Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

.++.+.+. ? RAILWAY FAR"S STILL ? ? HOLD THE FIELD. ? -? |G. C. DEAN, I G. C. The Tailor. is prepared to pay return. fare within 20 miles of + Swansea to any customer + placing an order at the ❖ following address upon production of Railway. Ticket:- 4- i 22, Castle St., Swansea. !.?.

Advertising

The Prosperous Up-to-date Tradesman Advertises. Do You Advertise ? { If not, become pros- perous.. Enquire for Rates.

SENGiiENYDO IN PARLIAMENT

SENGiiENYDO IN PARLIA- MENT. Mr. John Williams' Speech in the House of Commons In the House of Commons on Friday last, in the debate on the Labour Party's Amendment to the Address, Mr John Williams, M.P., contributed an able speech on the question. of safety in mines. .Mr Williams said I rise to support the Amendment, and At the outset I desire to express my re- ,gret at the absence of any reference in His Majesty's Gracious Speech to the terrible calamities that have occurred in South ales during the pa-st few weeks.. I refer to the Senghenydd disaster and also to the calamity which occurred at another colliery in the Principality, Glynea. At both of these collieries there was a large death roll. The chief ob- ject of the Amendment is, in my opinion, to ask the Government, to devise ways and means of preventing the occurrence -of such terrible catastrophes. I speak from a practical standpoint, as I have a right to do, having worked for many years below ground. I have been associa- ted with colliery work for a period of over forty years, so that I am entitled to say something upon these terrible acci- dents. Personally, I believe these ex- plosions are preventable. I believe it is quite possible to make these things im- possible. You cannot have an explosion without gas or coal-dust. These are the two chief factors in colliery explosions. EXPLOSIONS PREVENTABLE No one has heard of an explosion below ground where there is an absence of pul- verised coal—dead-duff as we call it-and gas. But with the presence of these two awful agencies of destruction an explosion is possible. I believe that these two agencies can be deaJt with effectively. There is no reason why gas should be allowed to accumulate in collieries to such an extent as to make the collieries a danger to life and limb. There is no justification, for these accumulations, and I regret to inform the House that I be- lieve that if the provisions of the present Coal Mines Regulations Act and the re- gulations continued in the statutory orders, were observed and enforced, we should; enjoy an immunity from these awful catastrophes. You cannot have an explosion from gas without some other element of ignition. You may have gas present in a large bulk, but so long as it does not come in contact, with a spark or flanie or some other agent of ignition, it is absolutely harmless. But you do not know the moment that the gas will come into contact with a flame or spark. So long as you have no gas everything is safe, but when you have gas in large quantities a.t the collieries you must pay close attention to the regulation of the gas and see hat it does not come into con- tact with a spark from overhead rollers, or from the rope, or from a fire, the result of spontaneous combustion. You must watch all those things. PROPER PRECAUTIONS NOT TAKEN Is that watch carefully kept; Is there a close eye kept upon the operations of the gas in collieries? I say not, and I ø:Yrry to have to say so. The number of inspections made during the last ten years is very small. I do not wish to speak dis- paragingly of our inspectors, but the only inspections of value that are made and tha-t are worthy of the name are made by th-o workmen themselves, and often under •con ditions which I do next like to describe to the Hm-e You may have an ex- plosion when a spark ignites the gas. Care should be taken that no spark should M allowed to be emitted, and that no combustion should take place. I have never known an explosion to take place where you have good ventilation. ;Zro must be something wrong with the ventilation to have an explosion, but I am carry to have to state from observa- tion, from experience, and from evidence adduced a.t our laet conference in Cardiff, that there are collieries in the United Kingdom at the present moment ttirough the returns of which a. man cannot cmw l. UNSATISFACTORY STATE OF I THINGS. That is a very unsatisfactory state of I things, and one that creates a want of can- Ifidenoe in the minds of the workmen as to the management of the collieries. Why should collieries be kept in this condition ? If the provisions of the Coal Mines Regu- lation Act were observed rigidly such a s/tate of thiines, as I hve described, could not exist. I hope that something will be •done to remedy it when the matters which ■were mentioned by my hon. Friend the Member for South Glamorgan last night are brought to the notice of the right lion. Gentleman the Home Secretary. Take, again, coal-dust. You may have an expl06ion from ooal-dust, but not from <-oai-d?st Itae?'S" S*" th? V lier^ -L but I b?ve that with great pre- l?.buti' ? ?ervation, tM gas c.,ut ?n <-r _? cl?ntrol to such ? ?.  t.o make it t'.fe ? ?? workmen f.n i,?r?,mk in the colliorie,?g. Then if it is not zet ri,,i of tho ga. as we S:??-?  ?n ? rid .f the ?l?,t wb..h ? on the m.m ~ad™Y»' Th,rre? is "» -J* r?son why ? ?cu.mu!?ton of two or three hundred tons of pulverised coal-dust should be allowed to remai-n on the main inroad. I hope that the Under-Secretary for the Home Office will take a note of things that could be remedied. Why should this auxiliary agent of destruction be allowed to remain to accumulate on the main roads ? It is only a matter of small cost to remove it. I would like to see those loads absolutely cleared once every weak. Then, if a gas explosion takes place, it has not another agent to help it in its course of destruction. Again, when we speak about gas in cavities, it may be said that that cannot be dealt with. I believe that in these cavities, in which gas exists all the year round, you cannot ha.ve a current of air right up to the top of the cavity. But this gas can be dealt with and made absolutely harmless by a process of hermetically sealing the cavity, by brickwork masonry, and by arching the cavity in such a manner as to make it impossible in a time of atmospheric de- pression for that gas to exude through the archway, and come down to the main intake and into contact with sparks and defective lamps. I hope that the Home Secretary will try to do something in that direction. I INADEQUATE INSPECTION. I Tho next point with which I wish to deal is this At the present moment the whole mining community is absolutely dissatisfied: with the existing system of inspection below ground. The duties df volving upon a mine inspector to-day are numerous and onerous. Let me describe to the House the duties de^eloving upon an inspector. He has to deal with a huge amount of correspondence, a great mass of clerical work, he has to attend inquests, examine working places, travel by train, coach lawyers, and do a host of other things. These duties make it physically impossible for him to perform his -vork efficiently. I should like to sec two classes of inspectors—one class, con- sisting of the present chief inspectors and sub-inspectors, whose duties in my opin- ion should be, first, organisation secondly supervision; and. thirdly, to deal with only fatal accidents. Another class of inspectors I should like to see would be a class who could devote their whole time solely to the inspection of collieries, Let me describe thot duties performed in the Welsh coalfield by an inspector in the course of a week. Are we to be told that the inspection of our collieries can be carried on efficiently and thoroughly under such conditions as now obtain ? We will assume that on a Monday morning tbo inspector receives a telegram notifying him of a fatal accident at a place Eixty iniles from where he lives. I THE FARCE OF THE PRESENT I SYSTEM. As my horn. Friend the Member for South Glamorgan stated hist night to the House, tho t-raiiis in that district do not run at express speed, so that it takes a whole day to travel there and back. One can judge, therefore, of the amount of time that is left to the inspector to examine the place where the fatal acci- j dent occurred. When he returns home he gets into touch with the coroner, and he arranges for the inquest. He attends the inquest. The inquest may last two days, sometimes more, or sometimes less; but suppose it lasts two dtys, aiid the re- suit is that the colliery company is found to have committed a breach of the Coal Mines Regulation Act, the inspector then writes to his superior and also to the Home Office. He notifiæ the Home Office of the fatal accident, reports there- on, and asks for instructions as to whether he is to engage a solicitor. The instruction is sent on to him, with the result that he goes next day to a solicitor and coaches him for the prosecution. Next day he receives notification of another fatal accident, and the same process fol- lows. What is to become of the inspec- tion of the collieries ? The inspector has been daily engaged in this other business, so that the collieries are not systematic- ally inspected at all, and there is no time allowed the inspector to make a system- ptle. thorough, and efficient examination of the collieries. HUMANITY BEFORE PROFITS I I hope that the two suggestion which I make, along with the list of suggestions given by my hon. Friend the Member for South Glamorgan last night to the right hon. Gentleman, will be taken into serious consideration by the Home Office. I can assure the Under-Secretary for Home Affairs that the workers at the collieries, and also the railway workers of this country are fully entitled to. whatever protection or assistance the Government can give them. I appeal to the Under-Secretary to take immediate steps to prevent, so far as is humanly possible, those catastrophes. The miners of this country are fully entitled to all that can be done for their protection. A large number of delegates assembled at Cardiff a. few days ago, and they drew up those suggestions which have been sub- mitted. They drew up many other sug- g-estions which will come on in due course. They are waiting anxiously to see whs/t will be the result of this appeaL It has often been etated that coal-getting is the staple industry of this country, and that coal is the most important and greatest national asset we possess. Let me point out to hon. Gentlemen that they must know tha-t it cannot be our greatest national asset, for the greatest national asset we po-mess is human life, and it is for every hon. Member of this House to do all he possibly can to preserve that in- valuable asset. —————— 1'8'. ——————

SIR MARCHANT WILLIAMSI

SIR MARCHANT WILLIAMS I Sir Marchant Williams, who has re- sumed his duties as stipendiary magis- trate at Aberdare, after several months' absence, was warmly congratulated on his recovery of health by the solicitors in Court. Sir MArchant said "I am gra,dually improving, but I am not so well as I look. I am still a bit of a wreck. I would like to be able to sit through the work this morning, but my doctor ordered me not to return at all to my old seat here. Still, I am anxious to feel that I am in harness again." —————

No title

Ex-Police Sergeant Henry Hill, died at Hove, aged 92. He had drawn a. Bright- on police pension for 40 years.

SAFETY IN THE MINES I

SAFETY IN THE MINES. I EDUCATING THE COLLIER. TREFOREST PRINCIPAL'S IDEA In his inaugural address to the Stu- dents' Association of the Treforest School of Minos, Principal Knox em- phasised the need for technical educa- tion in the mining industry. The de- velopment of technology in South Wales had not kept pace with the de- velopment of the mining industry. De- spite its outstanding importance in the coalfields of the world the facilities for mining education had been far inferior to those provided in other coalfields. A comparison in the mining colleges in France and Belgium, in Germany, in the United States, and in our Colonies would serve to emphasise the need for the Trefore.st School in South Wales. There was a prejudice against uni- versity trained engineers—a prejudice which had been expressed by one emi- nent writer in a comparison between English and American systems of edu- cation "that in England the university graduated a man into a top hat, where- as in America it graduated him into overalls." TECHNICAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS A great difficulty, however, confront- ed teachers in the higher branches of technology in the lack of suitable pre- paratory training on the pan; of stu- dents entering for technical courses. This training could not be conferred by purely evening classes. There was a pressing need for junior day technical schools to broaden the training of stu- dents for the higher branches of tech- nology. Such a technical training could not be conferred by the existing types of secondary schools, providing another route and training for those who con- templated passing directly into the in- dustrial organisation, fitting them with higher ideals and better developed minds, capable of taking a definite specialised part in their vocational work The same conditions with respect to age, standard of entry, and hours of study as those pertaining to second- ary schools might be established. The foundation of the curriculum should be science and mathematics, combined with the study of literature, history and the principles of citizenship to en- able the student not only to earn a living but to live well. The co-ordination between the ele- mentary schools and technological in- stitutions could thus be obtained on lines parallel with those existing be- tween the secondary schools and the university, with the diff erenee that the student would only attend the school for six or seven months in the year, II the other five or six months being spent in the mine or workshop. Students i showing special aptitude for technical work might be assisted by maintenance scholarship. to attend the full-time courses at the technical college or uni- versity. In England and Wales less than 5 per cent. of the children passed from elementary into secondary and techni- cal courses, as compared with 65 per cent. in the large German cities. This was due chiefly to the cost of higher education, which had to a great extent been the monopoly of the well-to-do classes. Such a scheme as Principal Knox had suggested would make it possible, he thought, for the poorest students to reach the highest rung of the educational ladder, and to become a valuable asset to the industry of the nation SPECIALISATION. The Treforest School was the first at- tempt in this country to found a. techni- cal school not only in connection with the industry, but as a necessary part of the industrial organisation. The de- velopment of the surface equipments of collieries was rapidly making it impera- tive that the colliery managers should superintend only the underground operations, leaving to specialists the control of the surface plant. The Tre- forest courses had been designed with a view to future specialisation in the mining industry, and it waa hoped th&t in the near future the mining engineer, surveyor, chemist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer should take a share of the responsibilities now borne almost entirely by the colliery mama- ger. With the association of the Tre- forest School with the University Col- lege, and possibly other similar institu- tions, a. highly specialised training was open to every student. The need for research was emphasised by a generous provision of the Mining Board for that item of work, and by the establishment or research fellowships facilities would he given in the near future to capable men to enable them to undertake the solution of the many problems affect- ing the mining industry. It was im- possible, however, to train a mining man in the technical college or univer- sity unless he was in close touch with everyday colliery practice. On the other hand, it was not pos- sible to train a man in the mine with- out the added help of technology. THE LONG VIEW. It paid in colliery managemnt to take the "long view" of things. This was becoming general in this ooalfield. The magnificent surface equipment of collieries to-day would have caused considerable consternation to capital ists a few years ago, but there was no doubt that these enabled a saving to (Continued at bottom of next column-)

SAFETY IN THE MINES I

(Continued fron preeedtng column). be made in the costs of coal production. The "long view" was equally essential in producing safety in mine working aa iii producing efficiency. The prpblem of safety from falls of roof, from explo- sions, and from the many dangers of the mining industry involved a com- bined knowledge of mechanics, geology and chemistry, and that could only be obtained by technical training. The Principal said he would like to see the Miners1 Federation taking a more active interest in the education of their members. So long as it was possible for one man ignorant of the causes making for disaster to be em- ployed underground no amount of legislation by the Home Office, or special rules drafted by officials would prevent the occurrence of mining disas- ters. With a well-educated body of miners a large reduction in the acci- dent rate would be within measurable distance. It was the duty of every per- son directly or indirectly associated with mining to encourage to the utmost the spread of technical mining education.

LABOUR MEMBER SCORES

| LABOUR MEMBER SCORES. I ANGRY SCENE IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS In the House of Commons on Wed- nesday, Major Archer Shee (U., Finsbury) asked the Home Secretary whether Mr. Poutsma, who had been deported from South Africa, was a British subject, and whether, if he was not a British subject, he would be refused admission to this country as an undesirable alien. Mr. McKenna. said that as he had previously stated Mr. Poutsma had stated that he was a naturalised British subject. In any case, he would not as far as he (Mr. McKenna) was aware be within the meaning of the section of the Alien Act an undesirable immi- grant, to whom leave to land in the United Kingdom might be refused. Major Archer Shee: Is Mr. Poutsma a naturalised British subject in the United Kingdom, and will the right hon. gentleman introduce legislation to amend the Aliens Act so that des- peradoes of this character (The re- mainder of the question was lost amidst loud uproar and cries of "Oh!" from the Labour party, one hon. member calling out "Coward.") The Speaker: The hon. member had better put that question down on paper. (Ministerial and Labour cheers.) Mr. W. Thorne (Lab., W. Ham, S.): Is Mr. Thornton, the new manager of the Great Eastern Railway, an alien? (Cries of "Order.") Major Archer Shee, rising a little later to ask the Speaker's ruling on a point of order, said'that while he was asking a question Mr. Joseph Devlin made an observation to him of a most offensive character. He said, "You ought to be the last person to bring charges against anybody." He desired to know whether it was in order for hon. members to make offensive 1 re- marks of that character—(derisive Na- tionalist cheers)—remarks which were mendacious and absolutely without any foundation w hatever. Mr. Joseph Devlin (N., Belfast, W.) said he had made the observation when Major Archer Shee was putting a sup- plementary question which, in his judg- ment, and in the judgment of all those who heard it, was personal, and of the most offensive character. (Ministerial and Nationalist; cheers.) It was not a question at all, but one of a series of observations which members of the Nationalist benches resented. It was true that he had said that Major Ar- cher Shee should be the last to make such charges, because he (Mr. Devlin) was one of thœê who strongly support- ¡ ed the attitude the hon. and gallant member took up when he occupied a large portion of a session of Parlia- ment in resenting the charges made I against a relative of his own. (Minis- terial and Nationalist cheers.) I IMPROPER QUESTION. I The Speaker: I hope the hon. and gallant member (Major Archer Shee) will see that the trouble has arisen in consequence of his supplementary ques- tion, and not in consequence of that which was on the paper. As I pointed out to him at the time the supplemen- tary question was an improper one. I regret that the incident has occurred between him and Mr. Devlin, but he must not put the blame on the latter member. ("Hear, hear," and National- I ist cheers.) I ARE THEY WORTH IT? Mr. Kellaway (R., Bedford) asked how many members of Parliament were at present refusing to receive their salaries. Mr. Montagu (Financial Secretary to the Treasury) said that the number was eight. Mr. Kellaway: Is the hon. member aware that the largest group of paid members in the House sits on the Unionists Bench? (Opposition cries of "Oh!" and Ministerial laughter.) Major Arther Shee (U., Finsbury): Is not a far greater amount paid to sup- porters of the Government than to the supporters of the Unionist party in the House? (Opposition cheers.) Mr. Jttinef^'Wpe (U., Sheffield, C.) asked if the hon. mem ber would use his influence with the Prime Minister with a view to ascertaining how many were willing to vote for the discontinu- ance of their salaries. No answers were returned.

BARN Y BRODYR

"BARN Y BRODYR." A NEW WELSH PLAY. PRODUCED IN LONDON "It was all about religion, you know: I that's how they are in Wales," re- marked one expensively-gowne d lady to another as they left the Rehearsal Theatre, London, where "Barn y Brodyr" had been produced for the j first time. The Welsh play came at the tail-end of a triad of plays produced by the Drama Society. The first was a brilliant but uneven work, that con- cerned the amour of a Parisian fille de joie, the second was either a clumsy attempt at comedy or the product of I an unusually jaundiced feminist mind, and "Barn y Brodyr," as the perspica- cious lady remarked, was "all about religion." Of this odd melange, the best effort (for those who could follow it) alike in conception and presentation, was undoubtedly the Welsh play. The story of "Barn y Brodyr" is a very simple one. Dai Williams, a model young man who gives promise of becoming one of the pillars of Bethania, has his religious convictions knocked out of plumb by an English Socialist. A strike occurs, and Dai leads the men. At a strike meeting he denounces the chapels, whose deacons are either of or with the employers, and this brings him at loggerheads with Rev. Robert Jones. The minister calls at Dai's house to rebuke him for straying from I; the path of orthodoxy, and to announce that he must submit him for judgment to the brethren at the "Seiat," a rather dubious tribunal, since, as Dai I vehemently remarked, it comprises the I employers he is fighting. Each fresh exhortation of the Rev. I Robert Jones only hardens Dai's re- solve, torn though he is by knowledge of the pain he is causing his simple, godly mother, Margaid Williams, to cut himself adrift from the old religious moorings. Enter Mair, Dai's betrothed and although she fully enters into his spirit as a rebel agains the established order of things, she is horrified to learn that he is an agnostic, mayhap even an atheist, and leaves him with the intimation that the relations -if love are severed by the too cruel, cruel blow. Mair acts and speaks as though agnosticism carries some definite moral obloquy-atheism, of course, being the last pitch of spiritual depravity—and even Dai seems to have a haunting sense of the sinfulness of renunciation. The play ends with Margiad, Dai's mother, raising despairing hands to heaven, and praying for the return of the prodigal. I Trite and simple enough the play appears from this resume; and so it is, but nevertheless it is in most particu- laars a faithful portrait of the life and mentality of a Carnarvonshire village. ) The author, Mr. T. R. Evans, knows hie Wales, and what he lacks in dra- matic technique he makes up in sin- cerity, intensity, and fidelity to fact. Betsan Owen is a realistic study of a lachrymose woman of the poorer class, and the author contrives a truly Welsh touch when Margiad places surrepti- tiously in the hands of the departing Betsam a package of sugar or some other pantry requisite, with the re- mark "Peidiwch a son." Betsan's description of "Yr hen Sccialws" as "Y lot fwya annuwiol," etc., set the audience laughing, as well it might. Rev. Robert Jones is slightly over-drawn, and the author does not seize his opportunity of show- ing how the minister's fervent and conservative mind is lacerated between the instinct of loyalty to capitalist deacons, and the desire to retain so promising a chapel member as Dai. Margiad Williams, the mother, was al- most photographic in accuracy of pre- sentation Wil Williams, a typically light and care-free youth, aglow with pride in his eloquent brother Dai, is fresh and vivid, but the most is not made of the opportunities of light re- lief he affords; and Mair is weak and ineffective, the failure of the play. The mounting was mediocre, but re- gard must be paid to the limited resour- ces of the Rehearsal Theatre. There was an impossible "dresser"; the delf was all white, and the blue and gold and bronze effects of the ordinary col- lection of cottage china were conspicu- ous by their absence. A copy of the "Geninen"- was lather ostentatiously- displayed on an upper shelf of the "dresser." The portraits included a sepia-tinted one of Mr. Lloyd George. There was a round table, but one missed the inevitable oak "settle." Al- together the producers quite failed to create the authentic Welsh atmosphere. It is impossible to witli-hold praise from the actors. Mr. T. R. Evans (the author) as Dai Williams, was vigorous and effective, if occasionally inanimate. Cordelia Rhys, as Marged was a pro- nounced success, and her brilliant work compelled admiration. H. D. Jones (Wil Williams) displayed great natural gifts, and Gwilym Aeron (Rev. Robert Jones) gave a finished study of pon- derous gravity. Megan Williams (Bet- san Owen) contrived the right blend of lugubriousness, and Janet Evans (Man- Jones) made up in vivacity for a rather obvious failure to stimulate the North Welsh intonation. The great defect of the play is its lack of humour. But Mr. T. R. Evans (Continued at bottom of next column*)

BARN Y BRODYR

(Continued from prseafttmf eolmmm). has done well enough for us to expect him to learn not to make over-drafts on the deeper emotions of his audiences. The few laughs raised were purely ad- ventitious, and it jarred somewhat to find the audience tittering a.t tlio, simple-minded earnestness of Margiad. The theme, of course, does not casj]. lend itself to humorous treatment, but the author might have got more light relief out of Wil and Mair. Mr. Evans has left no doubt, however, that he can do good work, and he should vet do better. —B.D. j

SENGHENYDD INQUIRY

SENGHENYDD INQUIRY THE CLOSING SESSION. WHERE DID THE EXPLOSION OCCUR? Expressing the hope that the labours of the officials and witnesses would not be in vain, and that those disasters would become things of the past. Dr. R. A. S. Redmayne, President of the Home Office Inquiry into the Senghen- ydd disaster, closed the proceedings at Cardiff. It was arranged that the ad- vocates for the interested parties should address the Commission at the Home Office on Friday and Saturday. Mr. Thomas Griffiths, mining en- gineer of Cymmer, told the Com- mittee that he did not know a single case where anybody had been found alive when an accident originated in the interior of the workings, but he had known instances of men being brought out alive, though badly burnt, when the point of origin of the explosion was not far from the pit bottom. "The coal-dust," he declared, is exactly like gunpowder and our great difficulty in South Wales is how to get rid of this from the roof and the sides. Mr. David Hannah, the agent of the Ferndale Collieries, in cross-examina- tion, said it would be unwise to let the rescue brigades to enter the returns. He admitted that, at the time of the explosion, he was not thoroughly con- versant with the whole of the plans of the colliery, but he knew that men had reported earlier that day that it was impossible to enter the Brittanic pit, and that this view was confirmed by him when he put his head into the return. Men could not have lived there for five minutes. Dr. W. N. Atkinson, H.M. Division- al Inspector of Mines, one of the pione- ers of the ooal dust theory, gave it as his opinion that gas was released by a fall in the Senghenydd pit, and was ignited by a spark from electric sig- nalling or from falling stones. Replying to Mr. Smillie, the witness said that the period during which the colliery had been exempted from having means to reverse immediately the air-current, expired a fortnight be- fore the explosion. Mr. Smilfie: Another breach of the Act. This is the second serious ex- plosion where it was found there were no means of reversing the air current. RESCUE APPARATUS. I Dr. Atkinson added that one lesson of the explosion was that no naked lights should be allowed underground. He would advocate that all lamp stations should be on the surface. Pending further investigations, he would prohibit the use of electric signalling wires with a voltage above five or six. I desire to qualify any impression (added the witness) that I am not in favour of rescue apparatus. Every en- couragement should be given for its use, and rescue brigades are worthy of every honour, but I have not such implicit faith in the appartus as many people have. The nearer the pit a rescue brigade is the better. Senghenydd had, he said, been inspected five times in 1913 before the explosion. Don't you think if the collieries were inspected more frequently there would be a sort of bracing, up all round so far as the officials are concerned ?—Yes. Replying to Mr CLem. Edwards, he said that if more inspection was required then more inspectors would be required. Mr Clement Edwards was proceeding to cross-examine on the question of the reversal of the air current, when "the President observed "We are øa.td that it would be very unwiee to reverse the air. It would have resulted in the death of the men in the 'Brittanic. Mr J. Dyer Lewis, senior inspector of mines under Dr. Atkinson, said he had experience of a.11 South WaJes explosions daring the past 20 years, and he cor- roborated the evidence of Dr. Atkin- son. Witness regarded oncogging as the very best method of dosing cavities. Mr Greenland Davies, mines inspec- tor, also gave evidence. In reply to Mr Kenshole, he said he was of opinion that the seat of the explosion was in the Mafeking Hard Heading. A fall of roof occurred, bringing down gas and causing a spark." The President said this exhausted all the evidence, and at the close he would like to th-Jik all for the very great as- sistance they had given the Court in ex- tracting the evidence. Their labours were nearly finished. "Ours is only just beginning, and we will give the evidence our best attention." Mr Trevor Lewis, responding, thanked Court for the great patience shown and the courtesy extended to all. Mr Clement Edwards, M.P., Mr. W. Nicholas, and Mr Thomas Richards, M.P., associated themselves with Mr Lewis's '~»:pres8ion of thanks, and the pro- ceedings terminated.

Mr J Hugh Edwards MP and HalfTruths

Mr. J. Hugh Edwards, M.P and Half-Truths To the Editor. Sir.-In his reply to my challenge in your last issue, Mr Hugh Edwards, M.P. tries to dodge the issues raised regard- ing his reference to the Minimum Wage Act, but I do not think he will enhance his reputation by a policy of evasion. If Liberal politicians have the audacity to claim on public platforms that working- men should support the Liberal party, in preference to the Labour party, because the former happened to be in office when the action of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain forced Parliament to legis- late on the Minimum Wage problem, they must expect their opponents to raise the whole question of the attitude of the Liberal Government towards the Mini- mum Wage claims and the proposals of the workers themselves. Whenever a Liberal politician makes that preposterous claim in Mid-Glamor- gan, I shall invite him to justify it be- fore mass meetings of miners, who are the men best fitted to judge. If Liberal politicians like Mr Hugh Edwards are not ashamed of the part played by the Liberal party as a whole in the Mini- mum Wage agitation, they ought to wel- come every oportunity of fully and frank- ly debating the subject beforo the work- men. All I ask is that in the contest be- tween Liberalism and Labour the truth, the who e truth, and nothing but the truth, s all be told. For z: -iy Liberal politician to put forward a claim to the votes of miners bocause the Liberal government had per- force to pass some Minimum Wage legis- lation is to base that claim on a statement which is a half-truth. Mr Edwards knows, no doubt, what description has been applied to half-truths. The attitude of the Liberal Govern- ment towards the Minimum Wages ques- tion, prior to the National strike, during the National strike, and during the de- bates on the Minimum Wage Bill, is a matter of record and history, and I am not at all surprised that Mr Edwards is not anxious to debate it be fore a mass meeting of intelligent Welsh miners. It will not help him one little bit to quote one or two words, torn from the con- test, of Mr Ramsay Macdonald's speech. That again is the trick of the half-truth. It matters not what Mr Lloyd George said or did not say in the course of de- bate, and I am at a loss to understand why Mr Edwards should subject a Cabinet Minister to the indignity of being dragged into this controversy by the scruff of the neck—unless it be that Mr Edwards is as incapable of keeping Mr Lloyd George out of his letters and speeches as poor Mr Dick was to keep the head of King Charles out of his compositional. It matters not what an in- significant minority of Liberals may have done, because individuals like Mr King and Mr Edwards count for next to nothing in party policy, and claims upon the electorate are made on behalf of party movements rather than on behaJf of individuals. What does matter, however, is the atti- tude of the Liberal party as a whole, and this I am willing to debate with Mr Edwards. In order to meet Mr Edwards I am quite willing to agree to debate the contention which he seems anxious to bring forward :—That he was justified in saying that the Minimum Wage Act, as it exists at present, was both introduced and passed into law by the Liberal government. g'; Though I agree to this being included under the heads of the debate, it is ob- vious that the debate would be a ridicul- ous farce if confined to that stupidly narrow issue, and in order to save Mr Edwards from the righteous wrath of several thousand miners called together to listen to debate which would insult the intelligence of an imbecile, I must in- sist. that he shall meet me half way, and agree to the inclusion of my contentions, as I have agreed to his. Neither Mr Edwards nor myself could expect thou- sands of Garw miners to waste their time listening to a so-called debate on such fatuous problems as "Is Maesteg in Mid. Glamorgan!" or "Waa the Liberal Govern- ment in office in March 1912?" So in order to provide a discussion of real value, I am prepared to meet him by including his point in those I origin- ally put forward, and I modify my challenge accordingly. I will debate publicly with him before a mass meeting of Garw miners at Pomtycymmer, the following contentions which I shall up- hold :— 1. That prior, to the National strike the Liberal Government were opposed to the principle of Minimum Wage. 2. That all the benefit there is in the Minimum Wage Act, the miners owe to their own organisations, the Miners Federation of Great Britain and the Lab- our party. 3. That all the defects in the Act are due to the opposition of the Liberal Government to the proposals of the Miners' Federation and the Labour party, and 4. That Mr Hugh Edwards was not justified in stating that the Minimum Ve Act, as it at pNMmt exists, was both introduced and passed into law by the LiberaJ Government. Here we have lssuee which will give Mr Edwardb an opportunity of proving that the Liberal Government were favour- able to the demands of the workmen. It will also give him an opportunity of ex- plaining to the Garw nuners why, on the third reading of the Minimum Wage Bill, for which he is now claiming so much credit, HE NEITHER VOTED FOR NOR AGAINST THIS MEASURE. The electors of Mid-Glamorgan have a right to an explanation. When he was seeking election to Parliament, he under- took that his actions on Labour matters should be judged by those of Mr Brace and Mr Ricliaids. If he could not lead, I suppose he could follow. But he neither led nor followed om this occasion. Probably he has a valid explanation which he would like to give the Garw miners. Perhaps he was writing the biography of Mr Lloyd George. I shall be glad, to meet Mr Edwards at Pontycymmer any Saturday night con- venient to him-the sooner the jollier. T > hope he will manage to tear himself away from Mr Lloyd George's biography for one night at least. Yours, etc., VERNON HARTSHORN.