Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

 -?.?**?*ogoofooo.o.oooe?oooolC?o ogo. Uoo*o0g 0*0*ooo*o0o6e04o6**o*"MoOo**Oo*oo SS:SSSSSSS:SSSSSS2:SSSSSSSS2:SSSSSSSS2SSKSSSSS?:?0??2SSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SSS'SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSX      ¡FURNITURE Under to?o F SS I F. JAY&CO. | 'jF ?<. JT rA iV l ? OC f?tUf? t | CASH or CREDIT FURNISHERS 1 ? M? or CREDIT F??V/S?/P-S  CASH or CREDIT FURNISHERS o.o0"s J Having purchased the Stock of Messrs. Ii g Alsop, Son and Hammond, Cabinet Makers, fi if Bristol (in liquidation), are offering some g f o# ] Rare Bar g ains at Less than | Manuf acturer's Cost e I IS #° ? See our Window To-day. Judge for Yourselves.  ) F. JAY?CO. ) 1 1 eo ? Cash or Credit Furmshers. g 80 j 34, Hi?h St., Swrnea j ? Catalogues and Delivery Free. !§ H ? o *US* o o.o. .o.o o.. o- -O.o* o, ?SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS:SSSSSSMSSSSSSSSSS?KS?SSSS!SSSSSSSSKSSSK3S?SSKKSK?SSSSS?SSS?SSS?S

FROM LABOURS STANDPOINT

FROM LABOUR'S STANDPOINT. THE I.L.P ELECTION FUND. Two questions 01 grave  to the future well-being of the Party, were discussed at the coming of age conference of the I.L.P., held in Brad- ford, a report of which appeared in our last week's issue. The foremost of these was the question of the Parlia- mentary Fund. The statement of the treasurer, Mr. T. D. Benson, to the effect that there was not a penny in hand with which to fight the General Election, an event which might take place within the next three months, must have fallen on the delegates, as well as the general movement through- out the United Kingdom, like a bombshell. It is inconceivable that this fact should not have been made known months ago, and a desperate attempt made to replenish the de- pleted exchequer. The present state of affairs must not be allowed to con- tinue for a singl-e moment, and we trust that the shilling levy to be made on all members of the Party, will be com- menced immediately, and that all con- cerned will make an immediate re- sponse. That a political organisation of the nature of the I.L.P. should have a perfectly empty election ex- chequer at the present critical juncture is nothing short of disastrous. SOCIALIST UNITY. I .LL The discussion which ensuea on we Socialist Unity proposals also merits attention. As we have previously in- dicated, there has been formed, at the ougestion of the International Socialist Bureau, a temporary committee repre- sentative of the I.L.T., the British So- cialist Party, and the Fabian Society, the object being to set up an Executive Council of the three bodies for the pur- pose of taking united action on matters of importance appertaining to the movement in the United Kingdom. Already joint demonstrations have taken place in London and the pro- vinces with distinct success, and there is reasonable ground for hope that a permanent agreement will eventually be arrived at. The conference dele- gates last week carried by a large ma- jority a resolution providing that, with the object of securing unity on the basis of common action within the Labour Party, the representatives of the three organisations should lay be- j fore the Labour Party Conference next year a proposal providing for any can- didate who may wish it to describe him- self as a Labour Socialist candidate. This provision is insisted on by the B.S.P. and we see no reason why it should not be conceded. Mr. Egerton Wake, of Barrow, an honoured propagandist in the I.L.P., astonished his supporters by speaking against the proposal, and we think he is much mistaken in believing that it will "throw open the door to dissen- tions and threaten to paralyse the 1 L.P." The proceedings at the B.S.P. sa.ther?, which took place in London, completely disarmed such fears. The propœal for unity was received with cordial'ity and by a considerable ma-  the question was referred to a f r,? the financial members lor their S of rn'r. -» f-o for vry de- riSSh«pe that umty wll ha™ been firmly MttAMfih? next year. TWO BIG STRIKES.. It is ?t;sf?ryto nu? VHOU _u W It is 8a.tisf dication that the gr4?at London ¡;eifdtndication that the g"¡; during the dmg õtrike will be BetHed pute has b'xt few days. The a; ?eeks, and wa? provoke d by t great Master'B Ii'"°voked by the two .ks, and w m progre6S for twe1v-e who insisted that Ullder's organisations, "¡gn a form biudive, employee should in case of future 6 -'them to a penaJty ??nanny refused rlto as. The men in- selves thus, ? the enslave them- ?y were deprived of result was that many efforts Work. ? a _ai agreement durin tot arrive lit ?ns no pr?cal resjt e past two tut ?t week-end, a mee accrued, National Joint Conoiliation ung of the p l ace, and a oasM of oettl oard took T?ch'ed, which, if accept.¡'n"'t was rasters, will ensure peace, WitY tho our, to the men. The work hon- $owever, l?repared to hold out un:' are, vaaetoro' Wvw ? ?t???y, but the indications of a long spell of fine wea- ther (so essential to the building trade), will no doubt materially influence the employers to settle the dispute as quickly as possible. So far as the Yorkshire coal strike is concerned, the trouble is virtually-over, and by a large majority the men de- cided upon resuming work. They had very real grievances in regard to the evasion of the Minimum Wage Act, but the men would have been wise in ac- cepting the advice of the leaders rather than forcing a strike before the ques- tion had been considered by the M.F.G.B. The return to work has been made on the assurance that the dispute will receive the immediate at- tention of the Conciliation Board. THE NEW FEUDALISM. Many ot our readers are acquainted with the great difficulty experienced by officials of the Agricultural Labourers' Union in organising the workers on the soil. The condition under which these men and their families are compelled to exist are notoriously bad, but the lowness of the men's wages, together with the intimidation practised by the landlords and farmers, are effectual barriers against the spread of trade unionism in the country districts. This has been well demonstrated dur- ing the past few days. About seventy labourers on the estate of Lord Lil- ford, Northants, have been persuaded to join the union, but the news reach- ing the ears of their employer, My Lord issued a decree threatening dismissal of the men unless they resigned from the union. This alternative meant, of course, the loss of home, as well as livelihood, and the majority of the men withdrew from the union, but several persisted in their membership, and have received notice to quit from their em- ployer. Mr. Lascelles, Lord Lilford's agent, said they did not object to the men belonging to the union; all they said was that they would not employ union men. We would suggest that Lord Lilford should be compelled to live the life of one of his labourers for six months. It would be a kindness in disguise for a Tory autocrat of his out- look. PEER WELCOMES DEPORTEES. The announcement that Lord vvil- loughby de Broke, an aristocrat of the aristocrats, who has attained notoriety as a "Die Hard" Peer of the first rank, had consented to preside at a meeting held on Monday evening in Bourne- mouth for the purpose of welcoming two of the South African deported leaders, was hardly taken seriously when first published. Yet he fulfilled the engagement, and thus aroused still greater amazement, tinged with an ele- ment of humour. The sight of a man who fought to the very last ditch the Parliament Act, attending a La- bour meeting to protest against the despotism of Smuts and Botha, is surely a little too much for serious thought. It is stated that Lord Hugh Cecil wired regretting his inability to attend the meeting, but expressed unqualified condemnation of the action of the South African Government, in exiling the nine leaders. We cannot help think- ing that something lies behind this co- quetting with the Labour Party by the blue blooded Tories, who usually delight in attempting to frustrate every mea- sure of progres3 at IVekstminster. I G. A. G.

ITROUBLE IN WELSH BAND

I TROUBLE IN WELSH BAND. NEW REGULATIONS MAY CAUSE MEN TO RETIRE. A forty years' association with the band  the Welsh Howitzer Brigade wi th the regiment is in danger of being 3 ZTZ' There has been disunion among InemWs of the band at Swan- sea +i? e ren being apparently that re- cently the bandsmen received instruc- tions that they were to undertake the .nine drill duties as other members of the corps. They have been told that unless they do this they will not be re- ?bursed for their seven or fourteen days' ??dance at camp. The bands- men re^ !l this enforcement of the ordiers. ne Already weve of the oldest mem- b? have ..ignifi:d their intention not ,gnoa?n.

II I South Wales Labour ChairmenI I

I I South Wales Labour Chair- men" I As a sequel to the many successes achieved by Labour candidates at the dis- trict council elections comes the election of several Labour chairmen of the new councils. Risca (Western Monmouthshire) already claims to possess the most democratic council in the South Wales coalfield. One of its enterprises has been the erection of some 250 workmen's cottages. It has had one Labour chairman in the person of Mr Alfred Onions, treasurer of the I South Wales Miners' Federation. At the last election there were further successes, and last night Councillor John Powell, I chairman for the last eight years of the Risca Miners' Lodge, was chosen to pre- side over the district council. He has been a member of the council since 1907, and has always had large majorities. He has been a member of the Monmouthshire County Council for some years. Another Monomouthshire Labour leader is Councillor John Phillips, secretary of the Monmouthshire Labour Party, and a prominent miners' representative, who has been elected chairman of the Aber- tiUery District Council on which he has sat for five years. Previously Mr Phillips served six years as a Poor-law guardian. He has teen identified with sanitation reform and the establishment of the first school clinic in the district. Councillor Evan, Davies, the new chair- man of the Ebbw Vale Council, the authority for a district with 40,000 in- habitants, is also a miners' leader for 18 years a committeeman for the largest pit in the district, and for eight years chair- man of the Ebbw Vale district of miners. It was on his personal guarantee that the tradespeople of the district advanced E6,000 to the miners' lodge for strike pay, when funds ran out at the time. of the great strike. No one is better trusted in the district. He has lately been chairman of the Education Committee.

i AMUSING COURT SCENE I

AMUSING COURT SCENE There was an .musing incident at the Old Bailev on Tuesday during the trial of John Kane (47). for burglary, before the Recorder (Sir Forrest Fulton). When evidence of previous convictions I ha-d been given the prisoner asked whether he was to be punished again for offences for which he had already be-en punished. "I was tried before by a man named Sir Forrest Fultoa, and I didn't have half a chance," he added, innocently unconscious of the fact that he was ad- dressing the remark to Sir Forrest Ful- toon himself, while the court laughed. ) Whsn he realised the situation, he raid: "I didn't know you were the man. I didn't know vou were Sir Forrest Fult&n. I must make an apology to you." (Laughter). The Recorder passed sentence of 12 months' hard labour, and the prisoner muttered "Lumme, he was the man." —————

I j TINPLATE WORKS PURCHASED I

TINPLATE WORKS PURCHASED. — The Aberdulais Tinplate Works and plant, which were offered for sale on the 8th inst. by Messrs. W. Harry Rees and Son, have now been sold by private I' treaty to Mr Evan Taylor for £ 6,000. Mr Taylor was lately of the Wern. Tin- plate Co. Ltd., and he, together with other local gentlemen, wil form a new company, and as soon as the necessary repairs a.nd alterations have been com- pleted, the works will again be put in full swing. «<«>»

IGENERAL SIR R BADEN POWELL WELCOMED AT SWANSEA

I GENERAL SIR R. BADEN POWELL WELCOMED AT SWANSEA ¡ General Sir Robert Baden-Powell visited Swansea, on Monday In connection with his appeal on behalf of the Scout movement. He was accorded a splendid welcome. Lady Baden-Powell accom- panied him, and a crowd received them on their arrival from Cardiff. Subsequently Sir Robert addressed the Swansea commercial men at the Rcyal In- stitution, and the place was crowded. He denied that tfoare was any military or political significance attaching to the Scout movement, and also said that the health and physique of our boys had b,ii sadly neglected in the past. The General later inspected the local Scout units in the Guildhall Yard. +++++■

IEVEN A JUDGE STAGGERED

I EVEN A JUDGE STAGGERED "Good Lord!" was the ejaculation to which Judge Scully succumbed at St. Albans' County Court on Monday when he was told that agricultural labourers in the district worked for 3d. an hour and not 4d., as had been suggested by a witness in the case under considera- tion. "Do you mean to say," asked the Judge, "that men are working at the rate of 3d. an hour "Yes." replied the witness. "They are getting 14s. a week, and that will give you a little idea." It was then that the Judge delivered himself of the expressive comment al- ready quoted.

IEXAMINATION OF MINES j

EXAMINATION OF MINES. EAST GLAMORGAN BALLOT ON WHOLE TIME APPOINTMENTS. The East Glamorgan district of miners containing about 10,000 mem- bers of the federation are balloting this week on the appointment of whole- time colliery examiners. The collieries in the district are at Senghenydd, Abertridwr. Pendllta (near Ystradmy- nach), Llanbradaeh, Pentwyn, and Bed- was, all in the Rhymney Valley. Since the Senghenydd explosion miners have desired that permanent ex- aminers should be appointed under Clause 16 of the Coal Mines Act, 1911, and that a general district fund should be created to which should be contri- buted the money now expended by the various lodges to meet the cost of pre- sent examinations. It was proposed to appoint two ex- aminers, but four may be necessary if a monthly examination of all the work- ings of each colliery is to be carried out. — I

No title

Mrs. Sarah Hobson, who was over, a hundred years of age, has died in Da- < ventry Workhouse, of which she had been an inmate for several years. I

FUSION OF THE BIG UNIONS

FUSION OF THE BIG UNIONS RAILWAYMEN AND MINERS TO CO-OPERATE. THE PROPOSED JOINT AGREEMENT. Mr. A. Bellamy, president of the Na- tional Union of Railwaymen, and Mr. Vernon Hartshorn, who is one of the members of the National Executive of the Miners' Federation of Great Bri- tain, addressed a mass meeting of rail- waymen at Tondu on Sunday, and both referred to the conference which will be held in London on Thursday next between the Executives of the National Union of Railwaymen, the Miners' Fe- deration, and Transport Workers' Fe- deration for the purpose of drawing up a scheme of co-operative support be- tween the three organisations in fur- therance of their demands for improve- ments in wages and conditions of em- ployment. Mr. J. Tanner presided over a large attendance. MOST TRAGIC STORY IN HISTORY. Mr. Vernon Hartshorn said the greatest movement in the industrial history of this country was now being developed. Never before had there been so much preparation undertaken by the working classes. Trade Union- ists were calmly but dcttrmi- edly mak- ing their preparations for the events which would be upon them at no dis- tant date. The workers were develop- ing aspirations which were unthought of a few years ago, and were raising problems which would involve in their solution a complete reorganisation of the commercial and industrial system. Whether the present economic system was to continue or to be overthrown won la be determined very largely by its ability to adapt itself to the needs and aspirations of the working classes. The history of working class struggle constituted possibly the most tragic story in the literature of the world. Labour had all through the ages been doing the useful work and rendering all the useful services, but had had only a small share of the fruits of its in- dustry. But the workers were now making up their minds that in future they would have a much larger share. That meeting was being held on the eve of one of the most important events in the history of industrial develop- ment, namely the conference between the railwaymen, miners, and transport workers, to consider joint action in re- spect of their various demands. It did not require very much thought or intelligence to realise that a combina- tion between these three great bodies of workers would possess more power than any Government had ever pos- essed in this or any other country. The miners alone by their national strike of 1912 were able to force the Government to do something which they had not intended to do. If the miners alone could force the hands of I the Government it went-without saying that with a working arrangement with the railwaymen and transport workers they would be able to exercise still greater pressure. f WORKERS' POWER NOT BRUTE il FORCE. But the workers must realise that this increased power meant increased responsibilities. It would require more loyalty on the part of the men towards their leaders, and more discipline among .he rank and file than had yet been brought about in the Trade Unions. The idea that seemed to be prevalent, even among railwaymen, that it was a good thing to indulge in sporadic strikes must be completely eradicated from the minds of the workers, and in its place there must grow up a con- j sciousness that progress was to be j sought not along those lines, but along 1 lines that would eventually bring the j whole power of the organisation into play. The new power, which he sin- cerely hoped might bo brought into be- ing in the near future, might be used for either of two purposes. It might result in great good, it might result j in great ill. The kind of result would depend upon the wisdom with which the new power was wielded. There was one essential condition to success. j The workers must clearly understand that the power which they were about to exercise was not the power of armed revolution or brute force, but the power of economic pressure, which would bring home to the minds of the em- ploying and possessing classes the con- viction that the toilers were absolutely indispensable. But the workers must also realise that it was not sufficient for them to be organised industrially. They must be organised politically also if they were to be really effective. (Ap- nlausel. 1 A BIG POLITICAL UPHEAVAL. There was an amalgamation between the miners, railwaymen, and transport workers, and if that force came into conflict with the employers, Parlia- ment would be bound to intervene, whether the men wished it or not. If 1 the men were wise they would not! merely force their industrial problems: on to the floor of the House of Com- I mons, and then hand them over for! solution to the "gaffers," but they would send their own men there to I finish the job properly. (Applause). He thought the present big industrial movement was bo and to result in a big political upheaval as well. (Ap- plause). Mr. E. Moles, signalman, moved, and Mr. I. John, president of the Garw miners' district, seconded, a resolution urging the executive of the N.U.R. to use all the resources at their disposal to secure for railwaymen an eight hours' day and a substantial increase in wages, and to bring about a close working arrangement with the miners j and transport workers; also to spare l no effort to bring about a complete amalgamation of all railway Trade I Unions into the N.U.R. (Continued at bottom ot next oolumn-)

FUSION OF THE BIG UNIONS

(Continued from preceding oolumn). I MR. BELLAMY. I Mr. A. Bellamy supported the reso- lution, and spoke on the relations be- tween the N. U.R. and S.L.E. and F. in connection with the negotiations with the railway companies regarding a new Conciliation Board scheme. Mr Bellamy said that the great increase in the number of Trade Unionists on the railway was bringing about a marked change in the attitude of the directors towards the men's organisation. Representatives of the N.U.R. had already met the seven general man- agers on the subject of the- new scheme and the representatives of the Asso- ciated Society had met them the day after. But he submitted that if the best interests of the railwaymen were to be served there ought not to be two parties negotiating at separate times with the railway companies. (Ap- plause). The Conciliation Board ma- chinery would cease on the 1st De- cember next, and the railwaymen had already indicated the outlines of the reforms they wanted. The companies had suggested that the N.U.R. should bring forward joint proposals with the Associated, but there had been a split between the two organisations on the rock of sectionalism. He believed in organisation by industries, and that all grades engaged on the railways should be members of one Union. (Applause). j The N. U.R. could not consent to the proposal that there should be one se- parate board for drivers, firemen, and cleaners alone, because that would split up the men.

IUDEPonTEES AT NEWPORT I

I UDEPonTEES" AT ) NEWPORT. MR. W. BRACE, M.P. ON DEMOCRACY. Mr. W. Brace, M.P., presided on Friday evening at a meeting held at Newport under the auspices of the New- port Trades Council, at which Messrs. Mason and Watson, two of the nine Labour leaders from South Africa, were present. There were also on the plat- form Mr. H. W. Dinham (chairman of the Council), members of the Execu- tive, and others. The chairman said the mind of the ordinary man rebelled at the action of General Botha's Government, but it was simply a demonstration of the spirit now prevailing among the privi- leged classes, not only in South Africa but in this country as well. The mis- take of the democracy was that they under-rated the determination and courage of those who were opposed to them. The success of the democratic movement would be determined by the amount of self-sacrifice that was made for the cause. (Hear, hear). He (the chairman) had been called easy going. (Laughter). That might be so in mat- ters of unimportant detail, but when he was faced with a fundamental principle affecting the welfare of the people he was always prepared to assert himself. Messrs. Mason and Watson, who were given a hearty reception, then ad- dressed the meeting. Mr. James Winstone moved a reso- lution welcoming the deported Trade Unionists, protesting against the action of the South African Government, and pledging the meeting to assist the de- portees to return. Mr. George Jack- son seconded, and the resolution was carried. 0

IMinimum Wage AveragesJ

Minimum Wage Averages J STILL NO DECISION I The Welsh Coal Board held its month- ly meeting at Cardiff on Monday, Mr F. L. Davis presiding over the owners' representatives, and Mr W. Brace, M.P., presiding over the workmen's representa- tives. HOLIDAY FOR MAY DAY. I ine workmen s represen uit,i v es made an application that the workmen should be granted the u&ual holiday for the pur- pose of holding their demonstrations in the different districts, and the owners agreed to this on the understanding that at least seven days' notice is given to the coalowners in the different districts of the day to be taken by the workmen as a demonstration holiday. It was arranged that disputes at several collieries should be referred to representa- tives for investigation and with power to settle. The only question of general interest had reference to the suggestion made by the workmen's representatives that an- other effort should he made to effect an agreement in regard to the period recog- nised for averaging the wages of piece- workers under the Minimum Wage Act. It will be remembered that it has been held' by the courts that the rule made by the independent' chairman fixing on a fort- night is ultra vires and that previous ef- forts to settle the point had proved abor- tive. But, while both sides were agreed to limit the period to one week, differ- ences arose as to the conditions which should accompany the adoption of this shorter period. The workmen's representatives put for- ward the proposal that the week should be unconditional; that is, that each week should be independent of the other. The owners' representatives, on the other hand ,in view of the limitation of the period, argued that there should be some accompanying safeguards. It was main- tained that it was quite possible for the coal-hewer during the week he was under the minimum to perform all the necessary unremunerative work, and thctt on the immediately succeeding week, when he would be above the minimum, he would be reaping the full advantage of this work, notwithstanding that the cutting price for for coal included payment for dead work. No agreement was arrived at, and the workmen's representatives agreed to put their proposal in writing for consideration at the next meeting of the board. CYNON COLLIERY DISPUTE I ? 1 ? I in regard to the musunaersfwuKiing as to the piecisie terms of the agreement ar- rived at by Mr Evan Williams, (represent- ing the owners ) and Mr William Brace, M.P. (representing the workmen), in settlement of the protracted dispute back to the same two gentlemen to deal with the two representatives being vested with full power to decide finally all the pointe at issue.

Advertising

fat oip* r. pp Ilk Eli <4 gdine -Xaficto I occtb f§e Aeari of Wan." iSwf 12ou must caff at 1fe gifde ,,C3A;wine f?oppe 1 o. 10 wansea Wo proioe it THE OLD WIVES AT TEA. Mrs. JONES IDdeed you must excuse me for being so long with the tea. The fire had gone low, you see, and I couldn't get the kettle to boil. Mrs. EVANS Why don't you get the gas in, Mrs. Jones; it would save you heaps of work, and be a big comfort too, with your weak eyes. Mrs. JONES: Merch fach i, I have lived to go without it, and bring up a family of tea, and I am too old now to bother about things like that. Mrs. EVANS: Yes, my dear, but you don't know how much easier it is to do your cooking, without making a mess of the fireplace. Mrs. THOMAS And so clean it is. Before the Tawe Gas Co. put in a stove for us, I had to clean my fireirons and fende; every day, and blacklead the fireplace twice a week. Now I have only to wipe them over. It is so much nicer. Mrs. EVANS And it is so cheap. We can cook a dinner for seven, and it only costs a penny. Mrs THOMAS: They put in a penny-in-the-slot meter for us, a stove and three lights, for nothing. The gas is much better than the messy old lamps and candles. Mrs. JONES Will they put it in for nothing ? Mrs. EVANS: Yes, merch i; just send a post-card to the Gas Works, Pontardawe, or to the Office at Yetalyfera, and they will send a man up at once, and the stove and lights will be fixed up in no time. Mrs. JONES Then indeed I think I will de it as soon as we have finished tea. Because I do believe my eyes would be better if we had gas instead of the eld-fashion lam ps. For particulars, drop a Post Card to the 1 MANAGER, GAS WORKS, PONTARDAWE. -e

No title

Miss Sylvia Pankhuret, who recently lectured at Vienna on votes for women, and was refused permission by the police to speak at Dresden, started for Bud"t, and has D re,? sd en, started for Budapest, and hae had an unpleasant experience in Hungary. It is reported that during the journey she was the victim of an ingenious thief, who robbed her of about CU.

I AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOL0

I AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOL. .0 At a meeting of the governors of the newly sanctioned Ammanford intermedr iate school it was reeolved to proceed forthwith with the erection of a bnilding of a temporary nature at a oost of £3,803, which, with other work neoessary, will make a total of sssl3. It is expected that the school will be opened the first or eeoond week is September next.