Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

G. c. DEAN,: + I + Is prepared to pay return. ♦ farf within 20 miles of Swansea to any customer 1 Snl an order for a Suit J £ overcoat upon produc- J S?o? RaUway Ticket. 1 Ticket can be produced + after the order Is given. J + please Note the Address + 22. Castle St., Swansea

Advertising

The Prosperous X Up-to-date Tradesman A t" Advertises. ♦ ♦ Do You Advertise ? If not, become pros- X perous.. Enquire for Rates. {

Wrongs that Cry in Vain for Redress

Wrongs that Cry in Vain for Redress. Mr John Galsworthy, the author and playwright, writes to the "Times" urg- ing that Parliament might well drop politics for a time, and devote its at- tention to humanitarian measures fcr the remedying of crying evils. "We have a Parliament of chosen per-, sons, to each of whom we pay L400 a year, so that we have at last sonl e, r; ght to say 'Please do cur business, ,ziid that quickly. ?'"?And yet we si t and suffer such bar- barities and mean cruelties to go on amongst us as must dry the heart of God. SOME PRESENT-DAY SCANDALS. I "I cite a few only of the abhorrent things done daily, daily left undone; done and left undone, without shadow of doubt, against the conscience and general will of the community :— Sweating of workers. Insufficient feeding of children. Employment of boys on work that to all intents ruins their chances in after- life-as mean a thing as can well be done. Foul i housing of those who have as I much right as you and I to the firSot decencies of life. Consignment of paupers (that is, of those without money or friends) to lunatic: asylums on the certificate of one doctor, the certificate of two doctors being essential in the case of a person who has money or friends. Export of horses worn out in work for Englishmen—save the mark! Export that for a few pieces of blood-money de- livers up old and faithful servants to wretchedness. Mutilation of horses by docking, so that they suffer, offend the eye, and are defenceless against the attacks of flies that would drive men,, so t?ted, crazy. Caging of wild things, especially wild? song-birds, by those who themselves tnink liberty the breath of life, the jewel above price. Slaughte r for food of millions of •creatures every year by obsolete methods that none but the interested defend. Importation of the plumes of ruthless- ly sla-in wild birds, mothers with young in the nest, to decorate- our gentle- women. Such as these—shameful barbarities done to helpless creatiires-vi-e suffer .amongst us year after year. "One and all t arc removable, and Jtikny of them by email expenditure of Parliamentary time, public monoy, and expert care. I A BOLD STATEMENT. I "Almost anv one of them is productive of more suffering to innocent and helpless creatures, human or not and probably of more secret harm to our spiritual life, more damage to human nature, than, for example, tho admission or rejection of f Tariff Reform, the Disestablishment- or preservation of the Welsh Church, I would almost fay than the gianting or non-granting of Homo Rule--qurdions that EOp up ad infinitum the energies, the interest, the time of those we elect and pay to manage our business. ROTTEN! "And I My it is rotten that, for mere want of Parliamentary interest and time, we cannot have manifest and stinking jsores such as these treated and banished once for all from the nation's body. "I say it is rotten th&t due tim? and machinery cannot be found to deaJ witn these and other barbarities to man and beast, concerning which. in the malll, r.o real controversy exists. "Rotten that their removal should be left to the mercy of the ballot, to pi-iia.te members' Bills, liable to be obstructed; or to the hampered and inadequate efforts of societies unsupported by legislation. REPLY TO THE MOCKER. "It is I, of course, who will be mocked at for lack of the senses of proportion and humour in daring to compare the Home Rule Bill with the caging of wild aong birds. "But if the tale of hours spent on the former since the last new thing was said on both sides be sot against the. tale )f hours not yet spent on the latter, the uiockcr will yet be mocked." ——————* f < I

r Three Cornered Contestsi

r Three Cornered Contests MR ARTHUR HENDERSON. M.P., SAYS "NOTHING TO APOLOGISE FOR." M' r Arthur Henderson, M.P., speaking at Bishop Auckland on Saturday, said that every time there was a three- cornered contest, which ended as at Leith, they could not be surprised fthow was a me?uro of dissatiBfact?n me&t ?section of tho?who had given the.i vote to the labour P?ty "I h?e wl- disguised tho fact," added Mr SHendeer ri '?? t in my own 

HOUSING IN BRECONI

HOUSING IN BRECON. I Amazing Disclosures I I DOCTOR'S PLAIN LETTER I An indictment of Brecon housing con- ditions by Dr. A. C. Johnson, tuberculc&is physician, was contained in a letter which he wrote to the Breoon Board of Guard- ians. Dr. Johnson wrote with regard to a case of tuberculosis "I have had some experience in the slums oi Lambeth, but it is, I think, the worst case I have come across, and is hardly a credit to the character of the Brecon housing accommodation. The facts. are briefly mother died about a I month ago, I believe of pulmonary tuber- culosis. I wais not called in, and a doctor was only consulted shortly before her death. On January 30, I was called in I by Dr. Smith to see the. elder girl, Chris- tina. Acute pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed, and I offered to get her to the hospital at the first opportunity, but this was not accepted until it was too late to remove the girl, and she died on Wednes- ,day last. Meanwhile Elsie was brought to me on Friday, and I found she was also suffering from acute tuberculosis. I mads arrangements that she should go to ho&pital as icon as there' was a vacant bed. I also gave instructions for the otluir children (three) to be sent to stay with relatives, as there are only two btd- j roonift and, a landing, on which a bed is placed. On. Thursday (yesterday) it was reported to ma that the girl Elsie was alone in the house with her sister's dead body, and she could not go to bed as the coffin was to be placed in the ava.il- j able bedroom. Undt/r these circumstances I think you will agree with me that it was desirable that the girl should be got out of tho house at once, and the work- house infirmary being the only place j where she could get a bed and nursing, I saw the medical officer and made ar- ramgements for her to be taken over at once on the understanding that she should go to one of the. memorial hospitals at the first opportunity, Mr J. Conway Lloyd If it is a refiec- j tion at all it is a, reflection on the medical staff of this county, considering the num- ber we have to pay for. They ought to have discovered this cose before it got to such a.n acute stage. The Rev. II. J. Church Jones It has been, a. rather exceptional case. Take this girl Elsie. Three week s ago she was examined, and W6 perfectly well, but a fortnight later she WM simply riddled, with tube rculosis. Tho h:"ll&e ir ordinary circumstances is not tsmall, hut terrible casrs have occurred with such extraordinary rapidity nA to make the case so very difficult to dn-tl with. The Chairman's suggestion t-hat the girl should remain in the workhouse in. } firmarv and the matter left to the medical officer wa.s agreed to.

I C JIECTCWETGRING FOR THE STEELWORKERS i II

C JIECTCWETGRING FOR THE; STEELWORKERS. A GREAT PRINCIPLE ADVANCED. Mr. McKenna, the Home Secretary, had a notice on the Order Paper of the ) House of Commons for the introduction of a Compulsory Checkweighing Bill J to cover the Iron and Steel and various j other industries. For very many years deputations ¡ have waited upon various Home Sec- retaries with a view of having the principle contained in the Cheekweigh- man Clauses of the Mines Regulation Act extended to the iron and steel trades. Very little progress waa made until the advent of the Labour Party j into the House of Commons in 1906. In 1908 the Labour Party by the ballot got a good place, and a Bill was introduced by them. Mr. John Hodge, I M.P., stated the case on bohalf of \the I Iron and Steel Workers. The Home Secretary, who replied, was willing that the Bill should receive a second reading, but could give no guarantee of further progress. He stated, how- ever, that it was his intention to set I up a Departmental Committee to in- quire into the practicability of the ex- tension claimed. That committee was composed of equal numbers of employ- ers and workmen engaged in the in- I dustry, with several neutrals, Sir Ernest Hatoh being the chairman. A I unanimous report was presented, and the following session Mr. (now Lord) Gladstone intx ecl a Bill.  PROGRESS AT LAST. I Through the constant changes of those holding the position of Home Seo- ¡ retary, no progress was made, notwith- standing repeated questions in the House as well as repeated personal in- terviewf; on the part of Mr. Hodge. Last year, having quite failed to impress the i Homo Secretary, ho appealed to the Pnme Minister, who expressed the opmion that employers and workmen being agreed, there was no reason why I it should not have been on the Statute Book, but owing to the lateness of the session it was doubtful if a place could be found for it. Mr. Hodge in the firSt week of the session again approached the Home j Office, but without receiving any satis- factory assurance. Once again he ap- pealed to the Prime Minister, who pro- "nised to look into the matter, and the result has been the placing of the notice above mentioned. Mr. Hodge has been continuously Pegging away at this matter, and the members of his society will no doubt be verv much satisfied to know that at least there is some likelihood of the II Bill becoming an Act of Parliament..

PIT HEAD BATHSI

PIT HEAD BATHS I A Great Reform Urgently Needed CLENLINESS AND SELF-RESPECT I COAL DIRT AND LIMITATIONS I OF LIFE. (By Vernon Hartshorn). I It is astonishing that in this the twentieth century, after years of scientific teaching and propaganda on questions of personal and domestic hygiene, the coal mining industry of this country is being carried on without pit-head baths being provided for the health, cleanliness, and comfort of the workmen. I am positive the time will come when the mining com- munity will look back upon the days when miners went unwarhed, and in their work- ing clothes, to their homes, carrying there the muck of the pit, aa days of com- parative barbarism, almost on a level with those times when sanitation was practic ally unknown. When one reflects upon the important question of personal arid home cleanliness, it really seems astounding that employers with any public spirit or sense of obliga- tion towards their workmen should ever have contemplated the carrying on of mining or any other inSustry in which the men are bound to get into a dirty condition, without providing the most I ample and convenient bathing facilities and dressing rooms. I The comfort of the workmen and their families s,nd th/> maintenance of cleanli- ness should always have been one of the first consi derations in the management of j coal mines—as in-dispen^able as machinery or the half-yearly dividend. It is im- possible to acquit tmployters of disregard- ing the interests of their workmen in this respect. STANDARD OF LIFE AND COM- I FORT. Such neglect is largely due to a ten- ¡ dency oil the employing classes to judge the workers by different standards from those they apply to themselves. If facili- ties for the maintenance of personal cleanliness a.re regarded by the employ- ing clashes as good for themselves, they are equally good for the workers, and this fact ought to be. freely and generous- ly recooniied by the owners. Baths, dry- ing rooms for the men's clothing, and dressing rooms ought to be one of the first charges upon any indtustry such as coal mining. Apart from nis .Z,a,rdlirbeq-s and misconception as to the things which are helpful to the pE-If-respect of, workers, thero is no reason why miners should be singled out from the rest of the com- munity as a race of men who pass through the streets with black faces and clothes bedaubed with the muck of the pit. nor— why the dirt and labour of cleaning f.hould bo taken into the homes to make tho atmosphere sordid and less; homelike, and to add umieccssariiy to the many cares of the housewife. These serious home problems in mining communities ought never to arise. They ought to be deolt with on hygienic lines at the mine, to which such problems rightly belong. Public opinion on this question of bitha and ,n g-r4DOMS, and aJ?o generally on the scant regard that most l?wners display towards public interests, ought to rouse iteelf and insist on completo reform. The miners them- selves ought to decide that no longer will they make their home We disagree- able by carrying in it the dirt of the mine, and tha.t they must have facilities which will enable them to leave the.ir work clean and dressed as other men. REGARD FOR NON-MINING I RESIDENTS. But the general public should also in- sist that tlie mining industry should be carried on with regard to the resi- dents of tho districts in which the mines are situated, both as regards freedom from dirt and dust and tho appewanco of the neighbourhood. It does not con- tribute to the pelf-wepect of the workmen that they should have to appear in public covered with the dirt and filth of the mine. A clean and respectable personal appearance adds to thoeo self-respect of any man, and is in iteelf a moral tonic which braces up the whole character. Carlyle has pointed out the effect which a reasonably good sartorial appearance hns upon self-respect. There is no reason why tha mining districts, in whichthcl. mrida of miners, artisans and tradesmen have mow to speirid the whole of their lives, should be so much associated with dirt, ccaj duet and unsightly rubbish tips. The coaJ-dwners sihould gi" much more consideration in such matters, not only to the workmen, but to the non-mining public who have been very little con- sidered in the past. DISFIGUREMENT OF THE I VALLEYS. Dirt is no dtoubt inseparable from coal is no reason why it should be spread liko & blight over a whole neighbourhood. Public opinion ought not to tolerate, for instance, the disfigurement of the mining valleys—at «ne time glens of befiuty—by derelict rubbish tips. which by proper treatment 3,00 the planting of shrubs and trees might be deprived of their unsightlinese. Though as regards bathing and dressing facilities at the mines, the owners have not hitherto risen to their responsibilities to the workers, the men thmeselvea must see that they escape a charge of indiffer- ence. It is now within their p< £ ver. by means of recent legislation, to revolution- ise completely the present practice' in the coalfields and to confer upon themselves and their families at horqo an incalbul- able boon. There is now no reason why the men should not, by their own action, provide for the setting up of pithead baths and dressing rooms at the mines. It is to be hoped that they will take advantage of the opportunities they now have, and by I their own action do something to add I greatly to the amenities of life in the colliery districts. ¡ (ámtinuad at bottom of next colimn i

PIT HEAD BATHSI

(Ocntinned from preceding oolumn). I There can be no doubt of the import. anoe of this question to every miner and every miner's wife, now borne down by the excessive, labour of the home. It is therefore a good thing that at least one large firm has decided to make a move towards reform, and everyone who has the welfare of the miners at heart will welcome the scheme now about to be carried out by Mr W. Jenkins, of thfi Ocean Coal Company, a.nd will hope that it will moot with success and with complete appreciation by the men in whose mte.re.sis it is being established.

SOUTH WALES BURIALi SENSATION JSENSATIONI

SOUTH WALES BURIAL SENSATION. J SENSATION. I House Floor Collapses. I FIVE PERSONS INJURED I An Aberdare funeral on Monday was marked by a remarkable accident, which caused injuries to five persons, the. floor of a room in the hous. irom which the cofiin had just been br light out collaps- ing. A lailge number of friends had gathered for the funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Lewis, wife of Mr John Lewis, of 19, Trevor street, Aberdare, a. guard in the service of the Great Western Railway. The body had been carried out of the house, and the time-honoured custom of singing a hymn was being observed, when sudenly there was heard a crash from the interior of the hpuse. The singing was I instantly stopped, and several members of the cortege rushed into that dwelling. FIVE PERSONS IN "PIT." I They discovered that the floor of the I room had sunk down a depth of about six feet, and the husband of the de- ceased, together with Mr Matthew Lewis, his son, Mr Lewis, a br(ther, and two sisters, were in the "pl t," Fortunately, however, the other mourners remained cool, and at once set about releasing the victims. Mr John Lewis and his son were found to have FiiffeTed.iiagty t)riiises about the face, Mr William Lewis l ad fared much worse, as he had sustained a severe in- jury to his back, while the two ladies' heads had knocked against something. Mr Lewis and his son were able to accompany the funeral to the cemetery, but Mr Wm. Lewis's condition was such that it was deemed necessary to convey him in a cab to his home in Merthyr, while the two other sisters were advised to abandon thejr intention of attending the funeral, which was delayed for over half an hour. Very fortunately, the part of the floor on which rested a. piano did not give way or it might have fallen with a crash on the temporarily entombed people, with serious OOlL"-equ,nc£&. OLD COLLIERY WORKINGS. I The present was not the first occasion on which floors had, been known to subside with no warning in some of the houses in this particular street. It seems that a similar occurrence happ^ed not long ago, although not while a funeral service was in progress. Trevor-street, on the %mer side of which is a row of modern dwellings, is situated at the foot of the Great Western Rail- way embankment. About half a mile distant from the street lies the Graig Colliery, which was stopped ijiany years ago. It is surmised that coal has been worked at the particular spot, and that the displacement of the floors of these houses is due to a subsidence of the old workings of the pit in question.

I THE FUTURE OF WALES

I — THE FUTURE OF WALES REV. GWILYM DAVIES ON A NEW I ERA. The Rov. Gwilym Davies, Carmarthen, secretary of the United Schosl of Social Service for Wales, delivered an address on Sunday at the meeting held a.t Car- marthen in connection with the English Baptist Church Guild. Having outlined the various movements for progress in Wales since the last forty years, when, on the election of Henry Richard as member for Mecrt-hyr Tydfil, the Principality rejoiced at laet in the pos- session of a Welsh-speaking patriot as a Parliamentary representative, Mr Davies stated that lorty years back Wales was characterised as a "mere unmeaning and insignificant appendage to England." On St. David's Day, 1914, she would stand out distinctly as being capable of becoming one of the- meet progressive of the nat ions within the Empire. Com- menting on the progress made by the drama. in Wales in recent years, he stated that Carmarthen was the town where in 1911 the drama, in Wales got rj new lease of life. Those who were members of the Literary Committee of the Carmarthen National Eisteddfod knew what a fight they had to get, instead of the u sual recitation, a dramatic performance en the stage of the eisteddfod. The recognition of the drama. by the National Eisteddfod gave the movement a great impetus. The drama which won a prize of &1UU offered by Lord Howard de Walden was entitled "Change," and no more fitting title could be given to a drama of Welsh life and thought, since the vear 1911. In every sphere almost the old position was being challenged, and many of the old things were passing away. In the in- dustrial districts of Wales Mabon no lonsrer counted leader. The younger generation had broken 8.Wa.y from the old moorings. Nor was there that respect shown by all in the Glamorganshire Valleys to the ministry, to the clergyman, and the preacher that there need to be. There wee a marked tolerance in the Rhondda, in the Abordare., and: Merthyr Valleys, of some of the things once most securclv ent.renched in their midst. Affairs moved slowly in the agricultural areaa of Wales, but they were moving. There was change everywhere, but what of the Church es of Wales and the fta-te of religious views and methods? Here, perhaps, there was going on silently the greatest change of ail.

PONTARDAWE STRIKE SETTLED

PONTARDAWE STRIKE SETTLED. Inside History of Settlement I PEACE WITH HONOUR. I I There is now no reason to doubt that a very serious crisis in the industrial history of Pontarda-we has passed, and a great deal of relief has been experienced by employees, employers and trades- people since the "dark clouds" did, in reality, lift on Monday evening. Since a fortnight ago, when the dispute in the galvanizing department was temporarily adjusted, very few people in the district realized the seriousness cf the situation. The understanding given by Mr F. W. Gilbert-son at the Swansea Conference, when the Dockers' Union branch was re- presented by a deputation of fourteen, that there would be no victimization in connection with the dispute, was im- plicitly accepted by the men; hence, the chief reason why an arrangement to re- start work was madei on Wednesday, 19th February. The receipt of a letter by Mr Tom Jeremiah from Mr John Hodge, M.P., general s-sor-etary of the Steelsmelt-ers" Union, as is now known, caused the gal- vanize-rs to decline to resume work until Mr Jeremiah's position was made per- fectly dear. We are able to give the chief points of the letter which, was sent to Mr John Hodge by Mr F. W. Gilbert- son, a copy of which was afterwards sent to Pontardawe. In justice to the men it is necessary that it should be published. Immediately the galvanizers' decisaon to resume work reached the firm, a letter was dispatched to Mr Hodge by Mr F. W. Gilbertson, in which he stated that "now the galvanizers' strike at Pontar- dawe is at an end, there is a very im- portant matter I have to bring to the notice of your Association. Mr Tom Jeremiah has taken a very active part both individually and as chairman of the recently formed Industrial Council, in supporting and encouraging the illegal action of members of the Dockers' Union. Public evidence of this is to be seen in the reports of meetings addressed by Jeremiah as chairman, and in a letter to the "South Wales Daily News," signed by him. "There is other evidence of improper conduct in his capacity as checkweigher before me, and I am advised that ample evidence would exist for me to make a successful application to the magistrates for his removal if he had been appointed under the Coal Mines Regulation Acts. "I hav-e no objection whatever to the men appointing a check weigher in ac- cordance with the existing arrangement under which the firm has the right of veto, but I am not prepared to continue to approve of Tom Jeremiah unless he ia willing to make amends for his improper action in the past, and is willing to give us satitfaotery assurances of his behav- iour in the future. "I have drafted the enclosed) docu- ment, whioh I shall require Tom Jere- miah to agree to and to sign before we can continue to give our approval to his appointment. "I have drafted it in such a way that he has only to withdraw from the position which has already been abandoned by the Dockers' Union, and to undertake to conduct himself in future in the manner contemplated by the Checkweighing Acte of Parliament. "I h&ve no desire to be vindictive, and I hope that after this bitter exper ience a new leaf will be turned over at Pontarda.we, and that better relations will Tesult between us and our work- peopl-a who, after all, receive better and more sympathetic treatment at Pontar- dawe than most bodies of men reoeive at the hands of their employers. (Signed) F. W. Gilbertson." of the copy of Following the receipt of the copy of this letter, and the letter sent by Mr Hodge to 1.1.1" Jeremiah, the men held a meeting, and enthusiastically decided to support their secretary, and further in- sisted that before work would be re- sumed, Mr John Hodge should visit the branch. As reported in our last issue, pressure of other important matters did not allow Mr Hodge to visit Pontardawe until Mon- day last, but the men were determined that the works should remain idle until j such time as this important matter was cleared up. Not only were the millmen determined but, as was publicly ex- pressed. by Messrs. Wignall and Hughes at the Public Hall, on Saturday evening, the Dockers' Union was wit-h the men and would fight against any victimization. The document referred to in the fore- going letter was to the effect that Mr Tom Jeremiah was to express regret and apologise for the active part he had taken in the present dispute; that he SHOULD NOT BE CONNECTED WITH THE INDUSTRIAL COUNCIL in the future, and that a public apology should be made in reference to the letter he sent to the, "South Wales Daily News" and which was published "ija exteneo" by that p&M. Not only did Mr Jeremiah indignantly decline to sign this undertaking, but the man were unanimous that he ahould not do so. That, was the position up to last Monday morning, when Mr John Hodg?, M.P., accompanied by Messrs. T. Griffiths, P. Whitbead, M. Reeø, and a shorthand writer, visited Pontardawe and attended a meeting of the workers of all branches held at%he Works Institute. The building was crowded, and such was the public interest centred in the meeting, that hundreds assembled in the vicinity of the Works Road as they were unable to gain admission. Practically speaking, the meeting was open to all Trade Union- ists, aad undoubtedly, it was the most important meeting which has ever taken place in the industrial history of Pontar- dawe. Mr Tom Lewis occupied the chair and, throughout, conducted the proceedings with much tact. In the course of a lengthy speech, Mr John Hodge reviewed the position, and he declared that, upon the information he had at his disposal he saw no need for an Industrial Council for Pontardawe and District, as men and masters had the machinery of the Con- cilia-tion Board to deal witn. disputes. Mr Tom Jeremiah, who received a hearty reception, said that during his tenure of office as secretary of No. 2 Branch, there had not been a single occasion upon which the. men had "downed tools," neither had there been a striko in the mills (laughter). There were less "laggards" in No. 2 Branch than in any other branch of the Society in South Wales. Later on in the meeting, Mr Hodge expressed the opinion that Bro. Jeremiah had been more sinned against than sin- ning, and if he (Mr Hodge) was in Bro. Jeremiah's place, he would net sign, neither would he counsel any other maii to sign such a document. (Cheers). The meeting decided to send a deputa- tion to wait upon the firm, ancl the fol- lowing were elected Messrs. John Hodge, M.P. Tom Jeremiah, J. M. Davies, J. Owen Williams and Phillip John. They waited upon Messrs. F. W. Gilbertson, C. G. Gilbertson and P. Da.vies, and the deliberations lasted for 2b hours. Mr John Hodge put the case for the men with great skill, and the re- sult of the deliberations, as afterwards reported to the men, was that the docu- ment referred to above was wit-lidiawn by the firm and another one, drawn up by Mr John Hodge substituted. This document stated that Mr Tom Jeremiah would promise not to take any part in any unofficial strike inside the works. In the course of the branch meeting, held in the evening, Mr Hodge stated that he had demonstrated to the satis- faction of himself and of Mr F. W. Gil- bertson that Bro. T. Jeremiah was not a strike-make, but a peace maker. A ballot as to whether the document drawn up by Mr Hodge should be signed was then taken and, by a small majority, it was decided that Mr Jeremiah should do so. The decision was conveyed to the firm about 8 p.m., and arrangements were made for a resumption of work by the galvanizsre on Tuesday morning. The millmen will re-commeno^ work on Monday next, after six weeks' stop- page, for which they were in no way re- sponsible. It is hoped and expected that the grievances of the galvanizers will be dealt with by a committee of the Conciliation. Board within the next fort- night. oooo-

PONTARDAWE and ALLTWEN GLEANINGS

PONTARDAWE and ALLTWEN GLEANINGS [BY BIRKS.] I Question, was asked of Demosthenes, "What was the chief part of an orator?'' He answered, "Action." "What next?" —"Action." "What next again?"— "Action." "For when things are once come to the execution, there is no secrecy com- parable to celerity." —Bacon. "Dewi Sant" was celebrated in all tho local schools on Monday. Welsh airs, folk songs and recitations were given by I the scholars. Mr Abraham Jones, schoolmaster hns been appointed vice-president of the class teachers of West Glamorgan. Whilst driving through TreV.anos on Tuesday morning, a collision between two motor cars occurred. Mr F W. Gil- bertson was driving one of the cars but, fortunately, := with & slight &hoc\. A horse, attached to a milk float lte. longing to Mr John Bevan ran away on Saturday and, colliding with a. telephone pole in High street, opposite Mr Dan Harris' furniture shop, the float turned over and the surface of the road was washed with several gallons of milk. The horse continued it career with the overturned cart, but was pluckily stopped by Mr D. J. Harris, grooer, be- fore it could do any further damage. Mr Geo. Groom, late booking clerk at the Pontardawe Station, has been ap- pointed statiotb-maeter at Credenhill, near Hereford, and he has been succeeded by Mr W. Bott, of Brecon, During the time Mr Groom has been at the Pontardawe station he has made many friends by his oourtesy and willing- ness to oblige, and with all who know him, I join in wishing him every sucoese in his new and responsible position. The Guardians are on the look-out for a suitable site for a Children's Home. There are plenty of available aites, and no fancy prioes for land is to be paid. Despite the fire, the Co-operative Society is still in a position to pay a dividend of 12A per cent. Mr Ben Tillett disapointed more people than would have crowded the Public Hall from floor to ceiling on Saturday evening. Such is the magic of a name. The "lion" of the erening was Mr. Eli Skidmore, who is fast becoming an ac- complished public speaker. A special service for nwa was held at St. Peter's on Sunday afternoon, when the Vicar, the Rov. Joel J. Davies, gave an address on "Why I am a Church- man." There was a good attendance. The draw on behalf of Mr Phillip Stenbury, of Tawte Termoe, has been postponed until April 11th. Will all who have sold tickets return the cash as soon as possible? Pontardawe Albions lost to Llandebie at Pontardawe on Saturday by 1-0. The ball "busted" ten minutes from time, otherwise the homesters were just "sharpening their shooting irons." The sacred concert which should have been held at the Globe, Clydach, on Sun- day evening had to be postponed because permission from the Council could not be obtained. j At yesterday's meeting permission was printed and the oonoert wili be held this Sunday evening. An excellent pro- gramme has been prepared, and will re- pay those who walk from Pontardawe. j Breaks of 52 and 54 respectively were made at th81 Public Institute last week by Arthur Cla-twcrUiy and W. Ivor Jones. The test pieces which male voice choirs will be called upon to deal with at this year's eisteddfodau will be "Fallen Heroes" and "The Assyrians came down." Pontardawe Party hope to be able to compete at the Bristol Festival on March ?8th., and at Narberth on April 13th. DEWI SANT CELEBRATION AT TREBANOS SCHOOL. The arbnuaj celebration of "Dewi Sant" at the Trebanos School took place on Monday last when the children went through an excellent programme, the chief items of which were as follows Anerchiad Arweiniadol ar gadw Dydd Gwyl Dewi, Y Prifa-thro; anerchiad ax "Dewi Sant," Athro A. Jones; "Y Deryn Pur," Tom Evans; "Nos Calan," Blod- weti Davies; "Hob y Deri Dando," Y Safonau adroddiadau a. ehaneuon gan H. Blodwen James, Elsie Thomas, Winnie Morgan, Ceinwen Davies, Gladys Thomas, Cath. A Lloyd!, Megan Probert, V. Smith, Wm. J. Ada Griffiths, Joyce Kcogh, Maggie Williams, Doris Thomas; anerchiad ar Thomas: anerchia.d a.1' "WIadgarwch," Athro. Wm. Evans; can, "C-,ogerddan," Inda. Perkins; Unawd ar y Delyn, D. James; can, "Merch y Melinydd," Annie Walters; "Codiad vr Hedydd," Scfonau V.. VI.. VII. "Llwyn Onn," Saofreu III., IV; can "Doli," Margretta Davies; can "Y Gwenith Gwvn," Lewis J. Hodge; can, "Yn Nyffryn Clwyd," J. Joseiph; can, "Merch Iegan," Linda. Perkins: "Glan Mfddwdcd Mwyn." sa- onau III. a IV. Alawon Cymru, "Hela'r "Pant y Pistyll," "Y Fwy- alchen," "Syr Harri Ddu"; "Aberyst- wyth" "Hen Wiad fy Nhadau" "Duw Gadwo'r Brecnin." The harpist was Mr David James. PONTARDAWE v. BRITON FERRY AT BILLIARDS. At the Public Institute on Wednesday evening, teams representing Pontardawe and Briton Ferry met, and the homesters were dekatod by 50 points in the aggre- gate scores. Pontardawe. Briton Ferry. 220 W. J. Jones H. O. Daniels 114 200 Will Lewis B. S. Webb 76 173 Allan Phillips J. John 200 200 Gwilym Lewis W. Howells 184 82 H. J. Morgans J. Allan 299 171 H. J W. Davies 200 174 A. Clatworthy A. Webb 200 124 Abe Edwards A. Howells 200 1324 1374 LANTERN LECTURE. Some remarkable photographs illustra- ting scenery, wild animal life and native customs were shown at a lantern lecture given at the Public Hall, on Wednesday evenang, when Mr Joseph Burte,F.R.G.S, gave a lantern lecture dealing with the subject, "My thousand miles along the great slave route in Africa. Mr Morgan Jones introduced the lecturer before a fair gathering. The proceeds went to- wards liquidating the debt on the ball and institute. CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY MEETING The postponed quarterly of the members of the Co-operative Society wps held at Danygraig Church Vestry on Wednesday, of last week, Mr T. R. Williams presid- ing over a very large attendance. Mr H. L. Warren, public auditor of the C.W.S.„ was present, and submitted a r<}por^and statement of the position of the Society. In the course of his report he stated that, compared with the previous figures there was a diminution of stock in trade owing to loss by fire, a conciliation of reserve items, and a readjustment of debta, creditors and buildings. The auditor sug- gested that the Society should transfer their loans on mortgages to the C. W.S. house building scheme. The sum of j3850 was reserved for the re-erection of the building destroyed by fire at Alltwen, and the £1,000 insurance claim taken as an asset. Arrangements had been made with the committee to place at their dis- poeal a. member of the C.W.S. audit staff who under instructions would introduce proper business methods, system of book- keeping and generally modernise the working of the ssciety. Excellent rwults are anticipated from this. The reserve fund of £3,762 had been appropriated, together with the profit of £2ff7, and the educational fund, X177, a. total of R4,n6, and that left 91,000 balance disposable. There was BO renoou why if the Society modernized ita methods that it should not continue as a flourishing co-operative concern and the business further ex- tended. The total oasefa of the Socity, accord- ing to the bakwee e?Mot was £ 24,331 2a. 3d., aM ? toW balance waa available of ?01,, 001 15& 8d. &tier meeting all liabili- ties. The share capital end interest was shown to be £11,619, and penny bank, loans and iwUreat, £ 2,830 7s. Id. It was recommended that a dividend of 2s.6d. be paid, as wm&L The report was adopted. After a long discussion it was decided not to send repreaentatives to the forth- coming Congrem aA Dublin. Menem G. T=, AUtw

No title

In the course of aIR address on "Materialism," at St. Martin-inthe-Fields the Rev. C. E. Drawbridge said our bodies were continually changing, a.nd the rpirit within ffi kept us what- we are. For instance, m a man was hanged for a er-irno he f rome years before, when he ha;nl,c,d not a single em- bodiment, remniixd of the man who had not a spirit, the man who committed the ,r-;rro the- mp,n who was punished for w would not be the mmm