Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

.+. SPECIAL. (i. C. DEAN, The Tailor, will pay return fare wiU in 20 miles of Swansea on production of Railway + Ticket to any customer ordering a Suit or Over- coat at the following: address: 22, Castle St., Swansea. .4-

Advertising

♦  Ensure a | Prosperous Year. by | Ad 8  Advertising j in i Our Columns. { ♦ ♦ ♦

1NATIONAL FUND FOR MINING DISASTERS t

1 NATIONAL FUND FOR MINING DISASTERS t t National Committee I Inadequate Compensation i-, Act A representative gathering of dele- gates from Disaster Relief Funds, Pro- vident Societies, Trade Unions, and Coalowners connected with mining assembled at the Mansion House, Lon- don. on Monday, under the presidency of the Lord Mayor of London, to dis- cuss the need for a National Colliery Disaster Fund. The question was first raised at the delegate meeting of the Western Miners' District by Mr. W. Morgan, agent, and was subsequently taken up by Mr. W. Brace, M.P., who, by means of newspaper articles gave great- er prominence to the idea. The following were the South Wales and Mon. and Forest of Dean delegates to the conference:— Senghenydd Relief Fund.—Alderman Morgan Thomas, J.P. (chairman), Mr. F. J. Beavan, J.P., Sir W. J. Thomas, Councillor Tom James, Mr. J. L. Wheatley (Town Clerk of Cardiff). Wattstown Explosion Relief Fund.— Mr. H. A. Davies (secretary). Llanerch Colliery Explosion Trust Fund.—Messrs. Mark Mordey, W. P. James, F. A. Smith (secretary). Park Slip Colliery Explosion Relief Fund.—Rev. David David, Messrs. J. P. Gibbon, J.P., L. G. Jones (secretary) L. N. Williarnis. Ferndale, 1867, Elploeion Fund.- Lord Merthyr, G.C.V.O. Great Western Relief Fund.—Mr. G. A. Evans, J.P.. Albion Colliery Explosion Fund.- Alderman W. J. Trounce, J.P., Dr. T. W. Parry, J.P., Mr. David Ellis. Monmouthshire and South Wales Coal Owners' Association.—Mr. Evan Williams (chairman), Mr. Fred L. Davis, Mr. Joseph Shaw, K.C., Mr. W. Gascoyne Dalziel (secretary). Forest of Dean Miners' Federation. -Mr. G. H. Rowlinson (secretary). South Wales Miners' Fe(leration. Mr. Wm. Brace, M.P. (president), Mr. ti Alfred Onions, J.P., Mr. Jas. Win- w- stone, J.P., Mr Thos. Richards, M.P. ft (secretary). J -fitauttr 7 Miners' Permanent Providerirt Society. D. Watts Morgan, Mr. Henry Richards, Mr. Thomas Screen, Mr. E. Owen, J.P. The Lord Mayor of Cardiff (Alder- man James Robinson), the Mayor of Swansea (Mr. Thomas T. Corker), Mr. D. A. Thomas, J.P. The Lord Mayor (Sir Francis Wo- water) in opening the conference said that the attendance of so many repre- sentatives from all the mining districts of the country showed the very great interest that was being taken in the matter. In calling the conference he had been carrying out a pledge given by his predecessor, Sir David Burnet. There was nothing cut and dried, and his anxiety was that the matter should be fully and thoroughly dis- cussed. If it wa.s decided to form a cen- tral fund, the details could be thrashed out bv a committee to meet at a later date. It was desirable to have a national fund and leave the details to be worked out by a committee. It might be that r the surpluses of the existing relief funds might form the nucleus of a national fund. GREAT NATIONAL DISASTERS. The public mmd was moved by great disasters such as that which had recent- Jy occurred in Wales, but day after day there were men losing their lives in the collieries and for whose depen- dents nothing was done by the public. (Hear. hear.) They would recognise that one life was the same as another, and because one woman was made a widow in a single disaster owing to an accident which invblvecl only the loss l of one life, it was no reason why she should be placed in a. worse position than the woman who suffered as a re- suit of a great disaster. He therefore, I proposed the following resolution:— That this conference, representing trustees and civic officials of existing special oolliery disaster relief funds in the United Kingdom, coalowners' associations, miners' fedet-a. ions, miners permanent provident socie- ties, and others, approves of the pro- posal to establish a national fund for the relief of distress arising from fatal accidents of all kinds occurring in coal mining throughout Great Britain and Ireland. I In seconding, Mr. Wm. Brace. M.P., thanked the chairman for calling the conference. It was generally admitted that there was a great necessity for a national mining disaster fund for the purpose of relieving the dependents of those who lost their lives in prod ucing the great source of the nation's wealth. AN APPALLING WASTAGE liN I HUMAN LIFE. I I In referring to the records tor last year he found that 1,742 lives were lost—an appalling wastage in human life and a record that ought to compel any nation to pause. Out of that enor- mous total 461 lost their lives by ex- plosions of gas and coal-dust, whilst the remainder were killed by falls of roof and of sides Pnd from other causes un- associafced with explosions. The explo- sion at Senghenydd had touched the nation's generosity to its heart s core, had responded mnciii. ccnfv to relieve the distress, but he I thought the claims of the widows and orphans of the men who lost their lives in single accidents were as righteous as those of the people who suffered in the great disasters. (Hear, hear.) They felt that the occasion was ripe for such a scheme as this. FAILURE OF THE COMPENSATION ACT. Bereaved families were very much better off now than under the old state of affairs when there was no Compen- sation Act; but, after all, it was very inadequate provision that was made, and he suggested that conditions were such as to cast upon the nation the ob- ligation of doing something in addition. (Hear, hear.) Under the Compensation Act the basis of the grant was not on the needs of the family, but upon the loss of earning capacity in the case of a non-fatal accident, and on an average of three years' wages in the case of death, and the widow without encum- brance received exactly the fame amount as the widow with ten or twelve children to maintain. INTRODUCTION OF RED TAPE. I Mr. James -uarlington (cnairman or the executive council of the central as- sociation for dealing with accidents in mines) proposed the following amend- ment :— Without expressing any opinion on the suggestion that a national fund for dealing with mining disasters be formed, it is deemed desirable that a committee be appointed to consider the matters, and report thereon to a subsequent meeting to be called by the Right Hon. the Lord Mayor of London. This having been seconded, Sir T. Ratcliffe Ellis supported on behalf of the coalowners. The Earl of Derby, a representative of the Hulton Disaster Fund, support- ed the general principle of a national fund if it could be put on a proper basis and he thought the best way to get all rthe facts would be a departmenal in- quiry. (Hear, hear.) As a general rue they did not look to a Government de- partment for expedition, but if they could get the Home Office to appoint a small committee they would have more information at their disposal than any other body could get. MINERS' FEDERATION UN ANI- I MOUS r T"'Io 1 J"" I' 1 t 1- 1 L .Nir itobcrt. omiine, speatcmg on DenalI on behalf of the Miners' Federation, said that organisation, which was «-three- 'iu?'? W <>C P)iU:,gru{f wo\?.?: -?-, tol'utely unaujimouaf on th prmclpr; of a contra] national fund. lively day on the average four women were made wi dows by the toll of life in the riiine. Those widows and the. children who depended upon them had as much right to adequate provision being made for them as those who suffered b y big disasters. If there was a great calamity neither Sir Thomas Ratcliffe Ellis nor the secretary of a permanent fund would suggest an inquiry into the necessity of raising money to help the bereaved—everybody would set to work to get the funds together. Why was there any necessity to have an in- quiry in regard to this matter? They wanted it to go out to the public from that conference that, in their view, the time had corne to tackle the problem. Surely they knew enough about the need to affirm the principle—they had enough information in the Government returns to arouse the nation to a sense of its re- s'.visibility. (Applause). Ho agreed that it ought to be the responsibility of the industry itself fully and adequately to bear the burden of thc&e who were left widows and orphans, but the industry had not accepted it, and, consequently, it became the nation's responsibility to see that something was done. (Applause) Mr Alfred Onions reminded the Con- ference that only 335,000 out of 1,089,000 miners were members cf the Provident Societies. Mr Evan Owen, J.P. (Cardiff), who spoke as the secretary of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Permanent Relief fund, remarked it was not easy to see at the moment where the money was to come from when they considered that to deal with all the accidents of the kingdom something like J3230,000 a yea.r would be required. In South Wales alone, where would be required relatively by reason of the COALFELD BEING MORE DANGER- OUS 'I 'I 'I "n they would need &tu,uuv per annum to provide 5s. a week for each widow and 2s.6d. a week for' each child under thir- teen years of age. Where was that money to come from? Mr Joseph Shaw, K.C. (chairman of the Powell Dyffryn Company) said that he had been anxious in regard to the Senghenydd Fund that tiLo trust deed should make the powers wide enough to enable them to hand over any surplus to any Welsh fund or any central fund, whichever was thought advisable. He supported the amendment, however, be- cause h0 realised that it was a big sub- ject which bristled with businef-s diffi- culties tha, they could fuot surmount there. After further discussion the amendment that a committee be formed was carried by a small, majority, and the following resolution was then carried. That the Committee shall be comprÜcd cf fourteen gentlemen, with power to add, to act in conjunction with the Lord Mayor and the public trustee in inquiries and the preparation of a scheme to be submitted to a future con ference, the committee to consist of three members representing special relief funds, four re- presenting coalowners' associations, four the Miners' Federation, and three perma- nent provident societies. Mr Robert Smillie said the* miners had expected that conference unanimous to afhrm the- principle, and since they had nd done that tho Federation representa- tives would not pledge themselves further r in the matter. Mr William. Brace said lie assumed the committer* would bring forward a scheme, and ho and his (olleagv.' s would be we- to its preparation.

DEATH RATE IN MINES

DEATH RATE IN MINES Mr Keir Hardie's Hint to Colliers Writing on Monday in the columns of the "Daily Citizen," Mr Keir Hardie ob- served I regre-t to find that my pessimistic forecast in your columns concerning the slaughter in mines during 1913 is more than verified by the results. The figures just issued by the Home Office tell their own sad tale. Taking the divisions into which the country is divided for inspection purposes tho deaths in 1913, with the increase or decrease compared with 1912, were as follow Deaths Increase or in 1913. Decrease. North of England 206 -8 Y'shire & North Mds 291 -27 N'th & East Lanes. 51 -1 L'pool& North Wales 80 -13 South Wales 777 x 471 Midlands and South 130 x 8 Scotland 207 x 36 Total 1742 x 466 In four districts, as is shown above, there has been a slight decrease in the number of fatalities, and in three an in- crease the net result of the year's working of the new Act being that things remain pretty much as they were. The coroner's inquest on the Senghenydd dis- aster victims must have been a revela- tion to those of your readers who followed the evidence, when, after the second calamity in the same colliery, the man- ager f-oollv admitted that there were clauses in the Mines Act which he had not red. That fact explains a lot. Of course the jury found that noboby was to blames for the disaster, and with that the Great British public will doubtless be content. MEN TO APPOINT OWN INSPECT- ORS. But my present object is again to cali the attention of the colliers to the powers which they possess to see that the safety provisions of the Mines Act are properly enforced. I refer to the appointment by themselves of their own inspectors. I know that this power is far more ex- tensively used than waes fomerly the case but I fea,r the authority which the men possess is not enforced as it should be. It too often happens that when the in- speetion is made and faults reported the workmen themselves do not take the necessary action to have the findings of their own inspectors, enforced. Whf-ir th.išfs' the uaaethe nilglft- 3.1. [I most as well not be made. To remedy this, why should not every district of collieries have at lease one paid permanent inspector? The cost would be trifling, and he would be urd.er i:o fear of victimisation. He* would be always on the job, a.nd where the management re- fused to give effect to his recommenda- tions and the Government inspectors failed in their duty, he would have the power of his trade union and of the miners' M.P.s in the House cf Commons to call to his aid. The terrible thing about the slaughter in mines is that so much of it is pre- ventable, and if the miners would only use their powers drastically to see that the safety clauses of the Act are enforced then we might- speedily anticipate a, sweeping reduction in the long, weary procession of killed and maimed bodies which c.arry so much woe and want into their homes.

u Money a Curse

u Money a Curse" TESTATOR SORRY TO HAVE ANY TO LEAVE Probate has been granted cf the will of Mr William Marshall, of Hall-lane, Loughtoii, Pre"'ten, Lanes., a director of Messrs. W.. Marshall (Burnley), limited, who died on December 3 last, leaving £ 17.740. He stated in his will "1 feel that I am sorry to have money to leave, because inherited money often proves a Curse. I, however, sincerely hope that in this case it, will prove a blessing to the recipients. I desire to impress upon my children to use it well, in which case they will do honour to the giver. Believing that this my last hope and desire will be fulfulled, I shall die happy." Ruskinj Hall, a building he owned in Burnley, tho testator bequeathed to the Corporation of Burnley for the purposes i of a branch free library for the town, sub- ject to a ground rent of JE5 10s. per aiitini. "I make such request to my trustees tD offer Huskill Hall a-3 a gift for the benefit of my fellow-townspeople of Burn- ley, because I am a. Socialist, and as a substantial proof of the sincerity of the Socialistic faith with me. I believe that all land and capital ought to be public property. —

Praise for Mr in tone

Praise for Mr in' tone TRIBUTE FROM A POLITICAL OPPONENT. In an address delivered at a Conser- vative smoking concert at Garndiffaith Colonel Ellis Williams, the Conserva- tive candidate for North Monmouth- shire, said:- "Before conchtdin?. I have one thing I desire to say. I think you are bring- ing out a Labour candidate at the next election, and that Mr. James Winstone is to bo the man. Let me say that I have known Mr. Wina?one for some years, and that if he is the man who i-; going to fight it will be a. clean, straight fight. (Applause.) Mr. Win- stone and I have been friends for a very long time. We have worked on public bodies, the Monmouthsh ire County Council among others, and I know sonrctlii.ig of his worth. We have been friends and will fight in a j "r'endlv wav, nn.d when the fight is over we will still be friends."

WELSH CHARTISTS REMINISCEN CES

WELSH CHARTISTS RE- MINISCEN CES. INTERESTING STORY OF OLDEN TIMES Surrounded by three generations of descendants, there lives in retirement at 60, Penhevad-street. Cardiff, Mr. Edward Bellamy, aged 5»0, an ex-mari- ner, who has had an adventurous life. A press representative who visited the old gentleman's hoiy found him in a reminiscent mood. 'io was twelve years of age, he saia, when lIe first tasted sea life, and sailing out of his native town, Bristol, he found a sailor's life by no means so safe 41S at present, though as a matter of fact he was never shipwrecked. At the time of the historic Chartist movement Mr. Bellamy, then fifteen years of age, was in his father's boat, which was anchored in the Usk at Newport. "I saw the mob in the streets," he continued, "and suddenly about 25 soldiers ran out of the old Westgate Hotel. They fired into the crowd, and about a dozen people fell, the others running away. My father moved his ship some distance from the shore in case there should be fur- ther trouble." Some years later Mr. Bellamy went on a voyage to the West Coast of Af- rica and was for about fourteen months at a point slave trade had been so rampant. He saw slave dhows very often, but the war vossels were too numerous by then, and the prac- tice was nearly killed. Nearly 30 years ago Mr. Bellamy ran the tugboat Derby from Cardiff to Bristol with passengers in the record time of one hour. This was the first time for passengers to be carried on a tug between the two ports. Longevity appears to be a trait in the Bellamy family. His father lived to the ripe old age of 98, while he has a brother living in Bristol aged 88. He I had one daughter, who died a short while ago, and has eight grandchild- ren and 23 great-grandchildren.

A NEW DISTRICT OFI MTNEfiSI

A NEW DISTRICT OF I MTNEfiS I ,.(" 1 NEATH MINERS BREAK AWAY. A meeting was hell at the Neath Town Hall on Wednesci iy evening, pre- sided over by Mr. J.clies (Resolven) for the purpose of forming a new district of miners, comprising lodges on that portion of the area which has pre- viously been covered by the Aberdare, Anthracite and WesteTn districts. Six of the lodges represented have broken allegiance" with the Western district, whilst the Empire lodge, belonging to the Aberdare district, and the Aber- pergwm lodge of the Anthracite dis- trict, have joined the new movement. The new district will have its head- quarters at Neath, and will be known as the Neath District of Miners, and the first delegate meeting will be held on Saturday next. About 2,000 members of the new dis- trict formerly belonged to the Western district, and recently an application was made to the Western district on behalf of the Resolven and Skewen lodges for permission to secede, but the matter was referred to the Central Executive, which ordered an inquiry to be made. An inquiry was held and the Central Executive decided against tho further splitting up of the present districts, but in spite of this finding, the rupture has been made. The Ab-rpergwm lodg,3 was the third largest in the Anthracite district, and altogether the new district will consist of about 3,500 members. Officials have been appointed pro tern but there will be An election of offi- cials on Saturday next when it will also be decided to appoint an agent. ——————

Trade Union Programme

Trade Union Programme DEPUTATION TO THREE MINIS- ¡ TERS Arrange.ments havo been made for the reception of a Trade Union Congress de- putation by three Cabinet Ministers next month. The dates of the interviews, and the chief matters to be discussed by the deputation, aje MR McKENNA, FEB. 9. State maintenaJice and training of the blind. Government inspection of offices. Abohtion of fines in cotton weaving. Abolition of living-in system in shops. MR. CHURCHILL, FEB. 11. Wages reform in Royal Dockyards. Competition of Navy bandsmen with civilian musicians. r4 MR PEASE, FEB. 12. oompujsory aaywme classes lor COll- tinuing education. Maintenance grant for sc-condary school children. Resolutions on these matters wero passed at the Congress Inst autumn. -——————

No title

Professor Turner, le>turing in Lon- don, said that the earth wouid probab- ly last, as far as he conld sv scientifi- caliy, another fivo uiiiliuii years.

i DEATH TOLL OF THE MINES

i DEATH TOLL OF THE MINES I A Great Human Problem NATIONAL FUND NEED I By Mr William Brace, M.P. ——— Thero appear to four vitally interested parties involved in the creation oi a l atiollaI Milling Disaster Fund, viz., the workmen, the coalowners, the trustees and administrators of existing mining disaster funds, and the M iners' Perma- nent Provident Societies. Doubtless, there are other interested parties, but the four named would cover thase more closely affected. My friends suggest to me that I allow my view of the pressing need for such a fund to hide the rough- ness or the road which will ha.ve to be travelled before these parties can be re- conciled upon a mutually acceptable and workaole basis. I confess I feel sangine aLJout the success of the under- taking, because, strong as may be the ca&a which can be presented against the creation of a National Mining Disaster Fund, an infinitely stronger case can be made out for it. One has only to take the record of fatal colliery accidents for last year, published a few days ago by the Home Office. Through it the bbe? reaved women and. children's voices cry aloud for sympathy and help. DEATH TOLL OF MINES I do not know whether it is a pecuhar- ity of my own, but miners' fatal <:cciJent II records bulk before my eyes, not as in- animate things, but as men and boys I marching in procession to their graves. And what a tragically long and unend- ing procession it is! Year by year the list runs into thousand s. I quote the figures with the hope that they will speak the same pathetic message to all which they speak to me Number of Place or cause. accidents. Deaths Explosions of firedamp or coal dust 12 461 Falls of ground 591 614 Shaft accidents 73 96 M iscellancous under- groiuid 554 400 Total under?ou.nd .IC40 1571 On surface 170 171 On surface. 170 171 Gross surface .1210 1742 My colleague Mr Unions, wno has been making some calculations relative. to this matter, informs me that, broadly, half of the men killed are married, and would have two children dependent upon them. Upon this basis the mining industry created last year 871 widows- and 1,742 orphaned children. NEED OF NATIONAL FUND. I But really to understand the problem and appreciate the need of a National Mining Disaster Fund, the above figures require to e examined in detail. If this be done, it will be realised how fa.r the present system of raising money spas- modically, <:Jld only when great disasters devastate mining villages, falls short of properly grappling with the situation. In the 461 killed by explosions of firedamp or coal dust we have the awful dt-ai.-i toll at Senghenydd, yet, with that ap palling total included, it is 153 below the number of men and boys killed by falls of roof and sides, and the miscellan- eoua underground fatal accidents are within 61 of the explosions record for 1913. Then at ions was moved to its very heart's core by the Seinghenydd explos- ion, and responded most generously to the appeal made on behalf of the be- reaved families. We are indeed grate- ful to tho contributors for their timely assistance, but what about the 1,281 be- reaved families whose breadwinners were taken from by accidents in a different schedule, and, indeed, the families of those killed by explosions other than at Senghenydd and Glynea- Two-thirds of the number killed are without hope for help, although their needs are) the same and their claims as righteous. I COMPENSATION ALLOWANCES. I But they have their compensation, I hear someone say. In the majority of cases that is true, or it would be God pity them indeed. But will these who are prone to think tha-t the compensa- tion payment under the Compensation Act is an edequate allowance for the family whose support has been taken from, thorn figure out of the cauital value I of the money which the law provides I for them in this way? If they do, it will bring home to them, as nothing else I can, how essential it is that some ad- ditional assistance should be forthcoming from some source like a. National Mining I Disaster Fund. I am informed en the highest authority that compensation pay- ments, if capitaliscxl, would not exceed 6s. per week, and that the more correct figurp would bo about 4s.6d. per'week. Is this not an unanswerable argument for a National Mining Disaster Fund and a clarion call that. we should forget all points of disagreement or controversy and concentrate upon our many points of agreement ,iai tho interest of these who are so helpless to help themselves ? I A HUMANITARIAN MOVEMENT. I If the mining industry itself made it a charge upon the cost of production to raise tht- necessary funds to grant widows and orphans created by single fatal acci- de.nts equal treatment to the widows and and orphans who are bereaved by great disasters, it would not mean ruination d -? s P, 1 to it. But I am sure the general pub- lic would wish to be associated with such a noble and humanitarian movement which a. National J lining Disaster Fund j would establish, and many wealthy citi- zeIlS would- be p leased to enrich it bv way of legacy, bequest, or gift. It will, in nil probability, require more than Or.8 conference to see this busincs; through, j But if to-day's conference will affirm the principle of the desirability of e;> tibli.-bing a National Minium 1; s^stor • (Continued at bottom of next column)

i DEATH TOLL OF THE MINES

(Continued from preceding column). Fund, remitting to a committee tho power to draft a scheme in detail to be reported upon at a future conference, I am confident the pathway wiH be smoothed of difficulties which at c. dis- tance may appear very formidable, if- not i'isurmountaole. The Right. Hon. the Lord Mayor of London is doing his par; towards finding a solution cf a greai human problem. It will be for the re- presentatives of the minors and the coal- owners, the Permanent, Provident. Societ ies and the trustees and administrators of existing disaster .funds to do theirs. Success will be worth all the sacrifice and labour which nvyrno can put hi to —Mr Brace in the "Western Mail."

I A CO ORDINATION SCHEME 4

A CO ORDINATION SCHEME —— 4' Mining Education in South Wales NEW BOARD SET UP It will be a matter of gratification throughout the Welsh coalfield to learn that a complete agreement' has now been arrived, at, at least tentatively, on a scheme for the improvement and co- ordination of mining education in South Wales. This is t-he announcement, contained in a circular letter issued by the Lord Mayor of Cardiff (Dr. J. Robinson) con- vening the adjourned public conference to be held at the City-hall, Cardiff, on Saturday next, when the scheme will form the subject of further considera- tion and resolution. It will be remembered that on the oc- casion of the last conference difficulty arose as to the constitution of the govern- ing body. This difficulty will be over come by the establishment of a. new mining education board. With this end in view it is proposed that the members of the existing board should resign, and that the new board, the powers of which ahe to be purely consul tati ve, shall con sist of a stipulated number of representa tives appointed by various public authorities, the senate and council of the University College, the South Wales Coalowners' Association, the South Wales Miners' Federation, etc. Later on the same day the formal opening will take place of the new School of Mines at Tre- forest, the cost of which will be borne by the coalowners by means of a tonnage levy of O.lOd. on their declared output for the previous vear. TRAINING OF THE STUDENTS. The intention is that the students shall receive, by means of the laboratory equipment, technical and practical train- ing and experience in the matters with which they will subsequently have to deal at the collieries. In this connection an important part of the scheme is that arrangements have already been made whereby the students will be afforded op- portunities of visiting, under the control of the staff, the different collieries of the associated coalowners and of handling under working conditions, the machinery and plant. The value of this practical experience can hardly be over-estimated. In fact, the work at the school is to be looked upon as am integral part of actual colliery management. The school will be open, equally to the sons of working men a.nd the sons of colliery managers, and arrangements are made for part-time as well as full-time students. The fees per session for the various courses have been arranged as follows :—Full-time day mining course, £ 10; part-time day mining course, B2 10s. and special courses for mine mechanics, electricians, chemists, and surveyors, E5. Students from non subscribing collieries will have to pay 25 per cent. more.

ooo GOWER LABOUR PARTY

-————— ooo- GOWER LABOUR PARTY. PROPOSED PRESENTATION TO THE REV. T. E. NICHOLAS At an executive committee meeting of the Gower Labour Party on Satur- day evening held at the Western Miners' office, it was unanimously de- cided that a presentation should be made to the Rev. T. E. Nicholas, Glais (who is leaving the constituency) for the services he has rendered to the cause of Labour, especially in Gower. The secretary, Mr. H. W. Davies, Sea View, Penclawdd, will be pleased to receive and acknowledge donations. The following have been appointed to act as the committee for the purpose: Mr. John Williams, M.P.; Mr. J. Mil- lard, Llansamlet; Mr. Jno. Edwards, Pontardawe; Mr. W. H. Davies (trea- surer), Penclawdd; Mr. Meth Jones, Port Talbot; Councillor D. D. Davies, Gwauncaegurwen, and Mr. H. W. Davies, secretary, Penclawdd.

IMPORTANT CIVIL SERVANT CHARGED

IMPORTANT CIVIL SERVANT CHARGED. Alfred Hodgson, 39, secretary to the Special Commissioners on Inland Re- venue. was at Bow-street committed for trial on charges of forgery, perjury, and attempting to obtain money by false pretences. Bail was allowed. He was charged with forging a request for the repayment of £ 374 income tax in the name of "Andrew Anson." It was further alleged that 1*9 had forged a similar claim in the nar je of Williams. Mr. Norman Fisher, a Commissioner of Inland Revenue, stated that on Dec. 10 the defendant told him that he was in trouble owing to his having helped a brother to make up an income tax repayment claim, which he had since discovered to be a fraudulent one.

BRYNAMMAN NOTES

BRYNAMMAN NOTES. I GIBEA AND ITS BAND OF HOPE ounday last a "Cwrdd Cwarter, con- ducted by the Band of Hope children., took the pla-ce of the usual Sunday even- ing service at Gibea. The events of tho evening proved the change justified, it being evident that the Band of Hope wa.3 doing exceptionally good work, of which. Gibea may well be proud. Meetings lik40 this bring to light the acts of self- sacrifice, necessarily performed by sanwi in order to bring the youngsters to such a pitch of efficiency. The Band of Hope Choir, conducted by Mr JAhn C. William; contributed a num- ber of choruses, whilst individual mem- bers sang and recited songs and verses suitable to the occasion. Little Norahl Williams, Chapel street, opened the pro- gramme with a psalm and later yi-gain contributed a splendi 1 recitation; Miss K. Llewelyn gave a most masterly reci- tation entitled, "Magdalene." Miss Thomas, sc h ool teacher, sang in fine style; andalso took part in a dialogue, as jsl be wined -ft, ai:d a miblic so leiharuiv* aid indifferent towards the financial in- terests of the.institution has little ground for ccmpfoirrt- if the public c: i t 1>11! sacrificed to tI1. ■ the library.