BRUTAL BAYONET CHARGES. I The Government's vicious hate of Trade Unionism was deliberately shown on Wednesday morning after the declaration of martial law. The first action of the armed police was to isolate the Trades Hall by surrounding it with men carry- ing fixed bayonets. With a view to capturing Mr Bain, secretary of the Trade Federation, and Mr Mason, another Labour leader, the police desperately rushed both the front and back of the building. During the excitement one policeman fired his rifle, and there was an answering shot from within the hall. No one, however, was injured. Despite martial law immense crowds have gathered within a hundred yards of the Trades Hall. Mounted troops clear the streets at intervals, but, hitherto, there has been no firing. In some thoroughfares crowds have j been dispersed at the point of the bayon. et, ind several of the rushes made by the police were so ugly that they aroused de- monstrations of protest by the strIkers who, however, kept their temper oom- jnendablv under control. Several more Trade Unionists were ar- rested on Wednesday, but these stupid actions have only increased the spirit of determination among the oppressed men 'L" J. J:, l.. "J ,,>

MR J H THOMAS AT CARDIFF I

MR J. H. THOMAS AT CARDIFF RAILWAYMEN'S M.P. AND THE LLANELLY TROUBLE I STARTING OF AN "HISTORICAL YEAR. On Sunday evening, Mr J. H. Thomas, M.P., of the National Union of Rail- waymen, addressed a crowded meeting of railwaymen in the Westgate-street Hippodrome, Cardiff, and defended the action he took in connection with the re- cent sectional strike on the G.W.R. in South Wales. He emphasised the point that such outbursts as that which took place at Llanelly only led to anarchy and disaster. Mr W. J. Prescott presided. A re- solution declaring that "any scheme which shali be made the subject or negotiation to replace the existing scheme must ensure an eight hours' day, com plete recognition of the National Union of Railwaymen and a minimum wage for all railway workers" was proposed by Mr J. E. Lombard, and seconded by Mr E. Gough. GREAT YEAR FOR RAILWAYMEN Mr Thomas said he believed they were starting a year which would be an his- torical one for the railwaymen of the country, a. year that would practically re- volutionise the relationship between the railway employee and the railway com- pany. Tho Royal Commission now sitting was undoubtedly the result of the nation- al strike, but he maintained that the terms of reference of that Commission were not sufficiently wide. What they were pressing for, and they would press it in Parliament, was that there should be set up immediately alongside this a Royal Commission to consider alone ili.) whole question of labour and accidents as affecting the railwaymen's interests, so that, its report might be considered by the public at the same time that the Royal Commission reported. "APATHY OF THE MEN." The condition of tho railwaymen to-day he sa id, was not due to the railway com- panies. The wretched waRcs and long hours were not the fault of the employers, but it was the fault of the apathy, sel- fishness, and indifference of the railway- men themselves. (Hear, hear, ard ap- plause). They might, be botter in South Wales than in other plaoes, but even in 1911 there were not 59 ier cent. of t' ie men inside the organisation—(Shame)— and they had never been in a position yet to go to the Tailway company and say, "W e are speaking in the name and ou behalf of the whole of the railway men of the country." He would like them to ask tliemgelves "Are we going on in the right way to make the power of the National Union the power and influence that it ought to be ?" He. submitted that if th-ey had a repetition in 1914 of what happened in 1913, instead of their being prepared to meet the railway companies as a strong, determined and organised body they wouldv simply be in the posi- tion of a. disorganised mob and rabble. If they adopted the policy of sympathetic strikes to its logical conclusion they would simply be out every day in the week.

NORTH MONMOUTH

NORTH MONMOUTH Labour Candidate Chosen MR JAMES WINSTONE Mr James Winstone, vice-president of the South Wales Miners' Federation. has been selecte,di to contest the North Mon- mouthshire Division in the Labour in- terest at the next election. The selection was made at a conference held at the Waverley Hotel, Pontypool, on Saturday, under the presidency of Mr Z. Andrews (TaJywain). At a previous conference it had been decided to ask Mr James Winstone, Mr E. A. Charles (National Union of Rail- waymen), and Mr W. L. Cook (Blaen- avo.n) who had been nominated by var- ious lodges in the district, if they were prepared to aJlow their names to be sub- mitted. Their replies were received, at Satur- day's conference, which was largely at- tended. Messrs. Charles and Cook wrote stating that, although they were strongly of the opinion that the Lab- our party should contest the seat, they did not desire their names to be sub- mitted to the conference. Mr James Winstone was present, and told the conference that whilst he would be delighted to contest North Monmouth- shire in the Labour interest, it was no craving on his part, for he had been in- vited to contest North-West Manchester, and had, been asked to allow his name to be submitted as candidate for two other constituencies. The Chairman said it would not be necessary to hold a ballot of the work- men on the question, as the various or- ganisations had held meetings and ap- pointed delegates to attend the confer- ence, which he hoped would adopt Mr Winstone as the candidate. The Secretary (Mr T. Lang ley) said the delegates represented over 10,000 Trade Unionists in North Monmouth- shire. Mr Winstone was then proposed as candidate by Mr A. Jenkins (Aber- svcha.n) and seconded by Councillor P. Davies (Pontypool), the motion being carried with enthusiasm. The conference also appointed a depu- tation to attend the next meeting of the South Wales Miners' Federation with a j vi.-w to securing financial aid.

IWELSH IN DYFEDI

WELSH IN DYFED A PLEA FOR THE MOTHER TONGUE NEW AND OLD PREACHERS CON- TRASTED The first conference arranged by the Dyfed sction (Carmarthnshire, Pembroke- shire and Cardiganshire) of the Welsh Union of Welsh Societies met at the Lammas-street Congregational School- room, Carmarthen, on Saturday. A large number of delegates attended from all over the districts. Tho president of the section, the Rev. J. Dyfnallt Owen, was unable to bo present, and the chair was taken by Councillor Henry Howell, J.P., Carmarthen. He welcomed the new movement and expressed himself in full sympathy with its objects. Althought in that part of Wales the language was strongly entrenched, there, was room for improvement in several directions. They had felt for some years past that. the language did not receive the prominence it deserved in some quarters, and he feared that on, many Welsh hearths it was neglectc-d by the .parents, with the result that their children grew up ignor- ant of the mother tongue. He knew parents who had barely a sufficient know- ledge of English to carry on a conversa- tion properly, guilty of such neglect. That Welsh preachers, who always spoke Welsh in their Church services,, should be among those who ignored the language in their homes and all their children to grow up without a knowledge of it, was unworthy of Welshmen, and certainly of the Welsh pulpit. (Applause). Tho Rev. D. Bowen (Myfyr Hefin) dealt with the objects of the movement a.s set forth at the Neath Conference, laying .stres.s on the fact that the great thing was to get all Welsh societies thoroughly Welsh in language and in spirit. Mr John Hughes, B.A., Fishguard, was ur.animously appointed secretary ior the section, and the following were elec- ted to renesent the section on the execu- tive committee of the Union :-The Rev. J. Dynallt Owen, Carmarthen; Mr John Hughes, B.A., Fishguard, and Miss E. J. Lloyd, M.A., Aberystwyth. TOO SCHOLASTIC. I A general discussion on th!" objects of the movement followed. The Rev. H. T. Jacob, Fishguard, said the success of their societies could be greatly furthered if the subjects chosen for discussion at the meetings were of a popular charac- ter. The idea had piwailed that the Cymmrodorion Societies were simply learned societies where profoundly scholastic matters wore dealt with, and consequently were of no interest to those outside the ranks of scholars. With the popularising of the subjects, however, the introduction of things of real intere.st to the people, a new interest had been aroused and the meetings were now well attended. The language, he added, should have fair play in. the day schools. He feared that some of the teachers of Welsh, in the county schools did not dis- play that enthusiasm t,hey would ex- pect. The Rev. M. Watkins, Llanelly, said the younger generation of Welsh teachers were more enthusiastic for the language than the old. There were many of the old teachers who were absolutely in- different, but the young men almost without exception were reordering excel- lent service. (Applause). During the last few years, he said, the immigrants to Llanelly, which waB a typical Welsh town, were mostly English, but if Welsh people did their duty there was a cer- tanity that the children of thes-.c immi- grants would be as good Welshmen as any of them. One or two things must happen—.the native Welsh must absorb the English element or the English immi- grants would swamp the Welsh. RAILWAY MUTILATIONS. I Mr P. J. Wheldon, Carmarthen, wel- comed the signs of the spread of Welsh in the town of Carmarthen, where for generations the English element had been strong. There was more Welsh spoken here to-day than ever. Mr Wheldon re- ferrcd to the need of making a strong prot-est against the way in which rail- way companies and others shockingly mutilated. Anglicised, and changed pretty and expressive Welsh place names in their land. It was hight time that this sort of thing should be stopped. He gave notice that at the next meeting he would bring forward a motion calling up- on the authorities to take action with a view to preventing such alterations in the future and to restoring those place names which had been so ruthlessly changed already. The Rev. Gwilym Davies, M.A., ad- vocated taking steps for getting more Welsh into the columns of the local Press. The Rev. M. Watkins pleaded for greater support for the Welsh Summer School. Myfyr Hefin. snid that in Carmarthen- shire schools pictures of Welsh heroes/and Welsh scenery were conspicuous by their absence, and the attention of the authori- ties should be called to the matkr. A resolution calling upon the committee to provide scholarships and pictures was afterwards passed.

Y5000 FOR MR L G WELLS I

Y,5,000 FOR MR L G. WELLS I Mr H. G. Wells is to entertain cinema theatre audiences. On Thursday it was announced that the Gaumont Company had acquired the world's rights for the cinema of Mr H. G. Well's books. The payment made by the company of film producers for this concession is said to be £5,000 a vpar. Among the first books to be adapted will be "The Invisible Man" and "The Country of the Blind," and these will be followed by such well known and fascinating stories as "Tlio Time Machine," "The Martians," "Tlio Wai- of the Worlds," etc. \Π._J_. J.

YSTRADGYNLAIS SEWERAGE SCHEME

YSTRADGYNLAIS SEWERAGE SCHEME. Startling Allegations at the Council. The monthly meeting of the above authority was held at the Police Sta- tion on Thursday. Mr. J. W. Morgan presiding. Present: Messrs. Lewie Thomas, D. R. Morgpr. T. Williams, J. Howells, Rhys t. nman, S. J. Thomas, W. Walters, vrl Dd. Lewis, together wittf the clerk nd otbc-j- offi- cials. SANITARY INSPECTOR'S REPORT. Mr. G. J. Rees, M.il.S.I., reported that several occupiers of houses had complained of the <1: -ositing of road refuse at the sides of the roads so that in dry weather it was blown about and was a source of epidemic diseases. The haulier had occasIonally removed such deposits to the refuse tips, but had learnt that such deposits must be al- lowed to remain in order to provide material neeesnsary for binding when the roads were re-metnlled. INSANITARY PROPERTY. The inspector further reported on the condition of a house situated at Cwmgiedd, and occupied by Mr. Wm. Alexander. The house consisted of two living rooms on the ground floor and two on the first floor, the height of the sleeping rooms being only five feet. The condition of the ground floor was very dilapidated, with d. -"P cavities at va-rious points, provid.ig a passage for impure air into the living rooms. The lea.n-to at the rear of the dwelling house was dilapidated beyond descrip- tion All wood work was in a state of decay. The house was devoid of troughing; there were no sanitary con- venience and the house was totally un- fit for human habitation.—Recommend- ed that a closing order should be served. Further reported that Plasycoed Cottage, Cwmgiedd, had been reported to the Council since June 19th last, as unfit for human habitation. Nothing had been done and the house was still occupied. Fourteen days' notices were served on the occupiers of Water-street houses and shops to further refrain from oc- cupying the houses. Fpv; of the notices had been complied witJ, but the other houses were still occupied. BRYNMORGAN BRIDGE. The Clerk read correspondence re- ceived from the Local Government Board in respeot of the delay of the Board in granting sanction for the loan necessary to proceed with the work as a similar loan had been granted to the Pontardawe Rural District Council in respect of Gilwen Bridge. It was decided to press upon the Local Government Board the impor- tance of the matter and pointing out the seriousness of the delay which would be occasioned in ciase the bridges became broken down. DAMAGE TO MOTOR CAR. I A letter was received from an Insur- ance Company in resivet of damage done to a motor vast belonging to Messrs. W. Thomas and Co., Swansea, on the road at Penrhos, owing to a soft place of the road which had been badly filled in. The Clerk said he had replied to the effect that the Council were not re- sponsible for the main road at Pen- rhos, which belonged to and was under the control of the County Council. In reply to Mr. D. R. Morgan, the Clerk said if a claim was subsequently made against the Council it would be passed on to Mr. W. Morgan, the con- ¡ tractor. CLAYPOND CROSSING SCANDAL. I NOW WILL THE MIDLAND CO. MOVE? Alderman M. W. Morgan wrote call- ing attention to the serious obstruc- tions to public traffic caused by the action of the Midland Railway Com- pany in keeping the gates at Claypond Crossings closed so often and for such j a long time. On Friday and Tuesday j last Alderman Morgan, his wife, and children were returning from Swan- { sea by car, and had to stop there on • each occasion for fully 20 minutes or more. The Chairman moved that the Mid- land Railway Co. should be prosecuted if it were possible. Mr. D. R. Morgan thought that as the letter came from a County magis- trate they should forward a copy of it to the company. Mr. Samuel Thomas said he was not in favour of summoning the company. The Chairman: They would sum- mons you in a minute if you did any- thing wrong. Mr. Samuel Thomas said he had re- ceived complaints from Mr. Hughes, Ystalyfera, that he had been held up at the crossings. Mr. J. Howells did not think the company would take any more notice of the letter from Alderman Morgan than from anyone else. He had report- ed a case from Penrhos, where traffic had been held up at the crossings for 20 minutes. It was decided to forward a copy of the letter to the Midland Railway Co. I ABERCRAVE TO COLBREN ROAD. Tho Chairman reported that the sub- committee appointed to meet Messrs. J. E. Moore-Gu vn and G. J. B. Price had met those gentlemen. The farmers had offered to subscribe £ 100 towards :t"1.. .1 the cost of the proposed road, but Mr. Price would not do more than give the land and P-25 towards the scheme. The committee recommended that the mat- ter should be deferred to see if any further subscriptions could be obtained. Mr. D. R. Morgan seconded the adoption of the report. Mr. J. Howells said he had been speaking to a farmer who lived close to the proposed, new road and he stated that he did not know why the Council were making so much fuss over it as no one wanted the road. The farmer had told him that no more than 30 tons of coal went over the road in the course of a year. Mr. Dd. Lewis expressed surprise at Mr. Howells making such statements. He (Mr. Lewis) did not come to the Council to express his own opinions, but those of the ratepayers of Ystradgyn- lais Higher. Mr. S. J. Thomas thought the sub- committee should approach Lord Tre- degar and attempt to obtain a sub- scription from him. Mr. T. Williams said they ought to get at least £ 500 from the landowners. Mr. S. J. Thomas said if they could get from -01,000 to £1.500 the Council could very well provide the balance. They might also approach the Aber- crave Colliery Companies. Mr. W. Walters said Mr. Howells had been talking to a farmer from Glvntawe, and that was not in the Council's district. Ystradgynlais Higher had not been receiving a proper share I of the rates of the district, but whilst they did not complain when they want- ed improvements they ought to get them. Mr. Dd. Lewis said it appeared to him that the policy of certain members of the Council was to adjourn matters from one month to another. The chair- man's statement that the inhabitants should collect ?1,000 was absurd. The Chairman: But there is no harm in telling the public that. Mr. Lewis said that he was going against his conscience in going out to collect money on behalf of the road, but in order to get a road for the dis- trict he was prepared to sacrifice. Mr. T. Williams had offered to give £ 5 to- wards the road but were the other members of the Council prepared to do so ? The recommendation of the commits tee was adopted. An Amended Sewerage Scheme- Misunderstandings The Chairman: Now we will deal with the sewerage scheme. Mr. D. R. Morgan: I understand that the report of the Sewerage Scheme Committee was to be considered by the whole Council. In the commit- tee I stated that it was not desirable to rush this matter because I consider it is a very important matt-er to all of us who are ratepayers, and heavy ratepayers so far as we as working men are concerned. I am sure that work- ing men will have to pay as heavily in respect of this matter as anyone else. Objection to Forcible Feeding I suggested in committee that we should take three or four months to consider seriously what we are going to do in respect of the scheme. I don't want to rush it, and I don't wa.nt other mem bers of the Council to thrust it down my throat that the scheme should be rushed. There are many portions of the scheme which should be amended. When Mr. Swayne appeared before the Council I asked him whether these stipulations he had entered into the agreement would add to the cost of the scheme. Mr. Swayne said that such clauses put in were the usual clauses put in in other schemes, and that he did not think it would in any way affect our scheme. Ratepayers Surprised Well, what was the result? The re- sult has been that the tenders have been considerably above the estimate, which has not only surprised the Coun- cil but has surprised the ratepayers as well. Now they are thinking what will be the ultimate cost of this scheme. The £ 30,000 stipulated is not the only payment the ratepayers will have to meet, because they will have to join up with the main sewer from their houses. Mr. Swayne said in the committee that the causes of the cost of the scheme going up was because of the increased cost of material and labour. Why did he not take that into consideration when he was before us, and tell us frankly that that was the ca.se. We have been led to think that we could have got tenders for the work at £ 25,000. It is a fact that the estimate was made in 1910. Mr. Lewis Thomas: Was it in 1910? Mr. D. R. Morgan: The committee decided upon a certain course in regard to Mr. Swayne that he should amend his scheme in regard to certain por- tions of it. Mr. D. R. Morgan: This matter can be discussed by the whole Council, and I have a perfect right to give my views upon the matter. Mr. Samuel Thomas: Certainly, cer- tainly, you have. Mr. Morgan: If certain portions of the scheme are left out now, they will have to be done in the future. Suggested Amendments The Clerk proceeded to read the minutes of the committee meeting which showed that it was recommended that certain portions of the scheme, near the Lamb and Flag, A bercrave, oould be amended at an estimated sav- ing of £ 2.000: at Station-road, £ 340 ■ Gla-ntwrch £ 130; and from Penygorof to Gurnos at an estimated reduction of £ 310. It was further resolved that the En- gineer, after preparing an estimate, should see the L.G.B. inspector, and if he approved of the amendment, that the four lowest tenderers should be communicated w:h and asked 1' sub- mit amended tenders. Mr. Lewis Thomas: I did not come from the meeting with the some im- pression as Mr. Swayne. I unders-tood that nothing final was to be decided until this meeting. I understand that Mr. Swayne has sent out letters to the contractors. The Retorts Polite The Clerk: I beg your pardon. That is not so. Mr. Lewis Thomas: I beg your par- don; I have seen one. I want to under- stand clearly where we are, because this is a huge concern. It looks as if there is a game being played about this business. So far as the commit- tee was concerned we were going to omit certain sewers and diminish the depth of others. When asking for the prices of these four lowest we were only asking for the prices on that basis. Mr. D. R. Morgan: Yes, certainly. Mr. Lewis Thomas: Well, it has not been carried out. The door has been opened for the lowest contractor to raise his price, and for the second to lower his price. The Clerk: I do not know. Mr. Thomas: These are the words in the letter: I may mention that you are at liberty, if you see fit, to revise any of the prices. An Irish Stew. You see the mess we are in. They all know each other's prices. The se- cond knows the price of the lowest. It is open for the second tenderer to go down £ 1,000 and the lowest tenderer to go up L500, and then for him to cap- ture the job. That is how things are to-day. Any contractor of reputation will not go into this business. Council in Earnest Mr. Walters: I am a member of the Council but not of the committee. I am very glad that we have had these facts brought before us. No underhand- ed work should be done in a Council, especially where nearly the whole of the ratepayers are working men. If Mr. Swayne is doing this, if ho is giving a chance for one to raise his tender and another one to come down, it is our duty to tell Mr. Swayne to clear out. We must come to business. We are not playing. I do not think Mr. Thomas would say a thing if he had not proof for it. We hope to have Mr. Swayne here in a few days and I am willing to sacrifice time and money to get this proper. Mr. Lewis Thomas: I want to make it quite clear that the only thing in dispute regarding prices was the omit- ting of certain work. The Chairman: And to ask for amended tenders. Mr. L. Thomas: On these specific points. The Clerk: I understand that. Mr. T. Williams: I do not see that there is any tender in at all now. Mr. D. R. Morgan: We have not accepted any tender. Go Up or Come Down I Mr. T. Williams: The tenders were sent in but the way we are carrying it out is false. I am glad that Mr. Lewis Thomas has opened my eyes. The low- est one can come up or the second one can come down. We don't give fair- play to the ones who have tendered at all, because when we get tenders in we are expected to keep everything quiet so that each tenderer does not know what the others have tendered. Mr. Swayne ought to know that. The lowest could bring his tender up to within L60 or L70 below the second tender and capture the job and we pay another £ 1,000. The Chairman: That is not the re- solution of the Council. The Clerk: So far as I understand the decision of the meeting was this, that the question of communicating with the four lowest tenderers was simply on the question of the reduced scheme to be got out by Mr. Swayne i and approved by Mr. Crosthwaite. j Engineer's Mistake I Mr. D. R. Morgan said Mr. Swayne had ignored the Council and he was not giving them a report of his de- liberation with the L.G.B. Inspector, and he had gone behind the Council and had asked the contractors to amend their tenders without sanction of the Council. The Chairman: I think we gave power to Mr. Swayne that he was to go to the L. G. B. and ask their per- mission to reduce these portions that we have instructed him to do, and af- ter that he was to try and get the amended tenders in by to-day. Mr. Lewis Thomas: On these four points our resolution was that we should instruct Mr. Swayne to see the inspector in London and see if the L.G.B. would agree to knock off these different sections, and if the L.G.B. would agree to him applying to the four lowest tenderers to give an amend- ed tender on those four points: not I to give a chance to the highest to come down And the lowest to go up. ( onmit'ee or Coum il Mr. Dd. Lewis said that if Mr. j Swayne had taken the recommendation of the committee as the decision of the Council he had made an error. .1 The Chairman: It is the committee that has made an error and not Mr. Swayne. I am positive that the com- mittee instructed Mr. Swayne to see the inspector and then try and get amended tenders by to-day's meeting. .r. Samuel Thomas said he had not been present at the committee meet- ing. They had the lowest tender E2,375 3s. 6d. below the next tender. The four points had nothing to do with the whole tender. If he con- tracted to lay two miles of tramwav and the Council found that they could not afford to go on with it all he could still supply them with a mile and a half or a mile and three-quarters of tramway, pro rata. The only question he required answering was whether the lowest tenderer could do the job for the benefit of the ratepayers. "I want to find out the reason as to why you are calling in the four lowest tenders?" I Member's Amenities Mr. T. Williams: You are not the Council, are you ? Mr. Samuel Thomas: I am the Gur- nos Council. (Uproar.) The Clerk said he had not received a letter from Mr. Swayne for two days but there might be one waiting at his office at Neath. The Chairman said they had made an error. Mr. L. Thomas: We have not. The Chairman: Where the commit- tee is to blame is that they asked the four lowest tenderers to submit revised tenders instead of asking the lowest tenderer v hat he would take off for these four portions. The committee have not made a mis- take. The only mistake mad e :s that the committee did not bring the ro- irtion before the whole Council. Ihcy have taken the resolution of the com- mittee as final. Mr L. Thomas Mr Swayne has taken it. After further discussion Mr S. J. Thomas asked Who is going to have the job. Are we going to ac- cept the lowest tender ? The Chairman We cannot deal with that to-day. A Terrible Mistake Mr L. Thomas I am under the im- pression that a terrible mistake has been made in this. Let us get Mr Swayne down. Mr D. R. Morga.n I second that, be- cause I believe that Mr Swayne has not done his duty in approaching the con- tractors without the Inspector's sanction. Some discussion then ensued as to when a special meeting of the Council should be held, and in the course of dis- cussion it waa suggested that the meeting should be held in the evening. Mr Howells: I don't think you are dealing fairly with the reporters. Mr L. Thomas The reporters, like the poor, are always with us. Mid-Day Post Arrives After lunch, the Clerk read correspon- dence from Mr Swayne, the engineer, re- lating to the Sewerage Scheme. In the fir&t, Mr Swayne reported having inter- viewed Air Crosthwaite, the L.G.B. In- spector, and discussed with him the ques- tion of revising the tenders. Mr Crosth- waite statod that he believed the Board would not object to the alteration of tho depth of the sewer if it could be done satisfactorily at cheaper cost. Mr Swayne also reported having pre- pared a schedule of omissions and altera- tions to the scheme and forwarded a copy to the contractors who had Eent in the four lowest tenders, together with a letter, also a copy of which he enclosed. He had further returned to each con- tractor his original bill of quantities, and said the Council would ireceive the amended tenders on or before Wed nes- day, the 21st inst. The Letter to the Contractors The following is a copy of the letter sent by Mr Swayne to the conttax-tom along with the schedule of omissions and alterations — Dear Sir.-As the tenders received ara considerably in excess of the estimated oost, the Council have decided to omit certain sewers and diminish the depth of others, and I am instructed to ask those contractors who sent in the four lowest tenders to submit to the Council an a.mended tender. Enclosed with your original tender you will find a schedule of omirejoins and alterations, and I may say that you are at liberty, if you think fit to revise any of the prices throughout the Bill. The total of the amended tender should be marked ajid deducted from the total in the Bill of Quantities originally eent it, and this amended tender should be received on or before Wednesday, the 21st inst. No Need for a Special Meeting The Chairman thought from the letters, that there was no need for the suggested special meeting. That should be held after the amended tenders had been re- ceived, and there was no need for anyone to be accepted at that time, but they could be discussed, and if they varied from the expectations of the members, everything could be kept quiet, and a special meeting then called to deal with the situation. Mr Lewis Thomas thought it would be wise to ask the engineer to withdraw his letter to the contractors. There was nothing in dispute, but the schedule of omissions, and that was going to draw the contractors into such a great deal of trouble that they would take no further part in the matter, and the Council would find themselves with only one tender which would not. be the lowest. He knew of certain contractors who woul d t'ot toke the matter further in hand as it stood that day. Mr D. R. Morgan thought it was un- fair to ask the contractors either to raise or lower their tenders. He moved that the resolution pa:-sed before lunch should be adhered to. and that Mr Swayne be I asked to withdraw the letter to the con- tractors. This was agreed to, ard it was also decided to take no further steps in the matter until the Council had inter- viewed Mr Swayne. 'J.t. J!> 1,<