Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

.9. ♦ GOOD MEWS G. C. DEAN, The Tailor, ♦ is prepared to pay return ? ? fare within 20 miles of + Swansea to any customer. ♦ placing an order upon pro' duction of Railway Ticket. ? Ticket can be produced. after the order is given. Please Note the address: + 9-2, Castle St., Swansea. .+.+.+.

Advertising

 ? ♦ The Prosperous Up-to-date Tradesman X A t.. Advertises. Do You Advertise ? It not, become pros- perous.. ♦ ♦ Enquire for Rates.

SENGHENYDD SENSATAION

SENGHENYDD SENSATAION. WITNESS EXPLAINS HIS SILENCE. The Home Office inquiry into the Senghenydd Colliery disaster was re- sumed on Tuesday, and further sensa- tional statements followed those made at Monday's sitting. The witness was a miner named Thornton, and his allega- tions were of so grave a character that he was strongly pressed to explain his .silence before the catastrophe occurred. He gave two reasons: That he did not think it was neces- sary to speak of what was within the knowledge of the colliery staff, and That he feared victimisation. William Thornton, examined -on oath, said he was a miner employed in the Aberystwyth portion of the Mafeking district. He was not in the mine on the day of the explosion, Oct. 14, but he was there on the 13th, and for some time to time conversations with his mates as to the condition of the roads in respect of gas. It was usually said, "We are going to have something hap- pen here unless we are careful." USE OF THE LAMPS. I The firemen had cautioned them as I to the use of the lamps. He had known accumulations of gas fifteen yards from the face in his own working place, and had spoken of this to one of the fire- men, Frederick Williams, now dead. He and his mates had been told to "brush away" or "waft away" gas. The Commissioner: That is a distinct breach of the regulations. This is a very serious statement, and I hope you real- ise its importance. You are on oath, and I would remind you that these poor men are dead and cannot defend them- selves. You still say firemen told you to "brush away" gas accumulations? Do you not know that according to the regulations when gas is in a place you &re not to enter until an inspection has taken place?—The firemen would say, "Go on; it's all right." Replying to question, ThQrnton went on to describe certain mining opera- tions carried out in his district by a miner called Good Boy Dick, who lost his life in the explosion. This man was driving a hole through into some old workings. He (Thornton) saw gas com- ing through this hole the size of a I man's head under pressure from the other side. Such was the size of the hole on Oct. 13, but after the explosion it was large enough for a man to creep through. He had seen one of the de- puties using a lamp in this place in such a way as to occasion witness to remark, "You will play with it until it bites you." 'CANNOT ANSWER FOR HIMSELF.' I The 'Commissioner: You know the poor fellow is dead and cannot answer for himself ?-Yes. The Commissioner: This a a. very serious state of affairs, if correct. Did you report to the overman?—No; if I had done that I should have been go- ing over the fireman's head. Did you never think of seeing the l manager ?-N o. Did you ever see the under-wianager or tell him ?-No. How recently before the explosion did you see the manager, Mr. Shaw, in this district of the workings ?—About a fortnight before. He came with a fire- man and an overman. Did they make any tests?—No. Was there any conversation ?—No. Did anybody besides the fireman tell you to "brush" out the gas ?-No. MR. R. SMILLIE. I Mr. R. Smillie (assessor): If the fite- man and overman of this district were alive this would be a very serious state- ment, but it is more serious they being dead. You would not make it unless absolutely true ?-I would not. You say there was sufficient accumu- lation to put out a lamp ?—Yes. And you say that a foreman and over- man saw the state of things, and, know- ing it, went away saying nothing about it?—Yes. The Commissioner: You have been 12 years in this colliery, and you have never complained to the management? —No. The Commissioner: Did you appre- hend that if you made a complaint it would or would not be attended to?— II I might have been thrashed for it. Mr. Smillie: You do not mean thrashed in the ordinary sense of that I term? METAPHORICALLY. I The Comm-ssioner: You are speaking metaphorically ?- Y es. j Mr. Smillie: You think it might have been the worse for you?—Yes. The Commissioner: Well, you won't be the worse off for anything you say here to-day, and I hope the manage- ment will convey that to you. Mr. Smillie: You thought you might be viotimised ?-ExACtly. Mr. E. Williams (Assessor): Do you know of any instance of victimisation here?- W elÍ, after the last explosion I was idle eleven weeks; then I was taken back by Mr. Shaw. The Commissioner: Was any reason given for your not being employed?- No Thû Commissioner: You might have complained to his Majesty's inspector and nobody would have been one what the wiser?—I don't know about that; they find things out in a very funny way. (Laughter.) The Commissioner: You might have sent a letter to the Home Office. I see you are a very cautious man. Mr. Nicholas: Giving evidence against the company you feared would be a verv serious thing for yourself ?-Yes. The Commissioner: Did you make your statement immediately after the occurrence ?—Yes. Mr. Nicholas: Was it before the ex- ploration work had been very far ad- vanced ?—Yes. Mr. Nicholas: And you asserted the bodies of the fireman and the overman who were with "Good Boy Dick" would be found in the locality you have in- dicated ?-Yes. Mr. Nicholas: And as a matter of fact they were so found. (To witness): You believe the explosion was con- nected with this very place in Mafe- king?—Yes, with this very place. Mr. E. Williams (Assessor): You say there was a possibility of victimisation. Why ? Could you not have brought the matter before your trade union lodge committee ?—I did not like to do it. You are a member of the Miners' Federation. Why did you not bring it before the Federation committee ?-I did not care to do it. I did not think any report from me was wanted. The examiners would report the condition of affairs. "ABSENT." Mr. Trevor Lewis (for the manager) put it to Thornton that he had been frequently absent from work, putting in 51 shifts out of 158, and asked him why if things were so dangerous he did not absent himself altogether.—If I and my mate had come out there would have been two more taken on in our I place within two minutes. He repented that he did not report what he had seen in the workings to the fireman and overman. He thought it was their place to report to the manager. The Commissioner: "Their place, with the lives of your fellowmen at stake! Mr. Lewis informed the Court that in the explosion of 1901 the damage to the mine was so great that many of the men could not get back for some weeks. He did not understand that Thornton made any complaint about the management of the mine on that occasion.—I told the deputy to speak to the manager at the time. AFTER FIRST EXPLOSION. I Replying to the Commissioner, Thornton said he and his mates carried out their tools because of the firing of holes after the first explosion. He had then been back at work some time. Mr. Lewis: I thought you meant im- mediately afterwards. The Commissioner: So did I. Mr. Kenshole (solicitor for the own- ers) I hope you realise what you are charging Mr. Shaw with? What made you believe that he and the overman knew of this dangerous conditions of things ?-Because the gas had been there so often. Do you seriously say Mr. Shaw and the overman did not make tests ?—They did not in my presence. Mr. Kenshole: You were prepared to risk the lives of these men rather than report to your own committee?— I was running the same risk. Mr. Kenshole: This is the first time we have heard this allegation about "brushing" or "wafting" of gas. MR. CLEMENT EDWARDS. I Mr. Clement Edwards, M.P.: We cannot allow that statement to go un- challenged. Mr. Nicholas: And I raised the point in another place. Mr. Smillie: Do you know of any workmen who have complained to the management of gas accumulation?—No Mr. James Winstone, vice-president of the South Wales Miners' Federation gaveevidence as to his having taken a statement from Thornton in substan- tial agreement with his sworn testi- mony. Several survivors gave an account of their rescue. Mr. Winstone returned to the wit- ness-box to speak as to his inspection of the mine after the explosion. He was not satisfied with the system of mines inspection, and the men were losing conifdence because it had been decided in a recent case- that- no inspector was bound to produce before a judge any report made by him without the ex- press authority of the Secretary of State. Mr. Nicholas and Mr. Edwards ar- gued that this matter came without the terms of reference, and was a point of supreme importance. The Commissioner: I must rule against you. The point is directly ap- plicable to and should be raised in "another place." The Court adjourned until Wednes- day.

NATIONS LAWYERS AND STUDENTS ON STRIKE

NATION'S LAWYERS AND STUDENTS ON STRIKE Some curious strikes are just now spreading throughout Italy. fthat of the lawyers has now become general. It is a protest against the shortage of judges and magistrates, and the lack of practical provisions for working the new penal code. Italian law courts are choked with ar- rears of legal work, some of it being the accumulation of years. Another nova.l revolt has been pro- claimed by the students of the normal schools of the kingdom. The strikers ob- ject. to the proposed Bill presented to Parliament by the Minister of Public Instruction on the ground that it will necessitate higher fee:-1 and will injure the status both of teachers and pupils.

LABOUR IN PARLIAMENT

LABOUR IN PARLIA- MENT. I THE NEW SESSION. MR MACDONALD ON THE POSITION Parliament reassembled for the new session on Tuesday, and on Monday Mr J. Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., leader of the Labour members at St. Stephens ac- corded an interview to a representative of the "Daily Citizen," in the course of which he made reference to the many great issues facing the Legislature dur- ing the coming months. "The session," said Mr. Macdonald, "is going to be one of the landmarks of modern political history. First of all, we have to face one of the most critical of Imperial problems, that of how far a self-governing dominion fly- ing the British flag is to be expected to conform its actions to British con- stitutional practice, and how far the Imperial Parliament is to accept the responsibility of passing opinions on such a matter. Since I returned from Glasgow I have seen some of the great- est authorities on constitutional law and I have found none who did not look upon the action of the South African Government with grave con- cern. The clause in the Indemnity Bill dealing with the deportations carries us back to the time when the country was on the verge of revolution—the time of Charles the First—and so ob- noxious to all British instincts have such legislative acts been that they are specifically prohibited in the Constitu- tion of the United States. CIVIL FREEDOM. I "In this fight the party is not going to champion Labour merely but con- stitutionalism. I am bound to confess that it is to me a great regret that it is the South African Government which we have to challenge in this instance. We owe General Botha and his friends many debts of forbearance and gener- osity. I hope the discussion will be carried on in such a way as to con- vince the self-governing dominions that there is no intention on the part of any member of the House of Com- mons to question their full rights of self-government, and I believe that the members of the South African Govern- ment will be candid enough to admit that their action is of such a nature as to compel the Imperial Parliament to consider it. "I suppose some 'genius' will put down a blocking motion, but I know what to do in that event. Whoever is elected chairman on Monday will not be left in the lurch. NAVAL SQUANDERING. I "Then we have the question of ar- maments to consider. This will divide itself into two sections, first of all that of sheer extravagance and reckless waste of public money. "Unfortunately, the House of Com- mons will not be put into possession of many facts regarding this because it is so buried in the general expenditure of the Admiralty, but all I have met who know the workings of the Admiral- ty simply smile when I talk about ex- travagance and waste. They all have little tales to tell. I wish Sir Francis Hopwood, who was made an extra lord to look after the business side of things, would tell us candidly what he thinks of it. This side of Admiralty adminis- tration is almost as objectionable as its big programmes and inflated fleets. All this arises because the Admiralty knows quite well that if it talks 'nervy- flap- doodle about foreign navies and menace nobody will sit down and ask it to ac- count for the enormous sums which are devoted to it year by year. "The second part of our criticism re- lates to the size of fleets. I know that that hinges upon foreign policy. If we continue to assert our intention of cap- turing private property at sea in time of war, and if the foreign affairs of the Empire are conducted in padded rooms, and behind closed doors, with blinds drawn and shutters closed, so that no light can get in and no whisper get out, big fleets are inevitable. "But, again, the programme which I believe is to be presented to us is altogether extravagant and unneces- sary. More thousands of men are to be diverted into the production of ar- maments, and the problem of national distribution of labour is to be ren- dered still more complicated in conse- quence. If we go on much longer the whole"* of our industry will be dominated, Uv T form of prodirisSSh which everybody condemns and. which nobody can do more than apologist* for. ?N- o t onl y Not' only^is foreign policy conducted secretly but all the officials who are responsible for it are drawn from das- ses which are out of touch with demo- cratic feeling, and act upon sentiments which have little influence on the open political life of the nation. They are drawn from our 'classy' political back waters, stagnant and stinking. We are, therefore, not merely fighting naval estimates but the whole system of dip- lomacy of which they are a comple- ment. I um1 SCANDAL OF DUBLIN. I i 1 • i men questions like that of Dublin have to be considered. The position of affairs in Dublin again is not that of a Labour dispute. It involves the character of the Government and the conduct of the municipality, and re- veals a state of administration which is (Continued at bottom of next columik.)

LABOUR IN PARLIAMENT

(Continued from preceding rolumn). little short of a scandal. The tribunal which has been appointed to inquire into the conduct of the police and the way in which the inquiry has been con- ducted are worse than a farce. Every witness against the police has been browbeaten and not a member of the committee of inquiry has protested. The court has been packed with policemen to keep the public out, and no attempt has been made to secure the adequate cross-examination of the police witnes- ses. CRITICAL FOR LABOUR MEN. I "As to other matters tne party will settle these at its meeting on Monday. I should imagine it will put the feeding of school children, at any rate during times when schools are not open, in that place in its programme where Bills are found which are to be carried into law during the session. "Generally the pitfalls which will be placed in the way of the Labour Party during the year will be more numerous and more fatal than usual simply be- cause, every reactionary brain in the House of Commons realises that this is the most critical session which it has been called upon to go through. We shall require all our wits about us and all the solid common-sense of the dele- I gates who attended the Glasgow Con- ference to prevent ourselves being used as pawns in other people's games."

IIN MEMORY OF MINER HEROES

I IN MEMORY OF MINER HEROES. Monument Unveiled on Ardsley Hill. I OAKS COLLIERY DISASTER I Barnsley on Saturday afternoon had its memory carried back to the great disas- ter at the Oaks Colliery, where, in Dec. 1866, a devastating explosion was answerable for the loss of 361 lives. Though nearly half a century has passed, the heroism that accompanied one of the biggest calamities in the history of coal mining, is still remembered by the descendants of the victims and survivors of the disaster. That heroism has now been recognised in the shape of a monument, which lifts its head on the crest of Ardsley Hill, near Barnsley and which was on Saturday afternoon unveiled as a memento of the splendid courage of three mining engineers—Mr T. W. Embleton, of Meth- ley; Mr Parkin Jeffcock, of Derby and Mr J. E. Mam-matt, of Leeds. "The dauntless three," along with many others, were worthily honoured to- day, through the generous. provision of the late Mr S. J. Cooper, of Mount Vernon, Barnsley, who, in his life, ever retained warm admiration for the heroes who so readily gave their lives for those entombed. The memorial was unveiled by Mr. C. J. Tyas, Chairman, of the Oaks Explos- ion Committee, and a large measure of public interest was displayed in the ceremony. It. was on December 12th, 1866, while work was proceeding as usual in the pit, 340 men and boys being engaged in the output of coal that the explosion oc- curred. A mishap to the, shaft had not appreciably delayed the usual routine of the pit, and no suspicion of a disaster troubled the minds of the toilers. But with the afternoon caane the terrible ex- plosion. Notwithstanding the perils of after- damp, volunteers readily came forward for the dangerous work of rescue, and before night fell 19 living men had been brought out of the pit, and 60 bodies. And through the long and anxious night that followed, Mr Jeffcock, to- gether with Mr Minto (a former under viewer), and Mr Smith, of Lundhill, risked the effects of the deadly after- damp to restore the ventilation of the mine, and expedite the work of re- covery. But at six o'clock the following morn- ing many of the volunteers having noticed danger in a reversal in the air current, returned to the surface. Mr Minto made an abortive search for Mr Jeff- cock and his companions, and had not long returned to the pit bank bel! ,)r. a second explosion shook the mine, and this was followed, an hour later, by yet an- other explosion. In each case the terrific noise told the experienced people at the, top that there was little hope left below for either those who might have escaped the effects of the first explosion, or the search parties. Yet, contrary to all expectations, the next day (Friday), Mr J. E. Mammat, the .engineer at, the pit bank, received a signal, and then heard a voice. With great promptitude he lowered a. bottle con- taining brandy and water, which was taken off the wire. By means of an iron bucket Mr Mam- matt and Mr T. W. Embleton descended the shaft, each standing with one foot in the bucket and holding the rope with one hand. So nervous was the engine- man that Mr Embleton, sen., had to stand by him whilst he lowered the gall- ant engineers into the pit. Their descent was attended with great danger. When about 150 yards down water from the burst "cribs" of the shaft dashed over them, and after a journey of a quarter of an hour they reached the pit bottom, where they found one of the volunteers who had gone down the previous day in a state of exhaustion. Fire was burning fiercely in the pit, and the calls of the engineers for Jeffcock and. others brought no reply. After further difficulties which in- cluded a fall by Mr Mammatt into nine feet of water, the three were brought safely to the pit bank. No more were saved, the total death roll being 316, as stated.

YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL Ii

YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL. I i The usual monthly meeting of the Ys- tradgynlais Council was held on Thurs- day, Mr J. W. Morgan presiding. Pre- sent Messrs. Lewis Thomas, Thomas Williams, J. H'owells, Rhys Chapman, David Lewis, S. J. Thomas, W. Walters, together with the clerk, Mr A. Jestyn Jeffreys; surveyor, Mr Thomas Watkins; and sanitary inspector, Mr G. J. Rees. I THE YNISCEDWYN GARDEN VILLAGE Mr Thomas Watkins (surveyor) re- ported that the Welsh Garden Village Company intended to build 12 more houses, making a total of 38 at Ynisced- vyn, but had surrendered the lease for the other land. The landowner stipulated that the plans prepared for the garden village in respect of the other portion of the land, would have to be adhered to. Mr P. J. Evans, agent for the Com- pany, attended and stated that a com- plaint in respect of the poor quality of bricks had been attended to. The speci- fications stipulated that only the best quality of brick should be used. The Clerk of Works, superintending the coa tract, was looking after the interests of the Company. In reply to the Chairman, Mr Evans stated that Messrs. Bule and Baker were the contractors. The Surveyor further reported that nb would inspect the four houses for which application had been made for loans under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act. CEFNBYRLE ROAD I Arising out of the minutes, Mr David Lewis raised the question of the Abet- crave-Colbren road, and asked for some definite pledge from the Council that they would make a grant towards the amount required to make the road. The Chairman suggested that Messrs. Lewis and Walters should obtain pro- mises for subscriptions, and then come back and tell the Council the result, so that the Council could say how much they would subscribe. Mr David Lewis said the Council had not yet given a definite pledge to take the road over, even if they collected a large sum of money. If the Council did not intend to take over the road they should say so frankly. Mr W. Walters said it might be labour in vain if Mr Lewis and himself collected any amount suggested. They would like the Council to state a definite sum, then they could try and collect the amount suggested by the Council. Mr Rhys Chapman said he waa under the impression that the two Higher Parish representatives had been authorised to collect money, and that the Council would take the road over afterwards. The Chairman: After they had sub- scribed to the satisfaction of the Coun- cil. Mr S. J. Thomas said it was not fair to ask the Council to make the road. The custom in Ystradgynlais was that roads should, be made before they were taken over by the Council, and the Ystrad- le )s h oul d do the gynlais Higher people should do the same as others had done. He would do his best to assist them to get the road, but to create a precedent in the way sug- gested would be too dangerous. The Council were not against the road being made, bnt they were against the innova- tion of the Council making a road. The Chairman said the Council would support the people of the district to get the road. Mr S. Thomas I hope we shall give them a substantial grant. Mr David Lewis said there was no sense in the system of carrying on busi- ness by the Council. The Chairman We are carrying on the business now as we have always done. Mr David Lewis You give pledges at one meeting, and then revoke it at the following meeting. I shall raise the whole question again at the next meet- ing, and shall give a notice of motion to that effect. SLAUGHTER-HOUSE WATER I SUPPLY Mr G. J. Rees (Sanitary Inspector) re- ported that he had requested Mr C. Nor- ton, butcher, of Colbren, to provide a proper water supply for his slaughter- house, but he had not done so. Recom- mended) the serving of a statutory notice. NUISANCE AT CWMTWRCH I The Sanitary. Inspector reported that the' attention of the Tredegar Estate agents had been directed to the nuisance existing at Maesypica, Lower Cwmtwrch, arising from insufficient drainage. A letter had been received from the agents to the effect that the work would be proceeded with forthwith. RIVER TWRCH AS A CESSPOOL t The Sanitary Inspector reported that the Llandilo District Council contem- plated discharging sewage from a section of their area known as "Cwarter Bach" into the river Twrch, near the Brynheoi- llys Colliery, Upper Cwmtwrch, and to discharge, or allow to be discharged, sewage into a natural stream was quite HIagat. Recommended that the Coun- cil should call the attention of the L?m- dilo authority to the River Pollution Pre. vention Act, 1876. WATER STREET I The position regarding Water Street, reported the Sanitary Inspector, was as follows There were 18 cottages with chapel vestry, twelve dwelling houses and six lock-up shops. Seven houses) and five lock-up shops were still occupied. The closing orders served on the owners on Nov. 17th, 1913, would expire on Feb. 17th,-next Tuesday. Fourteen days' notices were served on the tenants on Dec. 29th, and such notices had: expired on January 10th, 1914. CLAYPOND CROSSING. A letter was received from the fewansea- office of the Midland Railway in respect to the alleged delays to vehicles at the Claypond Crossing. The letter stat,(-, d that the complaints, with the exception cf one, emanated from members of the Council, and these cases h ad been looked into, but owing to the absence or dates in some and times in others, they had been unable to make much of them. Instructions had been given to the staff to prevent delays at the crossing, but as the main road between Ystalyfera and Abercrave was being put in repair, the -traffic would not be so heavy, and the delays, if any, would disappear. Mr Lewis Thomas said he understood that Dr. Lewis had recently been delayed at the crossings for a period of 17 minutes. Mr D. Lewis thought it would be better to have a letter from every person who was delayed at the crossing. Mr J. Howells said he saw a car held, up on one occasion for 20 minutes, and when spoke to the gate man, said that he did not care if they had been delayed for an hour and twenty minutes. He thought the Railway Company ought to keep a man on the spot. Mr T. Williams said that the man who was supposed to look after the gates had to go away from them and help with shunting. The Surveyor said that he had had an interview with an official on the, spot who had said that the man ought to stop near the gates. Mr Samuel Thomas said the Council had been too tolerant to the Railway Company in the past. It was decided that Messrs. Howells, Thomas Williams, the Chairman and Surveyor should ask the District Superin- tendent to meet them, on the spot. TELEPHONE FACILITIES AT J CWMTWRCH The Postmaster General wrote stating that the cost of providing and maintaining a telephone call office at, Cwmtwrch would not be justified by the .receipts, and asked for a guarantee of JBII per year over a period of seven years. The re- venue from local calls would be credited to the guarantee account. The charge for the use of the line would be Id. per call, and the minimum for a trunk call would be 5d. If desired a guarantee form would be forwarded to the Council. Mr Lewis Thomas asked that he be allowed to take a copy of the letter and place it before the ratepayers of his dis- trict, and he agreed to report on their decision at the next meeting. Agreed to. OVERCROWDING AT ABERCRAVE; SCHOOL. A letter was .received from the Brecon Education Committee stating that the matter of overcrowding at the Abercrave School was receiving attention, and they proposed to erect a temporary building at Alwrcrave pending the consideration of permanent extensions. COUNCIL NOT RESPONSIBLE j The Clerk read correspondence from an Insurance Company, and also from Mr W. Morgan in respect of an accident to a motor car, in which the latter accepted full responsibility, but stated tha-t there had been no negligence. THE ROAD TO PALLEG. I The Kev. W. L. Grimths, iSryngroes, I wrote asking the Council to consider his and other ratepayers' grievance with re- gard to the road leading via. Pentwenpalt houses to Penpark. The length of the extension was about 50 yards. A long discussion on-sued, and the C^erk was directed to write to Mr Griffiths, stating that the road should be properly made, and then dedicated to the Council who would then consider the question of taking it over. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF WALES. A letter was received from Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas, secretary for the Ap- peal Committee for the National Libra- ry of Wales, asking the Council to pass a resolution asking the chairman in his official capacity to open a subscrip- tion list for the district for the above- named object. In the Cardiff district the miners at many of the collieries were giving a levy for two or three weeks, and if that could also be done in the Swansea Valley it would be excellent. After discussion the Council decided to form a committee of the whole Council, with power to add, and that the first meeting should be held on Satur- day, February 21st. Mr. Thos. Wil- liams offered to subscribe £ 2 2s. A resolution that the Council should grant 25 5s. was deferred until after the first meeting of the committee. COUNCIL ENGAGES MR. E. L. CHAPPELL. The Clerk read letters from Mr. E. L. Chappell, sec. of the South Wales Garden Cities and Town Planning Associ- ation stating that his vacant dates were few, but that he would be pleased to lecture under the auspices of his asso- ciation in March, when he would deal with the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act, as requested by the Council. He would also arrange for articles to be published in the local papers. Mr. T. Williams said they would have to pay the association for Mr. Chap- pell's services. The Chairman: I am not going to pay. I am not going guarantee for five guineas. Other members expressed themselves as being very willing to subscribe liberally, if necessary, and it was agreed that collections should be taken at each of the lectures which would be held at Abercrave, Colbren, Ystradgynlais, and Cwmtwroh. CWMTWRCH JOINT WATER 1 SCHEME. The Clerk was directed to write to Mr. Wyndham Lewis asking him to convene a meeting of the members of the Cwmtwrch Joint Water Supply Committee on Thursday next. THE COUNCIL HOUSES DISCUSSION ON THE TENDERS. The architect (Mr. J. Cooke Rees), attended and gave the tenders received for the Council houses at Colbrcn, Aber- crave, and Ystradgynlais, and which were opened at the morning session: Colbren. W. J. Carr, Neath: Class A, £ 218; Class B, £232; ard Roads, L156. Total: £ 4.656. Sidney James. Ystradgvnlais: Class A, £ 223; B, 2240 Roads, 2100. Total: £ 4,730. H. Rogers, Swansea: Class A, je224 10s.; B, P,226 10s.; Roads, £ 60. Total: £ 4,570. Thomas Bros., Pontardäwè: Class A, £ 229; Class B, £235; Roads, L170. Total: £ 4,810. Architect's original estimate submit- ted to the Local Government Board totalled £4,733 9s. 6d., amended by L.G.B. by the substitution of railings for walls, L4,493 9s. 6d. Abercrave. Sidney James, Ystradgynlais: Class A, L223; B, £ 240; Roads. £ 90. Total: £ 4,240. H. Rogers, Swansea: Class A, £225 B, £ 229 Roads, £ 162. Total: £ 4,244. Hopkins and Evans, Ystalyfera: Class A, £ 229; B, L238 Roads, L2CO. Total: 4,394. Rhvs Jones, Abercrave: Class A, E231 10s.; B, £ 257 10s.; Roads, L244 Is. Id. Total: £4,471 Is. 10. Architect's original estimate, 94,187 amended, ±;3,971. Ystradgynlais. H. Rogc-s, Swansea: Class A, E214 10s.; B, £ 219 10s.; Roads, £ 165. Total: 24,944. Sidney James, Ystradgynlais: Class A, £ 217; B, £ 232; Roads, tIlO. Total, £ 5,064. Thomas, Bros., Pontardawe: Class A, £ 239 B, £21:5; Roads, 2305. Total: £ 3.635. Thomas Jones: Class A, k242 10s.; B, £ 250; Roads, £305. Total: £ 5,635. Thomas Jones: Class A, jE242 10s. B, C230 Roads, R203. Total: £ 5,628. Architect's original estimate: £5,197 10s.; revised, P.4,933 9s. 6d. Total of the two lowest tenders for all three districts, Rogers, £ 13,754; Sidney Jaa-ne6, 214,038. A long discussion ensued on the ten- ders, several being in favour of giving the work to the lowest, Mr. Rogers, whilst others pointed out that his were much lower at Colbren and Ystradgyn- lais, but was R4 higher than of Mr. Sidney James at Abercrave. Eventually Mr. W. Walters moved that the whole of the work be given to Mr. Rogers providing the inquiry of the architect as to his sureties were satisfactory. Mr. Rhys Chapman seconded. Mr. T. Williams moved and the mÛ" tion was seconded, that Mr. Rogers be asked to carry out the work at Colbren and Ystradgynlais, and that the tender for Abercrave be given to Mr. James. Five voted for the proposition and three for the amendment, and the pro- position was aftetwards carried as a substantive motion without opposition. ——————

PREMIER and SURFACE WORKER

PREMIER and SURFACE WORKER. WARNING FROM MR BRACE In the course of an important article in the "Western Mail" in regard to the Premier's unsatisfactory reply to the deputation from the Miners' Federation of Great Britain on the question of in- cluding surface workers in the. Mini- mum Wage Act, Mr. W. Brace, M.P., declared:— I abhor strikes and stoppages, and am always prepared to go a long way by negotiation and conciliation to try and prevent them. But if workmen have no alternative left but to go to war or surrender what is their due when the industry they are connected with can afford to pay it, what are they to do ? I am convinced that col- liery surfacemen in the main are gross- ly underpaid, yet the colliery owners are displaying no eagerness to meet the representatives of the workmen to re- model their wage-rates and hours of la.bour so that they may be more in conformity with present-day needs and requirements. The surface workers have displayed a patience Job-like in its es- sence, but this will end in the early part of next year. The demand to in- clude the surface workers within the Minimum Wage Act must be accepted as a serious proposition. If the rates could be arranged mutually between now and then, then it would be a simple and formal affair to include them in the Minimum Wage Act. But if necessary the full pressure to the Miners' Federar tion of Great Britain, both industrial and political, will be used to correct the wrongs of the surfacemen, as it was used to establish the minimum for tbe underground workers. 1915—THE FATEFUL YEAR. Because of this I have classified the year 1915 as a year of extreme impor- tance in our history. The Minimum Wage Act has to be renewed, and the colliery surface men demand to be in- eluded in 1915. All the mining Con- ciliation Boards in the kingdom also terminate simultaneously in 1915, and the underground workers are asking for an additional ninepence to the mini- mum of all the classes of labour whose minimum has been fixed by the district boards of presiding chairman. The movement for this ninopence within the Federation must be treated as seriously intended to go forward for a settlement. by direct negotiations a;d conciliation with the employers or by Parliament.