Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

« THE LATEST IN SUITINGS Neat Checks and Whipcords. ♦ in Greys and Browns, f ? from 37/6 to 63/- + G. C, DEAN, i The Tailor. is prepared to pay return. ♦ fare within 20 miles of ? 4 ? Swansea to any customer ? + placing an order for a Suit or Overcoat. + Please Note the Address + 22. Castle St., Swansea .+.

Advertising

"We have had good results + from advertising in Labour Voice"—Swansea Trades- + ♦ man. Name on appMcation. ? + + Do you want good results ? + + r + If so, Advertise in + ? LLAIS LLAFUR." ♦ + .+.+.

WHICH IS TO RULE I

WHICH IS TO RULE ? I THE TRUTH ABOUT THE POLITICAL SITUATION (By Our London Correspondent.) I The last few days in London have witnessed scenes of political excitement unparalelled within living memory. In the House of Commons, the clubs, the restaurants, and wherever men congre- gate, the sole topic of discussion has been the political situation. Even in tramcars, where passengers harbitually maintain an icy reserve, men who are utter strangers to one another liave joined in eager and angry discus- sion. In IQeBt-streot I have seen bar- ristel's excitedly rushing from their chambers in the Temple to buy succes- sive editions of the evenmg newspapers, and in certain clubs I have heard or- dinarily staid Nonconformist Liberals deliver themselves in terms startingly strong. The occasion of the unusual excite- ment is the successfu l defiance by a small number of the officers of 'crack' cavalry regiments in Ireland of the will of the elected representatives of this country. Aided directly or indirectly by the King (that is still firmly believed de- spite Mr. Asquith's mild repudiation)' these young aristocrats have thwarted "the bally Government," and estab- lished their right to obey only those orders which are in line with their par- ticular opinions or prejudices. JOHN WARD STRIKES A KEY- I NOTE. Humiliated, embittered, and disgust- ed beyond words, the Liberals have found relief for their feelings in the speech of M;. John Ward, of the Navvies' Union, the M.P. for Stoke-on- Trent. He expressed in fiery, unequivocal words in the House of Commons, their feelings about the King, and the Liberals were not slow to show their appreciation. Not only did they make the most re- markable demonstration witnessed with- in living memory in the House of Com- mons when he said in stentorian tones that the people would brook no inter- ference from King or Army, but on the following day, when the National Liberal Club was thronged just after the lunch hour, a member jumped on a chair and said, "Gentlemen! Three cheers for John Ward who has said what we all think." The cheers were given with great enthusiasm. But Ward did more than please the Liberals. He struck consternation into the Tories. Flushed and elated as they were on Tuesday, his passionate speech opened up to them a vista of the far-reaching issues involved, and they began to see how the country, would regard the use of the Army as a Tory instrument. Even Lord Narthcliffe's scurrilous newspapers moderated their tone when they realised how completely democra- tic opinion had been roused, and the worst epithet they could find for certain utspoken passages in "The Manches- ter Guardian" (the most influential Liberal newspaper in the country) about the King was "unhappy." THE KING AND A GENERAL I ELECTION. It is not difficult to outline the causes of the deep disquiet in the Liberal f-anks. They had learned from the week-end newspapers of the week-eaid visits of Lord Roberto and other Tory leaders to the King. For many months the rumour has lieen rife among them that the King has been pressing Mr. Asquith for a general election on the issue of the Home Rule. Hr. Asquith is said to have replied that the Government is perfectly willing to go to the country as "dismissed" Ministers, but not as voluntarily dis- solved. The chief political advisers of the King, they believe, are the Tory Lord Stamfordham, and Mr. A. J. Balfour. When the thunderbolt—the news of General Gough's rr-instatemerit.-f ell,, thev immediately concluded it was the result of pressure from the King. Their attitude to that august personage was A good indication of the hollowness of Royal ism in this country. I verily believe that if Mr. Koir Hardie or Mr. Philip Snowden had given a direct Republican lead in the House of Commons they would have cheered to the echo. Seely's resignation produced a queer reaction, but it is whispered pretty freely that his resignation was prompt- ed by a desire to prevent the storm and lightning that would play about the King's head if the full facts became known. So much for the effect of the political crisis on the Liberals. There were the same violent oscillations of feeling among the Tories, and they were much perturbed bv Mr. Ramsav Macdonald's ruthless application of their new doc- trine of "optional obedience" to the private soldier when called upon for duty in connection with strikes. v TORIES' WELL-LAID PLOT. I The Tones had their plot carefully laid. They knew exactly what action would be taken by their political allies in the Curragh camp, and at Aldershot if circumstances warranted. They also knew that practically the whole War Office staff had their resigna- tions ready for handing in at the psychological moment. Thus the Army was theirs to use as they liked in furtherance of their own ends. But they had not foreseen what use the Labour party would make of their trifling with treason, nor had they guaged the full effect of it on public opinion. "The Times," in a leading article tried to prove that while it was right to disobey orders in Ulster, it would be wrong to do so in cases of strike disturbances. In the one case, "The Times" argu- ment ran, it is civil war; in the other it is rioting. Surely a worse piece of false logic never came out of Printling House-square! Arming, and drilling, with a definite- ly avowed subversionary intention is a mere misdemeanour, which it would be monstrous to punish by military methods. A purely spontaneous out- break of disorder on the part of men maddened by sight of their wives and children starving, and directed not against life or democratic government, but against property, is a crime which it is proper to punish with death by bayonet and bullet. Nothing could more completely be- tray the moral and intellectual bank- ruptcy of modern Toryism than this sample of distorted reasoning. NEW DOCTRINE OF MILITARY I OBEDIENCE. The real secret of Tory chagrin was the incipient alarm of property owners. The business man whose chief ooncern is the security of his capital would in- evitably vote Liberal, however much it might go against the grain, if his choice lay between the "optional obedience" doctrine of Mr. Bonar Law, and the Liberal theory (which was the Tory theory also until recently) that the Army is an automatic machine for en- forcing the will of the executive. Meanwhile the Labour party has looked on with feelings of mingled scorn and amusement. To them the only anxious factor has been the possible loss of the present Home Rule Bill. In discharge of their debt of honour to the Irish Nationalists no less than in their desire to see the Parliamentary field cleared of long- standing political issues to make room for social reform measures, they are determined to see the Bill through. Their attitude towards the King was well expressed in the "Daily Citizen" oontents bill: "No Meddling by Buckingham Palace." They know that the effect of the King openly meddling in party politics to Tory advantage will be to put him in the same category with the peers and dukes, as far as the people are concerned. And they have nothing to fear from a general election. LABOUR PARTY AND CRISIS. I If the Liberals go to the country on the admittedly powerful battle-cry of "People T. Army," the Labour party will stand to gain, for thousands of Radicals will vote Labour rather than Liberal because they know that for every inch the Liberals will go in curb- ing the power of aristocratic or mon- archic usurpers, the Labour party will go a yard. Mr. Ramsay Macdonald has made it plain that the Labour party are ready and eager for a general election. But it must be AFTER the Home Rule Bill goes on to the Statute Book. They will not consent to wasting three sessions of the new Parliament in go- ing over old ground, and re-fighting battles already won. Whatever the historic parties may do they may be sure that Labour on its industrial as well as its political &ide will not permit them to ignore the in- dustrial system. A few months hence, when the miners, railwaymen, and transport workers have arrived at their projected agreement they will be confronted by a situation far more menacing to them than a quarrel, however deadly, be- tween the two sections of tJho ruling and exploiting class. -D. M. I -—.——— < «K *—————

No title

"Tell King George to remember Charles I," said a gentleman to a sentry outside Buckingham Palace. For refusing to give an inspector a. pint of whisky for Lnalysis, Helen Rich- ley, a Morpeth woman, was fined 10s. During t.he hearing of cases of alleged thefts of coal at Swansea, Deputy-Chief Constable Roberts said they had had a complaint from one coal owner that his trucks were a ton short.

NO AUSTRIANS FOR RAND MINES

NO AUSTRIANS FOR RAND MINES. Grave Warning. to Workers. BEGINNING OF THE END. South African mineowners, in an at- tempt to induce Slavs to take the place of British workers in the mines have received a nasty rebuff from the Aus- trian Government, who, through their Ministry of Commerce, have issued a grave warning to Austrian subjects not to risk life and liberty upon the golden Rand. i Appended is a translation of the cir- cular issued by the Austrian Ministry of Commerce upon the subject:— EMPLOYMENT OF AUSTRIAN WORKERS IN SOUTH ARICAN u MINES. According to mlarmation received by the Imperial Ministry of Commerce, the leading South African mineowners are contemplating importing Slav work- men from Austria and Hungary to re- place the men employed in their mines. "The object of employing these men is the substitution of lower-paid labour for the miners taking part in the re- cent strike. The employment of such workers as strike-breakers would ex- pose them to continuous and serious at- tacks, and place them, moreover, in the position of low-grade labour, nearer that of the Kaffins than of white work- ers. In the case of serious disturbances, which might at any time break out again in the districts under considera- tion, it seems, according to recent ex- perience, that even the life of such workers would be seriously endangered. "In addition, the lack of knowledge of the language would place our work- ers in concluding their contracts, com- pletely at the mercy of the by-no-means conscientious mineowners and agents, and would even make it impossible for them to take legal proceedings. "Finally, the fact must be empha.- sised that in the mines in question the workmen employed, as is well known, become the victims of phthisis within a very short time. "Consequently persons are urgently warned against concluding contracts for employment in South African mines. BOTHA ALARMED. DRIVEN TO OPEN NEGOTIATIONS WITH HERTZOG. In view of recent Labour victories, General Botha now finds himself in a position from which he can only extri- cate himself either by inducing the Hertzogites to return to the fold or by effecting a coalition with the Unionists. Recognising that the adoption of the latter course wou!d mean that he would lose the support of the back-velders (the electora.te in rural areas), he has opened negotiations with General Hertzog, and these are still proceeding. »»

LANDING OF TOM MANNI

LANDING OF TOM MANN. NO OBJECTION OFFERED BY. THE GOVERNMENT. Mr. Tom Mann arrived at Cape Town on Tuesday in the Edinburgh Castle, and landed without any hindrance from the authorities. Interviewed by the Central News correspondent, Mr. Mann said he had not come to South Africa. to kick up a shindy with anybody, but merely as a substitute for the energy of deported men, in order to solidify the workers of the country. He had not come to create a revolution, although he was a revolu- tionary. Ho did not care for the Peace Preservation Acts, but he did not an- ticipate trouble. As Mr. Mann went ashore the only question put to him by the immigration authorities was, "Your signature." Mr. Mann was welcomed by a small gathering of Socialists and Labour men. There was nothing, however, in the nature of a demonstration. —————— r 0 «——————.

I MR ROBERT SMILLIEI

MR. ROBERT SMILLIE. I I NOT TO BE CANDIDATE FOR MID- LANARK. From a usually well-informed source. a correspondent in the "Daily Citizen" says that it is given out that Mr Robert Smillie, present of the British Miners' Federation, will not stand as Labour candidate for Mid-Lanark at the next General Election. The suggestion is that, as president of the Scottish Minors' Federation and of the British Miners' Federation, to- gether with a number of subsidiary ap- pointments, including that of vice-chair- man of the Scottish Coal Conciliation Board, Mr. Smillie finds that his official duties absorb much of his time. The work, so far as the British Miners' Federation is concerned, is steadily increasing, while the constant endeavours of the Scottish ooalowners to lower the standard of wages necessi- tate his being continually on the ground to be thoroughly in touch with the situation. Labour organisation in Mid-Lanark is in a satisfactory state and in many circles there is the feeling that if Ml. Smillie could find time to nurse the constituency it would be won.

LIGHT BILL 1200 000 LESS I

LIGHT BILL £ 1200 000 LESS I ONE BOON OF THE DAYLIGHT- SAVING BILL. Representing Chambers of Commerce and other institutions from all parts of the oountry. a. deputlation waited on the Home Secretary with a view to press- ing the claim-s of the Daylight Saving Bill. The Lord Mayor of London in- troducing the deputation, remarked that 25 out of 28 London boroughs had passed resolutions favouring the Bill. Sir William Ramsay said there were really no strc objections to the scheme on the nomic side. Artificial light was not jm' advisable for eyesight as sunlight. Tb > change in the times would be a. very simple matter. Sir Henry Norinan directed attention to the saving of artificial light that would result from the passage of the Bill. By a rough computation it would save Bl,200,000 all over the country. I Mr. McKenna said he did not think he ever recalled a deputation the speak- ers of which and the arguments they used he was so entirely in accord with. But, so long as members in every quar- ter of the House were largely uncon- verted to its advantages, so long would no Government be justified in using its powers to compel the public to ac- cept it. —————

SWANSEAS ENTERPRISE

SWANSEA'S ENTERPRISE. BID FOR POPULARITY AS A HOLI- DAY RESORT. A proposal to become affiliated to the Federation of British Health and Holi- day Resorts was strongly supported by Alderman Morgan Hopkin at Swansea Parks Committee on Tuesday. He point- ed out that Mr. John Hinds, M.P., was chainnan, and that the idea was to introduce a Bill in Parliament em- powering local authorities to levy up to a penny rate for the purpose of adver- I Itising. health and seaside resorts. Swansea was almost in a singular position in being both a large industrial centre and a. seaside resort. Thousands of visitors came there every year, and yet the Corporation did practically i nothing for them. They had recently purchased a portion of the sands, at a cost of two or three thousands pounds, and had also decided to erect a bridge from Victoria Park to the beach, but 1 it should not there. In two or three years' time there ought to be a pier and promenade for the visitors and so make the place at- tractive. If Cardiff had Swansea's sea front it would be made a second Brighton. Mr. Holmes said that a penny rate would mean £ 2,000. Alderman Hopkin: You need not spend the whole of it. The Bill proposes to levy up to a penny rate, and the benefit we should get by becoming af- filiated to the movement is that Swan- sea would be advertised all over Europe The matter was referred to the Par- liamentary Committee for their appro- val.

IMr Hodges Furnace I

Mr Hodge's "Furnace" I M.P.S' AMUSING DISCUSS- ION ON A BELATED LUNCH I Several members engaged in the con- sideration of the Plumage Bill in com- mittee on Friday, showed as the recog- nised luncheon hour approached a desire for adjournment. The Chairman (Mr Eugene Wason) suggested that they should continue sitting till. 2 p.m., and then adjourn for the day. This course did not, however, conunend iteelf to some members, and Mr J. i Hodge remarked "It's all right for the members of the Government, who slept late this morning and had late breakfast. (Laughter). I have to get up early to go to my office. (Laughter). When one has had breakfast at eight, it is a long time to wait till two o'clock, and the calls of nature are so great that I fear I must keep the furnace going with food." (Laughter). The PostmastwGeneral, who supported the chairman's suggestion, said be was as earl v at, hie office as the hon. mem- ber. (Laughter). The Postmaster-General Probally that does not renect cTedit on Mr Hodge. (Laughter). Mr Hodge, amid much laughter You can make any inquiries of my wife. The chairman's suggestion was accepted, and the members nursed their appetites for half an hour longer. —————— »«>■«

EXILES IN THE NORTH I

EXILES IN THE NORTH. I DEPORTATIONS CONDEMNED JiflI MANY MASS MEETINGS. Monster mass meetings in the NoflSi of England of Trade Unionists and Socialists have been addressed during the week by various members of the band of Labour leaders deported by the South African Government. The Lord Provost of Glasgow received Messrs. Watson, Crawford, and Me- Kerrell, and later they were enter- tained at a luncheon provided by Labour members of Glasgow Corpora- tion. At Newcastle Dr. H. Poutema, had a great reception. He was the guest at a dinner given by the local Labour and Socialist organisations in the Co-opera- tive Hall, and later he addressed a meeting in the Town Hall. Many people were unable to gain admission. Messrs. Bain and Mason spoke at a Labour demonstration at Bolton and as at Blackburn and other places where exiles spoke, a strong resolution con- demning the South African Govern- ment's action was passed.

SURFACE WORKERSI

SURFACE WORKERS I The Welsh Owners Un- yielding. i NEW SEAMS' SCHEDULE REFUSAL OF DEMANDS BY MEN I Two matters of general interest to the coalfield were broached at the meeting of the Welsh Conciliation Board on Monday. The owners again declined to agree to call a special meeting of the joint board to discuss the proposed new wage rate for the surfacemen while the pre- sent agreement remains in force. Attempts by the men to enforce a higher schedule of rates for new seams and new collieries, which have led to certain stoppages, were raised by the owners, who offered unyielding resis- tance. CONCILIATION BOARD OWNERS AND WAGES OF SUR- FACE WORKERS. The piocecdings were presided over by Mr E. M. Hann (the new chairman of the Coolorvvners' Association) on the owners' side, and Mr W. Brace, M.P. (and subsequently Mr James Winstone, after Mr Brace's departure in the after- noon), presidtd over the workmen's re- presentatives. The attendance also in- cluded Mr W. Gascoyne Dalziel and MrJ T. Richards, M.P., the respective secre- tari es. Though the matter was not on the agenda, the workmen's representatives explained that they had been instructed by the Miners' Conference, held in Lon- don, to make another effort to obtain improved conditions of employment for the surface workmen. For the purpose of discussing a proposed new rate of wages they asked that a. special meeting of the joint board be held. In view of the fact that the matter had already been the subject of an inter- change of views between the two sides, the discussion was brief and decisive. The, owners 'fide reminded the workmen's representatives of this fact, and also of the fact that the owners had Leen quite explicit in their intimation that they were not prepared to ignore the existing general wage agreement. The rates of wages payable to the surface workmen were embodied in this agreement, to which the workmen's representatives as well as the owners were parties, and as the agreement remained in force until the beginning of next year no purpose could be served in discussing the matter again. The owners' representatives conse- quently definitely refused to accede to a request for a special meeting, and the workmen's representatives will now have to il report to the national organisation a failuret o settle. It now remains to be seen whether the Welsh section will be able to induce the Miners' Federation of Great Britain to move further in the matter until the end of the present year. PRICE-LISTS FOR NEW SEAMS. The disputes mentioned on the agenda raised one other issue of more than local interest. This had reference to a. special schedule of rates proposed by the South Wales Minera' Federation to be applic- able to new seams and new collieries. As was fully anticipated, no agreement was arrived at an the matter. The owners were unequivocal in their resistance to the demands embodied in the schedule, and as the workmen's representatives were not disposed to withdraw from the position they had taken up the discussion ended without any suggestion as to a way out of the deadlock. The owners pointed out that these do- mands constituted a breach of the wage rate agreement, but the workmen's re- presentatives argued that this was not so, inasmuch as the agreement did not apply to those cases where there was no price- list in operation, and it was only in these cases that it was proposed that the new schedule should apply. FEDERATION EXECUTIVE. BRYNTEG and ONLLWYN MINERS' DEPUTATION. Prior to the meeting of the joint board a meeting was held of the executive council of the South Wales Miners' Federation. Mr W. Brace, M.P., pre- sided, and those present included Mr. James Winstone (vice-president), and Mr T. Richards, M.P. (general secretary), j A deputation attended from the Bryn- teg Colliery, Seven Sisters, and the On llwyn Collieries in connection with the j alleged refusal of the management to allow the checkweighers to accompany I deputations in dealing with disputes. Mr Enoch Mcrrell and Mr J. D. Morgan, were appointed by the workmen's re- presenfatites^to^ interview the manage- ment. > 1t! A dlso'tiu at the Bryiioethin Colliery, wher-e t he workmen had' given notice irn connection with failure to agree on a price hat, was relegated to Mr Vernon Hartehorn for investigation and report. A dispute at the Birchroefc Colliery with respect to the introduction of safety lamps was referred to Mr C. B. Stanton for investigation, and the question of notices having been; tendered the men by the owners of the Rock Colliery (Neath) to terminate contracts" was relegated to Mr J. D. Morgan for investigation and report. Mr Manning and Mr Stanton were in- structed to seek another interview with the management of the Llanbradach Colliery and repor to the council there- (In with a view to the counci l consider- ing the matter of rendering financial as- sistance to the workmen concerned in the dispute.

No title

James Day (45), a native cf Bath, who lodged at Oxford terrace. Gendros, near Swansea, was killed at the Cwmbach Quarrv, Cockett, on Monday through a fall of rock.

NEXT YEARS GREAT I FIGHTI

NEXT YEAR'S GREAT I FIGHT .I Mr. Vernon Hartshorn on Political Action Labour Meeting at Abercrave A large audience assembled at the Council SchooLs, Aberorave, an Wednes- day evening, when, under the auspices of the local L.R.C., Mr Vernon Harts- horn, miners' agent, gave an excellent address on Labour matters. Councillor W. Walters, who presided, said they had arranged the meeting in order to stir up a ilittle more enthusi- asm in the district. They wcfre always very active at e-lection times, but after- I wards their interests and energies flagged, and it was hoped that that meet- ing would no something to renew inter- est in the work of the L.R.C. A BIG MOVEMENT. Mr Hartshorn, who had an excellent reception expressed pleasure at being able to visit Abercrave. They were, he said, on the eve of a big movement, infinitely more potent than the big strike of 1912. He did not think anyone who followed the trend of events in the Labour world could have any two opinions as to the possibilities of the very near future. The country was on the verge of a new epoch, a tremendous upheaval. Many problems were forcing themselves to the front, a solution for which would have to be found. Yet there were varying opin- ions as to the methods to be employed by the democracy in the solution of these problems. One section of the Labour movement said that the work should be confined to the industrial organisation, that they wanted no politics, and should disregard the vote. All that was re- quired was perfect organisation in in- dustry, and the goal could be reaehel through direct action by the Unions. They did all they could to discourage, de- nounce and as far as possible, kill the policy of Labour representation. Another section took the view of the exact opposite, and said indus- trial action and the strike weapon were absolutely useless. The only thing to save the workers was an intelligent use of the vote. This state of affairs, this wide difference of opinion, was weakening the whole force of the demo- cracy. He believed that the Labour Party, or the working classes of the land, would never be effective or accomplish their real purpose until they gave up such bickerings, and realised that taken separ ately, these movemente could only be -i-lif effective, and that what was wanted, was a co-ordination, of the two, a powerful industrial organisation. (Hear, hear and applause. Far two or three years the big unions had been engaged almost ex- clusively in building up the industrial movement, and the results achieved by great nationaJ efforts on the part of the seamen, transport workers, railway workers, and miners seemed to have given the workers the idea that all they had to do was to continue on these lines to establish, the millenium. That move- ment for a. bigger combination was still going on between the miners, railway- men and transport workers who were uniting to help each other towards de- manding their individual claims. Next year there would be what would no doubt prove -the biggest upheaval ever known in this or any other country. The position would be unique, all the miners agreements ending simultaneously. Next year the Minimum Wage Act came to an end, and the Railway and Transport workers' agreements also terminated. In dealing with this matter as intelligently as they eught to, they must remember that industrial organisation wae only one phase of the question. He wanted to emphasise the other side of the move- ment. In the past it had been found difficult to convince miners that politics had any meaning for them, but he pointed out that it was through Parliament that the miners had got their great reforms; the Compensation Act waa secured through politics bMked by industrial pressure, and he did not know why a man should only have half his wages when injured through accident at his when inT ir Tmdes Union Congress had said that they would press for full wages. (Hear, hear and applause), and he be- lieved that sickness or an accident was just the time when a. man wanted his wages most. The eight hours day and weekly pays were also secured through Parliament. I BACK IN SAVAGERY. Then what of the latest reforms. The! Minimum Wage Act, rad safeguards pro- tecting the life and limb of the miner ? Without these reforms they would be back ia the days of savagery, and ail were obtained through Parliamentary I action, resulting from Trade Union com- j bination. More than ever before the time was to come when they would have to fight their battles on the floor of the House of Commons, and they must pay very careful attention to the power of, the vote. The Miners' Federation said that the Minimum Wage Act had. to be amonded by including provisions increas- ing the pay of all workers at least nine- pence per day, and this would no doubt have to be settled by Parliament. When the three sections, the Miners', Railway- men, and Transport Workers combined, and forced their respective demands to the front together, no Government could stand idly ly; they must take the matter up, and when the question, was taken to the House of Commons, the resultant legislation enacted woul d depend very largeiy on the number of Labour repre- sentatives there were in Parliament. This wao the case for stronger Labour repre- sentation in Parliament. If the- tions were going to be fought in Perlia.- rncnt. surely it could be realised that the workers must send th-ir own repre- sentatives to the House'—(hear, hearV If instead of sending representatives t- C gross to pans resolutions, they sert ■ h? men to Parliament to put these resolu- at bottom of next column-)

NEXT YEARS GREAT I FIGHTI

(Oattaied twm yMMding column). tions into measures, the result would be far more fruitful. (Applause). I WORKERS AWAKENING. Ho thought the workers were beginning to awaken to a sense of their respon&i- bility, and their great purpose, and after next year he thought there would not be much lingering doabt as to the necessity; of a larger measure of Labour representa- tion, both at Weatminster and on local bodies. The miners themselves had given Parliament a task in the National Strike. If the worksrs combined more effectively, they could determine what every question dealt with by Parliament should be. (Applause)—and no Govern- ment could resist their determination. (Hear, hear). He hoped that in the future, the workers would be a little more concerned with the great importance of both sides of the Labour movement, of which L.R.C. work should be an essential part. The workers could by industrial action pro- duce a revolution. They could bring it next year if they wished to do so. But they did not want to aim for a revolu- tion rather, to use their undoubted power in such a way as to compel other people, who ;;t'U-r all had most to lose bv a re- voluti'Mi. that thev could only avoid suchi a coii-ise hy assuring the worker a much larger meo.*ure of justice than thev had ever adv'-ced in the ast. (Applause). WVn ^'i iiimrnt knew that all industry was at a standstill, the workers urging better conditions, and would remain so until their claims were granted, theas thev would set about puting he House in Order, on the workers' terms. (Applause).

DUFFRYN RHflNDDA PITS

DUFFRYN RHflNDDA PITS AGREEMENT TO RESUME WORK A meeting of representatives of the Duffryn Rhondda Collieries and of the miners was held at Port Talbot on Motfc- day. Mr Berry, Merthyr, Mr Thonian Jones, Gowerton (one of the new direc- tors), and Mr Daniel Rees, Maesteg (the new agent, represented the company, and Messrs. Wm. Jenkins (miners' agent), T John, and D. M. Evans (check we i ghers) were for the men. It was decided to start No. 2 Colliery with repairing work, and on Monday, liext it is expected that 300 men will he engaged at t.re pit. The new pit-sink- ing operations will be commenced at once. A mass meeting of the men was held at Cvmmer oil Mcnday, when Mr Wm. Jenkins explained the proposals to the men. MINERS' NOTICES IN NORTH WALES. The North Wales Miners' Association met at Wrexham on Monday, when it was decided io give fourteen days' notice terminating all contracts at the following collieries :—Wrexham and Act- on, Gresfrxrd, Brymbo, Clayhall, Vaux- hall, Plas Power, Vron Gate Wen, West- minst r. and Gwersyllt. The notices will. be served. on the owners on Wednesday.; ABERTRIDWR WAGON SHORTAGE Over 2,000 men were idle at the Wind- sor Colliery, Abertridwr, on Monday owing to shortage of trucks. MINERS' APPRECIATION Mr Victor Anderson. proprietor of the Rink, Pontycymmer, has been made the recipient of a gold hunter watch by the Garw Valley miners for allowing them the free use of the premises to hold thear mass meeting. Mr Davidi Davies (Blaen-, garw) made the presentation. I THREATENED BRYNCOCH STRIKE Neath District of Miners met on Moiv. day, Mr Jas. Jones, Resolven, presiding. The question of finishing work early was discussed, and it was resolved to ask the executive to plaoo the question on the conference agenda.. It was re- ported that the men at Bryncoch No. 1 Main had tendered fourteen days' notices owing to ncwi-Unionist trouble. —————— I' <——————

I VICTIMISATION INCREASING

I VICTIMISATION INCREASING I IN THE ANTHRACITE DISTRICT A special delegate meeting of the An- thracite Miners' Association was 011 Saturday held at the Unitarian School room, Swanset, under the presidency of Mr William Owen, Brynamman, sup., ported by Messrs. J. D. Morgan (agent), John J. Janies (sub-agent), David Mor- gan (district secretary), and J. D. Mor- gan (treasurer), and 63 delegates. With regard to the new sub-agent, Mr Jamee, it was decided that his place of residence shall be Burry Port, and though ap- pointed for the whole anthracite district he is to pay special attention to the Gwendraeth Valley, where there are 5,000 miners members of the Association. An important decision was come to with regard to financial matters, it being resolved that a Finance Committee be established with full power to deal withf strike, lock-out, and victimisation pay, so as to relieve the monthly district meeting and the officials of that work. The serious attention of the meeting was called to o number of alleged vic- timisation eaaes, and it was pointed out that such oases were largely on the izv- crease. It woa decided that strong measures be adopted to remedy the pre- sent unsatisfactory state of things.

No title

Swansea, mooter tailors say that a good tailor and pressor in their town can make 9.5 a week all the year round I In low eI wages alone unemploy- ,ment oosu this country 926,000,000 a year, estimates Mr. Seebohm Row ntree.