Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Genuine Bespoke Trade G. C DEAN,: 4 The Tailor- ;♦ All Garments cut on the + premises by expert cutters + No Factory-made goods + + supplied. Return f are paid within 20 miles of + ■ 0 Swansea to any customer + ♦ placing an order for a Suit ♦ ? or Raincoat- + ? Please Note the Address: + t 22. Castle St., Swansea .+.++..+.++++.

Advertising

"We have had good results + + from advertising in Labour Voice"—Swansea Trades- 1 man. Name on application. I ♦ Do you want good results 7 +  ♦ If so, Advertise in ♦ "LLAIS LLAFUR."

NOTES and COMMENTS

NOTES and COMMENTS "The late President of the M.F.G.B., Mr. Enoch Edwards." says Mr Robert Smillie, in a recently published pamph- let, "Baths at the pithead and the Works," used to relate in his own •quaint way the story of a young collier who married a clean, tidy, lass, who was very anxious to keep her home in good order. The story goes that some weeks after their wedding the husband was washing himself in a tub which stood in the centre of the small kitchen, when he suggested that his wife might wash his back for him. The wife con- sented and began assiduously to scrub that portion of her husband's anatomy and cleared away layer after layer of grime. All at once she stopped, and exclaimed, "Why, Jack, I have washed through to a singlet" (simmet). The husband was at first a bit surprised, but at length he said, "Eh, lass, that must be the singlet my mother said I had lost long since, and we never could find out where it had gone." The storv may be somewhat exag- gerated, but it illustrates the difficul- ties of the present system of bathing which colliers are compelled, in most cases, to adopt. Lodgers, employed at collieries especially, find it difficult to worship at the altar of cleanliness and the installation of pit head baths would be a great boon to these long suffering people. The writer has a vivid recollection of an incident which occurred at a foot- ball match he attended some years ago at Whitehaven. The game was be- tween the famous Whitefaaven Recrea- tion team and Millom. The members of the former team were all employees at the ill-fated Wellington Colliery, where, some years latei-, a fearful ex- plosion occurred. The game was stren- uous, and player after player of the home team lost his jersey, but the fact was not verv noticeable, as the players' ,bodies helow* their necks, and their arms from their wrists, were as black as the jerseys they wore! Colliers in Cumber- land very rarely bath, simply washing their face and neck and hands. On Sundays they wear cuffs! The estate of the late Lord Wim- borne (Sir Ivor Bertie Guest), of the well-known Dowlais Works, has been provisionally sworn at £ 250,000 "so far as at present can be ascertained." A contemporary states that the fortune actually amounted to much more than a million, but that deceased made a distribution of transfer some time ago among the members of his family. We wonder if the Dowlais workmen will derive any satisfaction from the publi- cation of thfese figures t Mr. Towyn Jones is to have the as- sistance of a fellow minister as Liberal agent for his constituency. At the meeting of the Association, held on Saturday at Ammanford, the Rev. J. H. Rees, Burry Porjt, was appointed part time agent at the salary of L50 per year, securing eight votes over Mr. Morgan Thomas, of Ammanford. It is strange how ministers can reconcile the Christian office with official posts in the Liberal Party. 0 nerves and Eau de Cologne! as the late William Makepeace Thackeray would have said. CaBSar the late King's dog. has been and gone and died, and the newspapers couldn't have made more fuss if it had been "Im- perial Caesar dead and turned to clay." Some of these inspired journals printed three quarters of a column of blather- skite about it. If a poor unknown col- lier had been found dead under a hedge in Breeonshire they would not have given three lines to the news. How many readers of Mr. Wells's "The New Machiavelli," have recog- nised in the description of the persons attending the political salon a portrait -of the late Mr. Hubert Bland? "I par- ticularly recall a large, active, buoyant, lady-killing individual with an eye- glass borne upon a large black ribbon, who swaru :,x-yji us one evening. a high-pitched voice with (i • intonations, and he seemed t. ) i:1 perpetual state of jnterm£.1at¡i1 "vhat a.re we all he-a for ?' he would ask only too audibly, •'What are we doing he-a? What's the ,-connection 'e' Afr. Morgan Davies has been ap- pointed the chairman of the Pontar- ..dawe Rural District Council. He is not a Labour man, and on more than -one occasion he has proved himself a determined opponent of Labour pro- jects. When we have found it neces- sary to oppose him we have done so without mincing words. But political differences need nrt eliminate feelings -of friendship and goodwill. We congra- tulate Mr. Davies on his appointment to one of the most honourable positions that local public life has to offer, and the Pontardawe Council on securing for its chairman an able public representa- tive, who will conduct its affairs with impartiality and public spirit. There has been a meeting of the Corph at Borth, and some of the bre- .thren brought news of terrible goings, on in Breeonshire. They said that in that benighted county Sundays are c,"I ve n over to dissipation, to drinking, and motoring, and gambling. Then someone up and said that they must have an 'Act o"f Parliament to stop these iniquities. We do not think that things are as bad in Breeonshire as they are painted, but in any case you cannot abolish the old Adam in man by Act of Parliament. There are two newspapers in North Dakota which "go for" each other like the "Post" and "Leader" at Swansea. Here are two extracts from a recent issue:— Verily as a prince of liars R. V. Simmons, editor of the Ambrose "Tribune" has gained a reputa- tion that old Beelzebub himself would be proud of.—Ambrose "Newsman." The editor of the Ambrose "Newsman" is a skunk, a hog, a snake in the grass.—Ambrose "Tri- bune." Now these rival journals are amalgam- ated, and a grave-like peace must have fallen on Ambrose. Wo hope the "Post" and "Leader" at Swansea won't amalgamate, although as orthodox Torv and Liberal organs they could do so without much sacrifice of principle. Largely, if not entirely, as a result of the commendable efforts of the Ys- talyfera Branch, of the Women's Labour League, quite a healthy interest is being evinced in the upper reaches of the Swan- sea Valley in the pit-head baths ques- hon. Th{; committees at several local collieries are considering the advisability of organising lectures and distributing li eTature among the men, with the ob- jr t of enlightening the men as to the d* tails of the scheme. The large attend- ai ve at the lectures given during Easter al Ystradgynlais, under the auspices of the League, was an excellent indication of the interest which is being evinced in the movement. A meeting of delegates to the newly formed Swansea Valley Socialist League, together with the Cycling Scouts' Sec- tion, will take place to-morrow (Satur- day; at Ystalyfera I. L.P. Institute. It is hoped that a,]] the affiliated bodies will be well represented, as there will be im- portant business to transact. Heart y congratulations are extended to Mr J. L. Samuel, of Ystalyfera, who has been elected chairman of the South Wales Tin and Sheet Mil linen's Association. The appointment is a mark of appreciation of long and faithful service to the Union of which Mr Samuel has been a member since boyhood. Commenting on the forthcoming Royal visit to the llhondda, a writer in a ccn- temparary says :—"Without doubt the Rhondda is one of the most patriotic dis- tricts in the kingdom. No area in thp British Isles sent so many soldiers to South Africa," and on that ground he suggests that the Prince a.nd Princess Alexander of Teck are assured of a wel- come worthy of their exalted position. So now we should understand what patriot- isf means. The Rhondda Valley collieries employ more time expired soldiers and re- servists than any other district in the Kingdom. The decision of the workmen in the Caerphilly district to appoint full-time examiners for the collieries is indicative of their grave dissatisfaction and un- easiness felt by them of the present sys- tem of inspection. There are indications that this same dissatifaction is being feJt in aw own districts, and both the Wes- tern Miners and the Anthracite Associa- tion are giving their consideration the matter. Lord Howard de Walden's Welsh Dramatic Company are at present busy rehearsing the several plays which are to bo staged at most of the important halls in Wales. The company consists of about 30 artistes, who have been drawn from all ever the Principality. Amongst the plays which the company will produce and of which the founder of the movemnt lia-s purchased the copyright, are "Change," "Ar y Groes- fordd," "Ephraim Harris," and "Ble Ma Fa." The first public performance will be gi ven at Cardiff on May 11th. —

YORKSHIRE PITS AT WORK I

YORKSHIRE PITS AT WORK I STRIKE THAT HAS COST THE MINERS £ 1,180,000. Most of the pits in South Yorkshire resumed work on Tuesday after tha strike over the minimum wage, and, except in isolated cases, there- is an obvious feeling of satisfaction among the men and boys, as well as the gen- eral public. No little anxiety was occasioned at the week-end by the news that there were some difficulties in face of the prospective resumption, but a joint deputation from the various branches of the Miners' Association interviewed the managements, and whatever diffi- culties were anticipated were overcome. The men's officials then displayed a notice that all men and boys were to sign on on Saturday morning, every man and boy returning to his old place and position. These instructions were loyally adhered to. and preparations for the resumption of work were com- pleted during the week-end. It is roughly estimated that the brief coal strike has stopped £1,000,000 in wages from entering the homes of the workers, while £ 180,000 has been drawn from the accumulated funds of the Yorkshire Miners' Association. —————— I' '—————

No title

Burned in a fire at Kingsland, Emily I Storey, aged 12, died in the Metropo- litaii "Hospital. Her mother is pro- gressing favourably. You will not get hold of the means of production save on the barricades.—

WELSH CHURCH BILL

WELSH CHURCH BILL. SECOND READING PASSED FOR THE THIRD TIME. SPEECH BY MR. JOHN WILLIAMS. In the House of Commons on Tues- day for the third time in three years the Welsh Church Bill was read a se- cond time, the Government majority being 84. The voting was:— For rejection 265 Against. 349 I Government Majority 84 In the course of debate Mr. John Williams, M.P. for Gower, said the more he listened to speeches of hon. members opposite the more he was con- firmed that he was doing right in sup- porting the Bill. The treatment meted out to Welsh Nonconformity was, in his opinion, cruel and unjust. The Welsh nation was fully entitled to and could receive all she asked without inflict- ing any injustice upon the Anglican Church in Wales. Her representation in Parliament entitled her to it. He had always thought majority rule was one of the fundamental principles upon which the British Constitution was es- tablished, but he was beginning now to think otherwise. The majority of the Welsh nation had for a generation en- deavoured to accomplish what he hoped they would obtain this Session. Just as the party opposite declined to give ear to the majority in Ireland, so they refused to listen to the majority of gallant little Wales. The present spirit and temper of Welsh Nonconfor- mity would not allow of any further alteration in this Bill.—(Ministerial cheers). They were sick and tired of hearing of concessions. They hated and detested the words "further com- promise." To grant further concessions in regard to Disendowment would de- stroy every particle of confidence Welshmen reposed in the present Gov- ernment. The generosity displayed by the Home Secretary had already in- curred for him the displeasure of many of his supporters, and he hoped the Government would decline to consider any further overtures by opponents of the Bill. He was sorry for the people who had more faith in tlie'ir golf than in their God. Was the religious life of the Anglican Church dependent upon temporalities ? (Loud Ministerial cheers).

MPs Race to Vote on Disestablishment Bill

M.P.'s Race to Vote on Dis- establishment Bill. SPECIAL TRAINS AND BOAT. I By special train and special boat Mr I spe4c i a l boat '?N lr Davi?on Dalziel, M.P. for Brixton, raced from Brussels in order to vote in tho House of Commons on Tuesday night, for the Disestablishment Bill. While in Brussels on a business mission Mr Dalziel received an urgent whip to be present in the House of Commons in time for the division on the sec-end read- ing of the Welsh Church Bill. He immediately chartered a special train, and, left Brussels at 3.20 for Calais. By telegram he arranged for the steamer Engadine, specially chartered, to rush him across Channel. The steamer was waiting at the pier with steam up, and only seven minutes elapsed from the ar- rival of the M.P. and his companions and the departure of the boat for Dover. News of his journey and its object had spread among the people of the town, a large number of whom were at the pier.to witness his departure. VOTE THAT COST 5.- I The division bell against which Mr Dal- ziel had made such a frantic rush across three countries was echoing through the lobbies when he came out into the Central Hall at Westminster and gave the details of his lightning journey. "I left Brussels," said Mr Dalziel, "at 3.20 exactly. I had a special train to Calais, where there was a steamer wait- ing. From Dover I had another special, which got to Charring Cross just before 9.30, and here I am-very glad to give you the information. The whole journey took me only six hours four minutes, which I believe is two hours 10 minutes quicker than it has ever been done before or could possibly have been done by any route. So saying and similingly triumphant, Mr Davison Dalziel hastened away to t.h6 division lobby to cast the vote which had cost him the best part of £ 50. • « » » •

No title

Coercion is the central principal or government.-T,ord Armstrong. Although everything was arranged for the wedding, Robert Laidler re- pented at the last moment. A New- castle jury mulcted him in S20 damages. Owing to defects in working the pier at Westminster Bridge has been tem- porarily closed by the Port of London Authority. It is only by making the ruling few uneasy that the oppressed many can obtain a particle of relief.—Bentham. A Hampstead jury condemned the use of flannelette when holding an in- quest on Miss Connew, whose night- dress caught fire and caused death. Reforms which have been refused to argument have been yielded to fear.— Buckle.

Radium Company for I Swansea I

Radium Company for I Swansea I I COMMERCIAL SCHEME WITH I CHARITABLE OBJECT. "It is a commercial undertaking with a charitable intention," said Air J. Aeron Thomas at Swaaisea Hospital board meeting on Wednesday in giving details of an ingenious method for obtaining a quantity of radium. He explained that a sub-committee had ascertained that the est of radium eman- ation, if obtained f^^m the 1tadluni Qom- pany, would be tv elve guineas a day. Radium at present cost Cl4 per milli- gram, and as they would require about ¡ a hundred milligrams for the purposes of treatment, the capital that would have to fye expended would be about 91,500. They were of opinion that the charge would be too heavy for the hospital, and they suggested the formation of 'a little I company amongst themselves to purchase radium. Colonel Morgan. Dr. W. F. Brook, Dr. Eisworth, and himself had each offered £100. They proposed charging a fee of five guineas a day, and they hoped to make from B500 to JB600 a year. Dr. Brook having guaranteed that it would be used at least a hundred days in the year. In a few years they would, therefore, get their money back, with fair interest, and then they purposed giving the radium I to the hospital for all time. —————— I J. I

IWHAT EMPLOYERS DISLIKEI

WHAT EMPLOYERS DISLIKE I CAPITALISTS' OBJECTION TO PROGRESSIVE LEGISLATION. teome idea of the reactionary opinions held by many employers is afforded by the list of Bills to which the Employ- ers' Parliamentarv Council take excep- tion. Incidentally, the number this year—20—constitutes a record. Among the new Bills are measures- Enabling any local authority with a population of over 20,000 to carry on any business which might lawfully be carried on by a company. Authorising the detention of ships not manned in accordance with the rules of the Board of Trade. Abolishing the three-shift system in Northumberland mines. Extending the eight-hour day to sur- face workers at collieries. Regulating tip holidays of Scottish farm labourers. Limiting the hours of employment of certain railway workers to eight a day. Enabling representatives of Trade Unions to cross-examine witnesses and address the coroner in the case of in- quests arising out of railway accidents, I

WOULD THEY ELECT A SOCIALIST

WOULD THEY ELECT A SOCIALIST ? Mr. Frank Briant. L.C.C., a promin- ent Liberal, was elected for the fifth: time as chairman of Lambeth Board of Guardians, on which the Conservatives are in the majority. —————— 1..11

L150 FOR CONTEMPT OF COURT

L150 FOR CONTEMPT OF COURT. F. Fines of P,50 each for contempt of Court were on Thursday imposed upon Mr. Frank Harris, the editor, Messrs. J. G. Hammond and Co., Ltd., the proprietors, and Modern Society (191) Ltd., the publishers of "Modern So- ciety." The action, heard before Jus- tices Darling, Avory, and Rowlatt, in the Kings' Bench Division, arose by way of an application by Sir Joseph Robinson in respect of paragraphs pub- lished while Louis Cohen was being Charged at Bow-street with perjury in connection with the action for libel brought by Sir Joseph Robinson.

SUFFRAGETTE AND SUFFRAGIST

SUFFRAGETTE AND SUFFRAGIST. Mrs. W. Ceombe Tennant, president of the Neath District Women's Suffrage ocoiety, has issued &-n appeal for the wider recognition of the difference be- tween the constitutional and militant sections ef the suffrage movement. With a number of other distinguished sup- I porters of the women's claim, including Mrs. Henry Sidgwick, and Laddy Betty Balfour, she asks that the word "suffra- gettes" should be used only to designate the militants, and that the word "si;ira- gists" shouJd be applied only to the law- abiding bodies. ..8..

FALL OF 500000 TONS OF CHALK j

FALL OF 500,000 TONS OF CHALK. j Two hours after a coastguard had patrolled the cliffs west of Birling Gap, near Eastbourne on Thursday a great fall of chalk, estimated at 500,000 tons, occurred near the Seven Sisters. The beach is now impassaMe, the debris ex- tending from the cliff to low-water mark. Jr

No title

Rifles, revolvers, and bludgeons were used in a fight between colonists and Arabs at Zeralda. Three Arabs were killed and 17 injured. Navvies are on strike at Stevenage for an extra halfpenny per hour, Inns and Co., the contractors, so far refus- ing the demand. At a meeting held at Saffron Walden, it was announced that Mr. Allan S. Dobson would contest the Saffron Wal- den Division at the next election as an I.L.P. candidate.

YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL

YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN. The annual meeting of the Y&tradgyn- lais Coancil was held on Thursday, Mr J. YV. Morgan, presidang, pro. tem. There were present Messrs. Lewis Thomas, D. H. Morgan, J. Howells, S. J. Thomas. Rhys Chapman, Tom Williams, W. Walters, and David Lewis, and Dd. Lewis, together with the ofifcials. Mr J. W. Morgan moved, and Mr J. Howells seconded, that Mr W. Walters should bet ehcurmjaa for the ensuing year. There was no amendment, and Mr Walters took the chair amidst applause. Mr Walters said he would do ius best to maintain the dignity of the Council, and to serve the ratepayers to the best of his ability. He thanked them for the honour they had conferred upon him, audi hoped he would have the support of every member. He hoped they would carry on their deliberations in a peace- ful maimer. The Y stradgynlais Council was becoming more and more important, and during the ensuing year the sewerage scheme and housing scheme would Le commenced upon. He hoped there would be no qua-rrels amongst the members, but rather would they try to do everything to forward the best interests of the rate- payers and of the district. Mr David Lewis proposed that Mr Tom Williams should be vice-chairman, and this was seconded by Mr J. W. Morgan, and there was no amendment. Mr Williams said it came as a sur- prise to him, as he thought Mr David Lewis ought to be in the vice-chair. He congratulated Mr Walters upon his eleva- tion to the chair. They all knew of Mr Walters' good qualities, and his great ambition was to uplift the working class, and his every effort was directed towards improving the conditions of the workers— (applause). Mr S. J. Thomas said he felt proud that Mr Walteis had been elected, and he hoped the members of the Council would do their best to assist him in every way. "Of course." he added, "every- thing was arranged before the members came here, but I hope it will be to the advantage and interest of the ratepayers. I hope everything will be successful." Mr D. R. Morgan I don't think that the remark made by Mr Thomas is fair. I resent it, and say that Mr Thomas is wrong. Mr Lewis, Mr Walters and my- self came down this morning, and I was under the impression that Mr David Lewis would te vice-chairman, and I am glad of the spirit shown by Mr Lewis in proposing Mr T. Williams to the vice- chair. The matter then dropped. The Chairman moved that the whole Council should constitute the Finance Committee. Agreed to. The Sewerage, Committee was also form- ally appointed, the whole Council to act. The Council then resolved itself into Committee. SANITARY n INSPECTOR'S REPORT. Mr u. J. Hees, M.H.a.i. sanitary in. spector, reported that the Breeonshire Education Committee were not prepared to pay for 230,610 gallons of water con- sumed during the six months ending Nov. 30th, 1913, the amount owing being £ 8 16s. 8d. inclusive of meter rent. They had paid El 7s. 9d., leaving £ 7 8s. lid. in arrears. Mr Robert Meredith, builder, Aber- crave, owed -09 9s. Od. for water, a.nd had informed the Sanitary Inspector that he was not prepared to pay. MAESYPICA COTTAGES AGAIN. I The Inspector further reported that al- though the owner of the Maesypicu Cott- ages, Lower Cwmtwrch, had been served with closing orders, the last being served on January 24th, 1914, only a. few minor repairs had been carried out, and the houses were still occupied. CORSLLWYN COTTAGES, UPPER I CWMTWRCH. The Inspector reported that on Feb. 13th, the above cottages had been re- ported to the Council as unfit for human occupation, but as yet nothing had been done. A closing order had been served on January 24th, 1914. WATER STREET HOVELS. Three houses in Water Street were bmu occupied, and the Inspector stated that the L.G.B. had given as their decision that when a Local Authority had closed a building. it was not competent for the owner to do anything with the building except to reconstruct it, neither could the owner turn it into a workshop. INSANITARY PROPERTY. I The Inspector reported on the con- dition of a dwelling house at Penybont row, Ystradgynlais. The house consisted of two living rooms with scullery on the ground floor, and on the first floor two sleeping rooms, the height of the latter being five feet only. The ground floor was very dilapidated; the main walls were broken, and to mask the condition of the roof on the. interior sacks were placed in position to cover it. The woodwork throughout was in a state of decay, and the house, was devoid of any troughing, and in view of other insanitary conditions he recommended that a closing order should be served. The rcoprt was adopted. ISOLATIN HOSPITAL REQUIRED. A letter was received from the Local Government Board in reference to the necessity of the Council making arrange- ments for the accommodation of infectious diseases oases. The Board suggested an agreement between the three Councils under Sections 131 and 285 of the Public Health Act. Mr D. R. Morgan stated that he had raised the matter three months ago, and then said they would have to deal with the matter in the near future, and con- sider the advisability of providing an isolation hospital. He thought the sug- gestion of the L.G.B. a very wise one, viz. that a joint hospital should be pro- vided to cover the area served by the Ystradgynlais, Pontardawe a.nd Llandilo Town Councils. He proposed that a conference of representatives of the three  Councils should be called, and the matter fuHy discus?fd. Mr J. Howells seconded, and this was I agreed to. The Clerk was instructed to arrange the meeting. I BETTER POSTAL FACILITIES. A letter was read from the Postmaster General to the effect that the circum- stanoes did not warrant the establishment of a letter box at Cae'rbont. Mr J. W. Morgan thought the Coun- cil ought to protest against the decision. The Clerk stated that he had written to Mr Sidney Robinson and others, and they wanted to know what were the exact, requirements of the Ystradgvnlais dis- trict in respect of postal facilities. He suggested that the various members of the Council should write to him, pointing out the needs of their districts. Mr J W M 1rgan stated that the reason why there was an objection to the letter box at Cae'rbont was that the Post- master of Ystradgynlais would have to pay an additional 6d. or Tid. to a postman to clea.r the box. Mr D. JI. Alorgan said it was a serious thing if the whole of the residents were to he placed at a disadvantage because of 6d. per day. Mr J. W. Morgan That is my opinion. The Clerk's sugge6tion was adopted. THE SPIRIT OF ECONOMY. I The Clerk reported receipt of a. letter from the Rural District Council's Associa- tion to the effect that the Council should send a re.presentative and their Clerk to the annual meeting. Mr J. W. Morgan moved that the Chairman and Clerk should be sent. The Chairman The chairman is not in favour of spending the ratepayers' money in this way. I Mr Lewia Thomas moved tnat the Council should not send anyone. This was agreed to. On the motion of Mr J. W. Morgan, seconded by Mr D. R. Morgan it was .N i organ it was decided to obtain a book dealing with 1,100 queries, published by the Associa- tion at a cost of 25s. TRIP FOR THE SANITARY I INSPECTOR. Mr J. W. Morgan moved, and Mr D. R. Morgan seconded, that the Sanitary Inspector should be sent to the annual congress of the Royal Sanitary Institute to be held at Blackpool next month. Agreed to. A letter was received from Messrs. Batcup and Harris, Swansea, in which they stated that on the 26th March their steam van became sunk in the pipe track between Ystradgynlais and Abercrave, and that it took eight hours to liberate it. A large portion of the fruit was damaged, and they had had to allow customers to take the fruit at a cheaper rate, in addition to which outside assist- ance had to he called in, aud, eontinuocL- the letter, "we therefore estimate our loss to be at least C,5, for whl (-h amount we look to receive from the Glamorgan District Council." (Laughter). The Clerk stated that he had written to the firm to the effect that Mr W. Morgan, Rowton House, was the con- tractor, and that their letter had been forwarded to him THE WATER STREET PROPERTY7. Mr Silverstone appeared before the Council, and was informed by the Sani- tary Inspector that although he was willing to fall in with the scheme drawn up by Mr J. C. Rees, architect, Nenth, tli" L.G.B. would not approve of the hoiisve he at present uses as a second-hand clothes shop being converted into a lock- up shop. Mr Silverstone stated that it was his intention to buy one of the houses, and robuil.d it. The matter was adjourned until the next meeting of the Council. BRYNMORGAN BRIDGES. Mr Lewis Thomas thought sometMjg should be done in regard to the queswDn of the Brynmorgan Bridges, particularly bearing in mind the time of year. He was afraid summer would bik over before anything had been done. Oqji thing was certain, namely that the lower bridge would Dot hold out another winter. Re- garding the retaining wall along the river, that would now have to be dropped, because in the first place the demands of the Railway Company were too high, aNd again they had had it from Mr Morgan, engineer to the Pontardawe Council, that the scheme was- not workable, and ad- vised that it 'va" altogether teo risky. Taking this in'o c ns der.it-on h wanted to know wh> thir th y were to rwqk any more regarding the r taining wall, o" to go in directly for the, original scheme of erecting the two bridges. Mr T. Williams also thought that the question of the retaining wall was im- practicable. He thought they should go en with the first plan at once. Mr Rhys Chapman also thought tkt the retaining wall wonld rot \w pi a. tie- able, and Mr David Lewis said vlrlst at first he had agreed with the pr< p s;fO)1 of the reta-ining waU, but accord ng to the report he could not siiplwrt it. He thought the original scheme- should be proceeded with at once. Mr D. R. Morgan also support* <1 the Temarks of the previous speakers, and faad he thought they ought to go OP with n", first scheme without delay. The Twrrh was a very difficult river to deal with. and he thought the contract rs had had a very SClrry experience when doing work there. Mr S. Thomas asked why they should fall back on the original sc heme. He had hwd no explanation given why this should be done. He thought the schema for tlic- retaining wall was practicable, should be carried out. Mr Lewis Thomas said the reason why the original scheme should be proceeded with hid been stated. The work must h: proceeded with at onc.e. and finished this summer. This could not be done if the proposal for the wall was carried out. Tha.t was a stifficient justification for his position. Mr Rhys Champan said they were in the hands of the Midland Railway Com- pa.ny, and as the Council could not agree to the Company's terms, should go on with the original scheme for the erection of the two bridges. This was ultimately agreed to; together with the decision that the Clerk and the Surveyor should ar- range details of the work to b" proceeded with immediately, providing the sanction of the L.G.B. was obtained. I CEFN'RERW ROAD. This well-worn topic was again intro- duced by Mr David Lewis (Coibren);, who said it had been plaoed before practically every ward in the district with perhaps one -exception (Cwmtwrch), four of which wore in favour of his request. He raised the matter again because it seemed that the Council did not know their own mind, and he wanted a definite understanding. Last time the matter was discussed they in Y stradgynlais Higher were asked to collect some amouont of money, but when he asked whether the scheme would be proceeded witpif they collected as much money as they could, he got no direct answer. He personallv would do any- thing in his power to have the matter carried through, and tc improve the con- dition of the district. Answering Mr Lewis Thomas, the Sur- veyor said his approximate estimate of the cost oi the pr^p^ed new road was £ 1,200 to £ 1,500. Mr J. N'v. -Nic-i-g.Lii thought they should have an. unders!.ai.>uinig as to the raising of the money before it was prv;oee