Teitl Casgliad: Llais Llafur

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Study Economy and go In for a ? Blue Serge Suit! ? But be sure and have a I 'Lierapnon ? (Regd.) Serge which is guaranteed  to stand sea and sun. J ? The Suit to order from 35/ t G. C. DEAN, The Tailor is prepared to pay return fare Tx-ithin 20 miles of Swansea to 11 any customer placing an order. for a Suit or Eiincoat, upon ? ? prodaction of Railway Ticket. Please Note the Address X 22, Castle Street, Swansea.

Advertising

"We have had good results X from advertising in Labour Voice ,-Swansea Trades- man. Name on application. Do you want good results ? If so, Advertise in "LLAIS LLAFUR."

Insurance Co and Compensation Cases

Insurance Co. and Compensation Cases Astounding Exposure by a Solicitor ,,14 A Perfect Physical Wreck" Certified as Fit to Work" I "Time to Speak Out!" I At the monthly meeting of the Western District of Miners, held in Swansea on Saturday last. Mr. John Jenkins, solicitor, Swansea, attended to report upon a number of compen- sation cases submitted to him by the District. In the course of his remarks, Mr. Jenkins referred to t.he hardships which injured persons suffered at the hands of Insurance Companies who brow-beat and oftentimes « heat unfortunate workmen, and generally minimise and defeat the benefits of the Act as far as work- men were concerned. He had come into contact with colliers who had suffered accidents, and no one. however prejudiced he might be f gainst the collier, could say that they had recovered. Some of them were without legs.. without arms, and al- most without backs, but they did not receive a penny compensation. When these things were constantly brought before him, although he had been brought up as a. lawyer, his feel- ings got the better of him, and it was time to speak out. He re- ferred to one particular case from the Mountain Colliery, where a workman's compensation had been stopped, al- though the man had been almost killed and was still a wreck. The man had been assisted into his office bv his wife and "Gwilym Bedw,' and had to be accommodated with an arm chair. He could not sit but had to lean over the chair. At the irequest of the General Insurance Co. tlif. man "had gone to Dr. Lancaster, and when the latter saw him he asked "What have they stopped your com- pensation for ? The man replied, They say. I can do light work," upon which Dr. Lancaster had remarked in ast-onishment, "What, looking at the moon? He (Mr. Jenkins) had written a let- ter to the Insurance Company in the terms he had mentioned, add- ing that the treatment of the Mountai n Colliery cages by them had been brutal, and that he was glad that the Colliery was to be stopped as a protest against such treatment. After that let- ter the Insurance Company re- sumed payment. As this was after two or three months' persistent efforts for the man, he had an idea why they did so; but he could foresee it would only be for one or two months. The man will then be certified fit for work again or to be sufferi ng from prema- ture old a.ge. That was his experi- ence. That the man was only 31 did not matter! The Insurance Co. replied q.4 fol- lows: Your letter of the 26tli i" ,to to hand. and we have sent it to Mr. John Williams, M.P.. and we are quite certain that he will not approve of your remarks. It might well be that the men have other reasons for stop- ping the colliery perhaps they are not satisfied with their legal advice We will, however, refrain from further .comments until we hear what Mr. Wil- liams has to saw Yours faithfully, (Signed) W. E. Lock, resident secre- tarv. To that letter. Mr. Jenkins immedi- ately sent the following reply: Chancery Chambers, Rutland Street, Swansea. 2nd July, 1914. COMPENSATION CASES. Dear Sir, I am in receipt of vour letters of the 29th and the 30th ultimo; in the latter -you cast a veiled reflection on my cap- irity and attack my conduot, and you state vou sent my letter of the 26th to Mr; John Williams, M.P., evidently ?th a view of ?ing how far you f?uld get him to damage me. ? is t?his Sr? You did not hint at any com- -plaint to me. Seeing that instead of coming against me in a direct and speedy way -which I doubt not you would do ba-a there been any in. we urate at-aternent in my, letters-' I am fairly confident. Mr. Williams will see that by writing -to him vou were actuated by malicious motive; and it is not likely you will succeed. If. however, you do, I shall I take a more serious view of the matter and will write you again. I observe vou state you always act on modioal advice. Can't you see that this is the saddest part of your eou- dnct? The case sp-ially mentioned in ;T letter wM that of a man whose ■accident rendered him a, phy sical wreck-unah l e to sit, to tand, to walk or attend to the calls of nature vn tbout, n?rtificial ai&. Yet a doctor without artifi_ cral ai^. ^^eliber- ~arterly d hhiim i n fit for work. This ?Hv ?.ra1v.?d m wid1 amazement, von (\n ?"' ..?ts ]I] not 'h cnn-??.-y "y(!:r tllJ'eats ",II] not. avail to deter me from advising the miners who consult me to use every constitutional means in their power to check you. This is the only way, and I say so deliberately. Regretting the need and tone of this letter. I am, yours faithfully, John Jenkins. The Resident Secretary, General Insurance Cor., Ltd., 234, High Street, Swansea. Mr. Jenkins said that the Insurance Co. made no reply to that letter, and he thought that their attack was a libel on the man's character. Another case was that of John Rees (when this Insurance Company alone is liable, the particular Colliery Com- pany having been wound up) in which he (Mr. Jenkins) had obtained an award in his favour giving him light work at -01 10s. per week and 5s. 6d. per week compensa- tion. Rees had gone up to the place on four occasions at a cost of 4s. Id. train fare each time. when he was not receiving any compensation, but had failed to get the work. They told him to go home and they would send the money after him. for the 3 days he worked on sufferance once. Everything pointed to the fact that the man had been dis- missed and that the job was not there. He had written re- peatedly but received no reply until he put in an application for leave to go before the Registrar, and then a letter was sent to John Rees direct stating that unless he came back to light employment the job would not be kept open for him any longer. The dishonesty of this was apparent. The case must now be entered again. So far, as the Mountain Colliery was concerned, he pressed them to meet the employers as he had plenty of facts and possibly the employers did not know all. There was no need for speech. The sight of the crippled, maimed, battered, torn. blinded, to whom not a penny compen- sation was paid would be sufficient eloquent testimony. He had heard some of these men say in their despair, What's the good of the Compensa- tion Act. It's more of a curse than a blessing to us." Mr. Tom Jones said if such cases af- fected the feelings of a lawyer, they must more strongly affect those directly concerned. After remarking that lie would like to get an expression of feel- ing of that meeting he said it was full time that the Federation adopted an aggressive policy. They should go out and fight these plunderers of men —the class that employed them for their own welfare and to enable them to live extravagantly. He wished lie had sufficient eloquence to raise up that feeling amongst the whole of the workers in the country. He thought it well that sometimes feelings should have full expression. Mr. Elias Davies congratulated Mr. Jenkins upon the fight he was making on behalf of these their crippled com- rades. He was pleased that one from the legal profession was a rebel. If those cases had done nothing else they had made a staid lawyer a rebel. He did not think that Mr. Jenkins need trouble art all that so far as he was carrying on in the way he was, about the loyalty of the workers to him. Mr. Jenkins was of the stuff that there ?4? no financial price upon him. a thing he was sorry could not be said of the whole of the member of the legal and other professions. The Compensation Act had proved a. great outdoor relief to the members of the medical profes- sion. They could receive five or ten guineas to give evidence in a single case and they, as a district, had had to pay men "ten guineas to give evi- dence in a single case for an hour. it was a shame that the medical profes- sion could be bought in that fashion by the great Insurance Companies. The decisions obtained by the Insurance Companies in Court were obtained on evidence that was not true. They did not need any medical knowledge at. all to know that a cripple who could not stand was unable to do work. When a medical man, at the behest of an Insurance Company, stated that work was the best tVing for a cripple, it was time for the State to step in and stop that man from giving medical certifi- cates on any account. Mr. Gwilym Davi es said Mr. Jenkins had certainly done something to awaken those present if they had any- tbfniun them that could be awakened. He believed that the attitude taken up by Mr. Jenkins was one that they could all appreciate, and they should show him their appreciation of what he had done. The medical profession did not deal with them in the best possible way, and there were those present who knew very well from personal experi- ence—he knew of his own personal ex- perienco-of a medical man who was on the staff of an institution that was supported chiefly by public subscrip- tions from working men,—certifying for the hospital authorities that a man was suffering from nystagmus, yet when the same medical man acted for an Insurance Company he stated that the man was not suffering from nystag- mus! He considered that an abuse of subscriptions given by working men, and it was high time that they should exrpress their opinions very forcibly, and they should let even those who rode 88 high as they liked upon their whites and beautiful horses see that they (the workers) were men also. (Ap- plause). Mr. P. D. Rees moved a rote of thanks to Mr. Jenkins for his manly stand against unmanly men. Mr. T. Jones seconded. He said if (fw" of 'olimn-t

Insurance Co and Compensation Cases

(Continued froxi praoeding oolumia). they needed anything in the Labour movement it was men who understood the law. He was a member of the class that had no confidence in the law, and he realized that they were a class whose interests were opposed to every other class. It was gra-tifying to feel that a member of that class felt with the class to which they be- longed. What Mr. Jenkins had told them had been an instruction to them all. The vote wos carried with en- thusiasm. Mr. Jenkins, in reply, said that it was not one or two or three cases which had brought him to feel ns. he did, but it was the cumulative effects of a great number. It did not need any medical training to show that these men whose oases he had been dealing with, could not do any work at all. When men were permanently^ injured and the In- surance Co. said they could do some- thing, even so they were entitled to some compensation. But they were too often getting nothing. He instanced the case of another man who ca.me to his office on two crutches, and was unable to go up- stairs and he (Mr. Jenkins) had to go into the passage to see him. I have strong indepedent medi- cal evidence." said Mr. Jenkins, that that man is completely in- capacitated. If there is a dispute about it. then I say that the man is entitled to some compen- sation, but he does not get it, and you can plead, urge and 'belly crawl" as much as you like you will not get it. This man has not a penny coming in from any source, and he is going to the workhouse next week. His case is now entered in Court. I have restrained myself until I have suffered to see these men with tears in their e yies asking, Cannot I get some- thing,' and I have gone to the Gen- eral and have been met by the Scots- man there with the remark: They can work let them try." I don't care a button for the Croneral, and, for- tunately, there is no libel when one is speaking the truth. (Applause).

AUSTRALIAN POLITICSI

AUSTRALIAN POLITICS. I LABOUR PARTY'S PROGRAM OUTLINED. Mr. Fisher, the Leader of the Oppo- sition, opened the Labour Party cam- paign at Bundaberg. Queensland, on Monday. He attacked the Govern- ment's financial policy, particularly its borrowing and its intention to borrow for defence purposes. Mr. Fisher maintained that all ex- penditure on defence in time of peace should be provided for from the re- venue. He reiterated the demand for wider federal powers enabling the Fed- eral Government to deal with indus- trial unrest, trusts, and the increased cost of living. The Labour Party, he added, proposed to establish a State- owned line of steamers between the mainland and Tasmania and the over- seas. The party pledged itself at the first session to amend the tariff in the direction of higher duties, and in- tended to introduce the initiative re- ferendum on the lines of the Swiss system, and the substitution of a national referendum for a double dis- solution as a means of settling dead- locks between the House of Represen- tatives and the Senate. The party, continued Mr. Fisher, further proposed to make provision for widows and orphans, and 'to provide funds for the prevention and cure of cancer, consumption, and red plague. It favoured a State-owned Atlantic ca.ble, a general insurance lam, a uni- form bankruptcy law, and administra- tion and establishment of a Common- wealth Government Insurance Depart- ment.-Heuter. ——— ————

Arsenal Dispute Ends

Arsenal Dispute Ends. GOVERNMENT ACTION SUCCESS- 1 FUL. A settlement of the strike at Woolwich Arsenal was announced late on Tuesday night. Sir Frederick Donaldson, chief superin- tendent of ordance factories, attended the War Office during the day, and subse- quently met a deputation of the men. Later the strike committee recommended unanimously the acceptance of terms offered. These, briefly, are that Ei)t%istle-- whose dismissal for refusing to erect machinery on a concrete bed laid by "blackleg" labour caused the strike— is to be reinstated, and all other men are to return to their former positions. Mr Asquith announced in the House of Commons on Tuesday that the Govern- ment has decided to appoint a Board of Inquiry into the circumstances of the strike. This, it is understood, will now be confined to the principle involved in the men's action, and whatever the result, the men who have taken part in the pre- sent dispute will not be punished. The men returned to work yesterday (Thursday). ————— —————

ONE FUNERAL FOR HUSBAND AND WIFE

ONE FUNERAL FOR HUSBAND AND WIFE. The funeral of Sir Benjamin Stone, I the amateur photographer who made many national records, and that of his wife (who died 4 days later) took place at Sutton Coldfield.

MR HARTSHORN AND JOHN HUGH i I

MR HARTSHORN AND "JOHN HUGH." £ I Warned to "Keep Off the Urass." MR SMILLIE'S lDEAtS FOR MINERS. There was a. h ge attendance at the annual demcnstrii, on of the Maesteg Dis- trict of Miners 011 Monday, the chief speakers being Mr Robert Smillie (presi- dent of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain), Mr Vernon Hartshorn iminers' agent for the district), and the Rev. James Nicholas, of Tonypandy. The Federation resolution, with reference to the 1915 agreement, was proposed by Mr Rees, chairman of the district, and seconded by Mr T. Griffiths, secretary. Mr Hartshorn said it was suggested that they should go in for a minimum of at least 50 per-cent. on the standard. The Miners' Federation of Great Britain as a whole was pledged to that proposal. MAXIMUM "BUNGLE." I It was further proposed that they should seek to abolish the maximum. (Hear, hear). That was one of the things the Federation had bungled on all along the line. At the time of the national strike all the big coalfields had 50 per cent. above the standard. Since then there had been a great boom in the coal industry. The Welshmen had shared 111 it to the extent of 10 per cent, only, simply because their maximum was fixed at 60 per cent., and they could go no higher. Englishmen had participated in the boom to the extent of 15 per cent., because their maximum stood at 65 per cent. But the Scotchmen, with their usual foresight and hard-headed common- scrise, had taken care in the past to keep clear of maximums, and, in conse- quence, tbty had participated in the boom to the extent of 371 per cent., for they had gOlle np to about 874 per cent. [ WELSif COLLIERS BAD PAYERS. After remarking that Maesteg was as completely organised as any district from John 0' Groats to Land's End-(ap, pl;ifise)—he pn owdipd It was admitted all through thi :'1 ibers' Federation that the Welsh co L ld took the lead in everything 11  into the district and made it impossible to run the badge sys- tem notices would have to be tendered, and they would be held respsonible. Mr Hugh Edwards would find if they set themselves out to deal with this matter that he would have as livelv time when he went to CaeTau as he had when he went to Nantyffvllon. I A MODEST PROGRAMME. Mr Robert Smillie said the South Wales miners could supply them at any time with a revolutionary programme for their annual conference. (Laughter). Their only regrets seemed to be that they were confined to about thirty pages instead of having a programme as large as a family BIlle, and that the conference did not last about four months. (Renewed laugh- ter.) The resolution put before the meet- ing was a most higher minimum wage, for the inclusion of their comrades on the surface in the minimum wage, and for a few othe rreforms that were urgently nece?ary, not 50 years hence, but n" What was contained in the resoiutioH waa not the utmost they wished t?o real,.?se. STATE MINES AND RAILWAYS I They wanted the public ownership of mines and railways, to enable them to secure not merely a living wage, which! only meant an existing wage, but a wage which would provide sufficient to enable them to be properly clothed, housed, and, educated, and put by something for the inevitable time of sickness and old age without looking to the charity of neigh- bours. (Applause). The inin-ers seemed KVmtlnuM at bnfcfcftW aoInn»»4

MR HARTSHORN AND JOHN HUGH i I

(Continued from preceding column). to he well contented if they could once a year go down in an excursion train to tho nearest. cpast town and stay three or four days. Their masters did not need to rush a holiday by excursion train in three or four days. They took their month, or three months, c.r twelve months. (Laughter). Who had the bettr right to holidays—the workers or the parasites? He ventured to say it wis tile producers. (Hear, hear). I ONE CONTROL BOARD. The Federation (continued Mr Sillilli) was aiming at the setting up next year of one central board for the regulation of the wages of the whole of the miners of Great Britain. They did not think it necessary that when they met the em- ployers on this board or that board they should trot out one section of miners against another, in order to prove that because the wages in Scotland or Nor- thumberland were low they should also le low in Wales. They wanted to get an equality of wages, an increased minimum, and the abolition of the maximum. Em- ployers in Scotland, England, and Wales had made millions and millions of money during the last few years, and wages ought to have gone up to 100 per cent. No men working at the coal face should receive lees than 10s. a d'lv. The repolntior waa carriti. the future all matters relating to the ability of persons to maintain their re- latives should he referred to the com- mittee and will report from time to time to the Guardians. FINANCE COMMITTEE: CLERK'S I SALARY. r J .1.. At the finance L/ommittee meenng the members considered the applica- tion for increased salary from Mr. Stanley G. Clatworthy, assistant clerk. Mr. Clatworthy is 21 years of age and has been employed in the offices for four years, since October 31st. 1912, has received a salary of los. weekly. They recommended that his salary be increased from JE39 to L52 per annum. HOUSE COMMITTEE REPORT. I The House Committee met on July 6th, Mr. F. R. Phillips presiding. Seven applications had been received for the post of porter, but in their opinion only two had the necessary experience. The committee further adjourned consideration of the ap- pointment to the next meeting after which a further report would he given. The committee also had considered two sites for the new children's home, one at Trebanos on land the property* of Mr. Miers, and the other on land at Ynismudw on land belonging to Mr. J. H. B. Lloyd, but leased to Mr. Rees Lewis. The ground rent for the Trebanos plot was 3s. 6d. per, perch and was considered much too high. Mr. Rees Lewis asked £ 120 for his inter- est in the land at Ynismudw on which some old cottages now stand. The payment of this sum would entitle the Guardiwis to the benefit of Mr. Lewis' interest in the plot for 99 years at Is. per perch. Unless a.ny other suitable site is suggested within a fortnight, the committee would recommend that the Ynismudw site be acquired. The reports were adopted.

PONTARDAWE BOARD OF GUARDIANS

PONTARDAWE BOARD OF GUARDIANS INTERESTING BUSINESS AT QUARTERLY MEETING. The quarterly meeting of the Pon- tardawe Guardians took place on Thursday morning. Mr. Hopkin J. Powell, J. P., presiding. Those pre- sent were Messrs. Morgan Davies. Rev. Evan Davies, H. Gibbon, D. J. Rees (Ystalvfera), D. J. Williams, D. W. Davies, D. T. Jones, Lewis Thomas, David Jenkins, Joseph Thomas J. M. Davies, J. G. Harries, David Lewis (Colbren), T. Wade Evans. Henry Thomas, W. D. Walters, and the offi- cials. THE LATE MR. HERBERT LLOYD. Before the ordinary business of the Guardians was proceeded with, Mr. H. J. Powell said it was his sad duty to move a resolution expressing heartfelt sympathy with the family and rela- tives of the late Mr. Herbert Lloyd, for 34 years chairman of the Union, and expressing their high apprecia- tion of his services in many spheres of public duty which he so faithfully filled. Mr. Powell observed that his life of usefulness was a standing ex- ample. Ho took a leading part in local matters for many years and he thought if any man in South Wales gave his life to public work, that man was Mr. Lloyd. Mr. Morgan Davies seconded the proposition, and said he was sure it was the wish of all the Guardians to place on record appreciation of the service rendered by the deceased gen- tleman to the community. He sacri- ficed a great deal more than half his time to public service. He trusted that Mrs. Lloyd would have comfort and peace in the latter days of her lifq and that she and the Misses Lloyd would remain in the district carrying out their good work as in the past, and that Mr. J. H. P. Lloyd, the heir, would follow in his fathers footsteps. Mr. J. G. Harries, Mr. Morgan (sur- veyor), and Mr. Wyndham Lewis (clerk), also added their appreciated of the work of the deceased gentleman, and the resolution was passed in silence. RESIGNATION AND THANKS. Miss G. Jones, nurse at the Infirm- ary. wrote tendering her resignation, in view of her approaching marr'age. She expressed thanks to the Guardians and the Master for their kindness to her in the past. She had been very comfortable at Pontardawe. Rev. E. Davies: Good luck to her! It was decided to advertise for a successor on th £ usual terms. GRANT FOR THE BLIND. An application was received from the Blind Institution for the annual sub- scription of the Guardians, and it was decided to forward the usual sum of B2 2s. Od. LOCAL AND NATIONAL GOVERN- MENT. The Unions A.?

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL The Pontardawe Council met on I Thursday, Mr Morgan Davies, J.P., pre- I siding. TT" THE LOCAL HUUS1WU vtll\. I The Housing and Town Planning Com- mittee met at the offices on July 6th, Councillor Morgan Davies being ap- pointed chairman, and Councillor Herbert Gibbon vice-chairman, for the ensuing vear. The committee considered the need of building further houses at Ystalyfera, and recommended that 25 be erected on the land at Ystalyfera already in the possession of the Council, and adjoining the present scheme. Furthermore that the Engineer be asked to prepare de- signs with, if possible, some alteration in the elevations. The Committee also recommended that inquiry should be made for building sites as follows :-G.C.G. (48 houses); Clyd- ach (48 houses); and Pontardawe (48 housed. Also that the Chairman, Rev. E. Daviee, and Mr H. Gibbon, with the Sur- veyor and Clerk, endeavour to obtain an interview with the Rev. W. Williams, LLwdilo, with a view to ascertaining the terms for his building land at G.C.G. It was also further agreed that Councillor H. Powell, J.P. J. G. Harries, and Hy. Thomas be appointed to inspect sites for building at Clydach, and to interview owners if necessary. The Inspector reported that the two cottages at Cra-igf forest, formerly occupied by Messrs. Eli Dalies and J. Hardwick had been voluntarily closed, and owing to their present dangerous condition the committee recommended that an order be obtained for demolition. It was also agreed that the clerk write Mr W. J. Rees, pointing out that the Council must now proceed with enforce- ment of the closing order unless some definite arrangements be made at once. The Committee also considered a letter from the Local Government Board, dated June 4th, as to the duties of the In- spector of Nuisances. They had still the matter under discussion, and at the next meeting proposed to investigate more closely the actual work involved by the house to house inspection, and will after- wards report t^c-^on Arising out of Hous-'ntr and Town Planning report a heated scene took Mr. L. W. Franci s said be de»frcd to move an amendment regarding the erection of hoivses at Ystalyfera. He thought thnse should be utihsed to  commodate onlv those people who w?"e at present living in the slums. Tl? speaker was proceeding to enl^r^p on his proposal when the chairman in'^r- posed, a-sking Mr. Francif to first e the terms of his amendment lwfore speaking on it. Mr. Francis again proceeded without following the chairman's reque^. nrd Mr. Morgan Davies again interrupted, saying he must have the terms of the amendment.. Mr. Francis: We are here tll with the housing problem and you want to throttle it. The Chairman: No, I don't want to throttle it. Mr. Richard Thomas said he thought the proposal of Mr. Francis was admir- able, and Mr. H. J. Powe'l said ho took it that what Mr. Francis wi»nt»xl to bo  of was. that the new sobc-nr. at Y-.+.i V"era. would provide for small* rental* than the old ouf-reiitil-i of from Iôs. to £ 1 ner month. whirh J", thought would not be provided for in this new scheme. The Clerk said instructions were gi ven to the Engineer to prepare plans for cheaper houses, with improved features where possible. Continuing, Mr. Francis said housing conditions at Ystaiyfora were deplor- able, and he contended that the o!d scheme had not had the result that was most desired, viz.. it had not taken a single individual from the slums. That he contended was the main purriose of housing reform. He had been looking I into t), matter and found that tene- ment: :ad been erected in Swansea and Aberdare to let at from 15s. to 18s. per month. The Clerk: Not in Swansea. Mr. Francis: It was done at Aber- dare. I would like the Surveyor to prepare a such a scheme—a scheme of tenements. Mr. J. M. Davies said still Mr. Fran- cis did not commit himself to anything beyond the building of tenements. He should be more exact; he himself wanted to hear exactly what Mr. Francis proposed should be done. Mr. R. Thomas thought the chairman was very unfair. It was a very im- portant matter. and Mr. Francis should have fair play. The Chairman said Mr. Francis had already explained his ideas in commit- tee. and the committee had instructed the surveyor to prepare plans to his suggestions. There was something else at the bottom of all this. (Cries of dissent). Mr. Francis: It is your duty, Mr. Chairman, to withdraw that statement- Mr. Davies: No, I wont withdraw. Mr. Francis: Then I shall leave the room. Mr. J. M. Davies appealed to Mr. Francis not to do so. He, and lie believed the Council also wanted to- hear him, but he should move the amendment. He also appealed to the chairman to let Mr. Francis proceed, but he agreed with the chairman that- Mr. Francis was given a hearing in committee, and through his appeal, instructions for certain plans were given the surveyor. Mr. Francis said the chairman's re- marks were most uncalled for. Mr. H. J. Powell said the trouble would have been saved if Mr. Francis had moved his amendment and then spoken on it. Mr. Francis: It is wrong for the- chairman to suggest an ulterior mo- tive. The Chairman said he would not withdraw. He had nothing to with- draw. Mr. Francis then left the Council Chamber and did not return. Mr. Joseph Thomas asked why Ystalyfera should be made the shooting ground for tenements? There were slums at Ystalyfera, but there were also slums at Clydach and G.C.G. It was no use bringing the people out of their present slums to put them into new ones. Mr. Morgan Davies remarked that as. Mr. Francis was given a hearing in committee, and his suggestion was acted upon, he failed to see why he should have taken that course that afternoon. Mr. H. Gibbon and the Rev. E. Davies supported the chairman in his remarks. The report of the Housing and Town Planning Committee were then ap- proved without further comment. I YSTALYFERA SEWAGE WORKS. '1 he Ystalyfera Sewerage Scheme Com- mittee met oai June 30, Mr H. J. Powell, J.P. (chairman), presiding. The members discussed with Mr Seaton certain claims for damage alleged to havew been done on private lands. He pointed out that he had gone carefully into eachi claim at the time. In some cases he had reported liability, and in others, offered an amount to settle the claims. He saw no reason for altering his views, but would, without prejudice, look through the papers again, and if he thought he- could after his decision on ally claim he would acquaint the committee. The members also consid ered the claim of Ll ls. Od. by Mr Joseph Williams, for damage to salt by water flowing from ther canal, but it was agreed that such a claim was not one for which the con- tractor was liable, but it was considered reasonable, and it was decided that the amount be paid and debited to the Coun- cil. The members agree d to ask Col. Gaugh to perform the opening ceremony of the Sewage Disposal Works on a day during the last week in this month. The various recommendations were adopted.

No title

At the meeting of the Anthracite Miners' Association, held in Swansea. on Saturday last, it was unanimously decided to make an appeal to the South Wales Miners' Federation Con- ference, to be held on Monday in Cardiff, in aid of the colliers thrown out of work in the Anthracite dis- trict by the depression in trade, and consequent stoppages at the pits. Two local collieries, Tirbach and Raven, are on strike, but all others, Cwmteg, Ynisamman, Duffryn Amman, Am- manford No. 1 and Cawdor are stopped t-h rough the depresse d mar- ket, in addition to the fact that many collieries are only working one or two days per week. In all, uuwaHs of 5,000 men are affected, and it » earnestly to be hoped that the appeal will be successful, a-s there is no doubt .(,ns;,(Iern,t)14- suffering iu various part-3 of the locality. A highly important matter formed the subject of a long discussion at the monthly meeting of the Western Dis- trict of Minors on Saturday. In add- ing his support to a vote of condo- lence with the relatives of four mem- bers of the district who had met wit t fatal accidents during the month. Mr. John Williams, M.P., chief agent, said their district had the highest fatal accident rate in South Wales, which had more fatal inci- dents than any other coalfield n • bo Kingdom. Mr. William Brace v^l himself intended to raise this question on the ftoor of the House of Commons at the earliest opportunitr. Mr. W. H. Davies very wisely, urged the members tc support the proposal to levy themselves Id. per month for the purpose of keeping two workin g rr n inspectors. It is clear that some drastic Ttion mut be taken U this tatrifkis f life it to cease.