Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PONTARDAWE POLICE COURT I

PONTARDAWE POLICE COURT. FRIDAY. Before -N l e--irs. H. N. Before Messrs. H. N. Miers (pres-iding) E. G. Benthall, G. H. Strick and J. H. P. Lloyd. TEMPORARY TRANSFER Upon the application of Mr G. Mor- gan, solicitor, the temporary transfer of the license of the Traveller's Well, Rhydy- fro was granted from Hannah Lewis to Mansel Williams. DOG WITHOUT LICENCE John Richards, Trebanos, admitted a' charge of keeping a dog without license, and was fined 10s. and costs. THE DRINK AGAIN For having been, diunk and disorderly at Ynysmeudwy on March 26th, Daniel Jones was fined 10s. inclusive. Wm. Griffiths, Cyfyng road, Ystalyfera, ad- mitted being drunk on April 14th, and ha.d to pay 8s., whilst Stephen James, Pontardawo, vas also fined 10s. inclusive for a similar offence. Afred Confield, G.C.G., failed to attend, and his case was adjourned. Gomer Thomas, Gwilym road, Owmllynfel, pleaded guilty to the offence and a penalty of 10s. including costs was Imposed. REMOVAL OF PIGS. W. J. Davies, Gwauncaegurwen, was charged with having removed nine pigs from G.C.G. contrary to the regulations. A constable stated that on March 28th the man was granted a removal license for nine pigs from Llandilo market to G.C.G. Thursday, later witness called at defendant's premises and found that the pigs were not there, Davies stating that he had scld them to three different places in the district. The license pro- vided that the pigs should be kept in one place for 28 days after removal. Defendant pleaded ignorance, and said that he bought the animals for three different persons according to their re- quest. He was not accustomed to pur- chasing pigs. A fine of 2s.6d. for each pig was im- posed, together with payment of costs. RAILWAY TRESSPASSING. James Norton, Clydach, was summon.ed for trespassing on tlfe Midland Railway near the South Box, Clydach, on April ilth. His father appeared to answer the cha.rge. An officer spoke to seeing defendant going along the line, and said that "hen questioned, Norton admitted that he had no pass. Mr Norton, senr., said his son was merely crossing the line on an errar;ki.- Fined 10s. and costs. John Williams admitted a similar offence on March 11th. A constable spoke to seeing the man walking along the line between Tarreni Colliery and Ynysgeinon Junction on the day named, and in corroborating. Mr Max Franzen said they had considerable trouble in the men in this locality, much damage being done to fences, etc. Fined 10s. an d costs. UNCERTIFICATED LABOUR The West Glamorgan Canister Co. Ltd., Clydach, were summoned in three cases for failing to comply with section 33 of the Factory Act providing that employers must obtain certificates of fit- ness for workers under the age of 16. Mr Hilditch, Superintendent Factory Inspec- tor, prosecuted, and Mr John, manager pleaded guilty on behalf of the Company. Mr Hilditch said the facts were that -on January 27th, the Company had three girls, all aged 14 in their service, all of whom had been employed some months, and in none of the cases had certificates of trtness for work been obtained. They were got on February 6th, but should have been in the Company's ion within seven days of the girls' starting work. Mr Charles Evans, one of H.M. Inspec- tors of Factories, corroborated. Mr John said the omission was due to a. misunderstanding. Fines of 15s. and costs in each case were imposed. ILL TREATMENT OF A PONY David Hughes, hawker, Clydach, was charged with having ill-treated a horse by working it in an unfit condition. A constable stated that at 10.30 a.m. on April 6th, he. saw defendant driving a chestnut pony in Curwen Street, G.C.G. [t was in a very poor condition, and ap- peared to be in great pain. He called to defendant and asked him what was the matter with the poily, and he said the animal ailed nothing. Witness ex- amined it and found several old bruises and sores, and a new one apparently made that morning. He told defendant to lead the pony to the Police Station, where it was examined by Sergt. Shilom. He told the man that he would be reported, and ordered him to take the animal home, and not to work it. The Sergeant corroborated. The Chairman said it was cruel to work an animal in that state. Fined .£1 inr clusive of costs. MOTOR CYCLE OFFENCE. Considerable interest was taken in the case in which Walter James Laming, dentist, Pontardawe, was summoned for having driven a motor cycle without license. It will be remembered that the case was adjourned at the last aitting of the Court, for the purpose of obtaining oertain information from the County Council regarding the. date of the license. Mr Morgan Davies, who again defend- ed, regretted that the Police had gona to the trout le and expense of getting evi- dence from Cardiff in the case in ques- tion. It had been admitted that it did not matter when the license was granted, as he had produced the license covering the date of the alleged offence. The Chairman said the weak point was the failure to produce the correct license. It was not produced wheal requested, and he thought there had been some evasion at the previous hearing. Wilfrid Olark, a clerk in the account- ants' office of the Glamorgan County C-ouncil, Cardiff, said that on March 11 application was received from Laming, along with 5s. for the renewal of his license. It was renewed, and returned, and would be received hack on March 13. framing's license expired on January 19th, but it, was the custom of the officials to renew the licence from the date of ex- piration. Defendant was not licensed op March 9th, the date of the alleged offence. Mr Morgan Davies submitted tl,t in that case tlia license was misleading. De- f^nda.nt- was led to believe by experience that he was licentrd to drive on ti),- "-v ia question. The Chririiian ngreed. but th^ r'V- rviid. it could not be pnt was r-t licensed to driv" on "1T'(' 9th. and thit ° n <- ffence W3." A fir-R of 30s. inclusive of cost- vv> Inflicted. I GURNOS FARMERS' OFFENCE. I Rhys Williams, farmer, Gurnos, Ystaly-j' fera, was summoned for having allowed three ows to stray on the public road. His daughter appeared, and in answer to the clerk said her father had not told heir whether she must admit or deny the offence. The Chairman Did he give you any money with which to pay the fine?- (laughter).—Yes—(reneweded laughter). The police recorded five previous con- victions for a similar offence, and a fine of 4a. and costs for each cow was im- posed I A PAINFUL CASE. I I A painful case was mentioned in which 1 Mary Lewis, Pontardawe, summoned her brother, Benjamin Jeremiah, for assault. The proceedings, however, were not en- tered into, and at the suggestion of the Chairman and the Clerk, defendant agreed to be bound over. NEGLECTFUL HUSBAND'S I Maria Nicholas, Clydach, summoned her husband, Jas. Nicholas for desertion, stating that he had not maintained her for 20 years. Complainant said, thev were married in 1873, and had four daughters, all of whom were married. Defendant was a corpora- tion labourer earning about 28s. per week. They had lived apart for quite 20 years. She had) an order for maintenance from the Bench at Tenby about 14 years ago, but she only received two sums of 5s. from her husband, and as she had teen able to keep herself since, she had not troubled him. Defendant said he had had an opera- tion to his foot and could not work regu- larly. I An order for payment of 8s. per week was made. Thomas Langdon, Pontardawe, was summonoed by his wife Gwen Lang- don for desertion. She said defendant had left her several weeks ago. He had drunk heavily and had not maintained her properly for some time. An order for 10s. per week was made. Mary Rees summoned her husband Del. J. Rees for having deserted her, and asked for a maintenance order. The case had been before the Court previously, and was adjourned because of, defendant's ill- ness. It was stated that he. had recovered but he did not attend. The wife stated that her husband was 38, and she was 21. They were married at St. David's Church, Ystalyfera, nearly two years ago, and he had never worked regularly. He was a labourer and earned 52s. per week when he was employed. Supt. Lethera.n said hie understood that defendant was formerly a schoolmastei, but for some reason he gave that up and had done little work since. He used to go out prepared for work, but rarely did any. He would loiter about instead. An order for payment of 8s. per week was made. I UNATTENDED HORSES Gomer Thomas, Pontardawe, wi;s found guilty of leaving two horses unat- tended in the street, and was fined 2s.6d. and costs. P.C. Baker gave evidence, and Sergt. Woods corroborated. I ASSAULT AT CLYDACH. I "LIFE" IN THE GARDEN CITY. Emily Rogers, of the Garden City, Clydach, summoned Cornelius Govier, who lives next house, for assault. Complainant said she was outside her house on April 3rd, when defendant called her to him and asked her what she had been saying about himself and the woman he lived with. She replied that she did use the remarks he mentioned because they were true, whereupon he struck her with his hand across the face. Defendant said the woman threw a stone flt him before he struck her. Annie Weeks said she was a "deserted wife'' and defendant lodged with her on the occasion of the alleged assault, and said. complainant threw a stone at Govier first. Govier was also charged with having Lehaved in a disorderly manner on the day in question. An officer said he saw defendant outside the house shouting and swearing at the top of his voice. For the first offence a fine of 2s.6d. and costs was imposed, and 10s. inclusive in the second. The chairman added The conduct of some of the people down there is disgraceful. Rhys Thomas, Ystalyfera, summoned David Owen, a neighbour for having used threats towards him. Complainant said Owen went to his house using filthy language, and threatening to fight him if lie went out into the street. Answering the Clerk, Thomas said he was afraid defendant would do him some personal injury. Owen was bound over. INSURANCE ACT PROSECUTIONS. I A CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR! I The Bench were occupied for some little time in a case in which F. H. Neville, cinema, proprietor, of Gorseinon, and until recently of G.C.G., was summoned for failing to stamp the cards of three of his assistants under the National Insurance Act. Mr Haydn Jones prosecuted on behalf of the Welsh Insurance Commissioners, and Mr Neville did not appear. Mr Jones said briefly the facts were that Neville who had been connected with a cinema, show at G.C.G. had employed three men, Edwin Horstead, Frederick Ba-rber, and Trevor Jenkins, for whom he should have paid the employer's contribur tion under the National Insurance Act. Between. January 10th and the issue of the summonses, six visits were paid, or letters forwarded to defendant with the object of the local inspectors obtaining an interview with him, but all had been un- successful. The evidence would show that as was not uncommon in, some quarters. Nevills did not approve. of the Act, and for this reason objected to stamp the cards. The men concerned were not now employed by defendant. who had left the district. The penalty for the offence was a fine not exceeding 210, which really meant the making of an order which would cover all the contributions unpaid, leaving the insured person no worse off as a result of the proceedings. The cards should have been stamped when the wages were paid, whether weekly or monthly. The three men gave evidence bearing out Mr Jones, opening statement. Hor- stiead and Jenkins appearing on supoena. Horstead's arrears were 16 weeks. Bar- ber 31 weeks, and Jenkins five weeks. Evan Evans, district inspector, also gave evidence corroborating previous statements, aild spoke of his ineffectual attempts to get a-n interview with Neville. Defendant was fine,(i El and costs in ench case. YNYSAMMAN WORKERS I SUMMONED. TPOTTHLE ABOUT A FIREMAN I ?he Y'?y un.rnn)? C ? ?ry C?. Ltd., c,vl- li"v propr'eton. B''y;'?'rnt?n. F.-LiTnTr.('Tl"(1I i<'xtvof th,r '(,, f-?r 's-'Mf h d contract. Mr ?for?a"D''vi''s. I P?)?.rc)n.we,prospc'!t?.a.nd Mr Ran-, deH, Swansea, defended. j Mr Davies said he regretted to have I to proceed with the cases. He had hoped they could come to an amicable settle- ment. However, on March 9 last it ap- pe-ared that the workmen at the Ynys- amman Colliery had some grievance against a fireman, who had been appoint- ed. to start work on that day. The man had been emplo ed in that position up to August of last vear, but in the January previous, something had happened, a mis- firø taking plsce, and the men alleged that in view of this, the fireman had not done his duty properly. They endeavoured to get the Inspector of Mines to prosecute, but he replied that the fireman had done the best practical think under the cir- cumstances, and no prosecution took place. The fireman was employed from January 21st up to August, and left then on his own accord, going to work at the coal face. A new manager was appointed about throe weeks prior to March 9th, and knowing the previous fireman, thought, it would be of great assistance to have him back. He was therefore, re- appointed to his old position. The fire- man was to have started on March 9th, but the men hearing this refused to go down. They did not go down either on that day or the next, and the Company wrote a letter to the works committee stating that they had considered the re- port of the stoppage of work, and the men's reply adhering to their refusal to go r. a,ck to work unless the appoint- ment of Lewis as fireman was withdrawn. Under the circumstances they (the Com- pany) had decided to close down the col- liery unless the men withdrew their ob- 1 jection to Lewis, and agreed to pay the cost of keeping thie colliery open, the cost to be agreed upon between the, men's agent and the colliery officials. That, said Mr Davies was not unnreasonable. It was not accepted and tho Company issued summonses against the men who had stopped work, but on March 19, the men wrote offering terms themsel ves. They declared themselves prepared to resume work, withdrawing their objection to Lewis as firema,n (which showed there ha.d been no real objection at all; it was be- cause he came from the Pontardawe dis- trict), and they asked the Company to withdraw the claims for damages, the terms to te agreed upon mutually. By this time the pumps at the colliery were hing withdrawn, and the colliery was I Hooding. It was difficult to see what de- fence thera could be to the summonses. On the question of damages, the dates of the claim were from March 9th to 18th, and the total cost put in by the Company was £ 173 18s. 2d. In addition there were the damages incurred by the Col- lierv being closed down, because it stood to reason that when the colliery was re- open,ed if at all, a great deal of work would have to be done to put it in a safe condition. The sum to be incurred was quite inestimable. The Chiiirman said they covld not take the latter question into conosideration at all. They could fix no estimate. David Jeffrie?, manager of the colliery, corroborated Mr Davies in his opening statement, and give evidence at length on the question of damages. It was hereupon admitted that the men's second offer to meet the damages was made without prejudice. Cross-examined by Mr Randell witness made several admission which would have the effect of reducing the damages claimed He also agreed that the stoppage did rot bind the Company to flood the colliery, and said it would have been kept open if the men had paid the charges, etc. Further answering Mr Randell, witness sa.id he ha-d heard that Richard Williams, when manager, had agreed that Lewis should not be fireman at the Tjt, but he had also heard that the remark had been wrongly constructed. Lewis had com- mitted a technical offence in withdrawing a charge of powder, but it's seriousness, he said depended on the circumstances. He did not know that the Mines In- spector had pressed the Company to prose- cute. Mr Davjes objected to questions on this matter, because the Mines Inspector was not present, and the objection was up- held. He knew that the Company did not prosecute, and that the men did object to Lewis as fireman. He also understood that the manager put Lewis at the coal face because of the men's complaints, and he admitted being told that the men would object if Lewis was given the fireman's post again. Personally he con- sidered Lewis a competent man despite his technical offence. Re-examined by Mr Da-vies. witness said the colliery was flooded because it would hnve cost a, considerable sum to have kept it open, and they did not know when the men would be returing. Mr J. G. Harris, secretary to the Com- panv, gave corroborated evidence. Cross-examined bv Mr Randall, he denied that Lewis, the fireman, was ever dismissed, but admitted that the manager had aereed to find a way of removing Lewis from his post as fireman, also that the men did not obiect to Lewis ea.rning his living at the coalface. He denied on his oath t,hit the Company were requestrd by the Home Office to take proceedings a??ir&t Lewis. t he, ha-d Mr Randell complained that he had h?d no answer to his request for par- ticulars regarding the wages -due to the men from the Company. and Mr Harries said his answer was that the letter was forwarded to the solicitor. Mr Randell reviewed the evidence, and said regarding Lewis' action in with- drawing the powder, the men received such information that they expected that proceedings would be taken against him. I f the offence had been committed by a workman, he would have been summoned at once. His case was that it was a verb- al agreement between the former manager and the men that Lewis should not be fireman; that agreement had been broken by the Company in Lewis' re-appointment and that the men were therefore justified in leaving work without the customary 14 days' notice. It was pointed out, however, that if they had objected to Lewis, the men could have given 14 days notice in the ordinary wav, ard the clnk supported this vipw, but Mr Randell retorted by saving th/it anything might have hap- pened in the course of thoc 14 days the men were w -rking out their notices. Wm. .Nfo.Re; corrborated Mr Rail dell's statements, and said the men had a strong objection to Lewis as fireman, because of his actions and certainly not. because he lived in Pontardawe instead of Bryn- amman. The Chairman said the B^nch did not think the defence had Droved that there was any contract r^gvrd rg tl-e pit;on of r.evns as fireman, brt thev felt that there had been mistakes on both sides. The Bench gave judgment in favour of the Company, the damages to be settled amicably if possible, and failing this course, at the next sitting of the Court. —————

Advertising

vV WH.IJAMS Phremolop-ist ?n h? ?)'?? ri??v at th? Virt?f? a ■ '• Market'

I PONTARDAWE PICTURE I PROPRIETORS NARROW ESCAPE

PONTARDAWE PICTURE PROPRIETOR'S NARROW ESCAPE. A serious motor accident occurred at Newnham-on-Severn on Sunday after- noon, a car belonging to and driven by Mr. Evan Davies, Pengam, Cardiff, col- liding with a motor cycle ridden by Mr. H.. W. Davies, Bar borne-road, Worcester. The occupants of the car, including Mr. Williams, of Pontardawe, proprietor of the Palace Picture House, were uninjured, although the car was badly damaged, but the motor cyclist was seriously injured and was taken to the Gloucester Infirmary, where he was found to be suffering from dislocation of the hip and minor injuries. At the time of the accident lie was carrying a lady passenger, Miss Marie :Cullis, of Mile End, Coleford, on the back carrier of his machine, and she too was badly hurt, breaking her left leg, )and was taken to her home by motor car. The motor cyclist was said to have run straight into the front of the car. »»♦»>

Britains Output of CoalI

Britain's Output of Coal I RECORD YEAR FOR UNITED KING I DOM. The Home Office on Saturday issued an I advance proof (subject to correction) of the tables relating to the output of coal and other miners in the United Kingdom and the number of persons employed at mines during 1913. The document shows the output of coal from mines under the Coal Mines Act, which was 260,398,578 tons in 1912, rose last year to 287,411,869 tons, an increase of 27,013,291 tons. The total is the highest on record. The increases (in tons) in the various inspec- tion divisions of the kingdom were as follows :—Yorkshire and North Midland, 8,069,904; South Wales, 6,713,806; Northern, 5,266,438; Scotland, 2,937; Midland and Southern, 2,212,525; Liver- pool and North Wales, 947,393; Man- chester and Ireland, 865,336. There was a total of 1,127,890 persons employed at mines under the Coal Mines Act, an increase of 38,800 on the previous year. The increase in the output of coal is at the rate of 10.37 per cent., and the increase in the number of persons em- ployed at the rate of 3.56. OTHER MINERALS. J ihe output of some of the principal minerals, other than coal, under the Coal Mines Act were Clay and shale, 457,244 tons; fire clay, 2.585,763 tons; ironstone, 7,709,624 tons; oil shale, 6,280,143 tons; sandstone, 144,923 tons. Under the Metalliferous Mines Regula- tion Act the total ouotput of minerals in 1913 reached 3,236,283 tons, as compared with 3,024,621 tons in the previous year. The total yast year included 1,881,953 tons of iron ore, 356,316 tons of lime- sttone, 214,573 tons of rock shaJe, 238,494 ton os of gypsum, 133,984 tens of clay and shale, 95#371 tons of slate, 89,718 tons of sandstone, and 17,294 tons of zinc ore. There was a total of 27,412 per- sons employed in these mines, as against 28,058 in 1912.

Coalfield XJnrestI

Coalfield XJnrest 2,000 ABERDARE MEN STRIKE In accordance with a decision arrived at on Sunday, nearly 2,00 men employed at the Aberamman, and Abercwmboi Col- lieries of iho Powell Duffryn Company, in the Aberdare Valley, are idle in conse- quence of the prevalence of non-Union- ism. A fortnight ago the men decided to suspend notices for another fortnight in the hope tha,t all the "defaulters" would fall into line. In the meantime the lodge officials have made assiduous efforts to obtajn a "clean slate" but without com- plete success, and although the number of non-unionist has been reduced at Aber- amman Colliery from 34 a fortnight ago to 7, it was reported at the lodge meet- ing held at Aberamman that there were in addition 134 men in arrears with their contributions. The meeting, over which Mr W. J. Phillips, lodge, chairman, pre- sided, decided to cease working until i. "clean slate" is obtained. It was also decided to a.ppoint a deputation to wait upon the management with reference to the matter. Hopes are entertained of a speedy re- sumption of work.

LABOUR OPPOSITION TO MR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN

LABOUR OPPOSITION TO MR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN A pri vate conference, representing 65 Labour organisations in the city, held in Birmingham or. Saturday, decided to nominate Councillor J. W, Kneeshaw as Labour candidate to oppose Mr Austen Chamberlain in West Birmingham at the n.ext General Election. Councillor Shann has already been adopted as Labour can- did it, for East Birmingham in opposition to M" Steel Maitland. to N l i

No title

It was reported at a meeting of the Swansea. Corporation Distress Commit,te.e on Monday that a gtawit of P,200 had been ma.de by the Government towards local distress. works. It was decided to pay the amount into the Borough Fund.

Advertising

?J!L???M?,??JL

A HATED ACT I

"A HATED ACT" I JUDGE'S RETORT TO REMARK BY I COUNSEL. During the bearing of an action in the Liverpool Assize Court on Tuesday for d.amages. for loss of her husband by Mrs. Amy O'Donogbue it was stated that de- ceased was a doctor. and evidence was given to show that since 1910 his income as a practitioner had eocnsiderably in- creased. Mr Justice Ridley That would be due to the Insurance Act Mr Gordon Hewart (for the defence) And they call it a hated Act, my lord. The Judge And I have reason to be- lieve it is hated thoroughly. Mr Hewart Apparently there are those who have some reason not to re- gard it so. The Judge, That is so, but. I have no reason to make any remarks about it. Mr H)gby Swift (for the plaintiff) It is my learned friend's fault for trying to make a little political capital. I

Increase in the Number ofI Voters

Increase in the Number of 'I Voters. WHAT THE UNIONISTS ARE I DOING. At the annual meeting of the Swansea, District Unionist Association, held at Neath on Tuesday, the agent (Mr J. B. Rowlands) reported that the Unionists had gained over 1,000 votes at the re- vision courts., and that no fewer than 23 names of dead men had been removed from the register. From this it would seen that the work of placing the names of Labour men on the register is being done by other than Labour organisations. ———————

The Vice of Gambling I

The Vice of Gambling I Preaching at the Cardiff Syna- ) gogue on Saturday (the last day of the week of Passover), the Rev. H. Jere- vitch devoted his sermon to the vice of gambling. It was when the passion for gambling attacked the young people that the worst consequences were to be feared. Tho better their luck the worse their prospects. The history of every racing event would abundantly show how that kind of "sport" became a source of de- moralisation to the multitude. Ninety- one out every hundred persons who pro- fe&sed to be interested in the turf knew practically nothing about the horse on w hose success they striked their earnings or other people's, or, indeed, about horses at all. Referring to card plaving, he said it was to be profoundly deplored that Jewish society was far too much addicted to card playing as the one unfailing resource "to k.ll time." Why people who professed themselves their friends should invite them to seek recreation in their company, and then provide them with implements to enable them to acquire money they have not earned, or to lose money for which they got no equivalent, to vex, or to be vexed (of course, without showing it), re- maine,d yet to be explained, he would not say on moral, but on social grounds. He thought it would be much more hospit- able if the host provided the stakes aa well as the cards for his guests; one could then understand the social aspect of the, institution. It would be unfair, however, to sav that the Jew was more guilty in that respect than his fellow non- Jew. but two wrongs did not make one right. ——————————————————— <

Olympic Cinema Swansea

Olympic Cinema. Swansea The coolest place in Swansea during the recent, hot weather has been the Clvmpic Cinema in Oxford Street, where "The Tiger Counter" w as screened on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before large audiences. This week-end "The Vampires' Tower" will be the "star" and', in addition to which pictures dealing with history, travel and current events and humorous subjects constitute a pro- gramme unsurpassed for excellence. Some exclusive films have been secured by the enterprising management, who endeavour to keep right slap bang up-to-date Valley visitors to town should not fa.il to pay a visit to this most comfortable house of entertainment.

LANDORE MAN INJURED

LANDORE MAN INJURED. The Swansea police are investigating a case in which a young man, Thomas Myers, of Milbrook-street. Landore. was badly treated by four ruffians. He was coming from Morriston late on Satur- day night when the four men attacked him. Two of them rushed at him and he turned to defend himself, when the other two threw him to the ground. They knocked him about, and then bolted. It is surmised that the assault was meant for someone else/ Myers sustained a fracture of the forearm, and was bitten dbout the neck. ————— >.»».

No title

Lord Justice Vaughan Williams, the eminent Welsh judge, and a member of a great legal family, retired from the Bench on Tuesday. Mr Llewelyn John Bevan, of Bryn Elim, Craigcefnparc, who died in March last year left, estate of the gross value of £ 601 with ret personalty JS402. The will has only just teen announced. Trade reports indicate that there is still considerable slackness in the Anthracite coal niarekt. Big stocks remain on hand waiting for buyers, and until these a.re cleared, employ ment will be somewhat irregular. Tho Rr-v. E. Cornwall Jones, formerly a Congregational minister at Brecon, and wcill known In the County, who now holds an Anglican living in Scotland, has been appointed a canon in Aberdeen Catherdal. An engagemmt is formally announced between Mr J. H. P. Lloyd, J.P., eldest son of Mr Herbert Lloyd, J.P.. Cilybeb- yll, and Miss Nellie Parker, fourth daugh- ter of Mr and Mrs. Rober Packer, Bally Valley, Killaloe, County Clare. The brave engine driver on the Fur- ness Railway, William Marr, died on Friday morning at the North Lonsdale Hospital, Barrow, from shock follow- ing the severe burns which he sus- tained on Tuesday night while on the footplate of his engine. Flames from the firebox ret fire to his clothing, but Marr heroically remained at his post, and took the train into Furness Abbey Station. "f •

Advertising

  ? E. J. DANN & Co., 1 y South Wales Clothiers X <3 (UNIVERSAL OUTFITTERS), f) Boot 6t Shoe Merchants I Are now complete with their large and varied Stock for he Winter. • Estimates for Contracts. a ♦J* 0 Men's Overcoats, Ulsters, Raincoats, and Motoring Coats Ranging e.0 from 16/- to 6o/ 0 Long Oil Coats from 6/6 to & ♦♦♦ Long Oil Coats from 6/6 to 3? •> Our Noted Silk Oil Coat, Leggings and Sou'wester to match, total ♦> 0 weight (3 garments) i6oz., for Riding, Walking or Motoring. The Latest New Waterproof Coat known as the Pegamoid, prices j 16/6 to 25/ 0 Rubber and Oil Leggings, 2/3 to 10/6 per pair. 0 All Kinds of Waterproof Goods kept in Stock to suit every calling a in wet weather. ♦> 0 Goods dispatched same day as ordered. Goods dispatched same day as ordered. a 4) «> IF,. J. DANN 8c Co., | J South Wales Clothiers and Boot Manufacturers, | 15, & 16, Wind Street, Swansea, ÇJ —— AND 1 78, & 79, Water Street, Aberavon. S g & Webber & Son Ltd., 266, Oxford St., Swansea. Immense Stock of the most Fashonable and Up-to-date j- -w JEWELLERY Gem Rings, Bragelets, N ecklets, Pendants, Lockets,Long Chains, Alberts,Gold and SilverWatches, Sterling Silver, Electro-plate, Marole, Hall and Chiming Clocks OCCULIST OPTICIANS AND SPECIALISTS IN SPECTACLES. Manufacturers of Scientific Instruments, Mining Dials, Levels, Theodolites, Anemometers, Barometers, Telescopes and Field Glasses. WEBBER Ix SON, Ltd., 266, Oxford Street, Swansea OPPOSITE THE MARKET. DO YOU REQUIRE A MEMORIAL STONE Mr W. J. Williams has a large assortment in most artistic designs, kept in stock at Ystalyfera and Tatra&gjnlais and. Bryuamman ANY DEStGN EXECUTED TO CUSTOMER'S CHOICE. -,»RDFJR.S PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO Note the A.ddreu-u. W J Williams, Maiyfcra, YstradgyntMS \VAW/ ? ?t ??AV? Hi H Hi d? L?m? ?? ? Brynamman Bradford & I Manchester Warehouse Co. Are Now Showing First Delivery of New Spring Goods DON'T FAIL TO PAY US A VISIT. ALL GOODS ABSOLUTELY ROCK BOTTOM PRICES. Serges from I/I5 to 6/11 per yd. Welsh Tweed Suitings 5/11 per yd. Tweeds from 1/3. Ladies' Costume Suitings from 2/3 to 4/11. DON'T FORGET NEW ADDRESS- 12 Gower-st., SWANSEA Opposite Mount Pleasant Baptist Chapel, late 22, Waterloo Street. | JOHNSTON 1 FOR Garden Seeds Finest Quality at Moderate Prices. Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. 27, Oxford Street, Swansea Telephone: 567 Central. A man's thigh was smashed and a lady's leg broken in a collision between a m otor-cycle and motor-car at Newn- ham, Gloucestershire. Easter Monday should always be second Monday in April, and Whit-Mon- day first in June, saya Blackpool Chamber of Trade. Business before re- ligion. Pan Fyddwch yn Abertawe ac am GYVPANAID 0 DE neu GINIAW BLASUS Y He goreu i chwi fyned yw i'r HOTEL MONICO, > 33 HIGH STREET. YstalfeJl eang, gysurus at wasanaeth Un- debau, Gwib-gyrcb Ysgolion Sul, etc. PERGHESOGES: MRS. A. E. RICHARDS Priaoedd rhad, a'r gwaa&naoth Korea. "Your Treatment made me a New Man. I am grate- ful." —extract from letter from a patient whose case was termed hopeless by two medical men. This is the season, of the year when you feel "run down" and "out of sorts." I charge nothing for advice, and my reputation is of 40 yeci