Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Study economy and go in for a Blue. ♦ Serge Suit. But mind you have a ? Lier apnon Serge, regd. by G. C. DEAN. The Tailor: Guaranteed to stand sea or sun. The Suit to order 37/6, 42/ 1 45/ 5°/ 55/ ». 63/ 70/ return fare paid within 20 miles .+ of Swansea to any customer. pl,-Icitig an order for a Suit 2 or Raincoat. ♦  Please Note the Address ? 22, Castle Street, Swansea. + .+.

Advertising

"We have had good results + from advertising in Labour ? Voice "-Swansea Trades- ♦ ? man. Name on ♦ ♦ man. Name on application. I ? { { ? j| ? Do you want good results ?  i If so, Advertise in X ♦ LLAIS LLAFUR." J I 1 

Officials Fighting SpeechI

Official's Fighting Speech I References were made at the Derby Lodge of the Derbyshire Miners' Associa- tion on Saturday to the great loss sus- tained by the death of Mr W. E. Harvey, M.P., and the chairman, Mr Cooper, said he did not agree with Mr Martin, who contested, the &eat in the interests of Lab- our, refusing to h.a.ve anything to- do with the Liberal Party. This brought Mr Sewell, a miners' official of Eckington, to his feet. He said that the ejection in North-East DertAsMre had shown that the miners were a lone to blame for the position they were in. MT Frank Hall, seereta-ry of the Derby- shire .Miners' Association, said that by .a najcrity of 11,250 Derbyshire miiners had dcoided that the policy of the Lab- our Party should be the association's politics. "And then." he declared with some heat., "some of you have the cheek to tell us that you do not know how the -change has been brought about, when you your&elves have been actually re- sponsible for it. There n eed not be any mincing of words on this." One of tho causes of the association's failure, he continued, was that they neglected to organise their electoral machinery when they declared for an in- dependent policy, with the result that a sudden emergency found, them quite un- prepared. To-day there were three political parties, and the Labour Party, as distinct from the Liberal Party, had come to stay. They had a large number of miners in the Conservative camp and a large num- ber in the Liberal camp, and therefore, it was imperative the association should have a policy of its own. WHAT MR BRACE THINKS. I A SCURRILOUS CAMPAIGN. I Writing m a South Wales journal on Wednesday, Mr Wm. Brace, M.P., ob- served I have taken part in a number of Par- liamentary contests, loth as a candidate and. as an assistant to others, but I do not remember a contest in which such scurrilous leaflets and other forms of electioneering literature were issued as was done on behalf of the Liberal candi- dature in North-East Derby. It is freely stated that this was done for the purpose of creating a revolt among the inembers of the Derbyshire Mineirs' Association against th&Mv Waders because they de clined to allow Sir Arthur Markham, M.P., auid other to control the political policy of their Trade Union. That is has created bitterness of feeling goes with- out spying, and the result more than justifies the wisdom of the Chief Liberal Whip's Office in London in refusing to have anything to do with the attempt to deprive Labour of its right to a clear run against the Tory nominee, in North- east Derby. I notice it is claimed be- cause a Liberal whip was found in the pocket of Mr Harvey after his death that perforce he must haVíe classified himself, and was classified in the Whip's Offioe, as a Liberal member. The short explanation is that the Chief Liberal Whip, out of courtesy, had handed to Mr. Harvey as he left the House of Commons each night the whip of the following day. This was meant as nothing more or less than a kindly act by the Chief Whip towards a man w ho for many years had been an active Literal. There was no political significance in receiving that whip at all, and th:s is very patent when it is renumbered that Mr Harvey not only rtcoived the whin of tjh. L.a,bour party, bd r gnla.; ly attended. the Thurs- day meetings of the Labour members in' the House of Commons right up to the verv end. I 

T A noURS LITTLE WARS 1

T. A -noUR'S LITTLE WARS. 1 y ord?r to prevent a strike of 2,000 ?nion? ?iMt 50 non-Unionists, ? Tn?nAcement of the Trehafod Col-  SU to ?cw the lan-TTni™- ist/ to des?na the mine. This action shows some »ig™> <* 

No title

n„+ of &profits on ?" P? ? ?t?itv. 'f"e ?ott.?h? C?- < ALD(I 0,. e 'etricitv. -pomtion ,Ot?d M.OOO in relief? local 'Tate«.

INDEPENDENT CHAIRMAN J I

INDEPENDENT CHAIRMAN. MR. HARTSHORN ON A NEW ECONOMIC PROBLEM. THE FUNCTION OF CO-PARTNER- SHIP. In a recent declaration, Mr. A. Bel- lamy, J.P., president of the National Union of Ra.ilwa.ymen, said that in the new agreement the railwaymen might make when the present one comes to an end at the close of the year, there ought to be provision for the appoint- ment of independent chairmen from the class to which the workers belong, or the railway men should have noth- ing to do with independent chairmen drawn from the capitalistic classes. This declaration is endorsed by Mr. Vernon Hartshorn, who, writing on Saturday, declared that it was the position which will sooner or later be adopted by every Trade Union in the land if the movement for the economic emancipation of the wage earneis is to meet with real success. The political and industrial cause of the workers, is continued in Maesteg leader, gradually moving in the direc- tion of taking out of the hands of the employers the almost absolute power which they have possessed in the past of fixing the wages in the in- dustries which they own and control. The Trade Unions have achieved a con- siderable measure of success in restrict- ing the power of the employers over the wages in their own industries, and the Labour Party are beginning to write an economic Magna Cliarta, for the working classes which will give them a legal right to enforce standard rates of wages which shall be fixed from time to time, not by the owners, with their individualistic point of view and their arbitrary powers, but by the views of social justice prevailing from time to time in a democratic commun- ity. A FALLACY EXPLODED. Mr. Hartshorn thus exposes the fal- lacy of "independent" chairmen of con- ciliation and wages boards, appointed in the past:—The old, crude opposition of the employers to conciliation boards and wages boards is being modified,, and many prominent employers are now advocating these tribunals as the very best means for the adjustment of grievances arising between the work- men and the capitalists. This is be- cause the employers are coming to re- cognize that it does not matter to them what machinery is set up for dealing with the claims of the work- men so long as they are certain that the fixing of wages shall remain in the hands of the capitalistic class. And the control of wages is secured to the employers as a class, though not as indiviciuals, by the independent chair- man being drawn, without exception, from the class to which the employers themselves belong. Until the workers can break down this new caste of independent chair- men drawn from classes in economic antagonism to the wage earners a very narrow limit is set to the amount of benefit that the workers can secure from conciliation and wages boards so constituted. Our fight in the past has been against the capitalist, as a direct employer, and our elforte in that direc- tion have been w far successful that the champions of the capitalistic sys- tem have been forced in many in- stances to change their name in order to try and evade our onslaughts. In many industries the employer has been forced practically to surrender his powers as the ultimate arbiter of wages and his place has been taken by the independent chairman. FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS. The important consideration for us in the working of the conciliation and wages boards is not so much what is the name or the functions of the mind placed in ultimate control of that machinery for settling wages, but what is the bias of that mind, what is its training, it-s quality, and above all its class outlook ? I for one believe that wages boards have come to stay for a very long time, and that they form the scaffolding within which the structure of a new industrial economic organisa- tion will be built up. There are many social reformerthe Bishop of Llan- da.ff being among them, I believe—who coneider that the ultimate solution of the difficulties which arise between Ij&- bour and Capital is to be found in co- partnership. THE PLACE OF CO-PARTNERSHIP. I believe in co-partnership as a stage: in the transition of industrialism from private to public ownership. But not the so-oalled co-partnership in which the private owner remains in predom- inant control, and in which the inter- este of the workmen are restricted to the passible receipt of a bonus and the men themselves, are nqt associated directly in the control of the industry. Buoh a form of co-partnetrship at all, and the much-belauded bonus i8 only deferred wages. Such a form of co- partnership is nothing but a delusion and a snare. The only form of co- partnership which can be acceptable from the standpoint of the working man is one in which the workmen are at least equally associated with the em- Ployem, as rooogtiired partners in the control and direction of the industry and the fixing of wages. I believe such a form of nsoociation is inevitable as a transitiona-ry phase of capitalism, and that in all probability such a state of things will be brought about by a (Continued at bottom of next eoiumn-i

INDEPENDENT CHAIRMAN J I

(Continued from preceding column) change in the constitution of the Con- ciliation and Wages Boards. Only by a change in this direction can capital- ism adjust itself to the irras.istable social forces which are now at work, without running the risk of being overwhelmed by an industrial revolution. By asso- ciating the workmen more and more with the control of industry and by giving them more and more power in settling wages and working conditions by their own standards can society paes peacefully from the present selfish and degrading economic system to one more adaprtod to the needs of the age and the ideals of the democracy. CHAIRMAN DRAWN FROM I LABOUR RANKS. The conciliation and wage boards are destined to be the real controlling authorities as regards the details of wages and working conditions in the industries for which such bodies are set up, but they will be subject, of course, to the general plan of indus- trial organisation as settled from time to time by Parliament, acting as the central authority in the interests of t,he general community. But as the proletariat become more educated and class-conscious they will not tolerate the preponderating influence now possessed by the capitalist classes on these boards, and one of the first re- forms will have to be the selection of independent chairman drawn from the ranks of labour as well as the ranks of capitalism. We must create an at- titude of mind in the community which shall regard the põlicy of draw- ing industrial arbitrators from one class only as absolutely preposterous. It is only because long tradition has infected the whole community with the capitalistic bias that the idea of ex- cluding Labour men from acting as industrial arbitrators or independent chairmen has been so long tolerated. Such an idea is really outrageous when I you think of it impartially.

SUNDAY REST BILLI 1

SUNDAY REST BILL I Killed by Liberal Coalowner I By a majority of 12 the House of Commons refused a second reading to the Weekly Rest Day Bill, which had the support of Mr. J. H. Thomas, Mr. Walter Hudson, and other Labour M.P.'s. The Bill was intended to secure one day's rest in seven for the workers, and the decisive speech against it was made by Mr. Handel Booth, M.P., the Liberal coalowner, who represents Pontefract. He fastened on details of the Bill which could have been easily amended in Committee. We have been treated to early- Christian-martyr sort of essays," scoffed the Liberal coalowner. "Under the very first clause, he said, "if two working men were on their allotments on Sunday morning and one wanted to exchange a red geranium with the other, he could not do it. (Laughter). "You can go to a chemist or a. doe- tor; but if a man has toothache he must wait patiently till Monday morn- ing. "There's an extra half-hour for the 1 purchase of milk," went on Mr. Booth, "but you must not buy new-laid eggs! "At his club a member may have a hot meal on Sunday and drinks with it, but he must buy 'no smoking re- quisites or sweetmeats.' After dinner we should find members going round the room trying to cadge a cigar!" (Loud laughter). In strong contrast to this persiflage was an earnest dignified appeal by Mr. J. H. Thomas on behalf of railwaymen. He said that there were thousands of railwaymen working Sunday after Sun- day. The railway companies would work men seven days a week, but not the horses; because if a horse died they had to buy another, but if a man died there were applicants for his work. There was often more consi deration shown to horses than to men. It was unfair and demoralising to compel a man to work on Sunday, when that work could have been done on any other day in the week. W < —————

I SHOTFIRING IN MINES

I SHOT-FIRING IN MINES IMPORTANT CLAUSE IN THE ACT SUGGESTED. When the Northumberland Miners' As- sociation Council met during the week- end at Newcastle, Mr Ashing ton's resolu- tion that the men's representatives meet the owners' representatives with the view of getting an allowance to be s'own on the pay checks, instead of col- liery houses, was defeated by 54 yot s to 14. From New Delval a resolution came ask- ing coalowners to restore the short shifts lost by night workers through Lhe intro- duction of the Eight Hours Act and sug- gesting that should the eque,r. be re- fused a ballot be taken for a st-r-"l on the matter. This was by 35 to 20, the council supporting ihje resolution, tiit owing to the âepIe-Led funds of the assoc iation not favouring a ballot for a strike. By 42 votes to 21 the Ashlngton resolu- tion (that the association transfer the scholarships tenable at Ruskin College to the Central Labour College was defeated. A resolution from Blacker pit urging that an endeavour be made to get a ciause inserted in the Mines Act restricting shot- firing to night time or when, the least number of men were down the pits was CMried by 47 votes to 5.

THE BLIGHT OF INTEMPERANCE

THE BLIGHT OF INTEMPERANCE. A GRAVE LOCAL PROBLEM. I To the Editor of "Llais Llafur." Sir.—I do not make it a general cus- tom to parade my views upon local mat- ters through the columns of the Press, but on this occasion, I do ask you to grant me the hosoitality of your columns in order t, draw the attention of the inhaijit.ant of Ystalyiera. and district to a loot., evil of grave in- tensity, one which if not. quickly checked, is calcu!ated to undermine the morale of the entire locality. I refer to the terrible growth of intemperance in our midst. I am quite sure that no one who hap- pened to be in the town late on Satur- day evening, and who has any sort of regard for the well-being of the people, could fail to be struck with the appal- ling number of intoxicated persons thronging the streets. Lads, yet in their teens, as weH as men and women of mature age, were to be seen on every hand, and in amazingly large numbers. Lest it be urged that Saturday was an exceptional doty,and that as the sports brought in many visitors who were responsible for the scenes I h;n e referred to, I may point out that the worst scenes were confined to the tin'e between 10 and II when all the • ns had departed conveying the visitors to ,their respective homes. No, these sights are to be witnessed every week. Saturday was not in any sense a re- markable exception, and it is a matter of the greatest astonishment to me that thos.9 who are supposed to be responsi- ble for the spiritual and moral well- being of the people are doing absolutely nothing to stem this awful tide of drunkenness, the existence of which no lone can deny. I am only too well aware of the fact that the evil is largely an economic one, that the conditions of labour are in a considerable measure responsible for this terrible state of affairs, yet I am none the less convinced that some ef- tfort ought to 00 made to stem the tide of excessive intemperance so ram- pant throughout the district. This is surely the duty of the churches! Might I suggest that the ministers, leading members, and Sunday School officials of the various j,us denominations should unite in the formation of a tem- perance society which would regard it as a paramont duty to seriously attempt the curtailing of all this drunkenness that is at present a disgrace to our neighbourhood ? Yours truly, I A YOUNG READER.

1 rIDULAIS VALLEY PARISH COUNICIL CHAIRMAN

1 — r IDULAIS VALLEY PARISH COUN- I CIL CHAIRMAN. To the Editor. Sir.—I have patiently watched your columns for the reply of Mr D. W. Thomas, the alleged chairman of the" Dul- ais Higher Parish Council, to the letters of his critics which apeared in "Llais Llafur" three weeks ago. I have watched and waited in vain. Yet I am not sur- prised to learn that Mr Thomas has failed to supply you with an answer. In view of the facta given ty "Onlooker," Mr D. J. Davits, and Mr W. E. Thomas in their letters, it is exceedingly difficult to know what the alleged chairman of the Council and his supporters really can say for themselves. The trend of all three letters I have referred to was to prove that Mr Davies was elected chairman of the Council, and remains ro to-day. Mr Thomas has failed to deny or to chal- lenge those statements. ABe we to take it therefore, that he has no reply to give ? If eo we shall expect that he will be- have as the honourable man. I and others have always believed him to be, and that at the next Council meeting, he will take his place as am ordinary member of the Council with Mr Daviea in the (hair. What has Mr Thomas him- self to say to this proposal ? Yours faithfully, "ONE WHO WANTS AN ANSWER" Severn Sisters. f To the Editor. SiT.—We have had brought before our notice a "cutting" from a recent issue of your paper in which appears a report of the attendance of a Mr. Coates at a Western Miners' District Meeting held at Swansea. The report gives Mr. Coates as being our representative; we think there must have been some mistake in this as Mr. Coates has not been appointed our representative. We may add that we understand that he is a practical miner, and he was quite a stranger to us but got to know of the Hailwood Combustion Tube Lamp with its high candle-power, small weight and first-class gas ietectimg pro- perties, and that he asked us if we would let him have a sample lamp, and this we readily agreed to do. He showed this to a number of mates and we understand that he was so taken up with it be felt that it was due to his comrades to show them what he called "the good thing he had come across. Anything he may have said at the meeting regarding the eltnc lamp has been said entirely on his own in- itiative, and to prevent misunder- standing as regards the report of his acting as our agent, we shall feel I obliged if you will kindly publish this letter. Yours faithfully, For Ackroyd and Best, Ltd., E. A. HAILWOOD, Manager 25th May, 1914. (Comtinned at bottDm of next column.)

1 rIDULAIS VALLEY PARISH COUNICIL CHAIRMAN

(Contdnued from preceding column) LATE TRAINS FOR THE VALLEY. To the Editor of "Llais Llafur." Sir.—I .notice in your Pontardawe news that the district euperontemdent of the Midland Railway is giving the matter of a late train up from Swansea his con- sideration. It is high time too! This part of the Midland Railway is probably the moat lucrative section of the whole of the Company's system, and it is a srying shame that we are treated so shabbily in the matter of convenient I trams. I hope other Chambers of Trade, and the local authorities, trade unions, and other influential public bodies will take the matter up, and induce the Mid- land Company to grant this and other reforms. I am, your etc., I J. R. JONES.

I OPENING BY BISHOP OF ST DAVIDS

I OPENING BY BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S DISTINGUISHED ASSEMBLY. Tuesday last was a. notable day in the history of Cclbren Church, for it marked the rc-openiiiig of this edifice after im- portant structural alterations and exten- s ions. The work which has keen in hand for several months, -was designed by Mr J. Cook Reeis, of Neath, a.nd has been carried out by Mr Henry Smith, contract- or, of Kidderminster. The alteration has resulted in an increase in the seating acoommodationi from 105 to 180, and has ooet roughtly £ 600. The ro-opening ceremony was performed by the Lord Bishop of St. David's, Dr. Owen, who also attended a luncheon in the schoolroom, prior to the ceremony, the caterers being Mr Shopland, of Prices' Arms. Mr J. B. G. Price presided at the luncheon, and .supporting him in ad- dition to the Bishop were Mr and Mrs. J. E. Moore-Gwyn, Dyffryn; Mr and Afrs. C. F. Gilbertson, Abercrave House; Mrs. Gough, Yniseedwynj House Mrs. Jenkin G. Hughes, Abercrave Mr Howell Price, Ongar, Essex), and a large number of local clergy including tIla Revs. J. G. Hughes, Abercrave; D. Hughes, Callw-en Og-wen Davies, Cray; J. Davies, Rural Dean, Devynock; J. Jones, and J. H. Harris, Ystradgynlais; and J. Secundus Jones, YstaJyfera. The Vicar of Colbretn ('Rev. John Williams) was unfortunately j unable to attend owing to illness. BISHOP'S ADDRESS At luncheon Mr Moore-Gwyn, J.P., proposed the heidth of the Bishop, and in replying His Lordship referred to the great efforts made in the diocese during the past three yearz, in regard to the building of new churches and the restora- tion of ?nde?t edifices. He looked for- ??ird to the future with confidence. In I regard to the present situation, as far as the Welsh Bill was concerned, he said he re?rett?d to read m tha press accounts of resolutions passed at various religious a.s-I sefmb!?ea 3?inst any concessions in the Welsh Bill. All th?t feverish excite- ment in passing drastic resolution showed that those who supported th Bill did not look to the future with very great confi- dence. They did not know, of course, what the future would bring forth, but he (his lordship) was quite certain that the ultimate fate of the Bill would not be settled in Parliament, but in the country. (Hear, hear). THE OPENING CEREMONY. Subsequently, Dr. OWfn ?onsecra.Lc? I the new burial ground, and the dewa-rd* the cost of the extensions, and we understand the collection on that (b.y win prac- I tically clear the expenditure made. I GIFTS TO THE CHURCH. Several handsome gifts have been made to the Church including a lectern by Messrs. J. B. G. Price airid Yaughan Rice Price; e-%ndleeticks !Itax desk, service books and mats by Mr and Mrs. Moore ) Gwyn, Dyffryn; cross and vases ty Mr and M. C. F. Gilbertson, Abercra.ve I House; Glastonbury cha.;r bv the children of the Rev. and J. Williamis, Col- bren books for reading desk, and mats by the Mothers' Union. I ——————

IPATHETIC NEAT DEFENCE

I PATHETIC NEAT" DEFENCE ABUSE OF HOUSE COAL SYSTEM. David Thomas, Union-court, Penydre, haulier, was charged at Neath on Fri- day with obtaining ooal by false pre- j tenets from the Main Colliery Company. Mr Keashole (Aberdare), who prose- cuted, said the householders in the em- ploy of the company were entitled to a ton of ooaJ every six weeks at a reduoed rate, but for their own personal use. In this case the defendant reporttxl that he wanted a ton of coal, and obtained it for 4s.6d., but eventually sold: it to the land- lord of the Hope and Anchor Inn, Neath. Derendant said he did it becawse he' wan/ted to buy some "changes" for his little boy, who was going to the- hospital, A fine of 40s. was imposed, cr, in the alternative, one month.

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL I

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL The fortnightly meeting of the Pon- tardawe Council was held on Thursday. Mr. Morgan Davies presiding. There were also present, Messrs. J. M. Davies, Jos. Thomas, D. T. Jones, David Jen- kins, Williain Davies (Y), William Davies (B), David Lewis, Rev. E. Davies, W. D. Davies, John Thomas, Lewis Davies, T. Wade Evans, R. Thomas, D. J. Williams, H. J. Powell, Owen Davies, Hy. Thomas, J. D. Rees. F. R. Phillips, H. Gibbon, David Lloyd, together with the officials. A DANGER TO 'BUS PASSENGERS. I Mr. Joseph Thomas said he had travelled by the 'bus to Ystalyfera on I the previous evening and noticed that the branches of several trees were over- hanging the road and were a danger to those using the top part of the con- veyances. The Engineer promised to give im- mediate attention to the matter. A DANGEROUS PRECEDENT. I The Engineer (Mr. J. Morgan) re- ported that he had submitted estim- ates of the cost of the proposed works, ) alterations and repairs at Ystalyfera to Mr. Woosnam, Yniscedwyn, estate agent, as follow: Extension of new Wern School road, 257 2s. 6d. ballast- ing and metalling Clyngwyn Road, JB13 10s. Od., and widening, including ballasting and metalling Swan Lane, 1£32 10s. Od., and Mr. Woosnam had replied stating that Mr. Gough wished the Council to proceed with the work on payment of the amount of the es- timate by him. The Engineer re- marked that such an undertaking would form a dangerous precedent. The Clerk was instructed to deal with the matter and ask that Mr. I Woosnam should confer with the En- gineer. BAD ROADS AT RHIWFAWR. The Engineer further reported that he had received a copy of a resolution passed at a meeting of the ratepayers held at Rhiwfawr on the 15th inqt. requesting the service of the roller for the locality as the roads were in a bad state of repair. CLASSIFICATION OF ROADS. I The Engineer observed that at the invitation of the County Surveyor, he had attended a conference of surveyors at Cardiff to consider the classification of the roads in connection with the return to be prepared for the Road Board. He had ordered the necessary map to illustrate the return. WASTE OF WATER. I Mr. Morgan further reported that a leak resulting in & considerable wastage of water was found in the service be- longing to Mr. Daniel Davies, Brecon Road, who had bored a hole in the drain to take in the water thus wasted from the Cray supply. He reported that fact to show how water was wasted without their knowledge. When Mr. Davies came down to the offioe he said he did not know where the water was coming from. Mr. J. M. Davies said there had been a considerable waste of water by overflow in the Pontardawe district for six weeks and one tap had been run- ning full bore for the last fortnight and several men had tried to stop it. He suggested that the Pontardawe waterman should oome and live in the district. He suggested that the Cray water should be turned off at night and allow the Cilybebyll water to run into the mains. The Engineer said he had turned off the Cray water for the first time the previous evening. Mr. David Jenkins asked that the water should also be turned off in the RhvndwvcJvd:v.-h ard as well. Mr. Powell asked the Engineer to drawn up a return of the amount of Cray water used to show how serious the matter was. Rev. E. Davies: We find you have too much water here and yet we are suffering from a lack of wate r The Chairman said they had spent four hours at the last moetimr cf the committee in trying to Tirovide Cae- gnrwen with a better watN supply, Rev. E. Davies: We had onlv four inches in the tank this morning. Mr. Owen Davies asked if the En- gineer knew about the shortage of water in Western Road, and the En- gineer stated that lie had attended to it. SANITARY INSPECTOR'S REPORT. I The Sanitary Inspector (Mr. A. E. Edmunds), replied that the number of inspections made under the Housing and Town Planning Act of 1909, from April 30th to May 27th was 350. All these wore made at G.C.G. The num- ber of preliminary notices served WH." 2L 8 for the paving of back areas and 13 for general dilapidation. The number of scarlet fever cases notified since April 30th was 21, as follows, Brynamman, 9; G.G.G., 1; Clydach, 10; and Ynisymond, 1. Nine cases were removed to the infectious Diseases Hospital. TIN WORKERS WITHOUT DRINK- ING WATER. Mr Hy. Thomas stated that recex.tiy the water supply to Gilb,,n)s works had been cut off without notice, and 1.500 men had been without water for nearly 15 hours, and were thus placed at con- aidera.ble diaoomfort. The Engineer said he was not aware that the water had been cut off. I Mr J. M. Davies said he understood- that two taps had been leaking very bad- Ily. The Engineer: In that case the water- man was justified in cutting off the water. G.C.G. STORES. Ine Lngineer was instructed to report upon G the available sdtes for stores at G. C. G. SHOPS ACT CIRCUMLOCUTION. Mr H. J. Powell asked what the re- cently appointed Shops Act Inspector was doing. Two years ago the tradesmen of "Ystalyfera petitioned the County Coun- cil for a closing order, and six months ago an Inspector was appointed by four Com;oils which inoluded Popitardawey yet nothing h-:n yet bk-en done. The CLrk stated that tiia Inspector wps busy preparing a register of the v\ holo shops in the,, and could not pro- ceed any further until th:: t was com- pleted. SMALL DWELLINGS ACQUISITION ACT. Several applications for loans under the above named Act were received, and sanctioned TAR SPRAYING AT GODRE'PGRAIG Mr Lvan Hopkins moved that the County Council be petdtionka to tar spray the road near the Godre'rgraig Chapel to Cilmaengwyn Wood. He said that t his was one of the most important roads in the district and used by a. large number of children going to and from the school. Mr. Joseph Thomas said it was a fact that the most important parts of the roads were left undone. « ■ • ■

Cambrian Chairmans American Schemes

Cambrian Chairman's American Schemes. THREE AND A HALF MILLIONS- INVOLVED. With referemee to th-* import-jit pro- jects which Mr D. A. Thomas, chairman 01 the Consolidated Cambrian (Joiup.niv-, has recently had under negotiation i\>r the development of the coaj mining in dustry on the other side of the Atlantic, it appears (says the "Financial Times- ') that arrangements have already been en- tered into involving a capital sum of nearly £ 3,400,000, which amount rnav quite possibly be added to hereafter. TIJ)" net result of Mr Thomas's operations will be to develop some thousands of square miles of land in Canada, which at present is only very spartely mhabntf d, while, cer- tain areaa in the United Stat-es are also being taken in hand, and it is believed, that a great many export c,aj miners from Great Britairn. will be induced to try their fortunes on the other side of the Atlantic and also in the Dominion, there, by adding to the ranks of the skillel workmen in that country It is probably*" on this aspect of the situation that the Canadian authorities put the greatest, store Owing to his prominent position in the Englieh coal trade, Mr Thomas is not likely to find any difficulty in financ- ing his schemes; On the contrary, it is understood that he has already made the necessary arrangements in this con- n,w-ti,an by nwaris nection by means of private negotiations. Thia may possibly be followed by &n appeal for public support, but the policy to be pursued in. this connection has not been made known. On some of the pro- perties acquired by Mr Thomas it is probable that oil will be found, and if this proves to be the case the deposit will be developed with all expedition, Mr Thomas, although primarily a coal miner being fully alive to the fact that oil for purposes of fuel is likely to increase in popularity as time goes on.

LOCAL JOTTINGS

LOCAL JOTTINGS General sympathy will be felt with Dr. Gamer Lewis, of Swansea, and his re- latives is the grave illness through which he is passing. 'Gomer' is deservedly one of 'the nimt popular ministers, not merely in the Baptist denomination, but in the- whole of Wales. His vigorous preaching, and his natural wit have made him a great faroe, and hie temporary laying aside is a low to the Welsh public life. We hope the visit of Sir Edward Carson to Mountain Ash will not de- lude the Orangemen into believing that there is any widespread sympathy in. Wales for their precious Volunteer movement. Incidentally it is worth noting that ther? are 5trong nlDl